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Full text of "The Duluth Herald"

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THE DULUTH HERALD 




VOLUME XXVIII— NO. 137. 



THURSDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 15, 1910. 



TAFT CALLS OFF HIS 




ON INSURGENTS; 

S CHANGl 




FRIENDLY TO DR. COOK ON 
ROOSEVELT WAY NORTH? 



Primaries and Conventions 

Have Led to New 

Attitude. 



No More Patronage Will Be 

Withheld, Says 

Letter. 



-^ Duty Now Seen to Demand 
Equal Treatment of 
All in Party. 



Beverly. Mass.. Sept. 15.— No cjiffer- 
• nce bet-ween so-called "progressives" 
and "regulars" will be recognized by 
Pre.«;idont Taft herealier, but all party 
leaders will be treated alike as Re- 
pubucans in the matter of federal sup- 
port. The president's views to this 
effect are given in a letter from Secre- 
tary Norton to a Ilepublltan leader of 
Iowa, whose name is not disclosed. 

In the letter Secretary Norton stated 
that while important Republican legris- 
lation pending in congress was opposed 
by certain Republican leaders, the 
president felt that his duty required 
him to withhold federal patronage 
frc-m senators, and representatives who 
' Bteir.cd to occupy a position hostile lo 
efforts to fulfill the pledges of the par- 
ty platform. 

Primary RetiimM the Cauite. 

That attitude on the purt of t!ie 
president ended, however, witli tlie 
more recent primary elections and 
ncnunating conventions in which the 
people have declared themselves, and 
the president now looks upon "pro- 
gressives" and "regulars" alike as Re- 
publicans and as such entitled lo his 
support and the support of the party, 
and the fall elections, the secretary's 
letter says, must settle the question 
whether the differences of the last ses- 
sion of congress shall be perpetuated 
or forgotten. 

The letter of Secretary Norton in 
full, follow: 

•Beverly. Mass., Sept. 15, 1910.— 
Your letters of the t»lh at liand and I 
have delayed replying until after The 
primary elections. The president di- 
rects me to express to you and to your 
friends his deep appreciation of 'he 
work which you have done and the 
powerful assistance whicli you have 
e.xlendfd lo the administration from 
the beginning, an assistance that nas 
contributed much to the legislative and 
other success which has been secured. 
ReooKBisea Good Work. 

"The president recognizes that your 
efforts have been wholly dl.<interested, 
that you have fought sturdily and gen- 
erously for what you believed to be 

tContinued on page 11, fourth oclumn.) 




Railroad Chiefs in Northwest! He 
Disposed to Favor His 
Propaganda. 



Willis Abbot Says They Fear 

Nomination of Untram- 

meled Radical. 



Is Said to Be Headed 
for Etah lo Get In- 
struments. 



T Wa CEXOTS^- 



'--THRICE' » 

SdClcTY. 1 



— - •^imu*-*,^**^**'- 



W. E. HUMPHREY, 
Republican Representative From 
Washington, Who Lost Through 
the Second Choice Clause of the 
Primary Law. 




By WilllH J. Abbot. 

(Copyright, lUln, by Joseph B. Bowles.) 
St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Out here in the North- 
west the greatest figure in the control 
of great industries, and the man 
whose Judgment is most respected, 
when applied to public affairs — and by 
that I do not mean political affairs — 
is James J. Hill. That seems to be al- 
most a commonplace statement, but it 
would not be commonplace to any one 
who has had the advantage that I had 
tills morning of spending an hour with 
Mr. Hill and hearing him talk about 
business and political conditions. 

I am not going to quote hi«n literally, 
nor am I going to quote literally his 
son, Louis W. Hill, with whom 1 also 
talked. But I can say with entire ac- 
curacy that these gentlemen represent- 
ing the three lines of railroad running 
througii the Northwestern states lo 
the Pacific coast, are not at all hostile 
to the Roosevelt propaganda. They 
are, in fact, even friendly toward it. 

As nearly as I can judge, this is 
their position, and that of other North- 



Missionaries Declare Eskimos 

Insist He Fomid North 

Pole. 



JAMES GRAY IS NAMED B¥ 
DEMOCRATIC COMMHTEE 
AS HEAD OF STATE TICKET 



(Continued on 



page 



7, fifth column.) 



Washington Voters Have Not 

Given Him Required 

Vote. 



BROUGHT BACK 
FROM NORWAY 



Insurgent likely to Win as 

Second Choice— Shafroth 

Wins Out. 



Leon H. Marcher, Alleged 

Thief, Caught After 

Long Chase. 

New York, Sept. 15. — Two New York 
detectives who arrived today from En- 
gland on the steamer Adriatic brouglit 
with them a prisoner whose captiire 
was recently effected in Norway after 
a long search for iiim in various parts 
of the world had been in progress for 
many months. He is Leon H. Marctier, 
accused of abstracting |4.900 from the 
safe of the Morse Iron works in 
Brooklyn, where lie wa.s employed as 
a bookkeeper, and fieelng to Europe. 

Marcher disappeared in April. He 
was traced to England and then to 
Norway, where 'he was arrested by the 
Chrlstiania police. Notification of his 
arrest !iad liardly been received in 
New York when a second message 
came from the Norwegian authorities 
Baying that Marcher had made his es- 
cape from jail and was again a fugi- 
tive. Within a day or two, however, 
he was rcayiMirc) 



MONOPLANIST 
NE ARLY KILLED 

Harry S. Harkness' Machine 

Plunges to Earth During 

Low Flight. 

New York, Sept 15.— Harry S. Haik- 
ness. the aviator from Cleveland and 
member of a prominent family in that 
city, had a narrow cscaiie today when 
tlie incnoplano on which he was flying 
at the Aerodrome in Garden City, L. 
i., dlv-.»d suldeiily to the ground from a 
hfcigli of twenty-five feet. Harkness' 
machine was demolisiied, but he fortu- 
nat.'ly escai^ed li'jury. 

This was Harknets' first flieht In 
America. He has been abroad tor his 
feats in aviation and came to America 
to ent'ir tiie elimination ir'als for the 
inlernaiii>n;i I u ■ - >. nonlli. 

• - 
Diekinxuu ut HaiiKuw. 
Hankow, Cliina, Sept. i:.. — Jacob M. 
Dickinson, the American secretary of 
war arrived here today. The party 
will' proceed by train to Pekin, where 
I the secretary will be received by the 
Seattle. Wash., Sept. 15.— The count I Prince regent. 

of the ballots of King county has been . _^ _.,_ _ — . — __ — _ 

completed and it appears almost cer- ,,.,.,,.. 

William Hum- ' ***ii^^ tt*:f f*^***** ^ ^)H!/^i0^-*^'il0^^ 

* BV ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. * 

* ♦ 

^ V.nKhlDRlon. Sept. 15. — The ^ 
^ population of Atluutic City, N. J., ^jt 
■^ In •44,-mi, au increase «J l«.t{::;{ or ^ 
^ IiJ>.7 p^r cent an compared with ^ 

* ::7,838 iu 1000. * 



Copenhagen, Sept. 15. — The Danish 
government steamer Hans Egede ar- 
rived here today with the news that 
John R. Bradley, the financial backer 
of Dr. Frederick A. Cook's North polar 
expedition, was on his way to Etah to 
secure the much-talked-of records and 
instruments which Cook has said that 
he left at that Eskimo settlement 
northeast of Greenland. The captain 
of the steamer thinks that Cook is 
with Bradley, but gives no particular 
reason for tliis belief. 

The Hans Egede. which is the vessel 
upon which the explorer traveled to 
civilization, fell in with a yacht at 
Godhaven, a Danish settlement on the 
south coast of Disco Island, Greenland, 
and in the course of exchanges oe- 
tween the masters learned that Brad- 
ley was aboard the other craft. The 
polar hunt promoter admitted his iden- 
tity and explained that lie was bound 
for Etah to recover whatever had been 
left there by Dr. Cook. He refused, 
however, to either deny or confirm the 
report that he was accompanied by the 
explorer. 

EMklmoH Sny He Did. 

The government vessel also brings 
the Information that tw^o missionaries 
who are working among tlie l-]sklmos 
who accompanied Cuok on his expedi- 
tion say that these Eskimos insist that 
the doctor readied the North Pole, as 
he claims, prior to its discovery by 
Commander I'eary. 



CANNON AND 
CORRUPTION 

Two Issues Enter Into the 

Primary Election in 

Illinois. 



DEMOCRATS' CHOICE 
FOR GOPHER GOVERNOR 



Heavy Vote Is Being Polled 

Under New Law in 

That State. 



id 



CALEB POWERS 
FOR CONGRESS 



Big Vote Is Polled in Re- 

pubhc3n Contest in 

Kentucky. 



15. — The nineteen 
comprising the 



London, Ky., Sept 
nioiintaln counties 
Eleventh congiessloiial district of Ken - 
lucky are seething today over the Re- 
publican election between D. C. Ed- 
wards, incumbent, and Caleb Powers, 
forn^i'" secretary of state. Fine weather 
broiiglit oi.t a big vole. 

Pjwers' eight years imprisonment 
becau.se of his allestd connection with 
the (.J»\ urnci^ < iv-cbel a.-^sassl.iati jn has 
been an is.sue In the campaign. He 
used This "maityrdom," as he called it, 
in appealing for vttes. Bitter person- 
alities marked the canvass, and as a 
re.-^ult leaders of both sides were busy 
looay trvins to ke-^M (ln^v•Il trouble. 



Chicago, Sept. IB. — The issues In th«; 
primaries here today Include alleged 
corruption in the Illinois legislature 
as revealed In the trial of Lee ONeil 
Browne, who was charged with brib- 
ery in the election of William Lori- 
mer to the United States senate, and a 

plea for vindication on the part of 
men whose names were brought into 
the trial. In most of the congressional 
districts insurgency is an issue. 

The primary is the first under Il- 
linois' third primary law. Congress- 
man Mann, ciialrman of the committee 
of interstate and foreign commerce, a 
staunch supporter of Speaker Cannon, 
has two adversaries, both running on 
Insurgent platforms. So has Henry S. I 
l^outell in the Ninth district. Con- 
gressman Foss, also alllgned witli the 
regulars, has a contest on against an 
insurgent candidate. 




CHOICE IS 
UNAMMOUS 

Minneapolis Man Succeeds 

Lind as Nominee for 

Governor. 



Name Is Proposed By Stock- 
well and Seconded By 
Dan Lawler. 



JAMES GRAY 
Of Minneapolis. 




Heavy \'ote Polled. 

Peoria, 111., Sept. 15. — Reports are to 
the effect that a heavy vote Is being 
polled at the primaries today. There is 
a strong fight for legislative honors in 
the Eighteenth dist rict, the Hepu.^xicans 

(Continued on page 13, fifth column.) 



iF 

BIG THEFT 



Candidate Has Record for 
Great Personal Achieve- 
ments. 



tain thai Representative 

phrey, regular Republican, has been < ^ GOOD GROWTH SHOW.X 



beaten in the First district by Thomas 
Revelle, insurgent. In King county, | 
Revfrlle received 8,662 votes, Humphrey I 
7,132, a plurality for Revelle of nearly ' 
1,500 votes. Revelle's plurality in King | 
county is much more than offset by [ 
Humphrey's pluralities in Whatcomb, j 
Skagit, Snohomish, Kitsap, Island and | 
San Juan counties, yet Humphrey has i 
less than the necessary 40 per cent of ! 
all the votes cast, and the second choice I 



THREE POSTOFFK ES 

ADVANCED IN CLASS. 

"Washington, Sept. IB. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The following postoffices 
in Minnesota, now in the fourtli class, 
will be advanced to the presidential 
class, effective Oct. 1: Mabel, salary of 
postmaster to be f 1.200 per annum; 
Truman, salary to be ?1,200, and Wal- 
nut Grove, salary to be Jl.lOO. 



CLEVELAND, OHIO, HAS 
560.663 POPULATION | 



A^ A ^ j f -^ 

-«JN ^ -^ ^ - 

it 

it 
it 
it 

n 
n 

it 
it 

it 

* 

it 
it 
* 



V ^k ^n^^^'^' ^n •'f^ "^ ^^ ^^ '^ "T* "T* '^ ■'^ 




^'antainnrton, Sept. l."*. — The pop- 
uiiitiou of Cleveland, Ohio, Ik 500.- 
6«;l, an iucrease of 17Nt^S»f», or 4«.« 
per cent, an cumpared with 3IS1,- 
7«f^ In 1J)00. 

The popiilnttwn of Joliet, III., 
Ik ;i4,6ro, an lucreawe of 5,137, or 
IK.l per cent, ax compared with 
29J{.'i3 iu 1900. 

The ri'turnn for Cleveland ew- 
tabllMbeil that city an one of the 
la-TKe centers of population of the 
country, llftUiK it (o a point 
above I'lttsburg aud compKra- 
tlvcly below St. L.ouIm aud Hoa- 
tob. t'incinuutl, which In ISIKI 



St. Paul, Minn.. Sept. 15.^ 
(Special to The Herald.) — James 
Gray of Minneapolis is the unani- 
mous choice of the state Demo- 
cratic committee as nominee for 
governor in the coming election. 
He was placed in nomination at 
a meeting of the committee here 

I this afternoon. His name was 

'proposed by ex-Senator C. A. 

George W. Fitzgerald Is Held Stockwell of Minneapolis, and the 
° ^ action was seconded by ex-Mayor 

Dan Lawler of St. Paul. 

11 had been predicted that there 
would be a fight on the floor of the 
committee meeting by some who would 
oppose the choice of the Mill City man. 
and it was even declared that the name 
of W. 12 McEwen of Dululh would be 
placed before the committee in oppo- 
sition to Mr. Gray. Ex-Mayor Haines 
of Mlnneapolle and A. Lawler of St. 
Paul were said to head the oppf>sltlon. 
When the committee had begun its 
session, however, serious objections 
failed to materialize, and the nomina- 
tion was made without a hitch. 
Aerr^ed to .* crept. 

Mr. Gray had been asked in advance 
if he would accept the nomination, and 
had given his consent. He was not 
present at the meeting, but was no- 
tified by telephone as soon as the ac- 
tion had been taken, and he started at 
once for St. Paul from his office In 
Minneapolis. 

Ex-Senator Stockwell placed the 



for Sub-Treasury 
Robbery. 

Judge Refuses to Reduce 

Bail From $5(1,000- 

Sensational Case. 



Chicago, Sept. 15. — Efforts to secure 
a reduction In the ball of George W. 
Fitzgerald, who was arrested here yes- 
terday charged with stealing $173,000 
# j f rom the sub-f reasiiry three years ago. 
^ i were made in the United States district 
3t I court today before Judge Landis. Judge 



contained about :i.5,<»0<> more per- * Landis fixed the bail las night at $50,- 

f dlH- ^ I 



RouH than I'leveiaud, Ik uo>v 



„ ^00,000. The Northern t)hlo city 
-JJE brrcaftcr will take rank amoug 
^ the firKt tea cItieK of the country. 



(Continued <'n paerf 



t 



column.) 



TANNING IT. 



CLERICALS BEGIN 
SPANISH CAMPAIGN 



Return of Papal Nuncia to 

Madrid Gives Life to 

Movement. 

Madrid. Sept. 15. — Mgr. Vice, the 
papal muncio at Madrid, has returned 
from Zaracus after a month's stay at 
the summer resort, and wit., his reap- 
pearance in the capital the organiza- 
tion of the clerical campaign against 

Fromler Canslejas Js proceeding witli 
renewed activity. Great prepaiations 
under the direction of the priests are 
being made for the Inauguration of a 
series of manifestations and meotings 
of protest to be held tliroughout tlie 
country on Oct. 2, the day before the 
cortes reassembles. 

Particular care will be taken that 
the meetings assume a patriotic and 
peaceful character. Hostility toward 
the premier Is growing in court cir- 
cles, many of the ladies of the court 
having already signified an intention 
to remain in retirement so long as 
Premier Cnnahvias comi ; -.i , « \xi power. 

FIFTY PER ( ENT PAID 

BY EAST BKADY BANK, 



GET READY FOR 
AERIAL RACES 

Free-for-Ali Contests Will 

Start at Indianapolis 

Saturday. 

Indianapolis, Ind.. Sept. 15. — Pilots 
and balloons for the American cham- 
pions). ip and free-for-all races which 
will stait at the Indianapolis Motor 
speedwpy Saturday afternoon are ar- 
rivin.g at the speedway and inflation 
will start tomorrow Nine contestant.? 
hav'j entered in tlie championship race, 
whlih v.'ill be conducted under the rules 
of til.- Ae:o Club of America. 

Six arc entered in the free-for-all 1 
rate for ?as balicons of any capacity j 
wiiic!-. will be started Just aftor the j 
entries in ttie chainpionship contest 
have been sent into the air. This race 
is for d^staice, the winner to receive 
a diamond-studded cup. In the cham- 
pion-ihip race both endurance and dis- 
tance •vill be taken into accovint 






V ■T' -T* 'P ■T» 'T* ^ 



r^T" V^F^ ^^'^ ■'n J|* -^ -^^ -^ ^T^ 'f* ■^^^T*' •T» ^ -T* -T^ 




■Washington, Sept. 15. — A dividend of 
10 per cent has been declared for the 
creditors of ihe l'"lrst Natl )nal Hank of 
East Brady, Pa The bank failed o.i 
May 1, 1908. This will make dividends 
of .^>y per cent paid so far by the comp- 
troller of the currency. 



HELEN TAFT TO 
QUIT BRYN MAWR 

She Will Stay at Home to 

Assist Her Mother in 

Social Duties. 

Philadelphia, Sept. 15. — Announce- 
ment is made at Bryn Mawr college 
that Miss Helen Taft, daughter of 
President Taft, will not return to the 
college this year. Instead, it is 
declared, she will stay at home and 
assist her mother in the many social 
duties devolving on "the first lady in 
the land." 

Miss Taft's return to Bryn Mawr had 
not been expected by her close friends, 
but It was not known definitely that 
she had decided to discontinue her 
college course until the announcement 
just made. Friends of Miss Taft say 
that her own inclinations were to con- 
tinue her st\idie.« and that she had ex- 
pressed eagerness to return this year 
and complete her term. 




1 000, which Fitzgerald -^vas unable to 
furnish at the lime, and in consequence 
spent the night in a ceil. 

The prisoner, who stoutly denies the 
charge against him, was brought from 
the county jail into court to listen to 
the arguments. Attorney Lilzinger, 
representing the defendant, declared 
that a bond of 115,000 or $20,000 would 
be more fair. However, he declared, no 
matter what the sum it will be pro- 
vided. 

After hearing from both sides. Judge 
Landis declined to reduce the ball. 

Bonds of $50,000 wer(> furnished by 
William Joyce and Jam<-s Kalpli. 
Indictment Wan !<ecret. 

Fitzgerald was arrested on a bench 
warrant based on an indictment re- 

(Continued tm paare 11. fifth column.) 

TELLS'REilfs'OF 
PANAMA ELECTION 



(Continued on 



page 3, 



fourth column.) 



Charge Marsh Cables Returns 
to the State Depart- 
ment. 

Washington, Sept. "5. — P.ichard O. 
Marsh, the United Stj.les charge at 
Panama, has formally leported to the 
state department by cfible the result 
of yesterday's elections in tlie national 
assembly. The selection of Pablo 
Arosemena, Federico Boyd and Rodo- 
lofo Chaiarl as the Ih -ee vice presi- 
dents, had been fully anilclpated by the 
department, whicli apparently finds no 
ground for objection, aiid it is not ex- 
peclfd that there will be any inter- 
vention in the affairs of the republic so 
long as the terms of tie Constitution 



ATTEMPT TO BURN 
GIRI^' DORMITORY 

Matron at Proctor Academy 
Seriously Hurt By In- 
cendiary. 

Andover, N. H., Sept. 15. — An attempt 
to burn the girls' dormitory at Proctor 
academy here last night was frus- 
trated after a blaze had been started 
and Mrs. Eugene Sawyer, the matron 
of the dormitory, was tiiruck hy the 
incendiary in making his escape. Her 
injuries are serious. 

Mrs. Sawyer, entering the basement 
suddenly at about 8 o'oolck, discovered 
a strange man in the act of applying 
a match to a pile of wood. She 
screamed and the intruder knocked her 
down. 

The academy authorities can find no 
motive for the attempt to set fire to 
the dormitory. Tlie building acccmmo- 
dations arf for flftf-fn .--tudents. 

VANNUTELLI TO 
VISIT IN ST. PAUL 



are observed. 



SHAKERS SELL 
THEIR PROPERTY 



Purchaser Agrees to Support 

All Survivors of the 

Sect 



15. — The So- 
estate is lo- 
loday trans- 
Bohon their 

of the best 



Harrodsburg. Ky., Sent 
ciety of Shakers, whosie 
cated near High Bridge, 
ferred to Col. George 
holdings of 1,800 acres 

land in Mercer county, and their per- 
sonalty. The estate is valued at J150,- 
000, and in addition lo a casli consid- 
eration of $5,000, Ca:. Bohon binds 
himself to support the .ndividual mem- 
bers of the society during the re- 
mainder of their lives. There are only 
fourteen of the Shakers left and their 
Ages range from 70 yiiars upward. 



Papal Legate Will Go There 
on Leaving Winni- 
peg. 

Montreal, Sept. lo. — Cardinal Van- 
nuttelli, the papal legale, left here to- 
day for "Valley Field, Que., en route to 
Ottawa, where he will arrive this 

evening and be entertained by Sir Wil- 
frid Laurier, tlie premier. Tlie cardi- 
nal will leave Ottawa on Friday for 
Winnipeg. From Winnipeg lie v,-ill go 
to St. Paul, where he will be the guest 
of Archbishop Ireland. Leaving St. 
I'aul, ills Itinerary Includes stop.-j at 
Chicago, Waslilnglon, Baltimore and 
New i'ork, whence he will sail for 
Naples. 

FOURTEEN CHOLERA 

SUSPECTS ON SHIP. 



Almerla, Spain, Sept. 15. — There are 
fourteen suspected ctises of cholera on 
board the coasting steamer Antolne, 
w!-. ich arrived here today from Alex- 
andria. The vessel has been isolated 
and the sick placed under observa- 
tion. 



Sand-t ^ucct cd« C'uudcu. 

Washington, Sept. 15. — .Stephen H. 
Sands, a customs examiner in the 
surveyor's office at Cincinnati, will bo 
appointed cashier there, to succeed 
Frank M. Couden, who was recently 
removed on charges. 




- - 



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Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 15, 1910. 



CITY FOLKS 



hJ^V 



'ii^-aM 



INVITED 



Genuine Old Fashioned Har- 
vest Home to Be Held 
at Arnold. 



Spellin' Bee Will Provide 

Entertainment at Exhibit 

of Produce. 



folks of the burg may try lO "spell each 
other down," is also on t*ie cards. 

As an Incentive to tlie youngsters 
of Arnold to engrage in agricultural pur- 
suits and thus be better able to with- 
stand the lure of the city, cash prizes 
will be given for the best displays of 
vegetables, the classes in this contest 
being divided as follows: First and 
second prizes for the best displays of 
all kinds of vegetables; prize respec- 
tively fur the best display of potatoes, 
corn, cabbage and root crops; prizes for 
the best loaf of bread, the best cake, 
the best display of sewing, the best 
darned sock and the heaviest dozen of 
eggs. 

Refreshments will be provided during 
the evening and a special bid to the 
hilarious festivities is extended to city 
friends by the .Vrnold community. 
No admission will be charged. Erlck 
Holmerud and Miss E. A. Remfry are 
the committee In charge of the out 
burst. 



POTATOES, LUMBER AF^ MOVING 
PICTURES CAUSE XAW SUITS 



A genuine, old fashioned harvest 
home will be given by the residents 
of Arnold at the town hall in that 
prosperous suburb next Friday even- 
ing, Sept. 16, the principal feature of 
:which will be a display of all the good 
things that the farms of the neighbor- 
hood have brought forth this season. 

A program of speakin' and readin' 
has been arranged by the schoolma'am 
fcinJ a spellin' bee, in which the old 



Y. M. C. A. GLEE CLUB 

WILL BE ORGANIZED. 



Interest in musical matters at the 
Y. M. C. A. Is reviving for the fall 
and winter. A meeting will be held 
tomorrow evening at 8 o'clock In tho 
assembly room for the purpose of or- 
ganizing a Glee club, and all of the 
1.600 members of the association who 
take part In singing are invited to be 
present. 

It is expected to select at least six- 
teen voices for weekly rehearsals and 
a reserve of about twice that number 
for special occasions. It has been 
suggested that after a little practice 
the club shall give a concert for the 
benefit of the Bethel fund. Meetings 
will probably be held either Monday 
or Tuesday evenings. 



A queer state of affairs existed on the 
fourth floor of the courthouse building 
this morning. In Judge Dibell's court- 
room a Jury is trying to find out 
whether or not 2,46a bushels of pota- 
toes were frozen at the time of their 
delivery. In Judge Ensign's court- 
room a jury has lumber under consid- 
eration, and there were moving pic- 
tures under discussion before Judge 
Cant. 

When the spectators got tired of po- 
tatoes as a steady diet and found out 
all they wanted to know about lumber, 
they adjourned to Judge Cant's room 
for the moving picture show. There 
were not really any pictures to be 
seen but Charles B. Meyers sought to 
recover from J. B. Anderson and J. B. 
Dumphy on a note. The jury brought 
In a verdict this morning in favor of 
the defendants for $811.87. The de- 
fendants claimed that Meyers had mis- 
represented the actual worth of the 
show which he sold to them. It was 
located in the West end and it was 
not a "gold mine" according to those 
that took it over. Their counter claim 
was allowed. 

Magnus Bergren thinks he has $418 
coming from the Vermilion Lumber 
oompany on a logging contract he 
claims he had with the concern in 1908. 
The action is being heard before Judge 
Ensign. 

Charles Batcher wants $740.75 from 
the Minnesota Fruit company for 2,469 
bushels of potatoes that he claims to 
have furnished the company. The com- 
pany claims that the "spuds" were 
frozen when they were received and 



refused to rfay f3t them. H. W. Rich 
ardson of the local weather bureau was 
on the stand this morning telling about 
the weather at the time of the de- 
livery. 

WANTED 

At reasonable raises, convenient to the 
college, board and room for students. 
Apply at once at the Duluth Business 
university, 118-120 Fourth avenue 
west. 

COULD NOT STAND IT TO 

SEE FRIEND SAVE MONEY. 



Tony Dillen, arested yesterday on 
the charge of robbing Julius Zohua 
of $19 while they were sleeping to- 
gether in the Bethel, admitted the al- 
legation yesterday afternoon in police 
court and was fined $25 and costs, 
which he couldn't produce. Instead he 
went to the county jail for thirty days. 
He took an optimistic view of the sit- 
uation, telling the court that Zohua 
wasn't putting the money into circu- 
lation fast enough, which induced .him 
to lend a helping hand. He explained 
thUt he paid Zohua's fare over here 
from Superior, bought him a few 
drinks and supper and paid for their 
beds, while Zohua didn't spent a cent. 



Weather: Partly cloudy tonight and Friday; slightly warmer tonight; light to moderate winds, mostly southerly. 




T 



HE way to be sure of getting all that your clothes- money pays for 
and should insure — is to buy clothes oi known quality^ 



That's your big advantage here — whatever your selection may be, you have 
the maker's name to rely on — and our name back of that. • 

And keeping up our name is a mighty important particular here because we've 
made that name mean the best values — correct styles — satisfaction or money- 
back. 

You want to see the brandnew models we are showing for fall and winter. They bear 
the well-known name of 

The Hoose of Koppenlieiimer 

And there's no name in the clothing manufacture that stands higher — means more. 

These new styles show the highest perfection of the maker's methods — the newest crinkles 
in advance style — and solid worth of fabrics that means your satisfaction from first to last. 

We wouldn't wait if we were yoiL Choose while the stock is complete. 




0¥EIHC0IT 




Oak Hall 
Building 




Superior Street at 
Second Ave. West 



m TRIAL 
IS REFUSED 

Verdict of $3,355 Against 

Traction Company Upheld 

By Court. 

Verdict Against Dam and 

Improvement Company 

Cut in Two. 




CUB BEAR IS TREED AND 

TAKEN ALIVE AT WOODLAND 



A cub bear, probabl 
member of a family, i 
which were killed by 
at Lakewood last wee 
Alfred Dryer, a 14-ye 
then captured alive b; 
at llyan & Bergrtold's 
land this morning. T 
chained up at the dairy 
of curious attention. 

Young Dryer was 
the cabbage patch on 
cornfield near the dai 
when he sighted the 



y the surviving' 
.wo members of 
Charles Chartier 
k, was treed by 
ar-old boy. and 
' men employed 

dairy at Wood- 
lie bear is now 

aud Is an object 

massing through 
his way to the 

ry this morning 
bear cub. j.xe 



Judge Dibell of the district court 
this morning uphefd the verdict of 
$3,355 returned by a jury some time 
ago in the case of James B. Walker 
against the Duluth Street Railway 
when he denied the motion of the de- 
fendant for a new trial. 

In commenting on the case Judge 
Dibell says that while the verdict has 
been called very liberal, he thinks 
Iha: in his opinion it should stand. He 
say^ that the plaintiff In the action 
was very old at the time of the in- 
jury and that his life may have been 
shortened as a result. 

James B. Walker is the father of J. 

O. Walker of the county auditor's of- 

8r., was 7S years of 

lie was hurt. The 

when he was about 

car on East Fourth 



fice. Mr. Walker, 
age at tiie time 
accident liappened 
to alight from a 
street. 



Judge Dibell 
in the case of 
Fred P. Amo. 
owned a half 
coniucted by 



• ♦ • 

also denied a new trial 
Andrew Binder against 
Binder claimed that he 
interest in a bakery 
Amo and wished the 



partnership disolved and au account- 
ing made. 

• * * 

In the case of Ivar Edward Newman 
against the St. Louis River, Dam & 
Improvement company. Judge Dil)ell 
gi'aiited a new trial unless within fif- 
teen days the defendant would agree 
to pay the plaintitT in the action the 
sum of |S00. If this can be agreed 
upon, the plaintiff may take judgment 
for that amount. The verdict favored 
the plaintiff and was for ?1,600 at the 
time of the trial. 

Newman claimed that the company 
flooded and destroyed the improve- 
ments on his farm. There have been a 
nuraber of cases of this kind against 
the improvement company. 
« • • 

The demurrer filed by the city in tlie 
case brought against It by Arthur A. 
Fider stating that the complaint filed 
by the* plaintiff does not state suffi- 
cient cause for action, was overruled 
by the court. Mr. Fider claims that 
the city built a dam, which changed 
the course of the creek at Ninth ave- 
nue east. The course of tlie water was 
changed and a part of his property, he 
states, was washed away. He asks 
S650 damages. 

* « 4i 

The demurrer in the case of Matti 
Korpi against the Oliver Iron Mining 
company was also overruled. The de- 
fendant claimed that there was not 
sufficient cause for action. Korpi sues 
for his son, Nicolai 9 years old, who it 
is claimed, fell into a vat of boiling 
wa.er. The accident took place at 
Hibbing. He asks J15. OOP. 

CONDEMNATION 

PROCEEDINGS 



Great Northern Power Com- 
pany Will Build Series 
of Reservoirs. 

The Great Northern Power com- 
pany has begun condemnation pro- 
ceedings in district court against sev- 
enty-one parcels of land about Beaver 

Creek for the purpose of constructing 
a dam and storage reservoir. This 
darn, it is said, will be but the begin- 
ning of a series of dams and reser- 
voirs for the purpose of equalizing the 
flow of water which supplies the com- 
pany with power. 

The dam at Beaver Creek will be 
about twenty-five feet high. It is 
thought that the reservoir and others 
which will be built, will furnish a re- 
serve supply of water wliich can be 
used at any time of emergency. 

C. A. Duncan, president of the pow- 
er company, says that the sole object 
of the reservoirs Is to equalize the 
power. He says there are times in 
the year when the flow of water is 
insufficient for the needs of the com- 
pany. He was not aljle to slate just 
how great the increase in horse-power 
would be. The number of reservoirs 
lias, not been decided upon. 

The land which the company wants 
is mostly owned by Individuals al- 
though there is some railroad property 
Included in the proceeding's. 

BEGIN WORK ON 
NEW "WHITE WAY" 



Fifth Avenue Will Be Ughted 
From Courthouse to 



Bay. 



SNAKE INFESTED CANONS. 

Ventura correspondence Los Angeles 
Times: This is said l)y old timers to 
be the best year for rattlesnakes — or 
the worst — in the history of the 
county. The canons e.re full of them, 
and snake stories ate heard on all 
sides. 

On that part of the Ouadalaaca 
rancho known as the De Grasse tract 
there are a number of tumbledown 
shacks. Recently Cha-les Pitcher, who 
lives in the neighborhood, had busienss 
on the place and in vljiting the shacks 
found and killed a big rattlesnake. 
He heard another, am before he was 
through he had killec. ten. 

His experience was told to the Pld- 



chased the animal with a stick and the 
bear scampered up into a tree. The 
boy then summoned men working at 
the dairy and measures were taken for 
the capture of the animal alive. 

A long pole was used to dislodge the 
cub from his place in the tree and as 
soon as he struck the ground he was 
securely chained and taken to the 
dairy. The cub is fat and apparently 
is not taking his capture very much 
to heart. He has taken kindly to the 
milk offered him at the dairy and the 
boy has high hopes of being able to 
domesticate him. 



duck brothers, who had themselves 
farmed that tract. The Pidducks had 
their doubts and went to investigate. 
That was the day after. They killed 
seventeen snakes. They heard more, 
but they could not stand the war any 
longer, and turned the thing over to 
the crew of the Donlon Brothers' 
thrashing machine. camped In that 
neighborhood. The thrasers turned out 
the following Sunday and killed a total 
of twentv-seven rattlers among the old 
buildings. This makes fifty-four killed 
there. 



You haven't read all of today's news 
that's Important to you until you've 
read the ads. 




The laying of the conduits for the 
Fifth avenue "white way" began yes- 
terday and It is anticipated that with- 
in a short time the brilliant clusters of 
globes on the ornamental standards 
will extend from the courthouse to the 
bav. Fifteen posts, each with five 
llgfits, will be erected on each side of 
the aevnue. as well as In front of the 
Spalding hotel, the Holland hotel and 
the new Soo depot at Sixth avenue 
west. Work will be begun shortly to 
secure signatures of property owner.s 
on Superior street from First avenue 
east to Sixth avenue west for the com- 
pletion of the ■white way" on Supe- 
rior street. 

SOUTH AMIOHICA FILLING UP. 

Bulletin of American liepublics: Ten 
yea.rs ago the Immigration to me Ar- 
gentine Republic was almost exclusive- 
ly Italian and Spanish. Today there are 
colonies of Russians near Bahia Blan- 
ca- 10,000 Poles are settled in Misiones 
and 7,000 Finns are arranging to be 
their neighbors. Bulgarians, Croats. 
Greeks and Turks from Asia Minor are 
distributed in increasing streams by 
the Immigration offices. 

The writer has personally handled 
hundreds of these folk on railroad 
work, and found them in the great ma- 
jority young, healthy and hard work- 
ing folk, both men and women. From 
this .semi-Slav imniigrtaion to that of 
the Far East is but a step. Japanese 
coiimercial and Immigration agents 
are already in Buenos Ayres and Rio. 
If the first shipments of Asiatics to i 
the Platte are carefully handled, wise- | 
ly established and well treated during 
their first residence there, the thou- 
sarids who await their letters will come 
of tlveir own accord. 

• ■ « 

I'hone your wants to The Herald. 
Bo;h 'phones 324. Results are sure. 



Micl-Sept€:mber — Time to Discard Summer Hats ! 

WE ARE NOW FEATURING 

Fetching Styles in'Fir^' Hats! 

For **First-of-the-Season" 
wear, Milady will probably 
choose one of the smaller 
, close-fitting hats, in one of the 
various interpretations of the 
Frenchy High-Crowned 
Turban, the charming 
Corday, or one of the many 
Mushroom styles. 




"Tailored lookinjr" English 
Hats are also liberally classed 
among the simple, but stunning 
ready-to-wear types. 

Our clever French Designer, 
and her adroit co-workers have 
labored like busy fairies, until now^ 
the results of their handiv^^ork are 
bounteous and beautiful. 



In passing, one might especially mention the cozy and 'Gen- 
erally-becoming" Velvet Turbans; some with very wide Tap- 
estry Bands, and touched off with a charming silk Tassel — or 
again, the Youthful Cordays, with soft Lace or Accordeon plait-" 
ed Frills drooping over the hair and next to the face. The Gath- 
ering is now 1 beral ; Each Hat with its own Charm and Indi- 
viduality. Prices ^10.00 and up. 




'•''Correct Dress tor IFomcw." 



The Giclding Suit is a 
Suit Distinguishable 
Wherever Seen for it's 

Sy7}i m etry of Proportion , 
Excellence of Material, 
a7id Perfection of Detail 
and Finish, ^ 

In the new^ suits that are 
daily putting in an appear- 
ance all of Fashion's Sal- 
ient Features are brought 

to full maturity, and selections 
now afford ample range of choice, 
in the newest materials such as the 
following : 

Plain and Crystal Broadcloths, 
Zibeline Broadcloths, Velvets, Cor- 
duroys, Camel's Hair Suitings, 
Boucle Suitings, Scotch Tweeds,^! 
Mattesse Suitings and Cheviots.! 
Suit prices $29.50 and up. 

Coats and Dresses are also here 
in liberal array, including the latest 
fashion notions, in the newest and 
most approved materials. Prices 
$25.00 and up. 

New Arrivals in Charming Negligees 

Refined and beautiful styles in Jap Silk, Satin, Al- 
batross, Challis and Crepe, in handsome Roman stripes, 
rare tapestry, floral and Persian designs or solid shades; 
in plain or accordeon plaited styles. Empire, Princess 
and Belted effects, handsomely finished with dainty 
touches of ribbons or laces. Prices $5.00 to $25.00. 





I 



r 



i 



I 

\ 



I 

\ 



I 



I 




lI 



■Ml 



** Correct Dress for iro/ne/i." 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 



■oe. 





wot m 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 16, 1910. 



- f-f 




TELEPe 



BEING USED 

Replacing Telegraph in Dis- 
patching Trains on 
Eastern Road. 



—f 



Duluth Visitor Believes 
Will Come Info Gen- 
eral Use. 



It 



J. A W'halley. wlio is in the rail- 
read supply business and who is in the 
city upon business today, stated that 
in his opinion it wt uld not be a very 
fcreat wiiile before several of the big 
Western lines would try the experi- 
ment of dispatching their trains by the 
use of the telephone, and that in time 
the telegraph would be done away with 
entirely. 

Mr. Whalley told several of the lo- 
cal railroad men this moriiinK that the 
Delaware, Laokawana & ^Vestern rail- 
r*-ad had entirely done away with the 
telegraph for train di.^patching pur- 
poses. The telephone had taken its 
place, and according to Mr. Wlialley, 
hiis accomplished very satisfactory .e- 

EUltS. 

"The Pflaware T.ackawana & West- 



ern has at the present time over twen- 
ty-one stations equipped with the new 
telephone appliance, and over 2,500 
miles of wire in use," said Mr. Whal- 
ley. 

•Experimenting with the telephone 
as a means of dispatching was started 
in the West. However, the Lackawana 
is the first road to use the* telephone 
exclusively to replace the telegraph 
in the operating of trains and dis- 
patclung. 

"The experiment of the Lackawana 
has been watched by railroad men over 
the country with a great deal of in- 
terest. If the telephone proves entire- 
ly successful in tlie long run, as it 
has proved so far with the Lackawana, 
I believe that other railroads will adopt 
it. 1 wouldn't in the least be sur- 
prised to see one of the big Western 
lines adopting the telephone as a suc- 
cessor of the telegraph, in the event 
of the success of the Lackawana s test, 
as the lines in this part of the country 
are perhaps a trifle more progressive 
than the railroads of the i^ast. 

••The offlcial-s of the Lackawana say 
that the use of the telephone is not 
an experiment with them, as for a 
number of years tests have been made 
that have demonstrated beyond doubt 
the practicability of the system now in 
use. However, railroad men are con- 
servative about such things, and I be- 
lieve that they will wait and watch. 
In the event of the thorough success 
of the Lackawana system of telephon- 
ing, you may be sure that the example 
will be followed by other railroads." 



has tendered his resignation to the 
Milwaukee and the first of next month 
will leave for the Pacific coast, where 
he will engage in the lumber business 

A. L. Eidemiller has been appointed 
traveling passenger agent and will 
make Duluth territory after the retire- 
ment of Mr. Rovig. 

Mr. Rovlg has been with the Milwau- 
kee for the past eighteen years in dif- 
ferent capacities, entering the road as 
telegraph operator in 1892. He has 
held the position of Northwestern pas- 
senger agent since 1907. - will en- 
gage in the retail lumber business In 
the state of Washington 

Mr. Eidemiller is well known in 
Northwestern railway circles. He was 
chief clerk In the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy office and was later general 
freight and passenger agent of the La 
Crosse & Southwestern at La Crosse. 



DAY OF REST 
IS WANTED 

Postoffice Employes Want 

Sunday Distri)ution of 

Mail Abolished. 



ROVIG QUITS 

RAILROADING 



No New Cars This Year. 

It is very improbable that the annual 
yearly appropriations of the Duluth, 
Missabe & Nortiiern and the Duluth & 
Iron Range railroads will provide any 
funds for new cars. Last year each of 
the roads purchased 1,000 "new cars of 
tlie latest model. These cars are still 
being delivered to the two roads. 
> 

Freight Train Derailed. 

The Omaha train was four hours late 
in reaching Duluth today. The train is 
due here at 8:40. The cause of the de- 
lav was the derailment of a ireight 
train at Janesville Wis. No one was 
hurt in the wreck of the freight train. 



DANCE 



Duluth Clerk Says Opening 

of Offices on Sunday 

Is Unnecessary. 



rectly in the eye, hesitated a second 
and said; 

"No, :i did not." 

Without making another remark. Mr. 
Lind ar.d Mr. Goodrich sat down.* 

F. B. Lynch then called for the 
question, which had already been sec- 
onded, and on a rising vote the nomi- 
nation of Mr. Gray was so near unani- 
mous that it was so declared by the 
chairman. 

While waiting for Mr. Gray to arrive, 
State Labor Commissioner McEwen 
was cal'ed upon and made an address 
indorsing the nomination 

Gray Given Ovation 



wired to John Norton, county at 
ney: "Is your man a minister? It does 
not look right. Many peculiar things 
happen in the county attorney's office 
and Mr. Norton sent word to bring him 
along. 

He was indicted by the September 
grand jury and he will be arraigned 
within a day or so. 

The local courts and the county at- 
torney are determined to hunt down 
those who desert their farailies. 



ttor- he thinks your declaration is very much 



THROrGH THE CUSTOM HOUSE. 
Under the liead of "Advice to Travel- 



Mr. Gray received an enthusiastic i ers' a writer in the Won ans Home 



Popular Passenger Agent Will 

Be Succeeded By A. L 

Eidemiller. 

R. D. Rovig, formerly Northwestern 
passenger agent of the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul, making Duluth 
very often and very well known here. 



LAST 

ADAMS 

TONIGHT AT 

LINCOLN PARK PAVILION 

Ooor Itl^hts Heserved. 
Flnnt«-!i"H DD-lieislra. 'IM«-ke«>. r»Oo. 



SUPERIOR 



-4- 







^m^ m 



reate 
Store 



will open Tuesday morn- 
ing, Sept. 2o, at I o'clock. 

The greatest line of ready- 
to-wear clothes for women, 
men, young men, and boys, 
at prices heretofore unknown 
in this city. 

The very best of everything 
will be retailed at wholesale 

prices! 

gif" Watch Closely for 
Our Great Opening Sale. 



-r* 




SUPERHIR MAN WILL 

ATTEND ATLANTA MEET. 

Hans Rasmussen of South Superior 
will attend the convention of the 
Patriarchs Militant, the uniform rank 
of t: e Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, which will be held next week at 
Atlanta. Ga. He goes as an aide on 
the staff of Cm. M. A. Raney, head of 
the order in the T'untted States. 

HAS 'MADE" SUPERIOR 

TWENTY-THREE YEARS. 

George J. Lovell, representing the 
Wabash railway, yesterady paid his 
twenty-second visit to Superior and the 
Head of the Lakes. Mr. Lovell is the 
oldest agent In point of service rep- 
reseniing an outside lailroad comp.iny 
l.ere 

New Business Block. 

George W. Leamon, a Tower avenue 
business maan, has purchased from toe 
Sunderland & Ostrander agency, two 
lots on the southeast corner of Ogden 
avenue and the alley between Broad- 
w.iy and Eleventh streets. Mr. Leamon 
pronoses to build a new brick and 
stone business Irlock on the property. 

May Visit Superior. 

In preparing a bill for the next leg- 
islature for the creation of an educa- 
tional commls.=!ion far "Wisconsin, the 
st-itr- committee on education, now in 
session, may come to Superior. The 
members are the committee are: Sen- 
ators C. L. Pearson and W. R. Gaylord 
and Assemblymen E E. Haight and 
Edward Le Hoy 



Duluth postoffice clerks are faking a 
lively interest In the movement which 
has been under way in the United 
States for some time to secure the 
closing of all postofflces on Sunday. 
The movement took concrete form at 
a recent convention of the National Fed 
eratin of Postoffice Clerks at Chicago, 
at which resolutions were passed call- 
ing upon congress lo enact t- law abol- 
islilng Sunday distribution of mail. 

The present law provides that the 
general delivery and carrier windows 
of the postofflces shall be open for one 
hour each Sunday. In Duluiii the hour 
Is Irom 10 lo 11 a. m. and half of the 
carriers work every alternate Sunday, 
each man liandling liia own and an- 
otlier carrier's mail. 

•We hope the mov^rnent will suc- 
ceed, as there is no niore reason for 
postoffice employes working on Sun- 
day tlian tliere is in any otner brancli 
of the government service," said a Du- 
luth clerk this morning. The postof- 
fice department tries to accommidate 
business men in every way possible, 
however, and some business men would 
object strenuously if they were unable 
to get their mail on Sunday morning. 

"It's absurd when one comts to con- 
sider it. >io business house does any 
business on Sunday, yet some of them 
expect the postoffice department to do 
business the same as on otlier days. 
They get tlielr mail at 10 o'clock and 
have lime to get to church. The postal 
employes get an opportunity to attend 
church every other Sunday. 

"None of the big wholesale houses 
of Duluth call for tlieir mail on Sun- 
day. Few of the really biir business 
houses care for their mail until Mon- 
day morning, but the little fellows can 
make a lot of noise. We are willing 
lo accommodate the public, but we 
don't believe the accommodation is 
vital. Most people who call for mall 
on Sunday do it out of curiosity. 

"The first carriers in the business 
district are out of tlie ofttfce before 8 
o'clock on Monday morning. All im- 
portant mail arriving h*re on Sunday 
is delivered in time for the start of 
the day's business Monday morning. 
Tliat Bliould suffice and we would wel- 
come the abolition of Sunday distribu- 
tion and the establishment of a day 
of rest for all postoffice employes. 

"Not a postoffice In London is open 
on Sunday. In some of the Eastern cities 
public sentiment has ruled that ihe 
postoffices .shall not open on Sunday. 
If the people opposed lo Sunday labor 
on principle and others who do not 
believe that the distribution of mail 
on Sunday is necessary, were lo add 
their voices to those of the postoffice 
employes of the country, I believe we 
could get congress or the postmaster 
general to declare Sunday a day of 
rest in the postal service as it is in 
other lines of endeavor." 



ovation when he. appeared before the 
committee. His .«peech was brief. He 
thanked the committee for the honor 
conferred upon him and concluded by 
saying: 

"Indeed truth is stranger than fiction, 
I did not seek this honor from the 
hands <tf the party, but I accept." 

Frank A. r>ay was again chosen 
chairman of the committee. 
Mr. Gray's Career. 

Mr. Gray was born in Falkirk, Scot- 
land, Feb. 18, 1862, and came to 
America with his parents in 18U8. His 
early education, was received in the 
public schools of Iowa and »v isconsln. 
He removed to Minnesota in loSO, and 
graduated from the University of Min- 
nesota" In 1885. He then entered news- 
paper work, and was successively re- 
porter and city editor of the old Min- 
neapolis Times. From 1895 to 1899 he 
was secretary and a director of tlie 
Times Newspaper company. After nis 
term as mayor he bceame connected 
with the Minneapolis Tribune, leaving 
that publication for the Minneapolis 
Journa. in 1906. He has been an edi- 
torial writ* r on lliat i>aper since. 



WAS LEADING 
DOUBLE UFE 

♦ ■ ' ■ ' 

William King, Acting as 

Preacher, Arrested for 

Child Desertion. 



Companion offers some suggestions for 
smootliing the rough road which re- 
turning Americans must tr;ivel. 

"Keep all receipted bills for goods 
bought on tl.e other side. ' says he, "and 
present them to the inspi^ctor when 
asking to have your bagg-age exam- 
ined. The figures on the bill are a 
verification of the statement of cost 
contained in your declaration. Both 
act as guides for the insp^ector, whose 
work necessitates his making a rough 
appraisement of the value of an article 
on sight. 

"If you have no receipted bill, and If 



out of the way as to the cost of an ar- 
ticle, then it will be his duty to In- 
crease the value to an amount h» 
thinks is fair and just. If you are dis- 
satisfied with the value he places on 
the goods you may demand a re-exami- 
nation. 

"This demand, however, must bemad* 
immediately. The re-examination will 
be made then and there if possible If 
it is not possible, then the articles in 
question must be left in the custody of 
the customs officials and an application 
must be made to the collector for a re- 
appraisement. Remember, however you 
cannot have a reappraisement mad© 
after you have once taken the good* 
out of the customs custody. 

'What has been said here applies to 
residents of the ».nited States who have 
taken a short vacation abroad and have 
brought back with them small things 
for their own use as as souvenir.<. It 
does not take into consideration things 
brought into the country for other 
people or for sale. Where the intention 
is to sell anything brought in that fact 
should be slated In the declaration." 



Is 



Had 




If, through some special gift of busi- 
ness clalrvoj-ancy, you could estimate 
the number of people who during last 
week should have patronized your 
store, but who were influenced by the 
other store's advertising to go there 
Instead, you'd have Insomnia. 



YOUR FALL 
SE WING 

is on hand and you are enx- 
ious that it should be well 
done and out of the -way as 
quickly as possible. There's 
nothing saved in letting it 
drag on day after day. 
There's no satisfaction in 
work that is poorly done. 



JAMES GRAY IS NAMED BY 
DEMO( RATIC COMMITIEE 
AS HEAD OF STATE TICKET 



(Continued from page 1.) 




J >— ii 



» V 



northern national Bank 



With superb equipment in every 
department and a record of 8 
years of successful service, tlils 
bank invites you to open a 
checking account, confident that 
the relations thus established 
will be advantageous to both. 




Ta'.icsl Vodern Fire-Proof 
in Minnesota. 



NEW ALWORTH BUIlDliiS l>'u^^;; 

■'Look Up-You Cant Miss It!" 





Standard Rotary 

Sewing 

Machines 

will do the work quicker, 
smoother and with less trou- 
ble than any other luachine 
on the market. They are 
fully guaranteed in every way 
and we have a competent 
man to look after all ma- 
chines. If you have an old 
machine that is not satisfac- 
tory, come in and trade it on 
a Standard. 

We'll put a Standard ma- 
chine in your home on pay- 
ments of 



Per Week 



Csmplete Honsffnmlsh«r* 
Second Ave W. maA Flnt SL 




name of Mr. Gray before the commit- 
tee immediately after the roll had been 
called, and the applause which fol- 
lowed his action showed the temper 
of the committee. 

Then e.x-Mayor Lawler, to the sur- 
prise of many got up and seconded the 
nomination in one of ills characteristic 
speeches in which he said that the 
?3emocratic party held no brief from 
the railroad or the brewer^ interests 
of the stvte. He paid a glowing tribute 
to the worth of Mr. Gray and promised 
\he solid Democratic vote of Ramsey 
county and these of the insurgent Re- 
publicans for this nominee. 
ludorned by L,lnd. 

There were several brief seconds 
made to the nomination and then there 
were calls of "L,ind." 

Amid rousing cheers Mr. Lind came 
forward and addressed the committee. 
He said tiiat although he was a strict 
party man, he placed principle above 
party every time. The Democratic 
party represented a principle and h.ad 
an 'ssue to fight out on behalf of the 
people this year. 

He said that he wanted the party to 
come before the people wit,h a candi- 
date who could be v.rged forward not 
because of a personality, but because 
he represented and would figrht for the 
party's principles. Mr. Lind said thav 
he knew from personal acquaintance 
that Mr. Gray was a man for whom 
no Democrat need make excuses; that 
he was a morally clean man, and a 
man of irood personal conduct, a true 
Democrat and an able campaigner- 
Objection by BuTi'Ier. 

There were only two voices raised in 
opposition to the na-.nlng of Mr. Gray. 
Ma.1. J. M. Bowler of Minneapolis said 
it was his personal conviction that the 
Democratic committee was making a 
mistake in thu.3 making the nomination 
without getting the delegates together 
on ccnsultation. He blamed Mr. Gray 
for certain editorials in the Minneapo- 
lis Journal. 

Edward Stevens spoke briefly In 
support cf Mr. Gray as against the ar- 
guments of Maj. Bowler, and said so 
far as he could Judsje from MaJ. Bow- 
ler's remarks the only objection to Mr. 
Gray was that as a professional news- 
paper man and a true Democrat he 
eainod liis living by working on a Re- 
publican paper. Amid much laughter 
Mr. .Slevans fitly asked: 

"But where. In Heaven's name, would 
he find employment for his talents In 
»he T'vln Cities except on a Republican 
newspaper, or In the state of Minnesota 
for that matter?" 

Alderman Goodrich of Minneapolis, 
who was not a member of the commit- 
tee but who, after some wrangling, 
was allowed to speak, opposed the 
nomination of Mr. Gray. Mr. Good- 
rich said he was the Democratic rep- 
resentative In the Minneapolis council 
of Mr. Gray's ward. He said that Mr. 
Gray had done nothing since he left 
the mayor's chair to help the cause of 
Democracy. 

"He has always voted the Republican 
ticket since," raid Mr. Goodrich, "in 
our municipal election, and a year ago 
he took the Republican ballot In his 
precinct and voted it straight." 

"Do you knew that of ^ your own 
knowledge?" asked E<! Stevens, who 
acted as secretary, pointing his finger 
angrily at Goodrich, "for Ht you do 
not I will brand you as a — a — a prevari- 
cator." 

"I have the word of the judge of the 
election booth for that," was Mr. Good- 
rich's reply. 

There were cries of dissent, and 
Chairman Day attempted to tell Mr. 
Goodrich that his remarks were entire- 
ly out of order and that he had no 
right to be heard. 

Tilt With I-lnd. 

At this point John Lind Interrupted. 

"I would like to ask Mr. Goodrich a 
question," said Mr- Lind. 

"You and I had a conversation on this 
.<5iibj(;ot yesterday, and during that con- 
versation did you net say to me that 
you had urgently advlaed Mr. Gray to 
file for the nomlnaticn for the senate?" 

Mr. Goodrich, looke^ ilr^ Lind dl- 



Claimed to Have 
Two Families in 
England. 



After a search of more than a year 
and a half, Wiliiam King was arrested 
Tuesday at Mononia, Iowa, by Deputy 
Sheriff Frank Magie and brought back 
to Duluth this morning to answer be- 
fore the local court to a charge of 
cliild abandonment. 

King's career has been an interest- 
ing one. He Is an Englishman and 
while living in England is said to have 
lived a. double life, having two separate 
and distinct families. 

He divided his time equally between 
them, it is said. One of the women died 
and King came to the United States, 
bringing with him the children, Ken- 
neth, } years old, Bartian, 8, Harry, 7 
and Lillian 5. Duluth looked like a 
good place to loose himself and he 
made for this city, where he placed 
the children in the children's home. 

He worked here as a painter, it is 
said, und for a time contributed regu- 
larly to the support of the children. 
After a while he apparently forgot 
about them. 

The wife who was living was sent 
for and she came to this country, bring- 
ing with her the four children who be- 
longed to her. King dropped out of 
siglit In Duluth and in spite of the dil- 
igent searcli that was made, he could 
not b"} found. 

He evidently joined his wife in Mo- 
noma, Iowa, where he had secured the 
pastorate of a church. Pie has been 
living there since that time preaching 
the gospel. 

He does not look like a man who 
would abandon his children and Sheriff 
Magie didn't know what to do when 
he discovered him a preacher. So he 



MARVELOUS 
RESULTS SEEN 



CROWDS VISIT K. P. HALL TO 

AVITNESS ILLLSTKATIONS 

BY 



>Irs. Briggsr—K C a Big "Winner With 
Duluth Lailics. 



Th(! ladies of Duluth by their inter- 
est and enthusiasm have made of the 
K C IJaking Powder one of the great- 
est winners the merchants of our city 
have ever known. 'Tis those that 
have tried it and told their neigh- 
bors, friends and the merchants of Its 
great merit and how delightfully satis- 
factory it is in every way, as well as 
of its economy, that made its great 
success possible. Everything comes 
out all right when you use this never- 
failini? baking powder. To the ladies 
who have not been so fortunate as 
to have become acquainted with the 
marvelous results securable from its 
use, we say you will not regret it if 
you secure a can of K C from your 
grocer; you will be more than pleased. 
Mrs. Briggs at Friday's class will bake 
RibbciH Cake, Cream Cookies, Black- 
berry Roly Poly with sauce, all of 
which are very delicious and made 
from recipes contained in the most 
practical, useful, as well as beautiful 
"Cook's Book," it has ever been your 
good fortune and opportunity to se- 
cure. Mrs. Hill of the Boston Cook- 
ing School writes no recipes for less 
than $5.00 each. The "Cook's Book" 
contains eighty of her finest. The il- 
lustrations were made from photo- 
graphs of cakes, etc., actually baked: 
are 8.11 in nine colors, making it the 
most beautiful creation known to the 
prlnt'jrs' art. The "Cook's Book" is 
free to users of K C Baking Powder. 
Return the certificate from a 25-cent 
can of K C to the baking school and 
receive this fine collection of choice 
recip'js. Ask your grocer to send you 
a can at once, so you will have time 
to secure a copy before the lectures 
close. 

The time is linnited to secure your 
Cook'8 Book. Don't be too late. 



MORRISON 

Modern Tailor, 



8 LAKE 

AVENUE 
SOIUTH. 



My 
store is 
is the place 
where the sat- 
isfaction of each 
customer is made 
the first consideration 
^' of each transaction. Let 
^^me show you my Fall Suit- 



rr 



,-^— 


-aitf 


■MM 




■^ 


T— _ 














» 








' 

1 


' 




A First Peep at the New 

Dress Trimmings From 

Paris 



HE New Trimmings are a joy. Richer, more ar- 
tistic, more elaborate than ever, yet somehow 
they retain an inconceivable lightness and airi- 
In Paris today all the cry is "Persian Trim- 
' So Persian or Cashmer»e colorings predom- 



There are Bonds rich witli cashmere, colored beads or silk 
or melal embroidery — widths for the hobble skirt! 

The lavish use of lovefy dull metals. 

Hands with the new^ crystal beads or bugles. 

All- Overs in Persian colorings — Paisley patterns, some be- 
ing interwoven in shimmering threads of gold and silver. 

Large Mesh Xets^ charming and airy looking. 

Jr^ersian Bands in the narrower effects are very much in 
vogue — fashioned into chain passimentries used for ornamen- 
tation. 

Pig tail and rat tail are still popular, and Soutache is as 
staple as ever. 

Buttons will be in evidence — especially in the large door- 
knob effects, handsomely jeweled, beautifully cut and set. 

It wotild be well to add that prices are as a whole 
comparatively inexpensive. For instance, handsome 
bands can be had for as little as 50c a vard and tip to 
$15.00. Allovers from $1.75 to $12.00 a yard. 

p. S. On accomt of the unusual variety in Dress Trimmings this 
season and their high colorings; particularly in the Persian effects, a 
little co-operation in color scheming proves both effective and valuable. 
The head of the department is well qualified in this respect— she will 
be only too pleased to offer helpful suggestions— whch you m .y r«.ly 
on as both authoritative and correct. 




D. H., Sept. 15, lyio. 



Fancy Vest 
Special 

at The Columbia 

For Friday and Saturday we 
announce a special sale of Fancy 
Vests at — 








They are 
from a famousf^ . 
maker. A spe- 
cial purchase. 
Worth up to $5! 
and $6. All sizes 
and late patterns. 
Flannels and sij 
mixtures. Thehij 
class kind that fits 
like hand tailored garments. 

See display in Vestibule Case. 

The Columbia 

Foot-Note : Walk in Hanan Shoes. 



Al Third 

Avenue 

"West 



* " 



T < -3a fJLj 



<rf>lk^MwM^r^^^ \ 



1 




-» ■» ^^ 




Thursday, 



NEWS AND VIEWS OF POLITICS 
AND POLITICIANS 



Duluth Democrats Launch Important Ward Organization 
Scheme -Wheaton of Minneapolis, Democratic Candidate 

j for Clerk ot Supreme Court, in the City Dar Reese and J. 

I T. McCleary Here, Too— Second Ward Republicans Meet. 



I^a'ilngf Democratic workers of Du- 
luth met last evening and set in mo- 
tion the machinery of what promises 
to b«» one of the most effective or- 
eranizatlons the party 

Dernorratn has had at the Head of 

L.iiunoh the Lakes for many 

Wanl Cluba. years. Ilepresentatives 

of eacli ward and a 

number of the candidates for county 

and leglslatlvt? offices were present 

•nd a free, general exchange of Ideas 

was the feature of the meeting, which 

was in the nature of a conference and 

not a public gathering. 

It was decided to intrust to an 
executive commitleeinan in each ward 
the responsibility of calling together 
In the respective political divisions of 
the city, the men who arc most likely 
to ta -te an actl\'e part In the cam- 
paign. Ward oruranizations will be 
formed, and at the next meeting of 
the City Dt-mocratic club all tnese 
subsidiary organizations will unite to 
make the final meeting of the club 
prior ti} the election a rousing, old- 
tlnie. Democratic rally. 

Tlie ward comtnitteomen named at 
last night's meeting will not neces- 
sarily head the ward club, l)ut each 
ward organization will name its own 
officers and plan out Its own line of 
work, the committeeman l>elng em- 
powered simply to start tilings mov- 
ing. , 

Among the candidates attending the 
meeting were H. W. Cheadle. who will 
contest George R. Laybourn's return 
to the senate; Kdward H. Ribenack. 
who is running for the house In the 
Fiftieth district: R. A. Lindgren, can- 
didate for county treasurer: and Wal- 
ter F. Dacey. candidate for county at- 
torney. Tliese men told their as- 
sembled party friends how they 
viewed the situation, each from his 
own polni of view as a candidate and 
not one of them failed to say emphati- 
cally that lie hoped and expected to be 
elected. Mr. Lindgren covered the 
ground when he said: 

"I have no doubt that Judge Jaques 
will win in his flght, that Mr. Cheadle 
win be elected, and that Mr. Ribenack 
will go to the legislature with him. If 
a certain Republican candidate Is 
nominated for pr.ibate judge, that will 
make It a certainty that Tom McKeon 
will be elected, and I have no doubt 
tliat Mr. Jesmore and Mr. Dacey will 
occupy offices in the courthouse next 
year. As for myself, it Is unquestion- 
ably true that I will defeat Mr. Hol- 
gate — If I get enough votes.'" 

Air. Dacey was one of the moving 
spirits of the season, In which there 
was no speech-making, but simply a 



VOTE FOR 

John Tischer 

FOR COUNTY COMMIS- 
SIONER, 2nd DISTRICT 

He ha.s demonstrated his ability 
as a road maker. 




heart to heart talk. He presented the 
needs of tiie party in the city and 
urged that his co-workers take some 
action that will insure that the Re- 
publicans do not win by default, a 
view that was warmly indorsed by W. 
J. North of the First ward. Others 
who gave their opinions coincided 
with tliese sentiments, and when the 
meeting broke up the general feeling 
was one of satisfaction over the fact 
that someliiing detinite and tangible 
had been accomplished. 

• ♦ • 

Fred W. Wheaton of Minneapolis, 
Democratic nominee for clerk of th« 
Minnesota supreme court, was a visitor 
in Duluth yesterday, coming from tiie 

Twin Cities 

AVhoatun of .Mill City Wedn e s d a y 
ViMiiM evening and 

The Head of the Lakes, returning yes- 
terday after- 
noon. He is attending tlie meeting of 
the state central committee In St. I'aul 
today. Mr. Wheaton, who Is now sur- 
veyor general of logs and lumber in 
the Second district, was tlie Democratic 
nominee for clerk of tlie supreme coui t 
four years ago. Next to the late Gov- 
ernor Johnson and his running mate, 
Mr. Wheaton led the ticket. His visit 
to Duluth liad nothing to do with poli- 
tics, but lie talked interestingly of the 
situation as It Is viewed from the Dem- 
ocratic standpoint. 

"Since the holding of the Democratic 
state convention 1 have been quite 
generally In touch witli the situation in 
llie state," .said Mr. Wheaton, "and I 
am more than gratified to note tlie 
favor with which my candidacy has 
been received. From what I am able 
to gather after viewing the situation 
from that angle, I am convinced that 
the Republican organization realises 
that it must exert every possible ef- 
fort to elect the head of the party 
ticket. 

"To one who has noticed the trend of 
political events, state and national, 
and especially as the Republicans are 
face to face with a mass of unfilled 
pledges to the people, recent Demo- 
cratic successes are in no sense sur- 
prising. Undoubtedly the greatest Jar 
the G. O. P. has received in years was 
the Maine election. Being a native ef 
that state, the result there is especially 
gratifying to me. 

"The result in that supposedly rock- 
ribbed Republican stronghold, and 
other similar Democratic successes, 
tend to Intensify tlie intention of the 
people to take charge of their own 
governmental affairs. The people as a 
whole are disposed to take over com- 
plete control of their public business, 
wresting it from the hands of the po- 
litical party that has so long misused 
its power. 

"There can be no question but that 
the Democratic party In Minnesota oc- 
cupies a position of distinct and posi- 
tive advantage which will surely re- 
sult beneficially to Its own cause." 

Mr. Wheaton called attention par- 
ticularly to the fact that the tables 
liave been turned on the Republican 
oiachine. In the last few elections it 
was the Democrats who were forced to 
center their attention on the head of 
the ticket. Now the Republicans know 
th.at If they are to gain any ad«/antage 
they must concentrate their efforts on 
the task of electing the head of the 
ticket, with the chances against their 
success If the Democratic committee at 
its meeting today does as good work 
In choosing a candidate to take John 
Lind's place as Mr. Wheaton expects 
it will. 

As to the clerkship, Mr. Wheaton re- 
fuses to concede anything to his Re- 
publican opponent. Many times when 
the entire Republican ticket has been 
elected, comparatively few of the elec- 
tors paid any attention to the candi- 
dates for the clerkship. 

This means that when Mr. Wheaton 
gets on tiie stump and begins to work 
In his own and the party's behalf, ho 
Will have a very good chance to in- 
terest the voters in his candidacy iu.st 
as well as will the Republican nominee 
for the place. 

• • ♦ 

*. ^^L ^- x?,®®^® °' S<^- Paul, leader of 
the Republican organization In Ram- 
sey county, was in Duluth yesterday. 
ix^ 00..1 .^^ „. nothing of political 



He said there was 



Don^t Be l^isied 
By IKlsrepre- 



sentations and 
Fake Sales ! 

The original MANUFAC- 
TURER'S OUT-LET SALE 

will open its doors to the pub- 
lic on or about Sept. 24th, at 
15 East Superior street, (oppo- 
site Bijou theater). A certain 
clothing store knowing that 
we are about to announce a 
Manufacturer's Out-Let Sale 
on Sept. 24th, and seeing our 
posters throughout the city an- 
nouncing this great sale, are 
trying to take advantage of our 
advertisements by announcing 
a Manufacturer's Out-Let Sale. 
This is the method they pursue 
to deceive the public, and try 
to unload old .shop-worn 
merchandise and bought-over 
stocks. If you are looking for 
real bargains in Ladies', Men's, 
Young Men's, Boys' and Chil- 
dren's wearing apparel — wait 
for our opening. You will not 
be disappointed — no old mer- 
chandise, but all new, up-to- 
date goods. 

Watch daily papers for fur- 
ther announcements. 



MANUFAOTO 
OOTLET 



M. COOK, Proprietor. 

15 East Superior Street — Oppo- 
site Bijou Theater. 




Xon-lD»>iirgeutH 

I'ay 
VlNlta tu Uuluth 



Democrats .\re 

on 
the Side-Llnes 



significance attach- 
ed to his visit, but 
they always say 
that. He came up 
Wednesday night 
and returned last night. The suspicion 
grows that there are a number of "the 
old guard" scouting around In this 
neck of the woods, seeing what tiiey 
may .see. T. J. McCleary, formerly con- 
gressman from the Second district has 
been here for several days, explaining 
that his visit has no political signi- 
ficance which sounds reasonable enough 
"The best progressive Is the stand- 
patter. 

..^^^}^ J^ *^® expressed sentiment of 
Mr. McCleary. He spoke as an avowed 
(or convicted?) standpatter. Further- 
more, he said: 

"The so-called 'standpatter' is the 
be.n -progressive.' The standpatter Is 
not opposed to change when It Is clear- 
ly for the public good; but he under- 
stands that human progress is funda- 
mentally base on stability of law. The 
trouble with the so-called 'progressive' 
is that he assumes that motion is nec- 
e.'ssarlly forward. He seems to forget 
that It may be backward." 

Questioned as to how he viewed the 
Maine election results, Mr. McCleary 
said very frankly that they are an In- 
dication of a "trend of sentiment 
against us." He said several other 
things, not for publication, that were 
exceptionally enlightening — especially 
bearing in mind the remark he made 
at the outset that he is "out of politics." 

* * * 
Democratic candidates for county and 

legislative office are on the side-lines, 
closely watching the Republican scram- 
ble for nominations 
and finding In It 
much to encourage 
them. The fight 
between John R. 
Melning and William J. Bates for the 
nomination for sheriff is looked upon 
v.lih quiet satisfaction, and Charles 
Jesmore of Eveleth. the Democratic 
candidate for that office, who Is in the 
city, la now more confident than ever 
that he will be elected in November. 
Mr. Jesmore. in common with the other 
Democratic candidates, is doing prac- 
tically nothing at this time. After the 
primaries he will begin an energetic 
campaign that will not end until the 
polls are closed. 

T. J. McKeon, Democratic candidate 
for judge of probate, is out of the city 
for a couple of weeks, resting in prep- 
aration for the battle he will give the 
Republican nominee, and E. A. Lind- 
gren, candidate for county treasurer, 
with Walter F. Dacey, candidate for 
county attorney, are on the ground, 
finietly laying plans for the work that 
will begin as soon aa tlie primaries are 
over. 

As wag demonstrated at last even- 
ing's conference of ward leaders, the 
Democrats are going Into the fight In 
dead earnest. 

• • ♦ 

The Second Ward Republican club, 
which gives the West l>uluth Repub- 
lican club a hard run for first place 
as a live political organization, held its 
last meeting before 
the primaries last 
evening In Polish 
hall, and heard 
Bpeechea by S, W. 
Gilpin, candidate for Judge of probate; 
John H. Norton, candidate for re-eleo- 
tlon aa county attorney; Qeorgo J. Mal- 
?ory, president of the West Duluth 
club; Ray M. HugheB, Beeretary to 0<3n- 
groasraan Miller; Harvoy B, Clapp 8, S. 
Dahl a Virginia attorney. B,nd others. 

Republican doctrine waa expounded 
with a hearty good will by all the 
speakera, Mr, Clapp maklnff a upeolal 
plea for Senator Laybouin as a can- 
didate for re-eleotlon to the senatew 



Mr. Gilpin made an especially pleasing 
impression, and told his audience that 
If It was conceded his part in the de- 
velopment of St. Louis county as county 
superintendent of schools had been 
creditable, he would be pleased to re- 
ceive their votes for judge of probate 
aa a mark of their appreciation. 

Mr. Norton's talk was along general 
lines, with special emphasis on the de- 
mand of the voters that men who serve 
the public must be honest, fearless and 
unhampered in the discharge of their 
duties. 

Mr. Mallory discussed the Roosevelt 
phase of the national situation, saying 
It was his opinion that in the end the 
colonel will be one of the chief boosters 
of the Taft administration. 
* « * 

There will be a meeting tonight of 
the McKnlght Young Men's club in Mc- 
Knigl't headquarters. Manhattan build- 
ing, first floor. This club was organized 
several weelcs ago and is actively push- 
ing the insurgent Republican's candi- 
dacy. 

« * « 

Tomorrow night the West End Re- 
publican club will held a meeting in 
Sloan hall. Twentieth avenue west and 
Superior street. J. P. Boyle of Eve- 
leth, candidate for the senate in the 
Forty-ninth district, will be the chief 
speaker. L. A. Sulcove will be on the 
program also. 

« • « 

.Saturday night the West Duluth Re- 
publican club will hold its last meet- 
ing before the primaries. A good list 
of speakers Is being prepared and an 
Interesting pe^^slon l.'s fxportpd. 




Bs^lf Arrivals 

In new Cut Glass representing the 
best products of at least a dozen 
of Amerk^a's foremost makers. 
HeautJ*iil >f|W china — French, Ger- 
man, 4ngiih And Japan. 

C?>nie in and look over lines 
■e're sure you'll adniiro tlieiii. 



MARINE 




COAL DOCKS 
AREFILLED 

Movement to the West Not 

as Heavy as It 

Should Be. 



Lake Trade WiU Show De- 
crease During Remainder 
of Fall. 



A trip around the Duluth-Superlor 
harbor revals the congestion at the 
present time of the coal docks. Prac- 
tically all of the docks at the Head of 
the Lakes are well filled at the pres- 
ent time, and until the railroads carry 
away to the West some of the heavy 
supply, the coal carrying trade from 
the lower lakes Is bound to take a 
slump. 

Through the engineers at the Head 

of the Lakes do not for some reason 
keep a running account of the amount 
of coal at the Duluth and Superior 
docks, securing these figures only aft- 
er the close of navigation, and It la 
almost impossible to secure accurate 
figures upon the amount of coal on 
the docks at the present time, an In- 
quiry among the different agents of 
Duluth brings out the fact that every 
dock upon this side of the bay is al- 
most to Ita capacity. 

Coal is moving by rail fairly well, 
but not fast enough, say the coal 
dealers. 



STEAMER POMIAC 

RELEASED FROM SHOAL. 



Ri^ptibllcana 

Uuld 

Good Meeting;. 



Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., Sept. 15. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — The lighter 
Reliance returned last night from 
Gaffney's reef, where she lightered 
the coal cargo" of the Pontlac and re- 
leased the steamer. 

The Pontiac will go down the lakes 
to drydock. Marine men complain 
generally of the shoal, declaring the 
government should remove It. The 
department has done nothing. It Is 
said the buoy marking the shoal is 
In the wrong place, this alone leading 
many vessels to strike while round- 
ing the southern point. 
• • « 

Edward Bcothers have been awarded 
the sub-contract for dredging the up- 
per approach to the third lock by the 
successful bidders, McArthur Bros, 
This is expected to begin next week. 
« * * 

The steamer Robert Holland lost a 
wheel In Hay lake this morning. She 
was picked up by a tug and returned 
to the Soo for lopair.s. 




Silk Headquarters at the Head of the Lakau 
Superior Street— Lake Avenue— Michigan Street. Duluth, Minn. 

Bargains 



Many New Arrivals 

In beautiful rich Art Electric and 
Gas Lamps, New Brass Ware, New; 
Dinner Ware and Art Bric-a-brac; 
also Nickle and Copper Ware, 
Coffee Percolators, Chaf£«— 
Dishes, etc. 



From Our Popular 
Basement Salesroom 



$2 Wash Boilers, $1.39 




Special lot, heavy tin 
Wash Boilers; strongly- 
made; our regular $2.(X) 
leader, special for Friday 
at, each $1.39. 

Only a limited quan- 
tity, so if you want 
to get one at this 
price be here early. 






PERFECT 

SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 

To us« • Savory Koastcr 
meant 10 have better 
ta»tin£ ra?afa. more ten- 
der, more juicy %tA wicit 
leii (rouble Co toast. 
For The Savory bMtca 
atxi browDS the meat or 
fowl automatically And 
It docs all this with the 
cheaper cuii of meats, thus tavin| jrou money oo 
every pureliaK Buy oa« te4iy 



Regular $1.25 Value QQ^ 
Special Friday UO%^ 



$1.50 Tea Kettles, $1.10 



iA.V51^ 



Fifty Nickle Plated Tea 
Kettles; 14-ounce copper; 
n ccly nickle plated and an 
excellent $1.50 value, special 
for Friday, while a lot of 50 
lasts, at, each $1.10. 

It's not very often that 
we are able to offer 
such a good value, so 
take advantage of the 
opportunity. 




Glass Crystal 
Wash Boards 

Regular 50c values; 
special Friday — 

29c 




$3.75 Clothes 
Wringers at 

A very good 
quality, and at 
this s p e c i a 
price of $2.88, 
it's an excel- 
lent bargain. 



$2.88 





$1.48 Clothes Baskets 88c $1.25 Ironing Boards 




Extra 

large 
size Willow 
Baske t s — 
$1.48 V a 1 - 
ues, at 88^. 




Patent 
Mop Pail 

Like cut, reg- 
ular $1.75 val- 



Clark's Iron- ^e ; special— 



89c 




Genuine 
Wilson Toasters 

Like cut, selling reg- 
ularly at 25c; special, 
at — 




Just Right Carpet Whips 

"Like cut" — the best Carpet Whip made- 
special Friday, at each — 






strongly made 



ing Tables, 
"like cut"— 
and stands firm. 



$1.25 




Clearance of Go-Carts 

*vWeUiave about a dozen Go-Carts that j 
we've priced for quick clear- 
ance Friday — 




$1.75 Go-Carts. 

$6.00 Go-Carts. 

$8.00 Go-Carts. 

$15.00 Go-Carts. 



. 98<^ 
.$2.88 
.^3.88 
.^7.88 




nishes, 
etc.. at 



This is the 
time for fall 
house cleaning 
and fixing up 
for winter. We 
have a full stock 
3f JAP A L A C 
Paints, V a r - 

Brushes, Enamels, 

lowest prices. 



Frcimuth's Special 
Toilet Paper 

Selling regularly at 5c per 
roll ; special Friday, 8 rolls 
for— 



2Sc 




Enamel 

Berlin 

Kettles 




85c Kettles at 


59f^ 


98c Kettles at 


69^ 


$1.10 Kettles at.....^ 


79f^ 


$1.48 Bath Tubs 


74f^ 



One Table Lot Enamel Ware 

Regular values up to 
75c — Special for to- 
morrow only 

Sale of Enamel Kettles 

75c Kettles 48c I $1.48 Kettles 74c 

85c Kettles 59c | $1.98 Kettles 98c 



25c 




Sauce Pans 

50c Sauce Pans 29<^ 

60c Sauce Pans 39^ 

75c Sauce Pans 43^ 

85c Sauce Pans 59^ 



) 



1 *.^-^. 



i 



Sault Passages. 



Sault Ste. Mariu, Mich., Sept. IB. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — Up Wednes- 
day: Saturn, 1:30 p. m.; Bope, 2:30; 
Xeepwah, 4; Byers, 5:30; Town.seiid. 
Cowle, 6; -vngeline. 7; (large) Samuel 
Mathur, 7:30; Germain, 8; Nettleton, 
Germana, Schiller, 'j; Linden, Kedding- 
ton, Moreland, 10; T. Barium, 10:30; 
Juniato, Malietoa, Pellat, Matthews, 
11:30. Down Wednesday: Norwalk, 
Osier, noon: Shenango, 12:30 p. m.; 
Dundee, 1:80; Superior City. 2:30; Will- 
iam Brown, 4; Choctaw, Wexford, 4:30; 
lOdenborn, Plummer, 5; Dunn, 6:30; 
Moll, 7; Adriatic, »:i0 p. m.; A. Stone, 
10; Kirby, Hartnell, 11; Pere Marquette, 
11:30; Cornelius, midnight. Up Thurs- 
day: Scottish Hero, J. J. Mc"\Villiams, 
1 a. m.; Fulton, Maritana, Holley, 2; J. 
A. Donaldson, 2:30; Portland, 3; Corola, 
Martha, 4; Plankington, 7:30; Queen 
City, 8:30; J. E. Upson, Turrett Court, 
9; Stephenson, manila, 10; Perkins, Port 
Oolborn, 10:30; H. W. Smith, 11; C. F. 
Price, 11:30. Down Thursday: Wilpen, 
1 a. m.; Murphy, Seguin, 3: Bunsen, 
Roebling. North Lake 4; Morgan, Jr., 
5; Garretson, Watt, Fritz, Crescent City, 
Krlosson, b: Tlonesta, 6::W; Laughlin, 
6:30; Maria, Mala, 9:30; Buffington, 10; 
DuUalo, Huronic. Coralia, 11. 

Detroit Passages. 

Detroit, Mich., Sept. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Up Wednesday: W. W. 
Brown, 11:40 a. m.; Havey, Wall, Keith, 
noon; Hopkins, C. G. King, 12:40 p. m. ; 
M. C. Smith, 12:50; Duluth, 1; Princess, 
1:05; Wade, 1:10: Fayette Brown, 1:12; 
Princeton. 2; Amazonas, 2:10; Mataafa, 
2:40; Millnokett, 4:45; Sicken, Melvina, 
5; J. P Reiss, 6:15; H. H. Brown, Bos- 
ton, 7; Linn, 8: Living.stone (big), Ge- 
noa. 10:15; R. Emily, 10:30; Wickwire, 
11:30; Sheadle, 11:40. Down Wednes- 
dav: Turret Cape, 11:40 a. m.; Marshall, 
12:"30 p. m.; Kongo, 1; Sierra, 2; W. C. 
Rhodes, Alpena, 2:30; Columbia, 2:50; 
Denmark, 2:55: Maunaloa, Carnegie, 
3:45; Rochester, 4:30: Ohl, 4:45; Codo- 
rus, McGean, 2; P. H. Miller, 5:25; B. 
F Jones. 5:40; Starrucca, 5:50; Wells, 
6:05; Beatty, La Belle. 6:?0; Northern 
Star, 7:05; Pope, 7:30; Bessemer, Cor-* 
liB.s, 7:46; M. Taylor, 8:15; Olcott, 8:30; 
Ogdensburg, 9 15; North Star Clad, 
9:46; Viking, 11:40. Up Thursday; 
Starke, 12:30 a. ra.; Joseph Rhodes, 
12:50; Presoue Isle, 1:40; Verna, 2:20; 
Wolvln, 2:50; Hill, Binghamton, 4:20; 
A. 1). Davidson, 4:30; Ball, 6; North Sea, 
6:10; Dftvook, 5:20; Woodruff, 6:20; 
Morrow, 7:20; Hebard. 8; Waldo, 8:35; 
Leafleld, 9:30; Kendall, barge, 9:40; 
Qrlffltn, 9:B0; Soiiora, Canlsteo, 10; 
Steinbrenner, 10;60; Saxona, 11:20; Pere 
Marquette, No, IB, 11:50. Down Thurs- 
day: Emma Thomson. 3 a. m.; Hough- 
ton, Carrington, 2:50; Alaska City of 
Rome, 5; Port Maprna, 8; Marlska. West- 
mount, 9; M. Elphioke, 11:10; Nellson, 
1:37 noon, 

-J » ■• 

Port of Duluth. 

Arrivals: Constitution, Normanla, 
Frlck. Frank Peavey, Vance, (Jayley, 
8, F, Morse, Adanah. ooal' Victory, 
Krupp, Mariaia, McDoutfall, Empiro 



City; J. T. Hutchinson, grain; Mary 
W. Bourke Wyoming, liglit for lum- 
ber; Glenellah, package freight. 

Departed: James Wood, England, 
L. B. Miller, Empire City, Bell, Mc- 
Dougall, A. C. Dinkey. Zimmerman, 
Ward Ames Castalia, H. Coulby. W. 
H Mack, Ream, H. W. Oliver, Shaw, 
Morrell Falrbalrn, Bixby, ore; F. W. 
Mitchell, Clarke, light; North King. 
Lakeland, Troy, package freight; Ad- 
miral, gralit: 

• t ' m 

Safe .nedlci^e fur Children. 

Foley's Honey and Tar is a safe and 
effective niedlft^ for children, as it 
does not c^filalH opiates or harmful 
drugs. Get bht>- the genuine Foley's 
Honey and Tar ic the yellow package. 
Sold by allv drxjj^ists. 



as: 



Gommercial, Stenographic, 
English & Petimanship Courses 

Taught at ttie Duluth Business Univer- 
sity In dayl and night school. Now is 
the time to taie^n. Location, 118-120 
Fourth avenue west. 



planter, were burned. Bands of masked 
men 'eppeared simultaneously at both 
places after midnight and were seen 
settlne- fire to the barns. 

During the Night Rider troubles in 
Bracken county last summer. Air. 
Kenny permitted the state militia to 
encamp on his farm, and since that 
time- he lias frequently been threatened 
with violence. 



EXPERT TO STUDY 
COINAGE SYSTEM 



CHANCE OPEN TO 
FRANK KELLOGG 

Minnesotan May Be Named 

to Succeed Lloyd 

Bowers. 

Beverly, Mass., Sept. 15. — The sudden 
death last week of Solicitor General 
Lloyd W. Bowers has made an import- 
ant vacancy for Mr. Taft to fill. Several 
names have been presented to the pres- 
ident for his consideration. Among 
the most prominently mentioned is 
Frank B. Kellogg of St. Paul. Mr. 
Kellogg was employed as special at- 
torney in the prosecution of the Stand- 
ard Oil case, and it la understood is 
perfectly fariillgir with the work of 
the solicitor ^rneral's offica. 



NIGHT RIDERS AT 
WORK AGAIN 



Brookvlllej . KY^. Sept. 15.— Night 
Riders burnfed t'W'o barns In Bracken 
county last night, and although the 
losses were small, both equity aiid antl- 

equlty men suffered, the barns of W. O, 
Bradford, an Eqiiity society solicitor, 
and George B. Kenny, a non-equity 



Reorganization of Work and 

Administration in Treasury 

Work Planned. 

Washington, Sept. 15. — Charles Min- 
delhaff. a New York expert metallur- 
gist, lias been engaged by the treasury 
department to make a study of the 
methods of refining and coining gold In | 
the United States mints. He was en- 
gaged today bj' Acting Secretary A. 
Piat: Andrews and will begin work at 
once. 

Supt. Kingsford of the New York 
assay office liad a conference with 
treasury officials today about the pro- 
poses reorganization In his office. The i 
administrations there and in the sub- 
trea.'iury at Pliiladelphla will be reor- 
ganized to the new standard estab- 
lished at the trea.siiry in "'.Vr!.<;hington. 

GERMAN ACTION 
CAUSES CONCERN 



Washington Discerns Serious 

Blow to American 

Manufacturers. 

Washington, Sept. 15. — Efforts of 
Gernan manufacturers to secure the 
abrogation or material amendment of 

the existing patents convention be- 
tween the United States and Germany is 
viewed witli some concern at tiie state 
department. It Is surmised that the 
German manufacturers are desirous of 
having the convention amended on the 
llne^ of the existing British patent 
treaty, so as to require Americans tak- 
■ing out German paients to manufac- 
ture the patented articles in CJermany. 
This would be a very serious blow to 
American manufactures, and It can be 
safely predicted that any attempt in 
that direction would be strongly re- 
sisted by the iftate department. 



Ajuer^s Sarsaparilla 

Cleanses 




SILK UEADQUARTERS OF THE HEAD OF THE LAKES. 
Lake Avenuo, Michigan and Superior Streets, Dalutb, Minn. 



150 Long: Kimonas 





Reg. $1.50 Value 
Special Friday... 



These smart Kimonos are made of fine 
fleeced cashmerette, in bea'utiful Persian and 
flowered patterns, loose kimono style, nicely 
finished and well made. 

100 Long Kimonas 

Reg. $2.50 Values 
Special Friday at 

Made of fine Velour Flannelette, in pretty 
Persian, Oriental and flowered designs, rich 
colorings, browns, blues, tans, pink, blue, etc. 

New Empire and loose Kimono style, 
regular $2.50 value; special at ^1.98. 




25 Dozen Black 

Sateen Petticoats 





Reg. $2.00 Values, 
Special for Friday 
at only.. 



The best Petticoat bargain we've had for a long 
time, made of fine quality soft satin, highly mer- 
cerized satin finish, made very full with deep 
flare ruffle. 

Excellent $2.00 value — special for Fri- 
day — at each $1.25 




I 

tf 



DEFECTIVE PAGE ^ 



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1 



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i-a-gr 



Thursday, 




THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 15, 1910. 



WEST END 






OF HJSBRIDE 

Husband Returning From 

Work Discovers Wife 

Dead on Couch. 



Post Mortem Will Be Held 

to Determine Cause 

of Death. 



ordered removed to the undertaking 
ostablishment of Olson & Crawford. 
2010 West Superior street, where this 
afternoon, a post mortem examination 
,vill be held under the direction of 
Dr. McCuen. 

The dead woman was formerly 
Kathryn Maddox, daughter of Mr. an'l 
Mrs. W. C. Maddox of 1528 Elniira 
avenue, Billings Park, Superior. She 
was married to Beaumont on Aug. 23, 
at Superior, and elnce that time they 
had made their home at 2122 West 
Fourth street, upstairs. 

John A. Marshall, night foreman 
at the Northern Pacific roundhouse, 
whose family occupies the lower 
apartments at 2122 West Fourth 
street, says tliat none of his family 
saw or heard anything that would in- 
dicate that the woman had taken her 
own life or had been the victim of 
foul play. 

PASTOR RETURNED 
TO LOCAL CHARGE 



Mrs. Kathryn Beaumont, 19 years 
old. and a bride of three weeks, was 
found dead at her home this morning 
under rather unusual circumstances 
by her husband, Albert Beaumont, re- 
turning from work. The Beaumonts 
live at 2122 West Fourth street. 

There are no evidences of a violent 
death, discovered by the authorities, 
and the suicide theory is also dis- 
credited. The woman was found on 
a couth by her husband, who thought 
that she was asleep. 

Beaumont is a fireman, employed 
by the Northern Pacific road and left 
his wife yesterday noon, apparently in 
good spirits. Earlier in the day. ac- 
cording to Beaumont, she had com- 
plained of a slight headache, but said 
that she would be all right. 

Whpn Beaumont returned from his i 
run this morning, he reached his ' 
home at 2:10, and when ho entered 
the flat, he noticed the form of his 
wife on the couch. Thinking that 
she was asleep, he did not wake her 
at first. Later he noticed the pallor 
of her cheeks and going over he 
touched her, only to find the body 
lifeless. 

Beaumont at once called for a 
physician. Dr. C. L. Haney respond- 
ing. Dr. Haney said that the young 
woman had evldentlly been dead sev- 
eral hours, but ventured no explana- 
Jtion for the death. Coroner McCuen 
was then notified. 

The body of the young bride was 

pbocbessiveTiiuws ^ 
that boost the 



Rev. Edward Erickson Again 
Assigned to Norwegian Dan- 
ish M. L Church. 



Word was received yesterday from 
Chicago to the effect that Rev. Ed- 
ward Erickson, for the past year pas- 
tor of the First Norwegian-Danish M. 
E. church, has been returned to the 
local church for another year by the 



ernoon at 2 o'clock from the under- 
taking establishment of Olson & 
Crawford, 2010 West Superior street. 
Interment will be at gcandla ceme- 
tery. 

WILL REMODEL 

OLD CHURCH 

Two Episcopal Congregations 

at West End Will 

Unite. 

All bids for the remodeling of tb« 
St. Peter Swedish Episcopal church. 
Twenty-eighth avenue west and First 
street, are expected to be in by the 
last of the week, so that the Joint 
board cf the St. Peter and St. Luke 
Episcopal churches may pass upon 
them. 

The church is to be enlarged and a 
new foundation Is to Le put under It. 
The remodeled edifice will house both 
congregations in the future, an agree- 
ment having been reached whereby 
the congregations will unite as soon 
as the accommodations are provided. 

The property of St. Luke's church, 
Nineteenth avenue west and First 
street, will be sold probably next 
week. Several bids on the properly 
have been received. It is expected 
that the remodeling of the other 
church will cost about ?3,000. 

OLGA CARLSON DIES. 




WEST END— 



Reliable 
Dealers 

wlio will 

^^"■"""""""""""^ fill >OUi* 

orders promptly with re- 
liable goods and first 
class w-orkmanstiip : 



CLOTHING. 



BUY YOUR CLOTHES AT AVBLL- 
berg's. the quality store. This Is the 
store where vou get something tor 
your money. Juet received a full line 
of clothing and men's furnishings. 
1027 West Superior street. 



aniiual conference of Norwegian-I^an- 
ish M. E. churches held in the Windy 
City. 

Rev. Mr. Erickson and family are 
now in Chicago attending tlie ses- 
sions which close this week. Mr. 
Erickson will return to the city in 
time to conduct services at the church 
Sunday morning. 

The Ladles' Aid society has arranged 
for a reception in honor cf Rev. and 
Mrs. Erickson upon tiielr return. 



Upstroni Fiinoral. 

The funeral of Ciiarles Upstrom, 38 
years old. the laborer, who was killed 
by a street car on Garfield avenue 
this week, will be held tomorrow aft- 





ELECTIUI blPPLlES. 

•You'll not be shocked at your electrical 
bill and supplies if bought at Peter- i 
son's Elec Co., 22iy W. Sup. St. 



Electricity 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



Protect your home in 
pay losses iTomptly. 
Western Ktuity Co., 



companies that 
We have them. 

ii»::2 w. Sup. St. 



GROCERS. 

VIRKN & SWANSO.M. FIXE GRt »CER- 
ies; prompt delivery. 2130 W. 3rd St. 



Davidson & Olson, dealers in staple and 
fancy groceries; full line fruits and 
vegetables. 1814 Pled. Av. Zen. 214S. 



HARDWARE. 



JOHNSON & PETERSON. BUILDERS' 
hardware ; full line carpenter tools. 

C F GUSTAFSON HAS THEM— FIN- 
fst variety ot guns to be found in city. 

Forsberg-Henry Co., dealers In build- 
ers' hardware and tools. Cor. 2ath 
Ave. W. and 3rd St. Zen. 144S-Y. 



Com 




With the proper medical rem- 
edies can cure you. Neither 
medicine alone or electricity 
alone ever cured a chronic 
disease. 

They must be used together 
to effect a complete cure. This 
we know. A life study of men's 
ills and 25 years of succes=ful 
practice in curing men's ills 
have SHOWN us beyond the 
shadow of a doubt that it is so. 



West End Young Woman Passes 
Away After Lingering IHness. 

Olga Matilda Carlson, 25 years old, 
daughter of Mr. and Mr.s. Frank Carl- 
son, died of tuVierculosls yesterday 
afternoon at the family residence, 3217 
West Third street. She had been HI 
for some time. 

She was a graduate of the public 
schools of the city and up to the time 
of her Illness worked as astenographer 
for the Wright-Clarkson Mercantile 
company. 

The funeral will be held Saturday 
afternoon at 1 o'clock frem the resi- 
dence and at 2 o'clock from the Swed- 
ish Mission church. Burial will be at 
i'orest Hill cemetery. 

West End Shortrails. 

Mrs. A. C. Davidson, milliner, form- 
erlv of 1S14 Piedmont avenue, is now 
located in her new place of business at 
2111 West Third street. She desires the 
ladies of Duluth and vicinity to call 
and In.^pect her splerdld assortment of 
fall and winter millinery before buy- 
ing elsewhere. 

Mrs. A. C. Farrer of 318 North Nine- 
teenth avenue west has returned from 
a visit to A.shland. Wis. 

Mrs. N. Ettingcr of E^ighteenth-and- 
a-half avenue west and daughter Pearl, 
have returned from a trip down the 
lakes. 

The Adams Athletic association will 
give its last dancing party of the sum- 
mer season series this evening at Lin- 
coln Park pavilion. 

Th.' funeral ci Ewald Johnson, 2i 
vears oM, who Oled of typhoid fever 
Tuesdav at St. Mary's hospital, was 
iield this afternoon from the Olson & 
Cr.iv.f.-.rd undertaking rooms to Oneota 
cemetery. 

Andrew Anderson, a West end car- 
pent.jr, who ^^ as arrested yesterday on 
a charge of nun suppoit preferred by 
his wife, pleaded not guilty and will 
have a trial Saturday morning. He was 
relc-ated on $."5 ball. 

See our display of heating stoves. 
Johnson & Peterson. 

L. A. Slmonson of 2102 We.-'t Su- 
perior street has gone to Two Harbors 
en business. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cummlngs of 2732 
We.st Second street have returned from 
an a itouiObile trip to the Twin Cities. 

Rev. <-'. A. Elmqulst, a prominent 
Swelish pnea^l er of Minneapolis will 
be tlie principal speaker this evening 
at a festival, which will be held at 
■r, Swedish Lutheran church, 
Twenty-third avenue west and Third 
.street^ under the auspices of the Men's 
club. A niuslcal program has also been 
arranged. 

Reduced prices on alf high-grade 
vteel ranges. Johnson & Peterson. 



Whj f 

From a small beginning the sale and 
use of Chamberlain's Cough Remedy 
has extended to all parts of the United 
States and to many foreign countries. 
Why? Because It has proved especially 
valuable for coughs and colds. For 
sale by all druggists. 



LINCH ROOM. 



THY MY LUNCH— JUST LIKE MOTH- 
er's. 2005 W. Sup. St. Open all night. 



MISIC. 

PIANOS, ORGANS. MUSICAL MER- 
chandlse; Victor, Edison grapho- 
phones. A. F. Lundholm, 1^28 W. Sup. 

S. Jentoft, musical Instruments and 
furnishings; repairing a specialty. 
2103 West Superior street. 




MEAT DEALER. 

FOR FRESH AND SALT MEATS CALL 
at Trousdal. 2103 West Third street. 
Both phones. 



A. BROMAN. FRESH AND SALTED 
meats; dellverits promptly. Zen. 1694; 
Mel. 1044-L. 1S32 West First street. 

BUY YOUR FRESH AND SALT MEATS 
at Larson .Jros., 28th Ave. \V. and 
Third St. Zen. 1462; uld, Melrose 382. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING. 



JAMES GORMAN— YOUR PLUMBER 
estimates furnished; jobbing work 
promptly attended to. The shop 
where prices are right. 1 Twenty- 
third avenue west. Zen. phone 607. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 



MAKE A SPECIALTY' OF FINE 
camera portraits, enlarging views. I 
also handle a full line of frames. O. 
E. Mollan, 2302 W. Sup. St.; Zenith 
phone 1529-D. 



ROOFING, CORNICE AND SKY- 
LIGHTS. 



ROOFING AND SHEET MET^L 
work, tin and coppersmiths. C. L. 
Burman. Zenith phone 424-A; old 3899 
Melrose. 2005 West Flr.st street. 



HICCOUGHS LAST 
SEVERAL DAYS 

Thomas Feigh in Serious 

Condition From Strange 

Malady. 

Thomas Felgh is at St. Mary's hos- 
pital, suffering from a recurrence of an 
aliment that some time ago threatened 
to result seriously. 

Mr. Felgh who lives at the St. Louis 
hotel, was seized with a persistent, 
racking fit of hiccoughing several days 
ago, and In spite of resort to every 
known means of halting the trouble, 
he continued to be shaken by the dis- 
tressing spasms. This morning he was 
rehaoved from the hotel to the hospital, 
where. It Is hoped, he will recover. 



RESTAURANTS. 

TRY ONE OF OUR SQUARE MEALS. 
Open all hours. Twentieth Avenue 
cafe. 



SHOES. 



IF YOU WANT QUALITY, BUY YOUR 
shoes at Jutln's, 2013 West. Sup. St. 



Electricity is used to restore 
the system to a condition 
where the medicines can do 
their part to the best advan- 
tage in removing the ROOT of 
the trouble. 

After the ailment is cured, 
electricity is again necessary 
in rebuilding the body and 
bringing it back to its orig- 
inal healthy state. 

We have been using elec- 
tricity in connection with med- 
icine for the past quarter of a 
century, and their combined 
use works wonders with ailing 
and broken-down men. 

We treat the sicknesses of 
men only. Understanding them 
as we do, we are in a position 
to cure completely any and all 
of men's diseases with the 
most flattering success. 

Come to our offices and talk 
your case over with us. We 
will give you our valuable ad- 
vice without charge. Careful at- 
tention is given out of town pa- 
tients who state their ailings on 
our free symptom blank. Ask 
for one. 

PROGRESSIVE 

MEDICAL 
ASSOCIATION, 

NO. 1 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. 
m. Sundays: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m. 




VALUABLES 

ARE THEY SAFE? 

Think again — for valuable 
papers, etc., are safe only 
when in a modern Safe De- 
posit Vault. Our Manganese 
Steel Fire, Buiglar and 
Bomb Proof Vault is the 
most modern production of 
human skill. 

You Can Rent a Box For 
$3.00 Per Year. 



American Exchange 
National Bank 




Read The 
HeraldWants 



Tf 



T 




All Duluth Is Sight Seeing at the 
Panton & White Formal Fall Opening 



Thrdngs of People Are Now Visiting the Glass Black Store Which 
^ Is Gala Attire, Bedecked With Autumnal Foliage and 
^^* Showing the Authentic Apparel Modes. 

JUDGING from the immense crowds that were in attend- 
ance yesterday and today, it would seem that all Du- 
luth was sight seeing at the Glass Block store. 

The formal showing of authentic Fall fashions, which 
began Wednesday has proven an exhibition of never- 
ceasing wonders. On every hand, style-versed women 
have congregated, and viewed in charmed amazeniient the 
wondrous showings of stylish Fall apparel. 



Great Interest Manifest in the 
Millinery Salon 



The Costume Parlors Show 
the Newest Apparel 



Perhaps the greatest interest 
is manifested in the very un- 
usual display of millinery. 
Here the favored models of 
Georgette, Mayer and others 
have full representation, either 
in counterpart, reality or in an 
Americanized model conceived 
and fashioned by our own de- 
signers. 

Passing through the Millin- 
ery Salon, the advertising man 




band of mink fur around 
crown, caught in front l)y a 
jungle cabachon. The facing 
of silver cloth, though odd, 
added a finished rich tone. 

Another model that elicited 
hundreds upon hundreds of 
comjilimentary remarks was a 
counterpart of a Camille-Be- 
choff picture hat by our own 
designer. This has a brim of 
hatter's plush, a gold lace 
crown, net faced and embel- 
lished with rich white aigrettes 
—a picture hat of remarkable 



The Millinery Salon 
shares honors with the cos- 
tume parlors. The constant 
stream of fashion — interested 
women eagerly noting the 
numberless innovations in 
stylish apparel were wont 
to extol great praise for the 
unprecedented showing. 



^^v 



r^^ 






overheard enthusiastic lauda- 
tions of a jaunty turban from 
Esther Mayer, designed from 
extra soft hatter's plush, and 
ornamented with beautiful 
paradise aigrettes, held in 
place by an Oriental band of 
sombre, but hariponious tint. 

Another model that evoked 
great praise was a King blue 
suede picture hat by Georgette 
— artistically draped with an 
immense blue and white shad- 
ed willow plume, and with a 






Here a suit from imported 
broadcloth — revealing the 
i\ beautiful lines which char- 
acterize the works of that 
ma.'^-ter creator Paquin — 
there a coat that Drecol 
himself w^ould be willing to 
claim as his own. 



The French costume room 
is the scene worthy of the 
greatest commendation. This 
is given over to the display 
of evening, ball and recep- 
tion gowns and populated 
with favored models show- 
ing the influence of Red- 
fern, Paquin and Mayer. 
One of pale chiffon with 
pink rose ornamentation oi 
unusual coloring, satin gir- 
dle outlining the high waist 
line, and gathered at the 
bottom to give the hobble 
effect. Other creations of 
Ottoman sil^ and delicate 
satins of gorgeous beauty 
eluding description. 




graceful and undulating lines. 
Shown in our west window it 
compelled attention and admi- 
ration, and is proclaimed by 
many the prettiest hat ever 
shown in Duluth. 

On and on throughout the 
salon one might roam, meeting 
innovations on every hand, 
while the "French Rooms" are 
populated with exquisite crea- 
tions that elude description. 



New Silks, Dress Goods and 
Modish Trimmings 



Fur Innovations 

That Are New 

to Duluth 

The unusual is again in evidence 
where furs are shown. Newest style 
developments in coats, jackets, 
scarfs, muffs and matched sets re- 
veal the artist's touch in designing 
and finishing, and the customary 
•'P. & W." quality as to materials, 
linings, etc. 

Other Depart- 
ments Ready, 
Too 

The women's and men's furnish- 
ings, footwear, children's wear, car- 
pets, upholstery, draperies and other 
departments are ready as never be- 
fore with the new. But detail men- 
tion of their*preparedness is imprac- 
tical at this time. 



Completeness of showing 
extends through these de- 
partments as well. 

In dress goorls, basket 
weaves, ratine cloths and 
other coarse and pile fab- 
rics have ample diowing in 
two and three-toned effects. 
Imported broadcloths, chevi- 
ots, serges and ether mate- 
rials in every new^ shade. 

The splendid showing of 
gorgeous silks is already 
conceded the most complete 
at the Head of the Lakes. 
Persians, plaid:?, ombre, 
fancy taffetas and soft mes- 



salines abound in all the 
wanted shades. Chiffons, 
marquisettes and other over- 
drapings — all that's new are 
here. 

A wealth of trimmings 
that's almost bewildering 
will give every woman va- 
riety and individuality in 
the embellishment of her 
gown or dress. Of course, 
metal trimming is the key- 
note of the style situation. 
It may be of gold, silver, 
copper, bronze or old silver 
and combine in an endless 
variety of usages. 



Unequalled Showing 
of Waists, Corsets, Etc. 



Opening Continues Tomorrow 

The formal showing continues throughout tomorrow (Friday) 
and we urge all who have not visited the special displays to do so 
then. Those who have already attended will find new things dis- 
played each day that are worthy of examination. 

Remember, none are urged to buy, but all are expected to 
view at their leisure and to their heart's content. 

^__^_^ ■* — -■ — ■ .I.. .1 ■ ■ .. --■ — — -" ■■ " ■■ — - 

The Tea Room Beckons You 

The home-like surroundings ev-er charm the visitor to the tea 
rooms. During opening days, from 3 to 5 p. m., we're serving a 
special light luncheon, consisting: of Club Sandwich and Cup of 
Tea at 25 cents per person. 

You'll be delighted with both fare and surroundmgs. 




•at. »• 



Every depart 
parel shares th 
tune of being cc 
having authenti 
display. Tailore( 
Waists are she 
the score. There 
ly plain tailore( 
ment for gen 
wear, and the 
embroidered di 



nent of ap- 
i good for- 
mplete, and 
: models on 
I and Fancy 
vvn here by 
's the strict- 
1 linen gar- 
tral utility 
elaborately 
raped crea- 




See Tuesday's H«rald for 
opening days' specials. Big 
saving chances they are. 




Sec Tuesday's Herald for 
opening days' specials. Big 
saving chances they are. 



tions, bringing into their 
makeup nets, chiffons, mar- 
quisettes, Persian and plaid 
silks and satins of exquisite 
softness. 

New model Corsets that 
mould figures to the "sil- 
houtee" or straight outline, 
agreed as correct this fall, 
are to be had from several 
of the best makers in the 
country. 



kMdiiMita 




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Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 15, 1910. 






NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST 



MAY EXTEND 
DRYLIMITS 

Selling of Liquor to Indians 
in North Dakota Caus- 
ing Trouble. 

State May Be Placed Under 
Federal "Dry" Re- 
strictions. 



Jail at Walker In default thereof, by 
Justice Frank Ives. 



Devils Lake. N. D., Sept. 15. — Mayor 
MoCK-ry of Devils Lake announces 
that h« I. as received iiuportant infor- 
mation from federal officials stating 
that If the sale of liquor to Indians 
Is not stopped In this section of the 
state at least, and possibly tiie whole 
state of North Dakota, will be placed 
In what is known as "dry territory," 
the same as ha^ recently been done 
with certain >• tlons of Minnesota, 
which includes iiie cities of Moorhead. 
Cass L,«ke. Fosston and other places. 

The cause of the threatened order 
Is due to the disregard of tiie laws 
relating to the sale or introduction of 
liquor to Infiian.s In this section of the 
etite — particularly in the Devils Lake 
re^jlon. For several months tiie de- 
partment officials have had many 
complaints of violations of the law. 
an i tl '? Indians on tlie reservation have 
made considerable trouble. It is well 
known ihat several death.s have oc- 
curred on the reservation dui'ing the 
past year which are due directly to 
Indians obtainlnij liquor. 

Miiyor ilcCiory has tried to put a 
stop to tho practice of selling liquor 
to Indians in Devils Lake, and he says 
that unle.ss a change is made every 
drug score will find their permits of 
no value, and every pigger In the 
country will have the government on 
his trail. 

Every treaty made with the Indians 
since 1*553 has a provision In it in 
which the government guarantees to 
protect the Indians from the liquor 
evil, and a strict interpretation of the 
treaty law would prohibit the sale of 
a drop of liquor for tny purpose within 
the territory embraced in the state 
of Xorth Dakota, all of which was 
formerly Indian territory and has been 
ceded to tht- trover:' trt-iit I'v treaty. 

INDIAN AGENTS ARE 
GUILH OF ASSAULT 



Sero and Davis Fined $100 
Each in Justice Ives' 



Court 



Cass I^ke. Minn., Sept. 14. — (Spe- 
claJ to The Herald.) — The case of the 
Stat© of Minnesota agaln.^t N. J. Sero 
and Jimes Davis, agents of the In- 
dian department which has been re- 
ceiving considerable attention the past 
week came up for trial yesterday 
afternoon before Justice Frank Ives. 
The court room was packed during 
the trial which la.sted over two hours 
during which time half a dozen wlt- 
nesseti were on the stand to testify 
nearly all of whom were from Bena! 
as follows: John Rice, barber; W. R. 
King. Great Northern operator; D. F. 
Carmlchael, constable; Thomas O'Brien 
and James Joyce. 

A. A. Oliver, the complainant, who 
caused the warrants to be Issued 
aijainst the agents as a result of an 
altercation at Bena, which occurred 
last Friday, was defended by Charles 
Argall. a local attorney, whhe Assist- 
ant United States District Attorney E 
S. Oakley handled the case for the de- 
fendants. The evidence Introduced at 
the trial showed that Oliver had been 
knocked down and struck by one of 
the Indian agents just after getting 
off the train at Bena near which 
place he was engaged in attending to 
his duties as state land appraiser 

After the evidence was all heard 
Judge Ives imposed a fine of $100 and 
costs and In default In payment of 
tine sixty days in tho county jail. The 
Indian agents are now in the lockup 
here and it is not known what steps 
Assistant District Attorney Oakley 
will take in their behalf. 



Davis Committed to Jail. 

Cass I^ake. Mln:i.. .Sept. 15. — fSpe- 
cial to The Herald.) — James Davis, the 
Indian agent, who pleaded guilty to 
using threatening language against 
Attorney Charles Argall last Saturday 
evening and required by the court to 
furnish a peace bond in the sum of 
>300 to keep the peace six months, has 
as yet been unable to furnish bail and 
was today committed to the county 



PROMINENT MEN 
WILL BE PRESENT 



Inauguration of President Mc- 

Vey of N. D. University 

on SepL 27-29. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Sept. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Practically the 
complete list of speakers that will 
appear on the program that will be 

carried out during the Inauguration of 
President Frank L. McVey of tho 
North Dakota university, has been 
obtained. It includes a number of 
very prominent nien, being as follows: 

Chairman James J. Hill, Great 
Northern railroad; Pre^dent Howard 
Elliott, Northern Pacific; President 
Edmund Jones, University of Illinois; 
President George MacLean, University 
of Iowa; President A. Ross Hill, Uni- 
versity of Missouri; Rev. H. G. Stub, 
Hamllne university; Rev. G. Kildahl, 
St. Olafs college, St. Paul; Judge H. 
C Young, Fargo; Attorney Vic Ward- 
rope, Leeds, N. D., Hon. J. G. Gunder- 
son, Aneta, N. D. ; Dr. Frank Allen, 
University of Manitoba, and Sir Will- 
iam H. Allchin, London, England. 

Preparations for the inauguration, 
Sept. 2 7 to 29, are going forward 
apace with every indication that there 
will be an exceptionally large attend- 
ance. 



BELTRAMI FAIR 
HAS FINE DISPLAY 



Exhibition Opens at Bemidji 

With Many Attractive 

Features. 

Bemidji, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Although Beltrami 
is the most northerly county in the 
state of Minnesota, there is on dis- 
play at the fair which opened here 
today, grapes, sugar cane, lemon 
plant, peanuts, corn fifteen feet in 
height, grasses, millet and clover of 
extraordinary length. There Is a 
complete display of all garden vege- 
tables and grains of every description. 

The feature of the fair, which con- 
tinues for three days, Is the address 
today of Judge C. W. Stanton of Be- 
midji. Congressman Halvor Steen- 
orson of Crookston and Judge M. A. 
Spooner of Bemidji will also speak. 

AUTOIsfs HURT. 



Car Skids While Running Forty 
Miles an Hour and Overturns. 

St. Cloud, Minn., Sept. 15. — Running 
at the rate of forty miles an hour on a 
country road, a large touring car over- 
turned, fifteen miles southwest of this 
city, Tuesday evening, and pinned the 
four occupants under the car, 

Paul Truszlnskl, the driver, had his 

leg broken in three places and was 
unconscious four hours. Louis Detter- 
mann. Theodore Stemper and Harry 
Barry were knocked unconscious and 
were severely bruised. The cause of 
the accident was deep sand, vihlch the 
car struck while at high speed and 
Fkidiled into the ditch. The car is a 
total wreck. 



N. D. STATE SCHOOLS. 



Will All Open for Their Fall Termg 
Next Monday. 

Valley City, N. D., Sept. 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Practically all state 
educational Institutions in North Da- 
kota will open for their fall term of 
work next Monday, and with the gen- 
eral conditions favorable It is believed 
that the attendance In practically every 
case will be larger. There may be ex- 
ceptions to this situation, but the 
present Indications are of the very 
brightest. 



FATAL AUTO ACCIDENT. 



Minneapolis Woman Killed, Four 
Persons Injured in Collision. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Sei)t. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Mrs. Trules Mad- 
sen was instantly killed, Trules Mad- 
sen, her husband, was painfully in- 
jured and three others slightly Injured 
when an automobile with six occupants 
collided with a street car at Univer- 
sity avenue and Oak streets last night. 



(Third Floor—Take Elevator) 

FuFs arid 
Millinery 



BOTH Furs and Millinery are ex- 
acting our special attention and 
occupying considerable space on 
our third floor devoted entirely to 
women's outerwear. 

Furs in Duluth are a necessity and 
the cost is of the greatest importance 
to most women. There is no question 
prices have advanced, but you vjill 
not think so ivhen you price our fur 
sets. $12.50 to $150.00. 

We are showing the new "LaCloche" 
or bell shaped hats, $1^.50 to $12.50, 






8 East Superior St 



YOUR 

CREDIT 

IS GOOD 



SHOES 

$2.50 to $3.50 




Mr. Madsen, who ■was driving- the ma- 
chine, did not see the street car. , 



LOVED HER EMPLOYER. 



Governess at Akeley Takes Carbolic 
Acid and Ends Her Life. 

Akeley, Minn., Sept. 15. — Dolllfc Tope, 
aged 22, a governess, committed suicide 
here last evening by drinking two 
ounces of carbolic acid. She died about 
thirt.v minutes later. She left a letter 
to lier employer, whose wife had been 
dead only three months, stating that 
sh»- was madly In love with him in spite 
of herself and, knowing that he did not 
care for her, determined to end her life. 
Her home was at Blnck Duck. 



NEED MORE SCHOOL ROOM. 

Another Room to Be Added to Ac- 
commodate Bemidji Children. 

Bemidji, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — There is no race suicide 
in Bemidji. In fact there are so many 
children here that It has been found 
necessary to add another room to the 
public schools In which to take care cf 
the little ones. 

The board of education at a meet- 
ing held last night, upon recommenda- 
tion of Superintendent of Schools W. P. 
Dyer, decided to divide the primary 
room, employ a new teacher and es- 
tablish a separate room at the Cen- 
tral building at once. 

The resignation of A. P. Ritchie, 
former superintendent, was presented 
and accepted. Mr. Ritchie expresj^od 
regreat at beine compelled to give i-p 
his labors in behalf of Bemldjl's edu- 
cational system, but said he Intended 
to leave the city to reside on his farm 
south of town. 



WOMAN JUMPS FROM 

BUGGY AND IS HURT. 



Hlllsboro. N. D.. Sept. 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Attempting to jump from 
her buggy when she met a runaway 
team of horses attached to a drag, Mrs. 
Nettle Johnson of Kelso, this county, 
was thrown against the railing of a 
bridge and seriously Injured. The 

horse that she was driving was badly 
cut up by being tripped up in the drag, 
and the buggy was also badly smashed. 

FATHER AND SON ARE 

STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 



Fessenden, N. D., Sept. 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — William Schaver and 
his son, John, were struck by lightning 
and both were quite seriously as a re- 
sult. The lad recei%'ed very bad burns 
over his entire back and is in a pre- 
carious condition at the present time. 
Mr. Schaver is also In bad shape from 
burns that he sustained. 



Bemidji To Have New Jail. 

Bemidji. Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Bemidji is to have a new 
modern jail to cost $2,000 and work on 
it will be started just as soon as the 
plans forwarded today to St. Paul are 
sanctioned by the state board of con- 
trol. 



OMbum'A ^iou Murrled. 

Hancock, Mich., Sept. 15. — George Os- 
born, son of Chase Osborn of Sauit Ste. 
Marie, Republican nominee for gov- 
ernor of Michigan, was married here 
last night to Miss Emma H. Dunstan, 
daugliter of Former Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor Dunstan. Chase Osborn was here 
to attend the wedding and yesterday 
afternoon adderssed the Houghton 
county Republican convention. 
. - 
Given .Meuoniluoe More Liind. 

Xenominee, Mich.. Sept. 15. — (Special 
to the Herald.) — ^John Henes a few 
years ago presented to the city of Me- 
nominee the John Henes park of fifty 
acres. This park Is one of the mo.st 
beautiful In Michigan. He has just 
presented anotiier tract 'of land for 
park purposes, adjoining the John 
Henes park. 

Killed CroHsiuK Trackii. 

Menominee, Mich., Sept. 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Sudrio Silvia was 
killed at Hermansvllle while crossing 
the tracks of the Chicago & North- 
western railroad. 



A Reliable .Medleiue — Not a Xarcotlc. 

Mrs. F. Marti, St. Joe, Mich., says 
Foley's Honey and Tar saved her little 
boy's life. She writes: "Our little boy 
contracted a severe bronchial trouble 
and as the doctor's medicine did not 
cure him, I gave him Foley's Honey 
and Tar, in which I have great faith. 
It cured the cough as well as the chok- 
ing and gagging spells, and he got well 
in a short time. Foley's Honey and 
Tar has many times saved us much 
trouble and we are never without it in 
the house." Sold by all druggists. 




St. Cloud— Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Clarke, 
for fifty years residents of St. Cloud, 
Tuesday celebrated their golden wed- 
ding anniversary. Mr. Clark came to 
St. Cloud in 1858. In 18S0 he was mar- 
ried to Miss Carle Fields in Massa- 
chusetts and brought his bride to the 
then pioneer town of St. Cloud. 

Red Wing — The oldest settlers in 
Maiden Rock say this year does not 
break the record for low water in Lake 
Pepin and the Mississippi. In 1855 Bonl 
Prlchard of Maiden Rock waded across 
Lake Pepin from Bay City. Wis., to 
Wacoula, Minn. In 1864 the Mississippi 
river was so low that Mrs. Manon, wife 
of Dr. Manon of Prescott, and Mrs. 
Barnes waded the river at Prescott. 

Winona — Matt Neises, a Lewiston 
farm laborer, is in the Winona county 
,1ail, charged with obtaining money 
under false pretenses. On Sept. 3 
Neises presented a check on the Se- 
i urlty State Bank of Lewiston for 
$48.75 to the First State Bank of Utlca. 
He said he had an account of $900 In 
the Security State bank, but this 
amount had dwindled to |5 when the 
First State bank tried to collect. 
Neises was arrested, «omplalnt being 
made by C. H. Neeb of Utlca. 

Winona — Tuesday was Governor's 
day at the St. Charles fair, and the 
chief attraction was the address given 
by Governor A. O. Eberhart. It was 
preceded by a flag drill given by fifty 
St. Charles girls. The governor spoke 
on agriculture. 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 



Mandan, N. D. — A double wedding oc- 
curred at St. Joseph's Catholic church 
in Mandan Monday morning, when 
r'harles Brucker and Mary Heins and 
John Kupper and Bertha Baren were 
united In marriage by Father Clemens. 

Dickinson, N. D. — Judge W. C. Craw- 
ford will hold a terra of court at Schaf- 
er on Sept. 27. There are a number of 
civil cases to be tried, among which 
is the tax collection case against J. E. 
Phalen. Mr. Phalen grazes his stock 
on the Berthold reservation, pays the 
government rental for the use of the 
land and does not believe that the 
claim of McKenzle county la a Just 
one. 

Hettinger, N. D. — The community 
was shocked to learn that Dr. F. E. 
Russel had breathed his last, his body 
having been found near the roadside 
just south of Grand River. The doctor 
had started Thursday morning for his 
home on the claim near Strool and his 
body was found that evening by some 
.strangers who were pas.slng by. 

Bismarck, N. D. — A deal was closed 
Wednesday afternoon whereby the Bis- 
marck diocese of the Catholic church 




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FR 




AIL THE LATEST TALK- 
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Come in and make your selection of the machine you would like i:o have sent to your home — select any 
of the newest, latest models you like best from our mamrooth stock. Remember you can have the ma- 
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I' NONE BUT THE NEWEST, LATEST 1910 MODELS! 

With improved motors, latest sound reproducers, etc. You can entertain yciur friends, you can spend hours hstening 
to the most delightful music — a talking machine offers the greatest variety of home entertainment ever conceived — the 
new models are marvels of perfection. You cannot afford to pass this great cifer — if you once had a talking machine in 
your home you will never want to be without one. 

SPECIAL OUTFITS TO SUIT EVERY TASTE 

From our mammoth stock you may select any of the special outfits we make up — we have them at almost any price 
you wish to pay — oak or maJiogany cased instruments fitted with the latest style sound box, full nickel tapering tone 
tube, speed regulator, latest improved motor and beautiful horn, making an instrument that should be in every home. 

Make it a point to come in and select the instrument you want as soon as possible and take advantage of this truly 
wondejf ul offer. 



comes into possession of what is known 
as the Roanoke hotel property, which 
will be converted into a residence for 
the new bishop, Wehrle. The building 
was originally built as a residence by 
Col. Thompson, who was the contractor 
for tho state capitol building. It Is 
full three stories and with a little re- 
modeling will make an ideal residence 
property again. 

Dickinson, N. D. — Charged with en- 
tering tlie claim shack of Carl Peter- 
son, near New England, A. W. .Smith 
was captured and lodged in the coun- 
ty jail here. .It is claimed that lie 
stole about ^7K worth of clothing from 
the shack. Smith, when arrested, was 
wearing a part of the stolen clothe.-?. 

Minot, N. D. — With open knives Ben 
Unus, a JapMiese, and Remus Par- 
purus, a Greek both employes of the 
City cafe indulged in an old-fashioned 
duel such as only seen nowadays on 
the moving pictures. The two men 
struggled back and forth with the 
blades flashing, the Jap receiving a 
cut over the left eye. According to 
their story the Jap claimed the Greek 
had stolen %% from him and started 
the fight. 

Bismarck, N. D. — The firm of Miller 
& Costello, who have been retained !jy 
the county of Stark, have started an 
action to recover from the c->urity 
tieasurer and his predecessor anu 
their bondsmen the amount of money 
cmbgzzled by ex-County Auditor 
Whfte, who is at present serving a 
term in tlie penitentiarv for the mis- 
appropriation of about $40,000 county 
money. The bondsmen are only held 
for $30,000 of the money. 

Bismarck, N. D. — Assistant Attor- 
ney General Zuger has returned fmm 
Rugby, where he went in an effort to 
get the state made a preferred credit- 
or in the case of the defunct Rugby 
bank, formerly operated by Andy 
Jones. The office is in receipt of a 
communication stating that the order 



A STEADY DRAIN 

Sick Kidneys Weaicen the Whole 

Body— Make You ill, Languid 

and Depressed. 

Sick kidneys weaken the body 
through the continual drainage of llfe- 
glvlng albumen from the blood Into 
the urine, and the substitution of pois- 
onous urio acid that goes broadcast 
through the system, sowing the seeds 
of disease. Loss of albumen causes 
weakness, languor, depression. Urio 
poisoning causes rheumatic pain, nerv- 
ousness, nausea, cricks in the back, 
gravel and kidney stones. The proper 
treatment is a kidney treatment, and 
the b^t remedy is Doan's Kidney 
Pills. Here is good proof in the 
following testimonial: 

E. 8. Moulton, Flrat avenue, Two 
Harbors, Minn., says; "I waa suffer- 
ing from a pain in the small of my 
back for a long time. I finally de- 
cided to try a good kidney remedy and 
procured a supply of Doan's Kidney 
Pills. I was niuch pleased with the 
results of their use and I am now free 
from pain and feel better In every 
way. I know that Doan's Kidney 
Pills are a valuable remedy and am 
pleased to recommend them." 

For sale by all dealers. Price 60c. 
Foster-Mllbum Co., Buffalo. N. Y., 
sole agents for the United States. 

Remember the nam&^ — Doan'a — and 
take no other. 



has been made by Judge Burr and tluit 
the state will get the full amount of 
the money deposited there. The 
amount is nearly $11,000. 

J.imestown, N. D. — Again the dog 
poi.soner that aroused Jamestown to 
such indignation a short time ago Is 
at his work. Several of the best hunt- 
ing dogs left in the town after the 
rec<jnt weeding fell victims. Good 
dogs belonging to Conductor Hatton 
and E. J. Rhodes got enough of the 
drug to cause their death, while 
others owned by Clyde Foster and 
EdAvard Haberstrow were saved only 
by immediate action being taken to 
counteract the poison. 

Grand Forks — Just seventy-two 
hours after a warrant was sworn out 
for his arrest, Bernard Vevang, a 
school teacher, entered a plea nf guilty 
to a charge of rape and was sen- 
tenced to serve five years in the state 
penitentiary. Harry Little, accused of 
burglary, also entered a plea of guilty 
yesterday, and was sentenced to serve 
one year in tlie state prison. 

Bismarck, N. D. — The board of rail- 
road commissioners will hold a stated 
meotlng at the courthouse in Grand 
Folks, Oct. 4, 5 and 6. Notices are 
being 'mailed out to papers in the vl- 
cinUy of Grand Forks calling atten- 
tion to the meeting and notlfjing all 
intorested parties of the time and 
place of the meeting. All parties hav- 
ing complaints to be presented at this 
meutlng of the board should mail 
them to the office of the commission 
at Bismarck. 



I F>ENINSULA BRIEFS 



P.ougluoii. — The Per:j Marquette No. 
0. which made Houghton Tuesday 
moi-ning. brought news of the suicide 
of Joseph Gravala, a young man who 
shipped on the boat from Houghton on 
fceptembei 6, Gravala, It is said, leaped 
from the deck of the Marquette at 3 
o'clock Sunday morning at a point 
about twenty miles southwest of Little 
Auk Sable. He was about 26 years old, 
and nothing is known of his family. 
His body was not recovered. 

Ironwood — As the result of a quarrel 

regarding a difference of 25 cents in 

the.r wages. Liberate Rainelll, is now 

lyii :g at ironwood hospital in a very 

critical condition. Rainelll received 25 

cents more tlian Manno and a dispute 

arose, Rainelll becoming angry and 

firing at Manna, who returned the fire. 

; Manna was wounded, but it Is not 

; kiiC'Vvn how seriously, as he managod 

j to get away and up to the present time 

I has not been found. 

I Escanaba — Joseph Miller, who four 
I months ago was released from prison 
at Marquette after serving a term for 
' robbery, was arraigned before Jud^e 
I Kmll Glaser at Escanaba last week, 
charged with assaulting a companion 
whom It is claimed he attempted to 
rob. and was sentenced to forty-fiva 
days in the county jail. It is claimed 
that Miller attempted to rob the man, 
but sufficient evidence could not be .se- 
cured to prove a charge of robbery -jtnd 
he was arraigned on a charge of as- 
sault and battery. 

Siult Ste. Marie — Lead American 
doTars and quarter dollars and Cana- 
dla:a half dollars are In circulation at 
the Soo. The coins are all good Imi- 
tations, some so good that they can 
hardly be detected. They are, how- 
ever, a little light as will be observed 
if weighed and If thrown upon the 
floor will not bounce so high or ring 
so long. 

A::enomlnee — A new automobile rec- 
ord for the trip between Escanaba and 
Menominee was made when Lawrence 
Pei'ln covered the distance in one hour 
and forty minutes. G. T. Stephenson 
recijntly made the distance in one hour 
and fifty-six minutes. In the entire 
dist.ance Pepin met but one team in 
the road, thus allowing him to run at 
top speed over nearly the entire course. 
Koughton — According to a dispatch 
sent out from Washington, the upper 
peninsula will not know the results of 
the recent federal census In the vari- 



ous cities of the district for .several 
months yet. The dlsjiatch says: '"Tl-.e 
census bureau has completed Michigan 
for the time being. Nothing more 
need be expected until after Jan. 1, 
when detailed figures vill be given out. 
Thus far towns of less than 25,000 have 
not been announced, ;ior will they be 
until after Jan. 1." 

Sault Ste. Marie — William Reed, who 
has been employed during the summer 
by Benjamin Surman, a Chippewa 
county farmer, was hauling a load of 
ha> the otlier night .vhen he met an 
automobile. The team shied, tossing 
the load from ttie wagon into the ditch 
and throwing Reed upon his back and 
injuring his spine to the extent that 
his legs have been paralyzed since the 
accident. The physicians .ire of ihe 
opinion he will recove:-. Reed is in the 
hospital at the Soo. 

Escanaba — Announcement is made of 
the marriage of Dr. .S. .S. Hackwell of 
Blaney and Miss Jean MacTaggart of 
Bad Axe. Mich. The ceremony was 
performed at Escanabi. Dr. Hackwell 
is In charge of the hospital at Blaney, 
and is one of the school examiners isf 
Schoolcraft county. The bride has 
taught in the Blaney school district the 
past few years and p ior to that time 
lield a similar ijositlou in Mackinac 
county. Dr. Hackwell is a graduate of 
the Northern normal at Marquette, 
which institution his bride also has 
attended. 

Iron Mountain — Ma:t Grlmford, an 
engineer on the Chicago & Northwest- 
ern road. Is preparing to commence 
suit against the city «>f Iron Mountain 
for injuries received In a fall caused 
by a defective sidewaliv at the Hardi.ig 
house corner. The accident occurred 
some two weeks ago. Qrimford's foot 
was caught and the le;; twisted in such 
a manner as to Injure the kneecap and 
he has been unable to work since. The 
papers are being prepared and will be 
served on the city a ithorlties within 
the next few days. It is alleged th.it 
Grlmford will be pernanently disabled. 




Cohordes against the Menominee & 
Marinette Light & Traction company 
for $1(1,000 damages will be heard in 
the October term of the circuit court. 
The plaintiff alleges that she sustained 
Injuries in a fall to the pavement, 
caused by the motorman starting his 
car too eoon 

Plalnfield — William Ragan hag been 
appointed chairman of the board in the 
town of Pine Grove to succeed George 
Ameigh, who has resigned to move to 
Idaho. Mr. Ragan formerly served sev- 
eral years as chairman 

Kenosha — The Wisconsin state tax 
commission report of the valuation of 
property of Kenosha county for this 
year shows an increase of over $3,OuO,- 
000. 

Marinette — Claus Johnson and Carl 
Larson were killed in the Dunn mine, 
near Florence, by a fall of ground In 
one of the sub-levels. 



Barron — Martin J. tiolman, a farmer 
living near Cameron, was run over by 
an Omaha train about a mile south of 
Cameron and instanvly killed. The 
body was horribly mangled. 

Vlroqua — After getting ready for 
thrashers at her home near this city 
and leaving her 2-week-old baby iu 
the care of other children, Mrs. Tobias 
Olson went to an upper room in her 
home and hung herself. She leaves a 
husband and six children. 

Hudson — Henry P. Svendsen, presi- 
dent of the Central Lumber company at 
Hudson and owner of large timber in- 
terests In the West, died of diphtheria 
at Spokane. Wash., Monday. He and 
his family left Hudscn last Thursday 
for Spokane after a month's visit in 
this city. 

Madison — The state of Wisconsin Is 
going to build another home for the 
feeble minded. Presildent Elmer A. 
Grimmer of the state board of con- 
trol announces that t'le board will re- 
ceive offers of a trac of land for the 
purpose. About 600 seres are desired, 
and a site In one of the eastern shore 
counties Is preferred. 

Fond du Lac — Father Charles Lucas, 
who has had charge of the mission at 
St. Joe, near Mount Calvary In this 
county, drowned In Wolf lake some 
time last week. Father Lucas disap- 
peared on Tuesday ot last week, but 
nothing was thought of his absence 
until his body was found. 

Manitowoc — Mrs. Annie Lill. 86 years 
old a resident of Manitowoc since 1849, 
Is dead. Mrs. Lill wa;? born In Austria 
and came directly from that country to 
Manitowoc when she was 25 years old. 
.She was In good healti. until five weeks 
ago. 

Eau Claire — WHllan Tedorm. a la- 
borer. 4 5 years old, wa-s instantly 
killed by a train on Monday in Fair- 
child. 

Marinette — The ca.a» of Mrs. Anna 



MOTHERS 
WHO HAVE 
DAUGHTERS 

Find Help in Lydia E. Pink- 
ham's Vegetable Compound 

Hudson, Ohio.— "If mothers realized 
the good your remedies would do deli- 
cate girls I belie ve there would be 
fewer weak and ail- 
ing women. Irreg- 
ular and painful 
periods and such 
troubles would be 
relieved at once in 
^. . many cases. Lydla 
::iii; E. Pinkham's Vege- 
table Compound is 
flue for ailing girls 
and run-down wo- 
men. Their delicate 
organs need a tonic 
l and the Compound 

fives new ambition and life from the 
rst dose."— Mrs. George Strickler, 
I Hudson, Ohio, R. No. 5, Box 32. 
j Hundreds of such letters from 
• mothers expressing their gratitude 
1 for what Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegeta- 
, ble Compound has accomplished for 
I them have been received by the Lydia 
I E. Piukham Medicine Company, Lynn, 
Mass. 

Youngr Girls, Heed This. 

Girls who are troubled with painful 
or irregular periods, backache, head- 
ache, dragging-down sensations, faint- 
ing spells or indigestion, should take 
immediate action to ward off the seri- 
ous consequences and be restored to 
health by Lydia E. Pinkham's Vege- 
table Compound. Thousands haye b^n 
restored to health by its use. 

If yu would like special advice 
about your case write a confiden- 
tial letter to Mrs, Pinkham, at 
I.ynii, Mass. Her advice is freeb 
and always helpfuU 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 



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Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 15, 



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AND WOMAN 



IVIONDAY, SERX. 19, IS YOUR 
DAY OF OF»F»ORTLJINfIXY 



a Lot In diambeps 



' A^ddition Belovir the 
Filth and Xentli Avenues 



RAYIVIEIMX RLAIV 



r^o IVotcs 

r^o Interest 

rslo Taxes Ur»tll 1913 

IMo F'ay'ments When Stele 



ESE LOTS NOW, DONT WAIT ! 

Before Saw Such Beautiful Locations Sold 
So Little IVIoney On So Easy Terms 

XHe lots wc otter are accessible; only £i tew minutes \valk trom the present car line and on the pro- 
posed car line to Kenwood; close to w^ater and gas; In a district already laslt hulldlng up. 

GET AWAY FROM THE RENT PROPOSITION! 



r~ 



Reason No 16 

Street Car Service up Seventh Avenue East is 
now assured. If this District has built up as it has 
with no Street Car nearer than Fourth Street, what 
will it do with adequate transportation? We say- 
to you again, it is Safe, Sound, Sane and Sure. Look 
the situation over yourself. If you do — you will be 
at the sale on the 19th. 

RICHARDSON, DAY & HARRISON 




JAY 



Re£ison No. IT 



1 





EXOHAIiGE BUBLOINQ 



Where else in the 
can you buy proi 
on Popular Payim 

Conveniences. Nei 
Homes built rlgh 
natural healthy g: 
east or Eighth a.^ 
over before the d 



City of Duluth or any other city, 
)erty right in the center of things 
Mit Plan? Accessible, Sightly, City 
ghbors, Street Car Service assu/ed. 
' up to it without pressure, just a 
■owth? Go up to Seventh avenue 
enue and look Chambers' Division 
IV of sale, 19th. 

RICHARDSON, DAY & HARRISON 



TRADE TREATY ILONG VlGiL BY 

WITH CANADA DAUGHTER'S BODY 



Reciprocity Negotiations Will Mrs. Ellen Bahl Waits Two 
Be Opened Next 
Month. 



Beverly, Mass., Sept. 15. — Negotia- 
tions for the arrangement of a reciproc- 
ity agreement between the United 
States and Canada w ill be opened ne.\t 
nioafa. The Briti.sh ambassador, Mr. 
Bryce, has assented lo the negotiations 
being carried on directly between Can- 
ada and the United States without the 
formality of beirig conducted through 
the British emba; sy. 

The details of the negrotlations have 
not been arranged as yet, but it is the 
hope of President Taft that before the 
end of October the representatives of 
both countries will be able to come to- 
gether. 

The Canadian premier. Sir Wilfred 
Laurler, has declared In favor of the 
proposed agreement and it Is felt here 
that the negotiations will be carried 
through ro a safe conclusion. 



Days for Help to 
Come. 



While her father, Louis Dahl. was 
cruising in the woods near Virginia, 
Minn.. Ellen Dahl died suddenly in the 
family cabin in township 57-9, Lake 
county and for forty-eight hours Mrs. 
Dahl kept watch by the side of her 
daughter's body until friends came. 

J. W. Howie, W. H. Penny and Dr. 
J. W. Sullivan while on a cruising trip 
back of Beaver bay stopped at the 
Dahl homestead last Friday afternoon. 
Both Mrs. Dahl and Ellen were In 
good health then. The men remained 
that night at a nearby cabin, owned 
by Peter I>ahl. When they came back 
to the cabin Monday night they found 
a note from Mrs. Dahl requesting 
their presence Immediately at her 
home. A cruiser had left the note and 
had hurried on to Two Harbors to 
notify the coroner of the sudden death 
of Kllen Dahl. 

Mrs. Dahl told the men that her 



daughter was taken suddenly HI Sun- 
day night and died. The woman was 
hysterical with grief. The father 
does not know of his daughter's 
death. 

The body was to have been conveyed 
eight miles through the woods to the 
Duluth & Northern Minnesota rail- 
road today. It will be brought to Du- 
luth for burial. 

The Dahl family lived In Superior 
and later in Duluth fur several years 
before removing to I^ake county. 

A 8pralne«l Aukle. 

As usually treated a sprained ankle 
win disable the Injured person for a 
month or more, but by applying Cham- 
berlaln's Liniment and observing the 
directions with each bottle faithfully, a 
cure may, in most cases, be effected In 
less than one week's time. This lini- 
ment is a most remarkable prepara- 
tion; try it for a sprain or a bruise, or 
when laid up with chronic or muscular 
rheumatism, and you are certain to be 
delighted with the prompt relief which 
it affords Fur sale by all druggists. 

BIG PAVING JOB 
HALF FINISHED 



onlv ask this small bail because the 
prisoner has admitted that he did 
wrong, and promises to afford the 
prosecution every aid in his power." 

Th(! money went into ppeculation. ac- 
cording to Rothbarth's own admission. 

"I was squeezed in the panic of 1907, ' 
he said, "and began to get loans from 
the banks. It was so easy that I kept 
on. " 

Three other banks are said to be 
involved, but their names have not yet 
come out. It is said that by juggling 
loans among them, Rothbarth was able 
to keep as much as 1300,000 In the air 
at once. He could not give the bail 
demanded and had to spend tho night 
in the T omhs. 

CALLS GOVERNORS 
TO RATE MEETING 

Governor Stubbs Invites Eber- 
hart and Others to 



merce commission completes their In- 
vestigation they will come to that con- 
clusion.'' 



JOHNSON MAY BE 
MAINE SENATOR 



Conference. 



<r* " * 



The Only Ideal Trip to 

New York 

Is only made possible by — 

The only Water Level Route — 

The only Railway Terminal in New York on sub- 
way, surface and elevated lines, and — 

The only 20th Century Limited 

the highest-standard, most famous train in the world. 

Lake Shore -New York Central 






Leaves Chicaco 2:30 p. m.; Arrives New York 9:30 a. m. 
Leaves New York 3:30 p. m.; Arrives Chicago 8:30 a. m. 

Adoption of A I IS t eel Equipment 



The Pullman Company has under construction five new 
complete steel trains to be operated on the 20th Century 
Limited between New York and Chicago. They will be 
inaugurated on this world-famous train within a very short 
time. As fast as the builders can turn them out other passen- 
ger trains on the New York Central Lines will also be 
equipped with steel cars. 



Ttc;cit« and SltaplBi Car accoraBodationi and fall lafotmation 
tainlshed od applicatioa to your local aetnt, or lo 

A. M. NYE, General Agent Passenger Department 
340 Robert Street, St Paul, Minn. 

WARREN J. LYNCH, Passenger Traffic Manager 

Chicago 



Sandstone Blocks Laid on 

West Side of Garfield 

Avenue. 

Contractor P. McDonnell yesterday 
completed laying the sandstone blocks 
on the west side of Garfield avenue 
ijnd started his large crew of men on 
the east side. Concrete has been laid 

on more than half of the east side. 
This Is now being allowed to set and 
tho laying of the blocks will be 
started as soon as It Is sufficiently 
hardened. The blocks are now being 
put down on the east side at the end 
abutting the approach to the inter- 
state bridge. All but a small section 
of the west side has been thrown open 
to traffic, and next week the great 
volume of traffic will be traveling 
over the entire length of Garfield ave- 
nue on one side. The work is being 
pushed rapidly, and despite the delays 
caused by the laying of water mains 
and steet conectlons when the contract 
was first let, the job will be completed 
almost within the time specified in the 
contract. 

BANK LOOTED OF 
OVER $100,000 

Mercantile National of New 

York Victimized By 

Speculator. 

New York, Sept. 15. — Adolph Roth- 
barth of the firm of Martin Roth- 
barth & Co., hop dealers, with offices 
in London, Frankfurt and St. Peters- 
burg, pleaded guilty yesterday to the 
larceny of $10,000 from the MercantMe 
National bank, and was held for trial 
In an equal amount of bail. He had 
been under surveillance forty-eight 
bours, and his arrest came after a long 
conference between the district at- 
torney's office and a coterie of bankers 
with whom he has had dealings. 

"Your honor," said the assistant dis- 
trict attorney in charge of the case, 
"although the specific sum named in 
this complaint is only $10,000, the ac- 
tual amount this bank alone has lost 
will coma to more than $100,000, but i 



Topeka, Kan., Sept. 15. — Governor "W. 
R. Stubbs has sent by telegraph a call 
to governors of twelve states and to 
mayors or boards of trades of twenty- 
six Kansas and two Missouri cities — 
Kansas City and St. Joseph — for a con- 
ference at Topeka on the proposed ad- 
vance of freight rates. The confer- 
ence is to be held on Sept. 22. 

The purpose of the conference is for 
discussing ways and means to fully 
proptect the rights and Interests of the 
producers, consumers and the general 
public. 

The governors invited to attend the 
conference are Herbert S. Hadley, Mis- 
souri; John F. Shafroth, Colorado; 
John Burke, North Dakota; Robert S. 
Vfessey, South Dakota; Bryant B. Brooks, 
Wyoming; "William Spry. Utah; Adolph 
Eberhart, Minnesota; Charles S. De- 
neen, Illinois; George W. Donaghey, 
Arkansas; Charles N. Haskell, Okla- 
homa; Thomas M. Campbell, Texas, ana 
B. F. Carroll, Iowa. 

Governor Stubbs, commenting on the 
call, said: 

"I do not believe that the railroads 
are entitled to any increase in their 
present freight or passenger rates, and 
I believe that when the interstate com- 



Watervilie Lawyer Wants to 

Succeed Eugene 

Hale. 

Portland, Me., Sept. 15. — Two Repub- 
lican and two Democratic representa- 
tives will constitute the next Maine 
delegation in the national house. Doubt 
as to the make-up of the delegation 
was cleared up today when belated 
returns from remote towns of the 
Fourth district showed the re-election 
of Fiank E. Guernsey, Republican of 
Dover, by a small plurality. Mr. Guern- 
sey's election was conceded last night 
by his Democratic opponent, George M. 
Hanson. The election of Asher C. 
Hindu, Republican, li the First district 
Is shewn on the face of unofficial re- 
turns, but there may be a re-count. In 

the SiHond and Third districts the Dem- 
ocratic candidates, D. J. McGillicuddy 
and tjamuel W. Gould, won decisively. 

Attorney Charles F. Johnson, a 
prom.nert Democrat of Watervilie, is to 
be a candidate for the United States 
senate at the coming session of the 
legislature. That body will be Demo- 
crati(; by a vote of 111 to 69 In Joint 
convtsntion, thereby assuring the elec- 
tion of a senator of that political faitii 
to succeed Senator Eui;cne Hale. 
■ ■ 

Your kidney irouuie may be of long 
standing, it may be either acute or 
chronic, but wiiatever It Is, Foley's 
Remcidy will aid you to get rid of it 
quickly and restore your natural 
health and vigor. 'One bottle of Foley's 
Kidney Remedy made me well," said J. 
Sibbiill of Grand View, Wis. Commence 
takirg it now. Sold by all druggists. 

FRIENDLY TO ROOSEVELT 



Furs! Furs! Furs! 

To those who are contemplating buying furs. It will pay you 
to call and see otir large and magnificent display of up-to-date 
popular-priced Furs of every description — our line of Hudson Seal, 
Near Seal, Pony Coats in 45 and 5 2 -inch lengths, oan't be beat In 
quality or price. Call and see for yourself. If we have nothing 
made up that pleanes you, choose your own designs and skins and 
■we will do the rest Our guarantee goes with eveo' garment, and 
a word regarding j our old furs — don't wait until the last moment 
to have them repaired or remodeled — do it now. Our shops are In 
the handa of expert fur workers — and working full force. Your 
work done satisfactory or no pay. 



THE RELLIBLE FLR HOUSE. 

ZENITH FUR COMPANY, 

D. A. COXE. 
211 WEST SVPERIOK STREET. 



NO "RATS" OR SWITCHES. 



Peruvian Women Have Wonderful 
Hair. 

Washington, D. C, Sept. — Grlscom 
Clarke, trade Investigator at Huraz, 
Peru, for U. S. Merchants, in an ad- 
dress yesterday before the National 
Hair Dressers' convention, said: "The 
Peruvian woman's beauty is largely 
measured by the luxurlousness of her 
hair, and It Is a common sight to see 
senoras with a wealth of hair long 
enough to trail on the ground. 
Switches and 'rats' are entirely un- 
known in that country, due to the 
fact that women treat the scalp with 
beta quinol, which Is a great scalp 
tonic, and promotes a thick growth of 
hair. 

"Beta quinol is used to some extent 
in this country and is found In near- 
ly every drug store, but it Is evident 
that American women know little 
about it or there would not be the 
increasing demand for switches. La 
dame Peruvian mixes one-half pint 
alcohol with an equal amount of warm 
water, then adds an ounce of beta 
quinol, and after a vigorous shake or 
two, this hnir tonic Is ready for use. 
I also found that baldness among 
native raaa is unkaown." 



(Continued from page 1.) 

western men of affairs: The situation 
in the country and the sentiment of 
the voters is such that they appre- 
hend a recurrence even of the days 
of 1496. They think that there is a 
very serious possibility of a man so 
much more radical than Mr. Roose- 
velt being nominated — more radical 
even than Mr. Bryan in his radlca.1 
days — and of their being a trend to- 
wards him of the radical Democrats, 
that they are now disposed to favor 
Roosevelt. 

The railroads, as nearly as I can 
dete:"mine, are more afraid of a com- 
bination between the radical element 
in Doth parties than they are of 
Roofsevelt. Their managers say very 
frankly that they cannot market a 
railroad bond, and that tliey are cut- 
ding down expenses. 

A Graphic Illnstratlon. 

I -rent out of the office of the Great 
Northern building with Mr. Hill, and 
he jiointed out to me some thirty or 
forty canvas bags and battered suit 
case*. Said he; "Do you know what 
that means?" Of course I did not 
knoM-. "Well," he said, "it means 
simply this: every one of those bags or 
cases means a man going away for 
whom we can no longer nnd employ- 
ment. We would like to And employ- 
ment for them, but all along our lines 
the condition is such that we have 
no need for new labor, and as a mat- 
ter of fact are hard pressed to find 
employment for our old employes." 

C)l' courie the short wheat crop In 

the Northwest ha« somethlnsc to do 

with this, but Mr. Hill. I believe, In 

presenting his graphic Illustration, had 

> la i:aiQd ui« polltlcaJ, unrest and what 



he fears may result from it. 

None of the heads of the great rail- 
roads running from here to the Pa- 
cific coast are friendly to the Roose- 
velt conservation movement, never- 
theless they now look on Roosevelt 
as a necessary evil. One of them 
paid to me that the convention here 
was packed in favor of the sort of con- 
servation in which the Northwest does 
not believe, and that he had at one 
time asked that the city of St. Paul, 
Instead of appropriating 118,000 for the 
expenses of the convention, should ap- 
propriate $10,000 to keep it away. 

The complaint, as far as I can dis- 
cover, is against the aciivitles of Glf- 
ford Pinchot. And wl He I did not 
come to the Northwest to write about 
Pinchot, there was so much politics 
in the convention that It is quite im- 
possible to ignore its political b.Ue. 
There is a growing feeling that Mr. 
Pinchot is not without political am- 
bitions, and that Mr. l^oosevelt, who 
might rightfully aspire to place in the 
office of the cnief executive in 1916, 
thinks it the part of poi itical prudence 
to permit Mr. Pinchot to enter upon 
the earlier battle. In maiking this sur- 
prising statement. I urn expressing 
onlv the opinion of men with whom I 
have talked. I do not personally think 
that the Republican party has profited 
very mucii by the corservation con- 
gress, nor am I entirely sure that Mr. 
Roosevelt himself has ito profited. 
May Wldea tl»e *i»?ach. 

It would seem to me that the effect 
of the congress and of the sharp line 
drawn by its managers between Mr. 
Roosevelt and Mr. Talt will have a 
tendency to widen the breach in the 



party. There was much bitterness of 
feeling manifested here, between cer- 
tain governors of the Northwest and 
the local committee. The charge nas 
been made that the whole list of speak, 
ers was selected by Mr. Pinchot, and 
that scant opportunities were given to 
those who held other views than those 
of Pinchot to speak. Governor Stubbs 
of Kansas had the Pinchot and the 
insurgent indorsement, and retired 
from St. Paul without any honors 
resting heavily upon his head. Governor 
Hay of W^ashlngton, a man apparently 
of a much higher type, hardly had an 
opportuntiy to be heard. 

It is perfectly safe to say that tn 
this section of the country there is 
some sympathy for Ballinger. There 
are people both big and little in th» 
Northwest who believe that Ballinger 
Ls a safer conservationist of the na- 
tional domain than Pinchot. There are 
many who think that the controversy 
might be summed up thus: Ballinger 
believes the Northwest needs people 
more than It needs pine trees and par- 
tridges, and he therefore goes no step 
beyond the law of conservation which 
may stop the course of settlement. 
Pinchot looks farther into the future. 
He believes that the Northwest needs 
the conservation of Its resources, 
rather than the Immediate Increase of 
the volume of immigration. Pinchot 
would stretch the law almost to tho 
limit of breaking It In order to carry 
out his Idea of conservation. Ballin- 
ger would squeeze the law, as on© 
might squeeze a sponge. In order to 
prevent his being compelled to go be- 
yond his own convictions In carrying 
out bis Ideas. 



K7A SPECIALIST 

HUNDREDS ARE COMINQ TO ST. PAUL TO BE CURED 

ASJU UUfSIBUt PXOIIJB SHOUIJ> CK> WHEBS THXT 
▲BB SURl OV OBTTIIVQ ▲ OCllB 

TbQ k«rt pine* In th« Kort 
eb*«s«ft ti fti th« Ore«t 
btthtol 



TbQ k«rt pine* In th« KortIiw«f« triur* toq out m« «ar*d the qoickMt m4 
'■ ' - ~ t H«ii>«!b«r» ■•dlcfcl (nttitnt*. 8».P» 

1 Mrr1c«, U8W, u . . 

MMOBJkU* otuirc**. ConMBiw. asUrMul ntM only • o«Bta » mil*. 



nttit^. B». Paul. Uonea^ 
rTlc«, U8W, ulTui:e<l tre»«iaeat, expert ikill^ rapid oorM Mtd 




WB WnX CURS rOU 8KCBBTI.T MSD OHEAPI.V 
A VISIT imX GOMTIKOE TOU 
7e«n 9t onarieBOe la trM.Mii a Kerreu. Blood and Chronic DlMMM (!▼•• u nanr MlTnatacM orer tni» 
OjioAon. Weeurcweak nXnrM. Catarrhal dtoeharsM, Pu Soreii. diaaaaad Blood, Ilnptur*, TarleoM 
T«tB« and VartooM VXoK, Cllnar, Bladder and Proitailc troablea, Pllaa, rtstula and Rvetat affwstloaa, 
KaeoixuMus). OMarrh, Eeseiam Berofola. and other itnbbom chronto maladlee. Orer iie,000men hare 
ftPpUedto nl tor treatment. Conaultatlon, Examination and Adrlee Free and ConfldentlaJ. U 70a out' 
«•< oall, write oi today deaortbtnf your oaei In your ovn word* and we wQl adrUe 70a rsEJB. 

HEIDELBERB MEDICAL INSTITUTE '^S^^S^f^"- 

Oi^UU, Inowrpoiated ander llie Itete lAW ot Mlnaeeote^i— ^i— — 



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Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 






September 15, 1910. 



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LATEST 




TINC 



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OF THE DAY 



COLTON TO 
COACH^TEAM 

Duluth Man Will Again Drill 

Central High School 

Squad. 

"Heine" Nolle, Former Gala- 
had Player, Is Early 
Season Find. 



Chauncey C. Colton has again con- 
sented to coach the Central high school 
football team, and was out with the 
squa'l for the tirst time yesterday aft- 
ernoon. 

The fact that a game has been sched- 
uled for Sept. 24 with Two Harbors has 
increased the spirit, and Coach Colton 
gave the boys a regular midseason 
•workout yesterday. 

Yesterday's practice gave the coach 
a line on most of the new material, 
with which Colton seems to be very 
well satisfied. In the backfield, Ryan 
has showed up very well. He Is fast 
and heavy and ia sliowlng up remark- 
ably well in punting, which is ills 
strong point. 

The other find in the backfleld Is 
Hlggirs. who captained the Manistee, 
Mich., high school team last year. Al- 
though light. Hlgglns is fast and 
phiftv, and ought to be well adapted 
to the new rules, which give a fast 
and light man the advantage over 
heavier opponents. 

The real early season find seems to 
be "Heine" Nolle, the heavy tackle 
who played with Galahad iat^t year. Ho 
Is fast and a hard worker, and should 
hold up one side of the line In great 
fashon. 

The lower classmen aren't showing 
the spirit of former years. The upper 
classmen seem to be the only one.«! out, 
there having been hanliy enough men 
for two teams the flrat three days of 
practice. 

Tliere has been some talk of a 
game with the Kodahpa club for Sat- 
urday, but it Is hardly likely that 
Coach C «lton will consent to such an 
early season game, for the men are In 
ver;' poor condition. If the game i^ 
pulletl off It will probably be played 
the latter part of ne.\t week. 

The athletic board of control, con- 
sisting of Principal Young and Mr. 
Shilling. Faculty Manager T. F. Phillips 
and Trainer I>wight. president of the 
faculty, and the four major officers of 
the athletic association. President Rob- 
ert Mars, Vice President Harold Kelly, 
Treasurer Heine Nolte and Secretary 
Mortimer C. S. Bondy, held a meeting 
Tuesday, but put off selecting a stu- 
dent manager until today. Ray Han- 
cock, King. Hergstrom and Former 
Manager Samuel Gingold are all looked 
upon as likely candidates for the posi- 
tion. 

Despite the continued warm weather, 
practice will be held regularly every 
afternoon, under the direction of Coach 
Colton, A.ssistant Coach Furnl and 
Mack Cook. In preparation for the Two 
flarbora ga"?''" a v»«-k from ."Saturday. 




Standing of the Clubs. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Chicago 86 40 .6S4 

Pittsburg 77 i>4 .oS3 

^'ew York 74 54 .0(6 

PhllaJelphla 6S C4 .515 

Cincinnati 6<> 68 .493 

St. Louis 51 75 .40o 

Brooklyn 52 78 .4U0 

Boston 45 86 .343 

I » «• 

Games Today. 

Pittsburg at New York. 
Chicago at Philadelphia. 
Cincinnati at Brooklyn. 
St. Louis at Boston. 

D ALTON RATS IN 

VIITOUV FOR BROOKLYN. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 15. — Jack Dal- 
ton batted the P.rooklyns to a 4 to 3 
victory over Cincinnati yesterday. He 
drove In two runs with timely doubles 
in the third Inning, while he tripled in 
the eighth and brought W.eat home 
and scored himself on Mcuilveen's 
elngle. Score: R. H. E. 

Cincinnati 00001200 0—3 8 1 

Brooklyn 00 2 00002 x — 4 7 

Batteries — Gasper and Mcl^ean; 
Rucker and Miller. Umpires — Klem and 
Kane. 

DRl CKE IS STRONG 

AND PIRATES LOSE. 

New York. Sept. 15. — Drucke out- 
pitched CamnitT! ve.sterday and New 
York defeated Pittsburg 3 to 2. Breck- 
er, formerly with Pittsburg, made 
four hits and scored two of the home 
team's runs. Leach aided the Giants 
In winning by misjudging Myers' rap 
In the fifth inning. Two games will 
be played today. Score: R. H. K. 

Pittsburg OOlOlOnOO — 2 6 

New York - 1 Ox — 3 11 3 

Batteries — Camnltz, PhiMlppl and 



The royal LUNCH 

214 East Superior St. 

Our nprclHltle> for tomorroTF (Frl. 
day's) diiiueri 

BiVKED WALL-EYED PIKE 

FRIED OYSTERS 

\^E.\L FRICASSEE With DiimplluKa 

ETerrtbinK hume-niade at the 

THE ROYAL LUNCH 



r 




©TEL 



v 



•STRICTLY FIRST CLASS 

N«w. modern and absolutely fire* 
prool 

Rates, fl.OO and Up. 

Three Cafes. 

Popular-Prlocd Lunch Daily. 



Gibson; Drucke and Myera. 
Johnstone and O'Day. 



Umpires — 



PHILLIES AND (LBS 

DIVIDE DOUBLE HEADER. 



Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 15. — Phila- 
delphia and Chicago split even in a 
double-header here yesterday after- 
noon. The home team scored ail its 
runs in the first game in the sixth 
inning and knocked Reulbach off the 
rubber, while Chicago won the second 
I game by knocking Moren off the rub- 
ber In the fifth inning. Scores: 

First game — R-H. E. 

Chh-ago 00 00 00 00 — 5 1 

Philadelphia . . .0 5 x— 6 10 

Batteries — lieulbach. Weaver and 
Kllng; Ewlng and Moren. Umpires — 
Rigler and Kmslie. 

Second game — R. H. E. 

Chicago 1000400 — 5 7 

Philadelphia 2 0—2 7 

Patteries — Overall and Kling; >Ioren, 
Girard, Culp and Moran. Umpires — 
Rigler and Kmslie. 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



IStaiidiii^r of the Clubs. 



Won. 

Philadelphia Ul 

Boston 76 

Ne\/ York 76 

Detroit 77 

Cleveland oU 

Wa.sliiiigton 5& 

Chicago ...^. 52 

St. Luuls 41 



Lost. 


Pot. 


4v) 


.695 


5C 


. 576 


66 


.576 


57 


.675 


74 


.444 


76 


.440 


80 


.396 


94 


.306 



Games Today. 

Philadelphia at Detroit. 
New York at St. Louis. 
Boston at Chicago. 
Washington at Cleveland. 



TIGERS WIN RAia^ED 

GAME FR03I NAPS. 



Detroit, Mich., Sept. 15. — Detroit 
turned tlie tables on Cleveland yester- 
day, defeating the visitors, 9 to 8, In 
a ragged ganie. Score: R. H. E. 

Cleveland 2 10 5 — 8 12 3 

Detroit 26000100 x—9 10 1 

Batteries — Fanwell, Doane, Falken- 
lierg and Land and Adams; Skeels, 
Summers and Schmidt. Umpire — 
Evans. 



WHITE SOX FALL ON 

ST. LOLLS PITCHERS. 



Chicago, Sept. 15. — Chicago scored an 
even break In the series yesterday by 
beating St. Louis. 10 to 2, in the final 
game. Hall was knocked from the 
tilab In the second inning, while Pelty 
was hammered at will. Lange gave 
seven hits and made two doubles in the 
batting rallies. Score: R. H. E. 

Chicago 0500 2 102X — 10 11 4 

St. Louis 10000100 — 2 7 3 

Batteries — Lange and Payne; Hall, 
Pelty and Kililfer. Umpires — Egan 
and Sheridan. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



Staudiug of the Clubs. 



Won. 


Lost. 


Pet. 


Minneapolis 100 


00 


.645 


Toledo 84 


71 


.543 


Columbus 83 


71 


.639 


Kansas City 80 


73 


.623 


St. Paul 79 


76 


.510 


Milwaukee 71 


S3 


.461 


indianapolis 63 


92 


.406 


Louisville 5 7 


96 


.873 



Games Today. 

Kansas City at Minneapolis. 
Milwaukee at St. Paul. 
Toledo at Columbus. 
Louisville at Indianapolis. 

BLLES TAKE fIrST 

GAME FROM MILLERS. 



Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 15. — Sage 
was wild and Ineffective and Kansas 
City took the first game from the new 
ohampious In a .slow and listlessly 
plaj ed conte.st. Cravath's double and 
Uossman's single saved the locals from 
a shut-out. Scort,-: R. H. E. 

Minneapolis ...000000 001 — 1 4 1 
Kansas City ...011120120 — 8 11 

Batteries — Sage and Smith; Powell 
and Janes. Umpires — Bierlialter and 
Cusack. 



PASSES AND ERRORS 

HELP COLLMBLS WIN. 



Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 15. — Columbus 
took the first game of the Toledo series 
by a score of 6 to 5, the winning run 
being scored on singles by Downs and 
Ri-illy. J'our of Cook's five passes and 
both of Butler's errors figured in the 
scoring. A throw from the left corner 
to third by Hickman, retiring Perrlng, 
was thy feature. Score: R. H. E. 

Columbus 103 01010X — 6 10 2 

Toledo 00103100 — 5 7 4 

Batteries — Cook and Carlsch; Esslck, 
James, Robinson and Abbott. Umpires 
Owens and Chill. 



BREWERS BUNCH HITS 

AND DEFEAT SAINTS. 



St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 15. — Milwaukee 
bunched hits off Leroy In the fifth and 
won the first game of the series from 
St. Paul by a score of 3 to 1 yesterday. 
Clarke's hitting was the feature. 
Score: R. H. E. 

Milwaukee 000020 100 — 3 9 3 

St. Paul 10000000 0—1 5 

Batteries — Gilligan and Breen; Leroy, 
Chech and Spencer. Umpires — Fergu- 
son and Bush. 



NINTH-INNING RALLY 

W INS FOR INDIANS. 



Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. 15. — Indian- 
apolis returned home from its trip and 
opened the final games of the season 
ity defeating Louisville, 5 to 4. The 
locals made a grandstand finish In the 
ninth and scored three runs on a hit 
batsman, two bases on balls, a single 
and a sacrifice fly. Score. R. H. E. 

Indianapolis 00200000 3 — 5 6 6 

Louisville 2 10 10—4 7 1 

Batteries — Merz and Kerns; Rlchter 
and Allen. Umpires— Hayes and Wed- 
digge. 

ST. PALL Min PLAY 

GEORGE ANDERSON 



George Anderson, though drafted by 
the Boston Americans, may be tried out 
by Mike Kelly's Apostles this fall. St. 
Paul needs a nifty outfielder and Kelly 
would like nothing bettor than to get 
a line on Anderson this fall, for it is 
generally believed that Boston grabbed 
the Duluth youngster for St. Paul. 

Kohl and Schwab are both the prop- 
erty of St. Paul and will report to Kelly 
for Instructions. Both of these players 
may be used during the few remaining 
games or the present season. 

SETS NEW RECORD 

ON MOTOR-CYCLE. 



Milwaukee. Wis., Sept. IB. — Oakley 
Fisher, on an Indian motor oycle, 
broke the world's record for five miles 
"on a circular track when he negotiated 
the distance In 4 minutes 36 Vi seconds 
in a trial against speed at the state 
fair track yesterday afternoon. 



QUARRELS AND QUERIES 



"J. A. Y." writes in and requests the 
real .standing of the teams of the Min- 
nesota-Wisconsin league- 
Very glad to come throuph with the 
cryf;t:il pure information, old boy, but 
nobodoy In the league even has a sus- 
pision of the true standing, *cept the 
secretary to John A. Elliott. Mons. 
Harry Rood, and his guess was pub- 
lished last evening. After the directors 
get through deciding on the protests, 
:t may look much different. 

Taking a running guess at the stand- 
ing of tiie teams, tlie opine might be 
carole:;r5ly ventured that Duluth fin- 
ished in last place. We worked real 
hard 'or all the .?ames we won, and it 
Is to be hooed that the Mlnny league 
figur« sorters will give Duluth every 
thing It has coming. 

* • • 

Ooose racing Is the latest sport at 
some of the watering places where 
formerly the thoroughbreds romped 
swiftly over the course. Thus do we 
see that mere man can acclimate hlm- 
i-elf to the rigid atmosphere of deuced 
dullness — if he has to. 

In the goose race, six of the quack- 
ers are tied to a tub and men drive 
ilieir teams In a mad speed contest. It 
must be that exciting. One probably 
returns to dinner with nerves all 
shaken, after witnessing an afternoon 
at the goose races. 

If they get to laying odds on the 
geese, the "Sport will probably be 
stopped. 

* * * 

John Condon, a blind pool room oper- 
atoi-, is behind the movement to bring 
running races back to Chicago. Under 
the unfortunate circumstances Mr. Con- 
don can not be expected to see the 
fini"ih of such a reckless promotion. 

They had a day of racing at old Haw- 



GOOD CATCHERS 
VERY SCARCE 



Few Great Backstops Left in 

Either of Two Major 

Leagues. 

Chicago, Sept. 15. — "I wonder," re- 
marks Patsy Donovan, "where the 
catchers will come from in a few 
years more? Where on earth are we 
going to get real catchers, genuine 
marksmen of the kind the old-time 
fans used to see parading with the 
big chests and the jovial grins? When 
Kling, Sullivan and Criger give up the 
game, where will there be men to fill 
their places? Right now the visible 
supply of catchers in the two best 
leagues l3 so short and so Inferior 
that It la the best possible answer to 
the eager youngsters who insist that 
modern baseball is so much better 
ilian the sort of basAall we fos.sils 
used to play. That Is not true. The 
history of the catchers and a com- 
parison between those of today and 
those of long ago shows things" up in 
a light that is vastly pleasing to the 
old-timers. The modern catcher, as a 
rule is run down in size, strength, and 
all-around value when compared to 
the men who starred behind the plate 
in 1888 and 1889. Kling, Carrigan 
and Archer are among the few catch- 
ers I can mention In the present com- 
pany who can travel the gait at the 
pace maintained by the old-timers. 
These men can hit, throw, backstop 
perfectly, and handle a game with in- 
telligence and skill. Sullivan and 
Criger, old as they are, can still out- 
catch a regiment of tlie latter-day 
youngsters, but either of them ever 
cut any Ice as a hitter, and they are 
both due for the gong. 

"Take the big catchers of the long 
ago, and what a body of men they 
weiel They were giants, as a rule, 
in size. Doggy Miller. Kid Baldwin 
and Billy Earle were among the few 
of the old-time catchers who were 
small men, and they were chunky, 
agile and enduring. Such men as 
Flint, Kelley, Ewing, Buckley, Daily, 
Boyle and Bennett were big fellows, 
burly and impressive. So were Farrell 
and McGuire, and more yet whose 
names I oan't recall. These big rnen 
were grand hatsmen, as a rule, and 
some of them were among the finest 
base-runners of their day. Can you 
imagine a modern catcher being one 
of the liveliest men on the team when 
it comes to the base-running stunts? 
Nowadays a catcher Is supposed to bo 
simply a catcher — a sort of privileged 
catcher of the similar character. Ha 
Is there to catch, and not to hit, run 
bases, or stir up the game like a red- 
tailed demon. Can you imagirfe Buck 
Ewing or Mike Kelley being simply an 
automatic factor, just catching and 
throwing, striking out when going to 
the plate In the pinches and never 
having a word to say?" 



ANSWER TO 



BARRY'S DEFI 



"Scraps" Costello Ready to 

Give Battle to Clever 

Duluth Fighter. 

A letter from the manager of 
"Scraps" Costello contains a some- 
what heated protest against the Im- 
putation that Costello Is In the least 
timid about meeting Jimmy Barry, and 
that just as soon as the necessary ar- 
rangements can be made, Costello will 
hop Into the aiena with the clever 
fighter from this city. 

As a boxing show Is scheduled to 
be held In about two weeks. It is very 
probable that an effort will be made 
by the promoters of the Head of the 
Lakes Social club to secure Costello 




CLIFTON. 2f in. kif h BEDFORD, 2i i>. kigk 

Arrow 

7>(o(<A COLLARS 

Sit snugly to the neck, the tops meet 
in front and there is ample space 
for the cravat. 

tfc,i for 25c Clu«tt,Pe«body «( g«.,Makcra 



thorne track, just recently, and the 
clerks and shop girls of dear old "Chi" 
went dazzling dlppv over the rimnlng 
of the nags. Now about ninety days of 
the galloping Is In sight for next sea- 
son — according to Condon. 

In Chicago they are calling It a re- 
crudescence- In New York state Gov- 
ernor Hughes and .some of the judges 
called hcss racing harder names than 
that, wnatever the Chicago name 
means. 

The galloping game Is the one best 
matinee when the thugs are kept out 
of walking distance from the track Let 
the Ciiicago gents behind, attend to 
this, and trie nags may live to run 
ag-iin. 

* • « 

One wk-o does not "sign the papers," 
writes In to Inquire who l.s the best 
fighter In this country, outside of Jack 
Johnson, our champeen. 

That is a very difficult question to 
answer, but after very deep thought, 
one is minded to say J. P. Morgan or 
John Dietz. 

• * • 

Tho expressions — "She had every- 
thing on but the cook stove." was 
brought to Duluth by Billy Rlgg. It 
means, according to tiie translation of 
William, that any l.idy to whom the 
term Is wafted, has all the family jew- 
els on and Is decorated generally In 
high clars fashion. 

• • * 

"J. J. C," writes hurriedly from afar 
to learn if Pad ly McDonnell really has 
the "rheumatism. 

Please don't insist — It is a secret. 

* « * 

John Kading will be tried out with 
Pittsburg this fall, and Cleevland will 
also give Callahan a trial. Both nice 
boys. 



and Barry for the main event of the 
fight card. 

Barry stated today that his money 
was up, which Is $100 to go as a side 
bet on his chances with Costello. 

In the letter from the chap who 
looks after the business affairs of 
young Mr. Costello, that gent says aa 
how his protege is in the game as a 
business pure and simple, and as how 
one fighter looks the same to him as 
any other. Then he adds that Barry 
is just tlie man Costello wants to meet 
and that in consideration of this In- 
tense desire upon the part of "Scraps," 
they will permit Barry to scale 135 
pounds, although the man behind 
claims that Costello can easily make 
130 pounds, ringside. 

At the present time the impetuous 
"Scraps" is on a farm near Ashland. 
If the letter from iiis manager Is cor- 
rect in detail Costello is training hard 
and faithfully for some fights to be 
held iiere. .The letter says titat he 
is in tlie best condition of his gay 
young career, and is naturally pining 
and peevin' for a mi.x with young Kiu 
Barry. 

With such a willingness upon the 
part of the parties to the prospective 
quarrel, tiiere really should be no 
trouble in getting the milt wielders 
together. The fracas should be one 
quite interesting, if all the tilings tiie 
fighters iia\ e said, are true. 

^. iX- g^ J> J > » *!,• Or \tj ^' S ^ A" 1 *^ "*' w.^ " ^ WWW^ '^ ^ yje ^ ^ ^ 
^. ^ .Tt fvfC" 'T^ ^ Jf^ ^ Jf^*^*^ % ^ ^ Jf^ Jfi ^ Jf\ Jh 'h ^ V^^- ^ W^ 

JIST THE LUCK OF $ 

THE UA3iK," SAYS LAJOIE. * 



* 



Pustiibly a number of Cleveland 
fans are Huyiug: "Tou bud that 
Larry kax olriick a battiuij; 
slump," l^arrj biinNelt, bo^vover, 
'^ MuyM that there Im uu such tblug 
-^ ait a buttint;' Nlump. 
lit Here are Lajuie'tt OTvn -n'ordii ou 
^ the Mubjeett 

^ *'IV» juHt the luck of the game 
^ —that's all. Here Is the way It 
7^ sues. 1 so up and hit the ball. 
^ The fielder goes after It. He Just 
^ Kets It. 1 am out. Back tu the 
fie bench for uie. 1 go up again. 
^ Hit the bail hard. Same tlilug. 1 
^ go up again and hit the ball. That 
'^ man uut In center f;oen crazy ivlth 
the heat. Ruun three nUlcH, JumpM 
tnel\e feet in the air and catcher 
It on his thumb. 1 get that hnnd- 
^ ed jne for three or four days and 
¥^ the people begin to say, "What's 
the matter «Tith Larry f Xot a hit 
lu three days.' 



% 



* 
* 
* 



* 






* 

* 
* 
* 
* 



* 

* 



".\o\v, 1 am hitting that ball ^ 
Ju.st tkti hard us ever, but the luck ^ 
of the game is aiiain.<4t me, that's ^ 
all. The ne.iit day 1 go up and ^ 
swat it and some guy in the field ^ 
ruii.s under it too far and 1 f^et -^ 
around (u second and some fuus ^ 
say, 'A\ell Larry is getting his ^ 
bnitiuK eje back again.' 

"Tbeu ugatn. The bases are 
fiilled. I «valk up to the plate. 1 
get my eye on the ball and paste 
it hard. It sails uut on a line and 
the Inflelder ■who goes after it 
finds his arm half an inch too 
short. The ball keeps on rolling 
and tivo or three runs come in 
■Sf and Larry gets credit for It all. 
^ (ireat batter! .\oti-, if that infleld- 
^ er had not stood quite so close to 
ijt himself and had groTvu half an 
^ inch more of arm, the side vtould 

* have been retired and everybody ^ 
*- would have said, 'See the old * 
Tt^ bonehead hit right into someone's ^ 
^ hands.' -f^ 
mi^ "That's baseball for you. It's 

* the luck of the game." 

MINNY TEAMS 

LOSE MONEY 



Season s Play Will Show De- 
ficit in Treasury of 
Every Club. 

Some preliminary figures on the fi- 
nancial condition of the teams of the 
Minnesota-Wisconsin league, show that 
the teams of the league have all fared 
rather badly during the past season. 

If the early estimates are correct. La 
Crosse has dropped about $4,000 on the 
season. Superior is said to be about 
$1,000 behind the even water mark. 
Duluth is also behind as a result of 
the rather slim patroange here. 

Red Wing, Rochester, Wausau and 
Eau Claire will also probably lose 
money on the season's play. Winona 
may break even, but It is doubtful. 

It Is stated that President W. J. 
Sommer of the Superior club is 
through with baseball, and that some 
other of the men Interested in the 
club will be asked to take charge. 

Down at La Crosse the trouble is 
the same as here — the park is a long, 
tedious and dusty distance from the 
city. If the park at La Crosse was in 
the city, President John A. Elliott ea- 
tlmates that baseball at the German 
city would be a paying proposition. 

In Duluth it is believed to make 
baseball a paying proposition It will 
be necessary to construct a park some- 
where within easy reach of the busi- 
ness men. 

This proposition will be considered 
at the first meeting of the men in- 
terested in the Duluth club. 



Proctor Wants Game. 

The Duluth, Mlssabe & Northern 
team Is looking for a game next Sun- 
day with the Woodruffs of this city 
the game to be played at Proctor. Ar- 
rangements for the game oan be made 
by communicating with Dr. Speck of 
Prootor. 




(BY BRUCE.) 

In reading of the wonderful perform- 
ance of that wonderful Savage horse. 
Minor Heir, and also the further fact 
of tho unequalled feat accomplished 
by the crack steeds of one stable, for 
Lady Maud, George Gano and Hedge- 
wood Boy, all owned by Col. Savage, 
finished behind the wonderful Minor 
Heir in the order named, in the In- 
dianapolis events; Col. Savage should 
receivo due honor. 

As has been mentioned before in 
this column, the fame of Minnesota as 
the home of great horses, in fact, the 
very greatest In the world, has been 
Immeasurably increased by the inter- 
est of M. W. Savage has shown in the 
bringing of the very cream of the 
harness world to the greatest state in 
the dear old U. S. A. 

When Col. Savage purchased the 
wj|rld renowned Dan Patch, at a price 
tl!5,t was at that time probably unpre- 
cedented In the history of sales of 
harness horses, many people bhook 
their heads, doubting the wisdom of tli.e 
investment. 

Mr. Savage has probably received 
every cent of the original purchase 
price back, for never in the history of 
harness horse events in this country 
has any horse ever even approached 
Dan Patch, the famous son of Joe Pat- 
chem. Since 1902 to the date of his 
retirement to the stud, Dan Patch has 
been the undisputed pacA^^g champion 
of the world. 

The racing card at the state fair has 
been annually augmented by the pres- 
ence in an exhibition ^against records 
by thu wonderful Dan? The Hamline 
track has been given the name of per- 
haps the fastest speedway in the world, 
because upon this track the great pac- 
ing stallion traveled a mile faster than 
any harne.ss has ever negotiated the 
distanoe. 

Following close upon the wonderful 
record.5 set by Dan Patch comes the 
wonderful work being done by Minor 
Heir, a horse that may come very near 
the great pacing mark hung up by the 
other Savage equine conqueror. And 
with -.he work of Minor Heir, too, 
comes the great speed exhibition given 
at Indianapolis by Lady Maud, George 
Gano and Hedgewood Boy. 

In owning Dan Patch, Col. Savage 
has endeavored to encourage the breed- 
ing in thl.-j state of the best type of 
the harness horse. Groat as lie has 
been as a shatterer of records, almost 
equally great has Dan Patch proved 
as a great sire. 

Mr. Savage has added greatly to the 
fame of Minnesota as the present home 
of the greatest stable of pacers that 
was ever brought together. In fact, 
Mr. S£,vage has at the present time a 
monopoly upon the greatest pacers that 
live. 

The owner of these horses has not 
forgot-.en for one minute that Minne- 
sota in his state, and since becoming 
Interested in horses has also borne In 
mind :hat he could benefit the racing 
game In Minnesota, as well as the breed 
of horses. 

Columns of space have been devoted 
to the wonderful performances of the 
SavagH string of horses. Minnesota 
has come in for Its full share of the 
glory. Sometimes at home we are In- 
clined to take existing greatness as a 
matter of fact; abroad, if one reads the 
sporting pages. It is easy to see that 
Minnesota is unanimously recognized 
aa the state that Is the home of the 
greatest string of harness horses ever 
gathered together. .. - . 

Those who are deeply Interested In 
the doings of the harness ivorses, are 
somewhat regretful that the wonderful 
mile of Minor Heir was not paced upon 
the track at Hamline, instead of the 
Indianapolis speedway. 
■ « 

Handkerchiefs, Too. 

A writer in cne o^ the Cleveland pa- 
pers Muggests that the footbaa uni- 
forms the present season have pocKets 
for the plavers to place their hands 
in as under the new rules the partici- 
pants will have really very little use 




they v^ave -- 
in the stands. 
Oh for the 
thrilling days 
Fuzzy Wuzzy 
Alas, they 



dear old days; those 
of line bumping and 

^,c> fighting for ground. 

seem to have passed. 



Why Chicago Wins. 

Judging from the distance the chief 
reason why the perennial Cubs are well 
on their way to the four near-consecu- 
tive ponnant In the older major. Is be- 
cause the men are brainy ball players, 
also because during the existence of 
the wonderful machine under the 
Chanc.j regime, there has never been 
Internal dissensions among the mem- 
bers. 

What a great team the Pirates have 
to be sure. But the one thing that 
has m.litatod against their chances the 
present sea.son, is dissension and per- 
onal k.ltterness among the players. 
They write columns about the modesty 
and retiring habits of Hana Wagner, 
but If all the reports of the trouble 
that put the Pirates out of the ru:\- 
ning this spring are true, this same 
Wagnor was the leader In the clique 
that opposed big Jack Flynn at first, 
and ca-rrled this resentment to such 
e.vtremes that the play of the Pittsburg 
machine fell off woefully. 

The New York Nationals have suf- 
fered in the past few years from sim- 
ilar family ructions. Then there have 
been several squabbles among the 
Philadelphia Nationals, a great base- 
ball team that has hardly played up to 
the standard that the team is equal to. 

Along the path of years the Cubs 
have proceeded serenely. They have 
had accidents and more than the usual 
run of hard luck. But to any one at 
this distance from the field, it would 
aeem i:liat chapeaus must be doffed to 
Frank Leroy Chance for maintaJning 
discipline that is so essential to the 
succest of any baseball team. 

CHICAGO WOMEN 
PLAY FOR TITLE 

Visitors Are Eliminated From 

First Fhght-Mrs. W. 

C. Winton Wins. 

Chicago, Sept. IB. — Ideal golfing 
weathi*r favored the contestants In the 
firdt match round of play In the eighth 
annual championship tournament of 
the vromen's Western Golf associa- 
tion a-; the Skokie Country club yester- 
day. 

The Initial round was marked by on© 
great surprise, the elimination of Mrs. 
Al Grace Anderson of Hinsdale, tho 
title 1, older in 1908, who was defeated 
by Mrs. Harvey L. Pound of the STcokie 
club . 3 to 1. Mrs. Anderson went out 
In 48, her opponent taking one stroke 
more frith a 43 on the eight holes. Mrs. 
Pound was 1 up at the turn and al- 
lowed the Hlnsadel player only on© 
hole coming in. 

All of the visitors playing were put 



out In yesterday's round leaving onlv 
Chlcagoans to battle for the title. Miss 
Catoerii e .A^ot-ton of Minneapolis was 
beaten by Mrs E. T. Perkins of Glen- 
vlew, a former champion of California, 
1 up. Mrs. E. H. Spragu<: of Iowa was 
eliminated by Mrs. Thurston Harris of 
Westward Ho who won, 4 and 3. Mrs. 
Luth<!r Kennett of Evanston who had 
low medal score Tuesdav, disoosed of 
Miss G. Lee of Kansas Ci.y, 4 and 3. 

The best play of the day was by 
Miss Vida Llewellyn of La Grange, th.> 
title holder, who scored 184 in her 
match with Mrs. L. N. Itrochon of La 
Grange, who lost, 5 and 4. 

Mrs W. C. Winton of Daluth defeated 
Miss Elizabeth Towner of Exmoor, 4 
up and 3 to play, In the a.'-socoation cup 



division. 



HENRY H. TAKES 
FEATURE RACE 



Five Good Events Make Up 

Card at Wisconsin 

State Fair. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 15. — Five 
races were on the card of the second 
day's racing of the Great Western cir- 
cuit mteting at the W sconsin state 
fair. The feature race of the day, the 
2:15 trot, went to Harry H., driven by 
Dean. In straight heats, Lewis Forrest 
taking second money, with Vestale 
third. 

Summary: 

2:15 trot, purse $2,000. 

Henry H.. bg. Dean 1 i i 

Lewis Forest, blk g. Loomls 3 2 2 

Vestale, br m, Tifiany 2 4 4 

Johnnie G., ch s. Brown 4 3 3 

Jessie Allien, br m, Fonjythe 5 6 5 

Time, 2:10; 2:09V2; 2:1C%. 

2:30 trot, purse $1,000. 

The Angelus, br s Colbv 2 12 11 

Castle Dome, bh, Jr. B. Chand- 
ler 1 2 1 2 2 

Monarch, br & Fenelon Dls. 

Altro C. be, Forsyihe Dis. 

Time, 2:19»,4; 2:13; 2:14V4; 2:13%; 
2:12. 

Two-year-old pace, purse $500. 

Laura Patch, bf, Ed McCarr 1 1 

Princess Patch, bg, Bain 2 3 

Anna Oakley, rm, Sternemann 3 2 

H. N. Gentry, bh. Bills 4 4 

Time. 1:07; 1:05% 

2:10 pace, purse $1,000. 
Light of Strathmore, ch s. Frost.. 1 1 1 

Auctioneer, blk h, Tavlor 2 2 3 

Fly By Night, bg, Longley 5 3 2 

Oscar Wilde, ch h, Fenelon 3 4 6 

Mark Knight, blk h. Ha 4 5 4 

Time, 2:06?4; 2:07»4; 2 08%. 

2:17 trot, purse $1,000 

Howard, bg Colby " 1 1 1 

Wilna, bm, Dlckerson 2 2 2 

La Frame, ch h, Wilkinson 3 3 3 

Belle Colbert, bm, Fenelon Dis. 

. Time, 2:16V, : i':l:M_, : ;; isi;. 
m ■ 

fli ^T ^i -T^ ^i"^i ^i ?f\ ^\ ^\ ^\ ^p. ■^K^^C^^y/'t sfCi-fx ?j^ ■'jC ^p fv rtr ^p'^^'"^" 

^ KETCHKL DOESN'T iV.%>T * 

^ THE MO.\EV — help: * 

^ ^ 

* Springfield, Mo., Sept. 15. — * 
^ Stanley Ketehel, middleweight -^ 
^jt cliamplon of the ^orld, naid bore ^ 
^ Inst nlKht that he would prepare ^ 
^t tu fi^lit Jaciv JohnH<-<n fur the -)j(^ 
ijt heavyweight ehnniiil«inNhlp. "I * 
^ em thruiiKh with flsrhting in the ^ 
^ middleweight elans," M»ild Ketehel, * 

* "but I am working for JohuMuu. * 
^ I don't want money if I lose, but ^ 
^ will give it to oharit;-. I am in * 
^ the game no longer for the money. « 
^ I am K<:iiutf on a ranefa to sain W 
lit weight tu meet Johnnnn." ^jt 

* .* 

LOVE TIE SETS 
NEW MILE RECORD 



Canadian Mark Broken in 
Race in Which Jack 



Atkin Loses. 



Montreal, Can., Sept 
lent card brought a good 
Blue Bonnets yesterday, 
made his first start her. 

feat by Love Tie, which 
new Canadian record of 1 
mile 

Summary — Five furlon 
1, won; Baylhorn, 7 t 
S'weepaway, 3 to 5, third. 

Second — Seven furlong 
4 to 5, won; Tom Sawye 
ond; Lillie Hoy, 12 to 1 
1:27. 

Third — One mile and a 
bottle, 5 to 2, won; Ta 
1, second: The Golden B 

1, third. "Time, 1:52 2-6. 
Fourth — Steeple chase, 

Merryman, 30 to 1, won; 
6 to 1, second; Ballacla, 
Time. 4:13. 

Fifth — One and a half 
den, 8lo 1, won; Margo 
end; Duke of Roanoke, 
Time, 2:33 1-5. 

Sixth — Six furlongs, R 

2, won; Jim, 8 to 1, secoj 
to 1. third. Time, 1:14 4- 

Seventh — One mile, Lo 
won; Jack Atkin, 7 to IC 
tend, 15 to 1, third. Tim 



15. — ^An excel - 

attendance to 

Jack Atkin 

» and met de- 
established a 
3!S 1-5 for the 

^a, Leah, 3 to 
a 1, second; 
Time, 1:00 4-5. 
s, M Cambon, 
r, 7 to 1, sec- 
, third Time, 

furlong, Star- 
Nun Da, 4 to 
utterfly, IJ to 

about 2 miles, 
John Dlllion, 

6 to 5, third. 

miles, Whid- 
t^ 8 to 5, sec- 

7 to 1, third. 

,'o Straw, 7 to 
id; Planter, lU 
5. 

.'6 Tie, 5 to 2, 
second; Pre- 
1:38 1-5. 



BRITISH POLO TEAM 

WINS BY STRONG FIMSH. 



New York, Sept. 15. — 
team of britl.'^h polo pl£ 
hotly contested game oi 
yesterday by a spirited 
eighth period of the n 
Hazard cup played again 
way four at Mr. Hazard's 
on Long Island. The sup 
their ponies in the lasi 
gave them a final score o 
the tally formerly stood 



rhe Ranelelgh 
yers pulled a 
it of the fire 
rally In the 
latch for the 
st the Rocka- 
country place 
erior speed of 
. two periods 
f 10 to 8, when 
S all. 



INDIANA TO MEET 

FOUR BIG COLLEGES. 



Bloomlngton, Ind., Sept 
diana university football 
this year was announce' 
Cream and Crimson wll 
four colleges, Chicago, \" 
nols and Purdue. The 
lows: 

Oct. 1 — Depauw at Bl< 
Oct. 8 — Chicago at Ch 
Oct. 15 — Miliken at Blc 
Oct. 22 — Wisconsin at . 
Oct. 29 — Butler at Blo< 
B — Illinois at Bio 



15. — The In- 

sohedule for 

i today. The 

1 battle with 

Wisconsin, Illi- 

schedule fol- 



>omlngton. 
icago. 

omlngton. 

ndianapolls. 
• mington. 
imlngton. 
Nov. 19 — Purdue .nt T..af lyotte. 



Nov. 



Why nruggisli* iteeoinnn-nd Chamber- 
laiu'H Cuiie Cholera and Di- 
arrhoea Uemedy. 

Mr. Frank C. Hanrahan. a prominent 
druggist of Portsmouth Va., says: 
"For the past six years I have sold and 
recommended Chamberlain's Colic, 
Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy. It Is 
a great remedy and on a of the best 
patent medicines on the market. 1 
handle some others for the same pur- 
poses that pay me a larger profit, but 
this remedy Is so sure tC' effect a cure, 
and my customer so certain to appre- 
cltao my recommending t to him, that 
I give It the preference" For sale by 
all druggists. 



EVANS MEETS 
HERRESHOFF 

Eastern and Western Stars 

Clash in Third Round of 

Golf Tourney. 

Walter J. Travis Is Last 

Former Title-Winner to 

Meet DeteaL 



Brookline, Sept. 15.— It was an 
unusually high class field that started 
today on a double Journey over the 
hills and dales of the country club 
course in the third round of the na- 
tional amateur golf championship. 
Nearly all of the eight players had lo- 
cal, state or district championships 
tucked away in their golf bugs, but 
none liad ever gatliered in a national 
competition. 

H. H. Wilder of the Vesper Country 
Club of Lowell, Is a former intercol- 
legiate champion; W. C. Fownes, Oak- 
mont Country club, Pittsburg, has won 
the Western Pennsylvania champion- 
ship; Frederick Herreshoff, Ekwanok 
Golf club, Manchester, Vt., but who 
hails from New York, is the present 
Metropolitan champion, while Charles 
J^J^ans, Jr.. of the Edgewater Golf Club 
of Chicago, is the present Western 
open champion and has won both -.ha 
junior and Western amateur champion- 
ships. In the lower half of the draw 
was Warren K. Wood of the Home- 
wood Club of Chicago, who has sev- 
eral limes been runiit-r up in the West- 
ern event; J. G. Anderson of the Wood- 
land Golf Club of Newton, a former 
Massachusetts champion; H. Weber of 
the Inverness Golf Club of Toledo, a 
former Ohio champion, and W. R. 
Tuckerman, who plays from the Stock- 
bridge, Mass.. Golf club, but wiio is a 
resident uf Washington, who won the 
Mid-Atlantic States championship in 

The playing today brought together 
\\ ilder and Fowne.s, Herreshoff and 
Lvans, Wood and Anderson and Weber 
and Tuckerman. The Herreshoff- 
Evans match wa^5 held back until the 
last, for there the interest of the day 
centered. 

Walter J. Travis of Garden City, 
three times title winner of the United 
States Golf association, packed up his 
clubs yesterday at the fifteenth green 
where John G. Anderson of the %\ ood- 
land Golf club, a former Massachu- 
setts chajnplon, eliminated him by a 
score of 6 up and 3 to play after a 
match In which Travis was never In 
the lead. 

"Thery were too many traps on the 
course for my game," said Travis. 

The defeat of Travis and the brilliant 
playing of Herreshoff and Kvana M'ere 
the events of the day. 

Anderson was 4 up at the turn In 
the morning round but threw away 
three holes on the homeward Journey 
on trap work. 

In the afternoon Travis put his sec- 
ond shot for the first hole into the race 
track and followed it by a short third. 
Anderson saved mistakes on the sec- 
ond hole by a ten-foot putt. Travis 
sliced into the rough on the third hole, 
but both played the fourth to perfec- 
tion. Anderson topped on the fifth, tho 
sixth and seventh being played fault- 
lessly. On the eighth Anderson sent 
his second over the green Into the rough 
and repeated It on the ninth where the 
match was squared for the first time. 
The short tenth was halved and then 
Travis' game went to smash. 

Herreshoff continued yesterday tho 
brilliant work that won him the gold 
medal In Tuesday's qualifying round. 

Little "Chick" Evans, the Chicago 
stripling seemed loath to put out his 
fellow player from the West, D. B. 
Sawyer, and waited until the latter 
part of the afternoon before he settled 
matters on the seventeenth green. 

Tho only match to reach the home 
green on the final round yesterday was 
between M. P. Tuckerman and F. E. 
Martin, which has such speed that it 
overran to the thirty-seventh hole, 
where Tuckerman won. 

Ralph Rose Is 111. 

Healdsburg, Cal., Sept. 15. — Ralph W. 
Rose, holder of tlie world's amateur 
shot-put championship. Is seriously 111 
at his home in this city with ptomaiaa 
poisoning. 

"CHICK" BRANDON MIST 

PAY PITTSBURG CLUB. 



Cincinnati, Ohio, Sept. IB. — The na- 
tional baseball commission yesterday 
allowed the claim of the Pittsburg club 
against Chester M. Brandon of the 
Kansas City team for 1103.50. Brandon 
must pay this amount within three 
days or suffer suspension. 



How's Tbiar 

We offer One Hundred Dollars Re- 
ward for any case of Catarrh that can- 
not be cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure. 
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O 

We, the undersigned, have known 
F. J. Cheney for the last IB years, and 
believe him perfectly honorable In all 
business transactions, and financially 
able to carry out any obligations made 
by his firm. 

WADDING, KIN'NAN & MARVIN, 
Wholesale Druggists, Toledo, O. 

Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken inter- 
nally, acting directly upon the blood 
and raucous surfaces of the system. 
Testimonials sent free. Price, 75c per 
bottle. Sold Ly all Druggists 

Take Hall's Family Pills for consti- 
pation. 



soRENsoN's i::^ 

Positively the best equipped repair 
shop in the city. 

All Work Onaranteed. 
317 West Superior Street. 



THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPALDING 

Most delightful and luxurious restau- 
rant in Duluth. 



GRAND OPENING 

Of Roller Skating, Friday evening, 

Sept. 16th, at 

Lincoln Park Roller Rink. 

Matinee Saturday and Sunday. 
Music by Marine Band. 



f 



■- 



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I 



1 

• 


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1 


• 




i 


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i 


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1. 

I 



*l itri"r 1^ I 



t'i 



•tamt 



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^tSi 



r»" 



i< uitm 



4. 




tmsii 



II 



Thursday, 





SEND YOUR ^1^,?1L ORDERS TO 




1 



117-119 WEST 6UPEIUOB STREET. DULUTll. MINN, 




Bfirgain Square is a 
Busy Place These Days 

EEMS as if the women hereabouts must be buying laces 
and embroideries for next year — as well as this ! 

But then — who wouldn't buy liberally 
when they can buy at such prices! 



5c 



Vnrtl for Tor- 
chon lnM«>rtioiiM 
nnd I. «<•*■.«* — '•; 
to 4 lufbrM 
w Ido. 



25c for 39c 




For fine 


Corsft -^ 




firm hand- 


Cover CM 


5« 


loomed 15- 


embroideries wB 


Inch and 18- 


In dainty W 


Inch Floun- 


N;iinsoo)c; £\ 


clnK on 


Swiss, cam- ■■ 


Cr 


Swlsa, cam- 


brlc and 




bric and 


cross bars. 




nainsook. 




Yard for '^Hv to 
35c Enibroiiiery 
Galloons — (or 
Mhoulder straps 



And These Driving Bargains at the 
Lace and Trimming Department 



19 



CA yard for Rem- 
nants of Nets and 
All -Overs. whit-h 
sell regularlv up 
to $1.50 and $1.75 
yard. 



Yd. fur Odd 

Braids, 
worth to 35c 



17c a yard for 
choice of one lot 
of Trimmings of 
many kinds — reg- 
ularly 25c to 12.75 
yard. 



17 



c 



1 Oc for 25c to 65c Belt Pins, Buck 
les, Hat Pins, Col- 
lar Pins3rooches 

A miscellaneous lot — a clcarinj^ 
of all the little lots and fews of a 
kind — some are plain — some are 
stone set — our regular prices 
were 25c to G5c — tomorrow we 
offer choice of the lot 
to close, at each 



lOc 



You'll b© surprised by the 
big values this sale offers 
you! No doubt of it! 




esssn 



Women's Good Shoes at $3.45. 



These shoes are very much better than many shoes 
$3.00 throuy:hout the country and we have a right to 
ness on them. To sell tliem at lids 
price it was neces.-sary for us to 
I.lace a blK cuntract and have them 
made exactly to our order; of course, 
tlieivi isn't a big protit, but 
there's a bier advertisement in every 
pair of these shoes selling at $2.45. 

There are iiatent lenther.M, 

diiM leathers, and line kid 

in hea\y 4>r liprht noIon^ 

plain or ti|>s>ed toeM, buttou 

or Inoe models — ne»v Nliort 

tamp st>le!« notv favored by 

faablon. 

A large assortment of lasts in all 
sizes — all solid leather and built to 
stand hard wear — e.xtra (luality for 
the j^'upuiar price of $2.15 the pair. 



now celling at 
expect big busi- 



School Shoes for Boys 
and Girls 



51'20an'cV 

I fir t 



$2-50 



Mls.^es' and children's school shoes 
In natural shape lasts for growing 
feet — medium and high top — button 
or lace shoes — patent or dull leath- 
ers — substantial and good looKing — 
.25 to $2.50 the pair 
we take pains to 
fit them properly . . 

Boys' and little boys' school, shoes 
of stuut velour-clirome and box calf 
all solid leathers — good materials 
and nobby styles — models for com- / 
fort — and built for tlie hard weai 
Incident to foot ball and winter 
sports — uncommonly 
rood values — $1.50 to 
$2.50 a pair 



^'^-: 



$2-50 



Friday 10c for 15c Red Cross Seersucker Ginghams. 




lOc 



For house cresses, petticoats and chil- 
dren's wear these tine ginghams are known 
and used everywhere — they sell regularly at 
15c a yard — special for Friday at 10c a yard. 




I 



$1.33 for $2.00 White Underskirts. 

A big assortment of dainty white petticoats, prettily trimmed with 
laces and embroideries — 12-lnch flounces — every skirt properly cut 

$« *% '^ ^nd charmingly made — on sale special Friday gf» • '^ '^ 
I 33 ^"'^ Saturday at $1.33 for choice of all $2.00 ^ | ^^ 



75c to $10.00 Skirts now 50c to $6.67. 



Take yonr choice of nil our white miuilin and cambric and nnlnKook 
Kklrt.H at one-third off our regular prices — they range regularly 7.'c to 
:(tlO.<H) — many of them are elaborately trim- 
med tvKli laces and cmbroiderleN and ribbons 
—take >«>ur choice at 1-3 off regular prices 



50c 



$6.6c 



Special Snaps in Curtain Nets 

For Friday and Saturday Selling. 

PLACED on the bargain list for quick selling Friday morn- 
ing will be a number of pieces of Arabian and White 
Curtain Nets, as follows: 




19c FOR 4*1e ARABIAN NETS. 

Handsome 45 and 4S-inch 
Arabian Nets — usual prices of 
which were 30c, 35c and 45c 
— your choice for these, 10c a yard. 



19c 



2»c FOR eOc 48-INCH NETS 

One lot marked 45c, 50o and 
60c, in whites and Arabs — 
30-lnch and 48-inch Nets — 
your choice Friday at 29c yd. 



29c 



18c AND ::0c CRETONNES, lie YARD. 

11 About 25 pieces, marked ISc 

g ^ and 20c, box coverings, etc., 

u yard. 



all colors; choice Friday, lie 



f 1.29 FOR *2.7.'X CARPET SAMPLE 
RIGS. 

These are l\i yards long — Wilton Vel- 
vet Carpeting, w^orth $1.75 a yard — fin- 
ished with fringes — make |n « ^/^ 
good rugs for the bath Tj% I «^*y 
or bed rooms — get your f • ••^ ^ 

? supply early — you'll miss them later- 

' Friday on sale at *1.1'{>. 



PASSING OF THE CHAMOIS. 

The Scotsman: The "pride of the Al- 
pine fauna." as the Indians call it, is 
said to be rapidly disappearing. Unless 
the law intervenes to protect it in a few 
more years the chamois will be nothing 
more than a memory, living only in the 
ver.se of Carducci's "Piemonte" os as an 
obJ«t in the museums. 

One tiiousand chamois were killed in 
1909. mainly on the Alpi Lepontine. 800 
having been sold in various markets, 
while the remaining 200 fell to the rifle 
of the poacher before and after the pe- 



riod fixed for legal sport and were dis- 
tributed among the smaller Alpine inns. 
Indeed this estimate of 200 clandes- 
tinely slaughtered is, as the compiler 
of the statistics referred to says, "well 
within the mark," and strengthens his 
appeal to the Italian government to ex- 
ercise still greater surveillance if the 
chamois Is not to become as extinct as 
the dodo. 



Make your store important to read- 
ers of The Herald — and you'll prosper. 
Fail in the one, fall In other! 



j^arsT; 



:*« 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 




September 15, 1910. 



9 



BEHER FIRE 
PROTECTION 

City Officials Decide New 

Duluth Equipment Must 

Be Improvei 

Mayor, Chief of Fire Depart- 
ment and Commissioners 
Visit Suburb. 



That New Duluth Is entitled to better 
fire protection Was the conclusion 
reached this morning by Mayor Cullum, 
Chief Randall of the fire department, 
and Fire Commissioner James Hart, 
after a visit to the suburb. 

The party visited the scenes of the 

disastrous fires at the plant of the 

Rleckhoff bo.x factory and the Thomp- 
son Furniture company and carefully 
looked over the situation. At a glance 
it was apparent that the present equip- 
ment was entirely insufficient. 

Just what additions or improvements 
will be necessary was not discussed in 
detail, but it appeared certain that 
either a new engine or a combination 
cliemical and hose truck will have to 
be installed Uiere, togetlier with one or 
two more paid men. 

A plan is being worked out for the 
formation of a volunteer fire depart- 
ment v.hich would be highly efficient 
and fully capable of coping with any 
fires which might break out in that 
vicinity in the future. 

With the placing of several addi- 
tional policemen and one or two more 
liremen, the city will have quite a 
number of paid oificials stationed there, 
who would be expected to be right on 
the ground at the first alarm of fire. 
They would be able to take charge, and 
the abilities of the citizens as firefight- 
ers was amply demonstrated at the re- 
cent conflagrations. It is expected 
that the inhabitants would look after 
some of the details, such as making 
arrangements for having horses handj', 
etc. 

The final meeting of the city con- 
ference committee will be held Satur- 
day morning at the office of the mayor 
in the city liall, and It is probable that 
this subject will come in for a detailed 
discussion. 



Lester Park. 



Tonights' dance 
Tuesday. 



postponed till next 



CITY BRIEFS 



Dulutb-Made Books. 

Thwing-Stewart Co., I'hone 114. 



O'wed Money When He Left. 

Morris Nelson was arrested by De- 
tectives Schulte and Irvine this morn- 
ing for tlie Eveleth authorities, wiio 
claim that he left that town owing sun- 
dry bills, including his board bill. 
Nelson claims that he told his debtors 
that he was going to leave for Michi- 
gan to attend a lawsuit and that he 
would return. 

■« > » 
Given Chance to Work. 

The ( ase against Cecil Brlgham, 
who was arrested, on a charge of 
vagrancy, was continued for thirty 
days to give him a chance to go to 
work. Tiie young man said that he 
had had trouble witii his stepfather 
and wasn't living at home. He declared 
tliat he would rather work tlian go to 
jail. 

» » » 
New Aii.<iCHMor in Charge. 

J. A. Scott, the new as?sessor, took 
charge of his office at the city hall 
this morning. 

' • ■■ 
Police Kind Little Girl. 

The police picked up a small girl 
about 3 years old wandering about 
alone on Huperior street this morning. 
She was brought to police headquar- 
ters, where she was taken in charge 
by Mrs. Walsh, police matron. After 
lier first fright was over she prattled 
and laughed with the officers ail fore- 
noon. I'p to the noon hour no one had 
appeared to claim her and no lost 
children had been reported. 



Hotel En Raided. 

Margaret Riley, 20 years old, and 
George Murray, 25 years of age, were 
arrested last night in a downtown 
hotel on statutory charges by Sergeant 
Glllon. They forfeited $15 ball each 
when their names were called In po- 
lice court this m'.rnin<r. 
« > g- 

For StruliuK a I..enK. 

Albert Shields, a moving picture 
operator, was arrested yesterday on 
the charge of stealing a lens from the 
Cosy theater on East Fourth street. He 
entered a plea of not guilty in police 
court and his trial was set for this 
afternoon. 

Tried tu tool Agent. 

Peter Aleni. a woodsman, tried to 
"put one over" on the employment 
agent yesterday afternoon when he 
hired out to go to the woods. Because 
men who are without baggage often 
quit after they reach their destination, 
the agent required him to have lug- 
gage. Instead of the usual outfit of 
the woodsman Peter had shoved a 
lady's waist, a pillow slip, a soiled 
towel, part of a mop and a dirty col- 
lar Into a sack and attempted to make 
the agent believe that it was "bag- 
gage." It didn't work and he was 
locked up on a charge of drunkenness. 
He got off with the minimum in police 
court this morning. 

■ » » 

Nor4|ilan<i Printery. 

Good Printing. Call Zenith 494. 



PERSONAL 



D. M. Morrison of 8 Lake avenue 
south has returned after a tour of 
Europe. 

A. N. Elaftman of Tonopah, Nev., is 
a giiest at the Spalding. 

A. N. Gould and wife of Bemidjl are 
guests at the Spalding. 

W. M. Ferguson and wife of Crook- 
ston are in the city, guests at the 
Spalding. 

Margaret E. Galvin of Winnipeg is 
a guest at the Spalding. 

W^. Reynolds of Winnipeg Is at the 
Spalding. 

F. F. Mackmiller and wife and Mrs. 
F. J. Callahan and son of Iron River 
are guests at the St. Louis. 

F. Stanley Oadams of Two Harbors 
is a guest at the St. Louis. 

Mrs. P. L. Ramquist of Coleraine is a 
guest at the St. Louis. 

Owen M. Gooley of Grand Rapids Is 
at the Holland. 

M. Greene of Minneapolis is a guest 
at the Holland. 

G. E. Foster of Grand Rapids Is 
registered at the Holland. 

N. W. Drummond of Wrenshall Is a 
guest at the McKay. 

Selwa Sovalamien of Virginia Is at 
the MKay. 

J. E. Chandler of Two Harbors is a 
guest at the McKay. 

Thomas S. Irwin of St. Cloud is at 
the Lenox. 

Walter McClemans of Anoka Is a 
guest at the Lenox. 

Roll W. Cliristle of Bowstring is 
registered at the Lenox. 

D. A. Smal. traveling passenger agent 
of the Erie, is in the city today. 
■ 

Misrepresentation in a store's adver- 
tising is as rare as — murder! And no 
more profitable as a business policy. 



T 



00 LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 

One Cent a AA ord Kucii lutiertiou. 
No Advertisement Le»* Than 15 Centa 



STORE OPEN 
SATURDAY EVENINGS 



WATCH AND WAIT-^THE LOT S.A.LE 
of the year will i^e dfSfcred on Sept. 19, 
in Chambers P'ir^t and Second divi- 
sion, on the estny weekly payment 
plan. This property lies below the 
boulevard, between Fifth and Tenth 
avenues east; only a short walk from 
Superior street. Go up Seventh or 
Eighth avenue east and see this ad- 
dition. Go today. 

SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG LADY 
bookkeeper witli two years' experi- 
ence, desires position; can operate 
typewriter. A No. 1 references fur- 
nished. Address B 33C, Herald. 

LOST — LARGE SIGNET RING. 
Monogram F. T. Reward if returned 
to Herald. 

WANTED— A COMPETENT MAID, .',01 
East Fourth street. 

WANTED— YOUxNG GIRL, I'OLISH OR 
German, for light housework and 
care for baby. 323 East First street. 

FOR KENT— FRONT ROOM AND AL- 
cove; modern in every respect. 414 
Second avenue west. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS. 
8 Munger terrace. 

FOR SALE cilEAP — TWENTY-TWO 

and one-half-loot, full cabin, com- 
pletely equipped launch; finest boat 
of its size In harbor. Zenith 6040. . 

WANTED— PRESS FEEDER; STEADY 
position. Rankin Printing company, 
Axa building. 

FOR RENT— HIGH GRADE SEVEN OR 
eight-room flat; st. Elm; from Oct. 
1. All large outside rooms; every- 
thing modern and up-to-date. Satis- 
factory references required. Apply 
John A. Stephensen, rental depart- 
ment, Wolvin building. 

WANTED — TWO DINING ROOM 
girls at 2S03 West Superior street. 



MISS HORRIGAN'S HAIR SHOP NOW 
on Superior street, over the Oak Hall. 



RE.XOVATE YOUR BASEMENT, 

warehouse, factory or barn with 
whitewash or fireproof paint by the 
spraying process. Zenith phone 721. 



EVERYTHING THE BEST AT MISS 
Kelly's Hairdressing Parlors, over 
Suffel's. 



Protect the family, oy life insurance. 
PINEO, Penn. Mutual, 409 Columbia. 



MARRIAGES. 

John Andrew Murpliy and Mollie Mc 
Donnell. 

Medford J. Wood and Hannah C. 
Johnson. 

William H. Scott and Nellie Pirie. 

David L. Putnam and Bess P. Whip- 
ple. 



BIRTHS. 

GLENN — A daughter was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. George Glenn of 415 Lake 
avenue north, at St. Lukes hospital, 
Sept. 9. 



No Telephone Orders 




Victor Concert 
Saturday Evening 



r rrr r ^ 



MMPHiHp 



Please Come or Send 




rgains for Friday and Sat- 
urday in Useful Things! 

Every day show a big increase in the number of people who find they get better 
made, more rehable articles here Uian in the ordinary store and at prices that are 
actually less — QUALITY counts here. When we buy goods we buy the best 
made — that's what you get, too. Our prices are quite a bit lower than you pay for 
cheaply-made goods as ordinarily sold. Try trading here — we assure satisfaction. 





Bread Toaster 

Like Cut 



10c 




Full Size Curtain Stretcher 68c 

With Adjustable Pins $1.38 



Kitchen Set as Shown 



75c 





!i 



'<lu r!firi[ftij)j»^g intt" 
TheSUvexCoiB?a>? 



The Kew 
Sliver Polish Sink Strainers 1 9c 



Just dip your 
silver In a solu- 
tion made with 
hot water and Sil- 
vex — It cleans and 
l>olishes without 
rubbing. 

25cCanl8c 



Jelly Glasses 



I..arge size for 
tel use, »1.50. 



ho- 




Good (iii:i illy 
glass with tin 
tops. 

Small, doz l.*tc 
Large, doz.fl.50 




■»Sk - 



a^ 



"* ■■ ' 






Galvanized Wash Tubs 

strongly made, will not 
values at these 'prices — 



DE.4rHS AND FUNERALS 



CLAi:K — Almedia Clark, lib years ot 
age, a nurse at St. Lukes hospital, 
died late yesterday of pneumonia. 
She was ill but a short time. Her 
mother, Mrs. Julia Clark, was at her 
bedside at the time of her death. The 
funeral will take place tomorrow 
morning at 10:.'!0 o'clock from 
Stewart's undertaking rooms. Inter- 
ment will be at Forest Hill ceme- 
tery. Rev. M. S. Rice will have 
charge of the strvices. 

LUDVIGSON — The . body of the man 
who was decapitated near Saginaw 
Tuesday evening lias been identified 
as that of Charles Ludvl^son. He 
has a brotlier, Peter Ludvigson, re- 
siding at 42Z Hughitt aveniie, Su- 
perior. The funeral arrangements 
have not been comr>leted. 

SLOVlKOWSKI — Tlie funeral of Mary 
Slovikow.skl, who died Tuesday nlgiit 
at Si. Mary's hospital following an 
operation, will take place tomorrow 
morning from the Polish cliurch. 
Fourth avenue east and Third street. 
Interment will be at tlie PolisJi 
cemetery. She is survived by her 
husband, and has been residing at 
2806 West Third street. She was 
taken to the hospital the day of her 
death. 




Glass Wash 
Boards 38c 

No rust to get 
on the clothes — ■ 
no cut fingers — a 
smooth, clean, 
sanitary rubbing 
surface — these 
boards have extra 
heavy frames and 
heavy glass rub- 
bing surface. 



lO-Quart Gal- 
vanized Water 
Pails lOc 

These are ex- 
ceptional val- 
ue s; good, 
heavy galvan- 
ized iron, 
strongly made. 




Garbage Cans $1.18 
Size 15x19 



Medium size 
Large size . 
Extra large 



4Sc 

esc 

size. .S5c 



Mrs. Potts Irons 69c 

Regular $1.25 set — thre<5 
irons and detachable han- 
dle. 





A Clothes Rack That 

Has 52 inches of 

Drying Space 



Buys the completa 
Buffalo Steam Egi* 
I'oacher. All com- 
plete as cut shows. 



35c 



4-Foot 

Step 

ladder 

48c 



The most con- 
v e n 1 e n t in 
shape, folds up 
into a small 
space — for 
drying clothes 
on windy days; 
It's worth dou- 
ble its cost 
Price only — 

93c 





CARD OF THANKS. 

WE WISH TO EXPRESS OUR HEART- 
felt gratitude to our friends, rela- 
tives, the members of the Duluth 
Benevolent society and Rev. Mr. Reed 
of St. Paul's Episcopal church, for 
the sympathy shown during the 
death and bereavement of our beloved 
son and brotlier. Also for the many 
beautiful floral tributes. 
MIt. AND MRS. G. KRAUSE AND 
FAMILY. 



WE. THE UNDERSIGNED, WISH TO 
convey our moat sincere thanks to 
friends and acquaintances who aided 
us and extended their sympathy to 
us in this our hour of bereavement 
over the loss of our mother, Carrie 
E. Knistrom. 

CHARLES R. KNISTROM. 

HARRY A. KNISTROM. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

To A. B. Helmbach, foundation 
West First street, between 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
avenues | 

To A. Anttile, frame dwelling, 
Sixty-third avenue west, be- 
tween Main and Polk streets 



470 



1,500 



ACTION IS 
RATIFIED 

Woodland Properly Owners 

Express Satisfaction With 

Sewer Situation. 



A Woodland Improvement 

League Organized to Cope 

With Civic Problems. 



At a meeting of property owners of 
Woodland, held at Tierney Bros.' store 
last night, the action of the joint com- 
mittee of Woodland and Hunter's Park 
people which went before the council 
and securea the adoption of a plan for 
the extension of the Woodland trunk 

sewer to the end of the car line, was 
rctifled. It Is believed that the action 
of the meeting and the results obtained 
by the committee will do much to clear 
away the disaffection which was evi- 
dent among Woodland property owners 
over the sewer and the assessment lev- 
ied against them for its construction. 
The original plan of the sewer called 
for the terminus at Fairmount street, 
about a mile below the end of the oar 
line. Despite the fact that the Wood- 
land people could not make lateral 



For the Radio 

Nickel Reading 

Lamp 

Fine nickel read- 
ing lamps — the 

Radio — complete 
with shade. Gives 
clear, perfect, 
white light. Burns 
any good grade of 
kerosene. S u c n 
lamps generally 
sell for 11.98. 




Brackei 



25c Lamp 



Delivered 

Oniy With 

Other 

Goods 



For 

This 

Nickel Tumbler 

and Tooth 

Brush 

Holder 



Complete as 
shown, with 8- 
Inch reflector, 
guod iron brac- 
ket, all for 
only — 



69c 




w> 



Cdnnecilons with tiie sewer, the cost cf 
the construction was spread over 
Woodland property as well as that in 
Hunter's Park and other divisions af- 
fected. 

After vigorous protests had been 
vciced by Woodland people, a meeting 
wjis called about two weeks ago at 
the home of A. L. Warner at Hunter's 
Park and a joint committee consisting 
of J. L. Washburn, H. B. Fryberger, 
A. L. Warner, Cliarles R. Stal and J. 
A. P. Neal was appointed to go before 
the council and ask that the sewer be 
run from the end of the car line. The 
suggestion was adopted by the council 
and the board of public works and the 
city engineer's department is now- 
working on the plan and jjreparing iin 
estimate of the additional cost. 

At iast nigiifs meeting, Mr. Neal, 
w^ho was chairman of the meeting, ex- 
plained the progress made by the com- 
mittee. He also explained the advan- 
tage of having the sewer built to the 
end of the car line and after an infor- 
mal discussion in which the sentiment 
was that the extension of the sewer 
would eliminate much of the protes'.: 
now shown in Woodland to the a.'^sess- 
ment, the action of the joint commit- 
teij was unanimously ratified. , 

The Woodland Improvement league 
was also organized last night to take 
up matters, especially civic improve- 
ments, of Interest to that section of 
th city. A committee on constitution 
and by-laws, consisting of C. E. Roe. 
Giisav Swendson and O. O. Kolsad was 
appointed. 

The matter of a petition for the es- 
tablishment of a Woodland school was 
dlijcussed and all those who had not 
already signed a petition for it did so. 
l;e matter will be presented to the 
sciool board at the next meeting by 
Charles R. Stai and C. E. Roe. A com- 
mittee on lights consisting of Charles 
R. Stai, Peter O'Brien and Gustav 
Swendson was appointed, and also a 
committee on elections and precincts, 
consisting of Charles R. Stai, Frank 
Schubinsky and Moses Tierney. 

Those present at the meeting were: 
Harrv Pearson, Gustav Swendson. 
Peter O'Brien, John J. O'Brien. J. A. 
P. Neal, C. E. Roe, <^V. B. Roe, Charles 
R. Stai, J. D. Tusch, Thomas E. Spen- 



cer, Moses Tierney, Patrick Tierney, 
O. O. Kolstad, Frank •ichubinsky, C. W. 
Busch and O. Arimoi d. 



Till., (.'iai ic.-; AKj'lTO. 
Eugene Waller, the noted playwright, 
said at a tiieatrical supper that he 
gave at the Ansonia ;n New York: 
i "The critics liave been untisually 
' kind to all my plays, and I have only 
I praise for them. I can't share the 
I view of my friend, 331ink, the vaude- 
ville manager. 

"Blink's bill last week was handled 



very severely by the critics. I dropped 
in on him Tuesday morning as he was 

reading the roasts. On my entrance, 
lie looked up from a theatrical page 
and said: 

" 'Nineteen roasts out of a possible 
nineteen. Walter, my boy, the average 
New York critic's motto evidently is: 
Leave no turn unstoned.' " 

You'll never need to buy anythlngf 
that cannot be bought to best ad- 
vantage in a store that advertises. 



M- 




E. AIVGERIVIEIER 




Discoverer of Kerbaqueen Remedies. 
A. Eeeling of Security 

You n.iturally feel secure when you know that 
the meilic'liie you are about to take is abro- 
lately pure and contains no harmful or hablt- 
IiTCfiucing drugs. 

Such a medicine la HERBAQUEEN, THE 
(IREAT CURE for kldnPT, liver. bhuUler. stom- 
(x:h, cancers, tumors and ftnialr dlae.ises. 

It is nature's great helper and healer. 

TRY IT AND BE CONVINCED. 
Call 31 East Superior Street. 



GREAT MANUFACTURER'S 





ID)oir@©t 
norsSi 



m@ir 
©rimiiinii 




(fnyfadyren 
alt 



See full particulars in Friday Even- 
ing Herald and watch our windows. 








the: store that iviade good. 






"V • '~» :;■ ' , ^3^ m 



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10 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 






September 15, 1910. 



!*= 



P" 



>msb4i 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER. 

^ESTABLISHED APRIL 9. 1883— 

Published every evening except Sunday by 

THE HERALD COMPANY, 

Herald Building, Opposite Postoftlce Square, 

422 and 424 West First St.. Duluth, Minn.. 



Cutareil ta tecond-clAW mutter it the Diiiiith poMurrice under tbe act of con- 

(re« or Uirch 3, 1S;». 



TELICrUOXES — Bell and Zenltbi 

Business Office. 324. Editorial Rooms, 1126. 



OFFICIAL PAPER CITY OF DULUTH. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

(liy mall payable in advance.) 

Dally, one month .35 I Dally, six months $2.00 

L>aily. three months. .$1.00 ( Dally, one year 4.00 

i^nturilay llrrntd. one year fl.OO 

Weekly Herald, one year l-** 

Hemltunces maj t)e made by check, postofflce orler. regUtered letter or ex- 
prcan cri.r Maie ill remltttncea pajalilo to The Herald Company. Give p>5t- 
efflro aJdroai lA fviil. Induiiliig slate und count;. 

BY CARRIER— CITY OR SUBURBS. 

Dally, one week ' -^^ 

Dally, one month ^" 

Daily, one year ^•*'*^ 

8ul>^irlb«r» wlU confer a faror on the clrcuUtton department by calling 324, 
tllber 'pl.o.'ie. and maMng known any oiiiplalnt ot sen Ice. 

It U imp rtant when dwinog the addreai of jour puper changed to gwe DOin 
Ihe old and n«w aJdrcaaci, 

The l>uluth Herald accepts advertising contracts with 
the distinct guarantee that It has the largest circulation 
Of any newspaper published in Minnesota outside the Twin 
Cities. Its value as an advertising medium is apparent. 



I 



Let ^very man be occupied^ and occupied in 

the highest emj^loyment of which his tiature is 

capable^ and die with the consciousness that he 

has done his best. 

— Sydney Smith. 



MAINE AND TENNESSEE. 

The independent Democrats of Tennessee have in- 
dorsed the Republican nominee for governor, and in 
all probability Tennessee will have its first Republican 
governor since the early '80s. This is singularly like 
the Maine result, and it has precisely the same meaning. 
It adds emphasis to the truth that it is not good for a 
party to remain too long in control. Tennessee is rid- 
den by a corrupt and disgraceful Democratic machine, 
and Tennessee Democrats who are good citizens first 
and Democrats second will vote to rebuke it by defeat. 
In learning to vote the other ticket when such voting 
is for the common good. Democrats and Republicans 
alike, in Maine and Tennessee and elsewhere, are learn- 
ing the trick of good government. 



SHALL MINNESOTA BE FREE? 

The first duty oi the Mmnesuta legislature in the 
session to begin in January is to bring this state up to 
date by giving the people full control of public affairs. 

The people must be given direct and immediate con- 
trol of the nomination and election of all elective of- 
ficers, direct and immediate control of the conduct of 
these officers after they are elected, and direct and im- 
mediate control of legislation. 

To these ends the primary election law must be 
extended to cover nominations for United States sen- 
ator, governor and state officers. 

The people must be given the power to propose and 
pass upon legislation by the submission of a constitu- 
tional amendment providing for the initiative and the 
referendum. 

The people must be given the power to rebuke and 
retire unfaithful public servants by the submission of a 
constitutional amendment providing for the recall. 

The legislature and the party conventions in Min- 
nesota do not represent the people's will because it is 
not the people that control them. 

The Republican state convention adopted a platform 
that was a libel upon the state and a reproach to the 
intelligent and progressive Republicans of IMinnesota. 
It praised Taft, and ignored Roosevelt. It ignored the 
new tariff law, though the overwhelming sentiment of 
the state is that that law is a crowning infamy and a 
flat betrayal of the intere.sts of the people, and it left 
Aldrichism and Cannonism unrebuked. 

Why? Because political bosses and corporation agents, 
not the people, control party politics in ^Minnesota. 



twenty pounds, expenses nineteen pounds, nineteen shill- 
igs and six-pence; result, happiness." In other words, 
living within your income is happiness, living beyond it 
is despair. 

But the World-Herald is right in calling attention 
to the fact that while it is all well enough to counsel 
living within one's income, and most excellent advice, 
the responsibility shouldn't all be laid on the overburd- 
ened shoulders of the unfortunately afflicted ultimate 
consumer. 

The ultimate consumer is a packhorse, a beast of 
burden, who bears the whole weight of everybody's de- 
mands. Neither his income nor his expenses are en- 
tirely, or even measurably, in his control. He depends 
for the size of his income upon the will of his employer, 
and in a large degree the amount of his expenses depends 
upon the will of profit-seekers. 

It wouldn't be fair to divest the consumer of all re- 
sponsibility, but it is more unfair still to ask him to bear 
all of it. 

Wastes which society permits by its neglect; the 
greedy demands of the specially privileged who control 
monopolies; taxes with the fixing of which the humble 
consumer has little to do: these things combine to cut 
short the consumer's income on the one hand, while in- 
creasing his expenses on the other hand. 

Perhaps the government can't step in and say what 
wages the consumer shall receive. Perhaps it can't 
intervene and set a limit on the prices that shall be 
charged him. Perhaps society, through its government, 
can't do these things, but most assuredly it can help 
out the consumer by eliminating wastes, by keeping 
taxes, both direct and indirect, as low as possible, and 
by regulating the control which fixes the prices the con- 
sumer has to pay for what he needs to keep him fed and 
clothed and housed. 

It wouldn't be right to cease telling the consumer 
that he should try to live within his income, because 
there is no excuse for extravagance. But it isn't right, 
either, to make so much noise about the extravagance 
of the consumer that his complaint of unfair dealing in 
the fixing of wages and prices is drowned. 



EQUALIZING THE BURDEN. 

Whatever those whose assessments have been raised 
by the county board of equalization may think about it, 
the small property-owner who would have had to assume 
the full burden if these raises had not been made will 
rejoice and be glad. 

There never is any trouble about getting the small 
man's property taxed at its full value. His humble home, 
his household possessions, his stock of goods and his 
horse and cow are all in plain sight, and they never 
escape the tax collector's vigilant but astigmatic eye. 

And when' the property owned by corporations and 
men of wealth escapes the tax rolls or is under-assessed, 
as the case often is, it is the small man's property that 
bears the share of the buuden of public expense which 
should have been borne by others. 

The county board of equalization, therefore, is to be 
congratulated upon its action in equalizing the burden 
so that, so far as it can be arranged in the short time 
given to the board, each property-owner shall pay taxes 
according to his ability to pay, and not according to his 
inability to escape payment. 



MAKING GOOD THE DAMAGE. 

The investigating board that has been looking into 
the recent explosion on the battleship North Dakota 
finds that it was due to faulty design and faulty installa- 
tion of the oil-burning apparatus. 

Says the Associated Press report: "The plant is of 
German origin and was installed by the contractors who 
built the North Dakota. As they guaranteed the per- 
formance of the machinery for si.x months, it is be- 
lieved that they must make good the damage.'' 

Of course that means property damage, since it is 
the custom to think first of property considerations, and 
hardly at all of damage to human lives and limbs and 
to the hearts of those who love the victims. 

The contractors, clearly, "must make good the dam- 
age" due to purely human and purely preventable negli- 
gence. 

Just how will they go about it? They can repair 
the damaged machinery easily enough. But what about 
the men who were killed and injured? The contractors 
may pay the hospital expenses of the eleven who were 



Even Michigan, which has kept Burrows in the senate hurt, and they may even compensate them by paying 



until now, and which still keeps a number of standpat 
congressmen, has adopted the stale-wide piimary and 
has made it possible for the people to have their will in 
party affairs. Had it not been for that, Burrows would 
have been returned to give further services to con- 
gested property interests, even though the people didn't 
■want him. 

Minnesota should adopt the "Oregon plan" of select- 
ing United States senators, to put the control of this 
high office in the hands of the people until an amend- 
ment of the Federal Constitution makes senators elec- 
tive by the people. 

Under the present plan senators are elected by the 
legslature, which gives the place to the man with the 
biggest barrel and the best political wirepullers. 

Under the Oregon plan the party members would vote 
for senatorial candidates at the primaries, and at the 
general election the voters would choose between the 
men named at the primaries. While technically the legis- 
lature would not be bound to heed the people's mandate, 
every legislative candidate would be required to sign 
one of two statements, one binding them to vote for the 
people's choice, and the other holding the people's choice 
to be merely advisory. Experience has shown that nine 
out of ten legislative candidates sign the first statement, 
and elect the man chosen by the people. 

If Minnesota is to be free, the legislature must make 
it free by adopting the Oregon plan, the state-wide pri- 
mary, the initiative, the referendum and the recall. 



damages. But what can they do about the three who 
were killed? How can they make good that damage? If 
they had performed their work properly in the first 
place, there would have been no damage to make good, 
either to property or human life. 



••it was so EASY." 

Some hint of why American finance is so unstable 
that it often is shaken to its foundations by a gust of 
fear is furnished by the story of the man who was ar- 
rested yesterday for borrowing several hundreds of 
thousands from New York banks and wasting it in spec- 
ulation. 

"I was squeezed in the panic of 1907," he said when 
he was pleading guilty to larceny, "and began to get 
loans from the banks. It was so easy I kept on." 

It must have been easy, indeed. On his bare word as 
to his financial condition he got as many thousands as 
he wished from each of several banks, and was able to 
"to keep as much as $300,000 in the air at once." It was 
all used for speculation. 

If it is as easy as this to borrow from New York 
banks for Wall street gambling, it's no great wonder 
there is so much of it done, and still less wonder that 
New York, the center of the nation's financial fabrics, is 
unsteady and untrustworthy in times of alarm. 



THE OPEN COURT. 

_^:^ ^ 

(Readers of The HeraW are iivlted to nwhe free use 
of this column to express theij^ldeas about Uie topics 
of general interest. Ltlters aliould not exceed 300 
words — the shorter the jjiBttec, . They must be written 
on one side cf the paper' only, and they must be ac- 
companied In erery case by ilia name and uddroas of 
the writer. Uioitgli the<^ ne«ii- not be publlslied. A 
slguud letter is alwajs "more" ef/ecUve, Uowev«x.) 

commend^jThe move. 



To the Editor of Th« Herald: 

That Is an excellent resolve on the 
part of Health Commissioner Webster 
keep a record of all typhoid cases 
city. The reading I have done 
subject lias sgitisfled me that a 
cod can be accoin- 



to 

In the 

on the 

great amount 



of 



pushed by foUawTng each individual 
ca.se closely. The interiors of many 
homes, which either through ignor- 
ance or willful neglect, are filthy, will 
be cleaned up in this manner where- 
as otherwise they would never be 
reached. Flies would continue to 
breed In them In great numbers, pick- 
ing up the typhoid germ from the 
patient and transmitting it to others. 
Between the fly and the mosquito, it is 
difhcult to say which is the greater 
enemy of mankind, and a vigorous 
campaign should be continually waged 
to eliminate both of them. Both are 
extremely undesirable. 

PHYSICIAN. 
Duluth, Sept. 15. 



TIME HAS COME 
TO 



<i 



SHOW" DIETZ. 



WHAT IS WALL STREET? 



Lincoln Steffens in Everybody's* 
is said ir Wall Street that one man 
supreme down there now. If that 
so, it is time to talk business. • • 
For if Mr. J. P. Morgan is the boss 



It 

is ! 
Is ' 

* 

of 



head that wears 

And, if that is 

has, at last, a 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Anybody who lives In Wisconsin 
might well be ashamed of his state. 
Any sheriff, who resigns his position 
because of personal fear which holds 
him from the capture of a man ac- 
cused of a felony, is a poor type of a 
man to be elected to the post of main- 
taming law and order. John Dietz and 
his lawlessness are a disgrace, not 
only to Hay ward count v, but to the 
entire state of Wiscon.sin, and Govern- 
or Davidson should take the responsi- 
bility of calling out the militia to 
cope with a situation which terrifies 
the .sheriff and his deputies. 

Once John Dietz was a hero; today 
he is a vainglorious outlaw. He re- 
ceives a party of newspapermen and 
tells them the story of his life, prob- 
ably glorying in the stories that make 
him out a desperate character, hold- 
ing the peace officers of a county at 
bay with his shotgun. The determin- 
ation which prompted him to defend 
his home has been corrupted into ar- 
rogant defiance of authority and he 
should be abated as a nuisance. 

Perhaps his family should not be 
visited with the penalty of his law- 
lessness, but he should think of his 
family. The state of Wisconsin should 
send a force of men sufficient to make 
John Dietz realize that he doesn't live 
in the West of fiction. If he doesn't 
realize, let the penalty of his own 
foolhardiness be visited upon him. 

R. H. G. 

Duluth, Rent. 1 4 



fact 

use- 

un- 



Wall street, it means that those forces 

which are supressing competition and 
centralizing financial power in this 
country have come to a head. Not to 
their end. Competition isn't all over 
yet; not by a long way. There are 
some ind'jpendents left even- in oil. But 
if the leaders of the great financial 
groups that have formed the fighting 
olipjarchy of national business have 
seen the community of their interests 
and are submitting to the leadership of 
one of th5m, then the centripetal forces 
of American industry have come to a 
focus; to a head; to a 
a face and has a soul, 
so, the United States 
personal sovereign. • • • 

Wall Street is not merely a street; 
neither is it a local financial district 
limited to the operation of any one city. 
Wall Street is a national institution. 
It is to American business what Wash- 
ington, D. C, Is to a national politics; 
the seat of government. And so 1 use 
the phraae, as all the world uses it, and 
as we all use "Washington," figura- 
tively. 

By "W.ill Street'- I mean the national 
Amerfcar.. financial system which, hav- 
ing its capital in New York, ramifies all 
over the United States and, controlling 
inore and more completely not only tlie 
machinery of organized business, but so 
much of our political government as 
Big Business governs. 

Nor Is that all. -Wall Street" cut a 
woman in New York society not long 
ago for business reasons. It admitted 
into the "best set" of San Francisco, 
for the 'moral effect," a family that 
had knocked in vain until the head of 
it was •handed down In a swell list of 
indictments." It has had a clergyman 
silenced, editors discharged, professors 
dismisseil, judges appcinted, United 
.State senators defeated, and presidents 
elected. Organized capital opposes or- 
ganized labor and trusts have broken 
up unions, but organized business 
backs nearly every political organiza- 
tion In i>ower in cities, states and the 
United States. People don't realize — 
it seems to me that Wall Street men 
fall themselves to visualize either the 
pettiness or the largeness of Wall 
Street. Yet was all known that capi- 
talists and business men who belong to 
the business system own an influential 
part of the press, and advertise in the 
rest; they retain the leaders of the bar, 
and awe the whole profession; they are 
the greatest employers of labor, and 
they set the pace for others; they are 
the chief patroi-s of art, churches, char- 
ities and colleges. They dominate the 
institutions of American society in a 
broad sense, and, in a narrow sense, 
they and their famlMes are "society." 



Mi- 



Uent. 

wearied, and 



INCOME AND EXPENSES. 

Says the Omaha World-Herald: "One of the popular 
magazines reminds its readers that it is always possible 
for a man to find it impossible to live on his income, 
whatever the size of his income may be. All he needs 
to do in order to insure himself distress and uneasiness 
of mind is to make his expenses a little bigger than his 
income. And contrariwise, says the popular magazine, 
it is almost always possible, by a more judicious measur- 
ing, to live on less than your income, thus assuring your- 
self of happiness and contentment. In this, as in so 
many other arguments, the burden is put on the ultimate 
consumer. We assume that he is charged with the full 
responsibility of regulating his expenses, whereas the 
matter of the size of his income is in other and more 
competent hands." 

.As we recall it, it was Micawber who put the theme 
of this "popular magazine" better than it ever has 
been put before or since: "Income twenty pound, ex- 
penses twenty pounds, six-pence; result, misery. Income 



THE SECOND CHOICE PRIMARY. 

The defeat of Congressman Humphrey, standpatter 
and leader of the proposed ship subsidy raid on the pub- 
lic treasuiy for private gain, illustrates the working of 
a new primary election appliance that has proved its 
worth if it has worked the defeat of a man so deserving 
of defeat as Humphrey. 

Under the Washington primary law a successful can- 
didate for a nomination must have 40 per cent of the 
votes cast. This is to prevent nominations by minority 
votes, as w-hen a single standpatter is opposed by sev- 
eral insurgents, and the insurgents so divide the pro- 
gressive vote as to give the standpatter more +han any 
one of them. Without the second choice provision, a 
standpatter might win even though an overwhelming 
majority of the voters were progressive. Humphrey 
didn't get 40 per cent of the votes, and this throws it 
back to the second choice, on which Revelle, insurgent, 
has a long lead. 

However it was done, it is good to have Humphrey 
beaten. It means one less vote for tariff and ship sub- 
sidy steals. 



All KindM ui Labor. 

Emporia Gazette: O. Henry, who 
was the most successful short story 
writer of recent years, died a few 
weeks ago in the full flush of his 
fame and prosperity. The money he 
usually received . for a story, dashed 
off in an afternt>oti, perhaps, would 
seem like a small fortune to the 
brawny individual wlio is pitching 
hay or building a stone fence. 

Yet the author's last days were em- 
bittered by a sense of failure. He 
confided to friends that the work he 
had done seemed useless and tawdry. 
He wished he had been a farmer or a 
dairyman, doing something that would 
contribute to the real welfare of the 
people. The fact that he wanted to 
contribute to that w'elfare shows that 
he had a good heart in him; the 
that he considered his own work 
less shows that his mind was 
healthy in his later days. 

There Is no work that is useless, 
so that it is honest. If a man does 
his best, no matter what his vocation 
may be, he deserves all honor. 

There is a great deal of flapdoodle 
to the effect that in order to contri- 
bute to the welfare of the people you 
must feed them or cloths them. That 
Is a material, sordid view that one 
should be asliamed to acknowledge. 
The man who brings a basket of eggs 
or butter to town is doing his share 
for the general good, but he should 
not be unduly exalted; he is not do- 
ing anytiiing more praiseworthy than 
is being done by the minister, who is 
laboring in his study to produce a 
sermon that will encourage men in 
well doing. 

The man who pitches hay is doing 
useful wo'-k and everybody will wish 
him a long and happy life, but he 
should not be induced to regard with 
contempt llie man who earns his liv- 
ing with a fountain pen. The hay- 
maker seats lilmself by tlie evening 
lamp, when his day of strenuous toil 
is ended, and picks up a magazine, 
and finils refreshment and amusement 
In a yarn by O. Henry. And thus do 
all the workers help and comfort and 
encourage each other, and no man is 
woiking ill vain. 

If we adopted the theory that we 
must raise eggs or wheat, or fash- 
Ion horseshoes, or dig ditches, in or- 
der to do substantial service to so- 
ciety, we must admit that Shakespeare 
wasted his time when he wrote his 
plays, that Burns was more honorably 
employed plowing his barren acres 
tlian in composing his songs, tliat 
Washington should have been runriing 
a Hour mill Instead of planning bat- 
tles. 

It would be a disconsolate world if 
people t*uit gathering the eggs and 
churning the cream; but it would l>e 
quite as gloomy if the story tellers 
abandoned their crafi, and the poets 
sent their lyres to the junkyard and 
the musicians used their fiddle strings 
to bale hay with. 

__ m - 

It's Kasj -Now We Know. 

Puck: Among mans achievements 
during the current summer is bland Mr. 
Rockefeller's triumphant solution of 
the "cost of livng" problem. The oil 
king emeritus has discovered in the 
exodus from the cities the key to ulti- 
mate happiness. Laljorers, wage-earn- 
ers, he notes, are leaving the congested 
districts, "and are providing themselves 
with homes In the outlying sections, 
where with little effort they supply 
themselves with fresh vegetables, fresh 
eggs, and poultry. The high cost of 
living." he adds blithely, "has little ter- 
ror for them." This being the case, the 
end of the trouble is in siglit. All that 
the poor family in Essex or any other 
street need to is to leave the tenement 
behind and buy three of four lots in 
the suburbs. A couple doubtless would 
suffice for a house, but there is the 
farm and the chicken-run to be con- 
sidered. You can't raise chickens in 
your neighbor's back yard. Lots may 
be purchased on the installment plan, 
and when the emancipated family holds 
them at last free and clear, some near- 
philanthropist will be glad to build 
them a dwelling, to say nothing of a 
chicken-coop and a hotbed for radishes. 
Of course, the price of the land would 
be high, almost prohibitive for any 
but a very well-to-do poor family, but 
what of that'.' Think of the fresh vege- 
tables, the eggs, and the poultry. Every- 
body but Mr. Rockefeller has had the 
notion up to now that most of the va- 
cant land for miles about our cities was 
held at high figures, or out of use at 
low taxes, by real estate speculators, 
but now that Mr. Rockefeller has shown 
the way. and it becomes generally ap- 
preciated that the only requisite to a 
life of peace and plenty in the suburbs 
is monev, there will be a rush for the 
pleasant mead, and, demand becoming 
greater, th.e price of lots and chicken- 
runs will go down. Probably not all 
of Mr. Rockefeller's views on this sub- 
ject have been printed. Otherwise, we 
should know how a wage-earner, whose 
hours are long, is to overcome the ne- 
cessity of livng near his work. Also, 
how a family, which walks in the city 
for economy's grim sake, is going to 
pay daily railroad fare to and from the 
vegetable garden and the chicken-run. 
For answers to these and similar ques- 
tions we blindly groi)e in our aimless 
way. This onlj' reassures us, like a 
lamp in the dark. Mr. Rockefeller 
knows, and In his own good time will 
tell. Get free tickets from the gentle- 
manly real estate agent, go out on the 
Sunday Special, and look at the lots 
anj'way. 



feet are 
tired, 

My soul oppressed — 
And I aesire, what I have 
sired — 

Kest — only rest. 



'Tis 



my hands are 



'Tis 



hard to toil, when 


toil is 


vain. 




In barren ways; 




harjl to sow, and 


never 


gram 




In harvest days. 





long de- 



almost 



garner 



The burden of my days is hard to bear. 
But God knows best; 

And I have prayed, but vain has been 
my prayer, 

For rest^ — sweet rest. 



'Tis hard to plant In spring and never 
reap 

The 
'Tis hard to 
weep 

O'er fruitless field. 



autumn yield; 

till, and when 'tis tilled to 



And so I cry a weak and human cry, 

So heart oppresseil; 
And so 1 sigh a weak and human sigh. 

For rest — for rest. 

My way has wound across the desert 
years. 

And cares Infest 
My path, and through the flowing cf 
hot tears 

I pine for rest. 

And I am restless still; 'twill soon be 
o'er; 

For down the west 
Life's sun is setting, and I see the 
shore 

Where I shall rest. 

— Father Ryan. 



Should ShakcKpeare be I'layedf 

William ^\ inter in Harper's Weekly: 
No Shakesi'eare scholar, no person 
worthy of that name, admires or ap- 
proves 'jverything that Shakespeare 
wrote. The remark on that point made 
by his contemporary Ben Johnson com- 
mends i'.self as wise and well founded: 

"I remember the players have often 
mentlonsd it as an hour to Shakes- 
peare that In his writing, whatsoever 
he penned, he never blotted out a line; 
my ans^ver hath been, *^^'ould he had 
blotted out a thousand.' " 

In even some of Shakespeare's best 
plays tl ere are i^assages which ought 
to be omitted, and which customarily 
are omitted, whenever these plays are 
acted. According to the prevalent 
standard of taste in his time Shakes- 
peare was an exceptionally pure writer, 
but the standard of taste in his time 
u as not severe; the writings ot" soniC 
cause of vulgarity, and some of his 
own pages aie soiled with impurity. 

The standard of taste today, at least 
among decent people, is very much 
higlier than it was in tlie" age of 
Queen Elizabeth and James I in Eng- 
laitd. and it might be well to remem- 
ber tha"; tlie American republic ia an 
enlightened nation, living In the twen- 
tieth ctmiury, not the sixteenth. 

There is no reason why the plays of 
Shakespeare should lie relegated to 
desuetude because of occasional Idem- 
ishes ar d vulgarities in them, and, on 
the other hand, there Is no reason 
why their occasional vulgarities should 
ever be obtruded on tlie pu'ollc stage. 

It wag remarked by .siieridan, who 
certainly was accjuainted v.Mth human 
nature ml with the province of dra- 
matic ai-t. that everything which shows 
human nature depraved ought to be 
excludeil from public attention, for 
the reason that the design, however 
well ex.jcutcd. will disgust. 



TWEN TY YEARS AGO. 

Taken From the CcJumns of The Herald of This Date, 1893. 



•••The Y. 
director, A 
said to be 
place, 
leaves 



M. C. A. has a new athletic 

M. Cook from Baltimore. 

an excellent man for the 

Mr. Cole, the retirirg director, 

for a new fleld In a "ew days. 



•••The most 
meeting of 



the 
merce was 
the county 
legislatve 



Important matter at 
the chamber of com- 

the report on the fees of 

officers submitted 

commttee. Trie 



by the 

report 

system 

passage 

officers 



strongly condemned the 'ee 
and urged action to secure the 
of a law paying all county 
salaries and placing all the fees in the 
treasury. The committee found that 
last year the register of deeds received 
fees amounting to $10,964.7)!, of which 
16,036.43 was net; the sheri;T. $7,852.85, 
of which $4,375.69 was net, the clerk 
of courts. $12,200.18, of whl:h $9,537.26 
was net. while the auditor and treas- 
urer received salaries of $3,500 and 
$3,000 respectively, yet no one can be 
found who will claim that the duties 
of auditor and treasurer were per- 
formed with any less abilitj and faith- 
fulness than \vere those o:' the other 
officials. The report was unanimously 
adopted, and a committee, consisting 



MINNESOTA OPLMOXS. 



of O. P. Stearns, R. S. Munger, C. P. 
Craig. S. A. Thompson. T. B. Perry 
and E. H. Jefferson was appointed to 
draft a bill. 



Is the Root of the Elvll. 

Rush City Post: You can't bust a 
trust as long as the tariff laws are 
made to foster it. 



But He Uot Awaj. 

Barnesville Recurd-ivevie^v: Reports 
from St. Paul were to the effect that 
Secretary Ballinger may soon be fired. 
Ballinger had better be careful, for this 
Is the canning season in Minnesota. 



AVantM Nation to O^vn Roada. 

Mora Times; Generally speaking, the 
railroad Is and has been .lie breeder 
of trusts and corporate cor.trol and if 
their control cannot be brought about 
therwlse tlien they should be owned 
and operated by the government. 



They Hadn't Thought of That. 

St. Peter Herald: If the Republican 
standpatters made good their threat to 
work for the election of Democrats, it 
will be the first time on record that 
that wing of the party has taken any 
part in sliaping legislation jeneficiai to 
the country. 



A Tip for Joe Cannon. 

Biwabik Times: If the next con- 
gress is Democratic the fact can be 
cliarged to Joseph Cannon. Cannon is 
today the most unpopular political 
character in the United States and 
grows more so every time he makes a 
statement in whicn he ittempts to 
make the people believe tliat he la on 
the square. 



One Way to Get at It. 

Winona independent: It is estimat- 
ed that there are 92,000,000 of us. Sub- 
tract the few who are identified with 
the special interests and you have the 
number of Americans that are against 
Taft Aldrlch. et al. 



Bob Inquires to Kbiow. 

Princeton Union; In all 109 suits 
have been instituted in tlie federal 
court at Fergus Falls by the govern- 
ment to set aside transfers of tracts 
of land on the White Eaith reserva- 
tion The government asivs that the 
titles to these lands be again vested 
in the Indian allottees and the sales 
declared null and void. Have the de- 
fendants In these deals been playing 
the same little game as did the fellows 
down in Indian Territory? 

It I.S That Way Now. 

Austin Transcript: In Kansas it is 
irregular to be a standpat :er, and the 
Insurgent alone is a party loyalist. It 
is getting to be something that way in 
Minnesota. 



Collier's: 
Dick, the 
flowing 
tread. 



Contrast. 

Speaking of Ohio, Charles 
game warrior of the 
hair and tlie 
visited President 
Beverly to convey to 
cheering information that 
to be "an old-fashioned 
fight" in Ohio this fall, 
fashioned Republican victory 
what the senator 



SnllinK at Da^vu. 

One by one the pale stars die before 
t! e day now^. 
One by one the great ships are stir- 
ring from their sleep. 
Cables all are rumbling, anchors all 
a^veigh now. 
Now t;he fleet's a fleet again, gliding 
toward the deep. 



gumshoe 
Taft, at 
him the 
there was 
Republican 
and "an old- 
Just 
meant Ijy "an old- 
fashioned Republican fight, ' may be in- 
ferred from a newspaper dispatch 
Which tells of his enthusiasm over the 
discovery in a Beverly barber shop of 
two pictures printed on advertising 
calendars. One showed I.iucoln ad- 
dressing the soldiers; the other the 
raising of the Stars and Stripes at New 
(jrleans. Copies of tliese stirring en- 
gravings the Ohio leader insisted he 
must have to circulate in the cam- 
paign. Thus would he put to flight 
the treasonable hosts of the Democrats, 
free the slaves, save the Uniop. and 
have himself returned to the United 
States .'senate. Contrast tliis attitude 
with that of a Western Insurgent who 
writes concerning a receni canvass in 
his state: 

"For the first time In my experi- 
ence I had the young men (21 to 30) 
in my meetings, and I s udied them 
carefully from the stage. They are 
quite distinct as a generation, and I 
am positive that th.e ordiniry political 
speaker doesn't understand them at all. 
They are hungry for details, for speci- 
fications, for technical anal\sls. They 
suspect a generality. They want to 
know minutely about the ciuiimlttee on 
rules, for Instance. They sit tight and 
swallow everything In the way of a 
close description of a tariff item. They 
insist on 'Inside' informal ion, not on 
what happened but what made it hap- 
pen. The people have awa^tened to the 
fact that the obstructionist In this 
country has been fooling tliem Into the 
belief for years that obnruction of 
legislation, failure to enforce th.e law, 
apparent helplessness befo © industrial 
wrongs, was normal." 

Beside this modern Insurgent, talk- 
Iner the language of today. Senator 
Dick seem.s to be speaklr g a toneru*^ 
long since dead. Possibly the Issue of 
no extension of slavery into the terri- 
tories will win in Ohio ar d elsewhere 
In November. Pnsslblv! 



Now the fleet's a 
uj)on the old 
Splendor of the 
In the spray; 
Admirals of old time 
bold ways! 
Souls of all the seado 
today! 



again, boi^nd 



fleet 
ways, 
past comes shining 



bring us on the 
s, lead the line 



Far away behind us town and tower 
ai'e dwindling. 
Home becomes a fair dream faded 
long ago; 
Inflnitely glorious the height of heaven 
is kindling. 
Infinitely desolate the shoreless sea 
bolow. 



••♦H. A. Campbell of Merriam Park, 
formerly of the firm of Campbell & 
Smith, Duluth, is visiting friends in 
the city. 



•••R. S. Munger entertained hl« 
friends. E. G. Haight and C. B. Haight 
of Baltimore, with a planked white- 
flsh supper at the Spalding last even- 
ing. 



•••Miss Ada Van Brunt gave » 
dancing party last evening in Masonio 
hall In lionor of her departing guest. 
Miss Grace V. Allen of Ortonville, 
Minn. About forty dancers were pres- 
ent. 



•••J. W. 
Iowa, is the 

land. 



Weir of Mount 
guest of Rev. A. 



Pleasant, 
W. Rlng- 



•••Dr. 
Boston, 
busienss, 



Haycock has returned from 
where he was on theatrical 



A MOMENT WITH THE WITS. 



Catholic Standard and Times: "Do 
you think you could identify the burg- 
lar?" asked the detective from City 
Hall. 

"Well, I never saw him," replied tha 
victim, "but he was a very small man.** 

"How do you know?" 

"Haven't I told you he got into our 
flat without any trouble?" 



Judge: Stella — Do you think she Is 
only 16? 

Vlolette — Y'es, I'm sure of 
she seemed pleased when 
she looked older. 



It, because 
I told her 



London Opinion: Client — I don't mind 
what wages I pay so long as she's cap- 
able. 

Registrar — I can assure you, madam, 
she's capable of anything! 



Philadelphia Inquirer: "Dou you find 
any trouble writing stories, Dawdiy?" 

'None whatever. But I'd paj' a man 
well that could sell them for me." 



Pittsburg Post: "Yonder yacht is fly- 
ing a flag of distress." 

"What does she signal?" 
"Wants to know if you have a cork- 
screw aboard." 



Magazine: "Pleas«, 
5 Cents," begged John- 



Everybody's 
Mumsey, just 
nie. 

"But, Johnnie. It was only this morn- 
ing that I gave you a cents." 

"I know, Mumsey, but" — putting his 
arms around her neck — "I'm so hard 
on money!" 



The Delineator: Litle Eleanor, who 
was very fond of chickens, stood cry- 
ing over a dead rooster. Thinking that 
something good ou^cht to be said. s!:o 
remarked between her sobs: "He was 
always so glad when one of the hens 
laid an egg." 



New Y'ork Sun: Nebuchadnezzar was 
eating grass. "Probably this will start 
a crop scare and send the market 
down," he cried. Proudly he saw he 
had done more damage in a limited 
area than the bugs. 



Philadelphia Ledger; "I don't belleva 
the reports about the finding of a $150,- 
000 "diamond in Africa. " 

"Sounds probable enough for mp." 
"Sounds all right. But no rich -Amer- 
ican has tried to smuggle it in." 



Cliicago Tribune: Bluebeard was re- 
flecting on his past — for he was a man 
with a past. "Yes," he said, comj^la- 
cently stroking his cerulean facial 
adornments, "I've been something of a 
lady killer in my time." Moreover, 
the scoundrel "was an exception to the 
rule that all the world loves a lover. 



Birmingham Age-Herald: "You would 
not believe it, mum," said the wander- 
er at the door, "but in me younger 
days I had a high position an' wuz 
looked up to by everybody." 

"Is that so?" asked the sympathetic 
housewife. "What business was you 
engaged in?" 

"I wuz a steeplejack, mum." 



good 
to find 



for a 
never 

love 
could 



Now the fleet's a fleet 
upon the old ways. 
Splendor of the past comes 
in the .spray; 
Admira s of old time, bring us 

bold ways! i 

Souls of all the seadogs, lead the line 
tt'day! 



again, bound 
shining 
on the 



Once ap-aln with proud hearts we make 
the old suirender. 
Once again with high 
the age to be; 
Not for us the warm life 
cure and tender. 
Ours the eternal wandering and war 
fare of the sea. 



hearts serve 
of Earth se- 



Now th.e fleet's a fleet again, bound 
upon the old ways. 
Splendor of the past comes shining 
in the spray; 
Admirals of old time, bring us on the 
bold ways! 
Souls of all the seadogs, lead the line 

today : 
—Henry Is'ewbolt in the Spectator. 



Judgment Affirnieil by i be HigbeMt 
Court. 

New Y'ork Evening Post : The judg- 
ment in the Ballinger ;ase which 
Representative Madison ha.' pronounced 
in his report will, we bell?ve, be gen- 
erally concurred in by men who have 
carefully and impartially examined the 
evidence. It is not high crimes and 
misdemeanors that are charged against 
the secretary, but a lack of such fi- 
delity to the public interests as is 
essential to the proper co:iduct of the 
office to which falls the custodianship 
of the national domains. In assigning- 
the reasons for his conclusion, Mr. Mad- 
ison rests practically all the weight 
on two things — the treatiiient of the 
Cunningham claims and the way In 
which the restoration of .vater power 
sites was made. No corrupt motive is 
alleged or intimated in elt ler case, but 
in both cases it is held that the atti- 
tude of the secretary, un.U forced to 
change it by protests that he could not 
afford to ignore, was distinctly con- 
trary to that which a proper sense of 
his duty as the protector of the na- 
tional interests would have dictated. 
From the brief account given in the 
dispatches, It does not apiiear whether 
or not Mr. Madison, in his report, 
makes Ballinger's incredibly bad per- 
formance on the witness stand part 
of the case against him; but he does 
specifically mention the fact, distinctly 
proved by the evidence, that the sec- 
retary represented his action in re- 
storing the water power sites as due 
to the recommendation of the chief 
officers of the reclamation service, 
when In point of fact they had ex- 
pressed to him their earnest opposition 
to it. Inasmuch as the cise from the 
beginning — apart from newspaper and 
magazine extravagances — has been a 
case not of accusations of crime or 
corruption, but of charges of unfitness 
in a position of peculiar tiust. the con- 
clusion registered by BIr. Madison 
would seem to cover It Ji^stly and ap- 
propriately. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



NEW 



Both Phones 2416. 




THEATER 

Second Ave. East and Superior Street 
~ ADVANCED VAUDEV-LLE 



Seat* on sal* far 
one week ahead 

MaNnee 25c 

Except Sundays. 

NiBht*, ISc. 29c 
50c and 7S* 



SohocI Boy* and Girl*. 

Elita Proctor Oti*. 

Peter Donald and Meta 

Car*on. 

The Tempi* Quartet. 

Marie Hart and Billy Hart 

Arthur Bowen. 
• De Litle. 

The Kinodrome. 
The Concert Orche»tra. 



LYGEUM 



Tt>MGHT, 
Prl. and Sat. 



Sam 



(i 



MATIXEE SATIHDAY. 

8. and Lee Shubert Present the Stirring 
American Drama 

THE CITY" 

itlnee, S.'^c to $1. Mg;hts 25c to 91-50 



Next Sunday 
C«medy, ""The 
25e to tl.50. 

Sept. 20 to 
Fifht Pleture*. 



and Monday Nlflit* — the Farelcal 
Blue Mouse." Seat* on Sale. 

24— The Original i*flrie*-J«ha*M 



I 



I 



Pointed I*arasrap!iN. 

Chicago News: Dogs make 
i friends. Dugs can't talk. 

A lazy man has to work hard 
an easy job. 

He is a wise man who doesn't strive 
to know too much. 

Charity is seldom .satisfactory. The 
best way is not to need it. 

The man who says nothing doesn't 
have to swallow his words. 

None of us comes within a stone's 
throw of what we should do. 

An old bachelor would rather eat a 
green persimmon than kiss a baby. 

Ever notice how much oftener you 
meet a man after he lets you owe him 
money? 

It must be awfully monotonous 
woman to have a husband who 
hurts her feelings. 

Every girl thinks she could 
as no other girl ever loved if she 
only meet the right man. 

When a married man mysteriously 
dlsajipears people wander whether he 
ran away with a woman or from one. 

Owing to the hish prices of the ne- 
cessities of life, many deserving mil- 
lionaires are compelled to subsist on 

the luxuries.* 

■ 

Reflei'tlois of a Bnehelor. 

New York Press; A man swims with 
the tide and believes he's carrying It 
along with him. 

A girl would know enough to fool 
men if they weren't any in the world 
for her to fool. 

One big trouble is a mighty good 
thing to take your mind off worrying 
so much about the others. 

One thing a woman never brags 
about her husband is the kind of 
clothes he would wear if she would 
let him. 

If a man will remember his wed- 
ding anniversary, no matter how busy 
he is, his wife can forgive him for 
always forgetting ever to give her 
any money. 






I 

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Thursday, 



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THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 15, 1910. 



11 



Let Me Send You 
A Treaiment of My 
Catarrh Cure Free 



-.f^ 




OFFICIAL MAP OF THE WEATHER 



C. Ii:. GAVSS. 

I win Take Any Case of Catarrh, No 

Matter How 4'hronlc, or What Sta^e 

It In In, and I'ruve Entirely at 

My Own Kxpemte, That It 

Can De Cured. 

Curing Catarrh has been my busi- 
ness for years, and during this time 
over one million people have come to 
mo from all over the land for treat- 
ment and advice. My method is or- 
iKlnal. I cure the disease by first cur- 
ing the cause. Thus my combined treat- 
ment cures where all else falls. I can 
demonstrate to you in just a few days' 
time that my method is (luick. sure and 
complete, because it rids the system 
of the poisonous germs that cause ca- 
tarrh. Send your name and address at 
once to C. K. Gauss, and he will send 
you the treatment referred to. Fill 
out the coupon below. 



FREE 

This coupon is good for a package 
of G.\USS 0<^MBINEI^ C.VT.\MUH 
CURK .<ent free by mall. Simply till 
In name an<l address on doited lines 
below, and mall to O. E. GAUSS, 
9212 Main St., Marshall. Mich. 




H 



en»vttfeo#c*r- 



"AS LIGHT AS A FE4THER" 

Describes with little exaggeration 
the plates we make to supply one 
or a dozen artistic artificial teeth. 
Three main points of our handi- 
work are: Artificial teeth as we 
make them resemble nature, con- 
form to the mouth and are, there- 
fore, comfortable, and do not cost 
you more than excellent material 
and skilful workmanship warrant. 

STORER DENTAL CO., 

Cor. SiM-ond Ave. VV. and Sup. .St- 



LIMITED 

Treasury stock of Iron Mountain 
Mining company for sale at par $1 
per .share. Property on Mesaba 
Iron range surrounded by three big 
mines. Drilling shows large body 
high grade ore; for information ap- 

IRON MOUNTAIN MINING GO. 

417 Torrey llulldlng, Dulutb. 




DULUTH FUR COiitPANY. 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS. 

Zenith Pnant 624. Old. Melrcse 4^36. 

— Open Every Evening Until 10 o'Clock.— 




Cume In auJ make your sele<'tioii from the 
most complete line of re*<ly-to-w<;ar furs In the 
N. ^t^we.st at SUMMKH PKICKS. 

We havo the BKST KAC'IUITIKS for remodel- 
ing your ul'J fur garment luto the latest atylea 
at .SLMMEK PR1CK.S. 

Get our prices before buying pisewhere. 

325 WEST FIRST STREET. 




You'U Do Better at Kelly's. 




Here Are Some Great Values for This Week 

Kelly's Basement Bargains Always Mean a Great Saving. 



WW 




^¥ Airr^-v ^^^^ evening was 

C/LrfJVUm another of those 

autumnal evenings 
that take the edge 
off of the realiza- 
tion that summer 
has gone. The big 
moon shone from 
a cloudless sky 
and out of doors 
was the pleasantest 
place to he. The 
lowest temperature 
was 50 deg. Yes- 
terday was reasonably warm, the ther- 
mometer mounting to 72 deg. Today, 
cloudy and warmer. 

A year ago today was clear and fine. 
The sun rose this morning at 5:45 
and it will set at 6:21, giving 12 hours 
and 36 minutes of sunlight. 

Mr. Richardson make^ the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"Barometric pressures havo fallen 
over moat of the West and Northwest, 
attended by an increase in temperature 
over Canada and Northwestern States. 
Low pressure areas are centered over 
Northern Alberta and off the Lower 
California coast. During the last twen- 
ty-four hours light to lieavy rains have 
resulted in Eastern Texas, New Mexico, 
ITtah. Nevada. Idaho and Western 
Wyoming. In the meantime light 
showers also fell along the Atlantic 
coast from New Jersey southward to, 
including, the Carolinas. Tlie high 
pressure condition central yesterday 
morning over Iowa has advanced to 
Illinois, cooler weather resulting over 
the Ohio valley and Middle Atlantic 
states. Indications favor more or less 
cloudiness and unsettled weather at 
the Head of the Lakes during the en- 
suing thirty-six hours." 



and Friday; .slowly rising temperature; 
frost in marshes tonight. 

Minnesota — Generally fair tonight 
and Friday; warmer tonight in east 
portion. 

Upper Lakes — Light to moderate 
winds, mostly southwest; fair tonighi, 
becoming unsettled on Mic»..oan and 
Superior Friday. 



Geiierul Koreeanta. 

Chicago, titpt. 15. - — l-'ureca-sts 
twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. 
Friday: 

Wisconsin — Generally fair tonight 



for 
m., 



The Temperatures. 

Following were the maximum tem- 
peratures for twenty-four hours and 
the minimum for twelve ending at 7 
a. m. today: 

Max. 

Abilene 8ii 

.llpena 70 

.MLiatlc City ...TO 

Biiitlefonl 7tf 

Ho'...ie 72 

Iiu:ilon 66 

buffalo 64 

Calgary 70 

Charleston 84 

CliicaKO 84 

Corimi Qiristl ..80 

Itenver 78 

I)ts Moines 70 

Devils Lake 70 



Du.it's 74 

liul»uciue 70 

DULUTH 72 

UuMUgo 78 

Kastimrt 56 

Kdnumion 74 

Kscaiuba 72 

Ualvesiun 82 

Grund llavi^ ...64 

iirffii I!ay "2 

Ufttteraa 71 

Havre 76 

Helena "JS 

Uoughliin 68 

Hurn 68 

Jai:ksonrille 88 

Kamloups 80 

Kansas City 72 

KnoxviUo "8 

La Crosse 72 

I.aulsvlUe 76 

VlaUison 88 

Marquette 72 

Medicine Hat ... 76 
MeiuphU 74 



Mln. 
68 
44 
50 
44 
62 
50 
52 
44 
72 

3e 

72 
96 
54 

&U 
(JO 
50 
50 

ot; 

46 
40 
4S 
76 
52 
50 
72 
44 
54 
50 
58 
70 
44 
58 
62 
44 
54 
54 
52 
60 
60 



Max. Mln. 

Milwaukee 66 52 

Mlniit'dusa 72 40 

.Mo'iena 72 56 

MDuiKomary 94 70 

M iitreal GO 50 

Mo rhead 74 58 

New Orleans 88 75 

New Ynrk 68 54 

Noith Pliitte 74 .">3 

Oklahoma 78 64 

Fitrrj- Sound 04 44 

Phoenix 100 8u 

Plirre 66 50 

Pittsburg 68 48 

44 
50 




I'urt Arthur 68 

Portland. Or 74 

Prluco Alljert 74 SS 

Qu Appelle 70 44 

Italeigh 82 58 

Rapid Cltjf 72 52 

Koseburg 78 42 

Koswell 74 60 

SI. Louis 72 56 

St. Paul 72 52 

Salt Lake City 72 04 

.Sun DU'go 82 7'J 

Sail Francisco ....80 60 

.Sault Ste. Marie... 66 42 

Sheridan 66 41 

.><hreveport 92 68 

Sptikane 84 58 

Swl/t Current 72 40 

Tampa 88 72 

Toledo 64 52 

VVa.shlngtou 72 52 

WUlkton 68 44 

Wlnneniucca 58 54 

Winnipeg 74 42 

Yatlowsloue 62 42 



DIRECTORY OF 
AMUSEMENTS 



I gain the secretary's promotion. The 
i plan is really put Into operation and 
The Mouse" has every one scampering 
after instead of away fttim her. 



>\ HERE TO GO TONIGHT. 



LYCEUM — "The City." 
ORPHEUM — Advanced vaudeville. 



THE LAST PLAY 

OF CLYDE FITCH. 



Clyde Fitch's last play, "The City," 
will be seen at the Lyceum tonight. 
Here Is the reply of Mr. Fitch to those 
who claim the cities are demoralizing, 
as given by the hero of his play, George 
Hand, Jr.: 

"No, you're all wrong. Don't blame 
the city. It's not her fault. It's your 
own. What the city does is to bring 
out what's strongest in us. If at heart 
we are good, the good in us will win; 
If bad, God help us. A man may live In 
a small place all his life — deceive the 
whole place and himself Into thinking 
he has got all the virtues, when at 
heart he's a hypocrite; but the village 
gives him no chance to find out — to 
prove It to his fellows. She strips him 
naked of all his disguises and all of his 
liypocrlsies and she paints his ambition 
on her fences and lights up her sky- 
scrapers with it: What he wants to be 
and what he thinks he is! And then 
she says to him: Make good if you can, 
or to hell with you!' And what is in 
him comes out to clothe his nakedness, 
and to the city lie can't lie. I know, 
because I tried." 



New York's Muuicipal Skyscraper. 

New York's new municipal build- 
ing, now under construction, will be 
one of the moat remarkable struc- 
tures of Its kind, containing many 
features in both construction and 
architecture that differentiate it from 
other public edifices in any part of 
the world. Keep a case of Golden 
Grain Belt beer in your cellar for 
every-day use. It is a source of 
healthful and invigorating refresh- 
ment. Order of your nearest dealer 
or be supplied by Duluth branch 
Minneapolis Brewing company. 



DEMOCRATK FACTION 

INDORSES CAPT. HOOPER. 



FROHMAN STAR 

TWENTY YEARS AGO. 



Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 15. — The In- 
dependent Democrats of Tennessee yes- 
terday indorsed the candidacy of Capt. 
lien W. Hooper Republican nominee 
for governor, and further cut loose 
from the regular Democratic wing by 
referring the latter's harmony resolu- 
tion to the new Independent state ex- 
ecutive committee without decision. 

The possible break in the Solid South 
extends only to one office, tlie govern- 
orslilp. There is a "gentlemen's agree- 
ment" between the independents and i It 




p • 



All Kinds of Recovering 
and Repairing 

done on short notice; strictly first 
class work guaranteed. 

A. GIIMGOLD, 

Umbrella Manufacturer. 
125 KAST SM'EUIOH STllEET, 



Ties, Pulpwood, Piling 

And Other Timber Products. 

McLEOD-DAViS TIMBER CO., 

515 Lyceum liuiliilngr. 
Duluth, Ml'iu. 



Advertise in The Herald 



Elita Proctorn Otis, who is appearing 
this week at the Orpheum theater in a 
little comedy sketch called "Mrs. Ban- 
ner's Bun" Is well rtmembered by old- 
time theatergoers as having been at 
one time one of the leading actresses 
of tlie country. 

Miss Otis played at the old Temple 
theater here twenty years ago In an 
all-star company sent out by Charles 
Froliam In "Lady Wyndemere's Fan." 
This play was new at the time and was 
the first of the so-called "tea cup" 
dramas, or parlor plays. The play was 
a tremendous hit and is still used fre- 
quently by stock companies. The com- 
pany sent out by Mr. Frohman was a 
most brilliant one and Miss Otis had 
one of the leading roles in It. 

Miss Otis made and lost a fortune. 
By careful saving and Investments she 
accumulated a fortune of more than 
$100,000, which she used to back a week- 
ly paper in New York City. The paper 
proved to be a failure, after she had 
sunk practically all of her money in 
it, and she was compelled to return to 
the stage again. 

"The sketch she Is presenting at the 
present time is a clever one and Is one 
of the "headline" acts on the Orpheum 
circuit. 

"If I had the $100,000 back I would 
put It Into the show business, which I 
know something about," said Miss Otis 
yesterday. "Instead of sinking it In a 
business that I know nothing about. 
Perhans I shouldn't say nothing, for I 
spent "$100,000 learning about it, but I 
have had enough." 
a 

"The Blue Mouse." 

It is the "tempraniunt" of the mis- 
chievous little "Blue Mouse" which 
causes mo.st of the trouble In the play 
of the same name which the Messrs. 
Shubert will present at the Lyceum 
theater two nights, commencing Sun- 
day evening, Sept. 18 and 19, with a cast 
including Grace Merritt, Wilton Taylor, 
Inda Palmer. Guy D'Ennery. Mabel Rls- 
h>y, John Hynes, Gordon Mendelssohn, 
\V. G. Reynler, Frank Holbach, John 
Dunne, Mary MacGregor, Doris Kraker, 
Manual Alexander and others. 

"The Blue Mouse" is a dancer at a 
New York variety theater who Is em- 
jiloyed by the secretary of a railroad 
president to flirt with his employer and 



tlie Republicans that neitiier party 
will Invade tlie otheV's "safe" legis- 
lative territory, and this, the independ- 
ents say. assures a Democratic legis- 
lature. The last ReiJublican governor 
in Tennessee was Alvin Hawkins In 
1881-82. The convention was run off 
without a ripple of opposition to the 
program of the leaders. 

The pardon of Senator Carmack's 
.slayer was denounced repeatedly. The 
convention ended with Capt. Hooper's 
address. 



BEST LAND 
FORTU 

Poor Farm Demonstration 

Shows Possibilities of 

Potato Raising. 

County Not Growing 5 Per 

Cent of Its Possible 

Crop. 



Interested farmers and others who 
attended the potato demonstration at 
the county poor farm yesterday came 
away more strongly convinced than 
ever before that St. Louis county is 
destined to be a great farming com- 
munity. Prof. Thomas Cooper, who has 
charge of the experimental work on 
tiie farm, aslsted by Prof. A. R. Kohler, 
showed the visitors a few things about 
potatoes grown in tnis county that most 
of them had not known. C. Melby, su- 
perintendent of the farm, cultivated 
the ten-acre tract demonstration plot, 
which is one of twenty-one laid out 
by Prof. Cooper in different parts of 
the state. 

Briefly, the results of the demonstra- 
tion led to these conclusions: 

The potato crop is the most profit- 
able one in St. Louis county. 

Selection of the best seed Is of pri- 
mary importance. 

Tlie crop should be cultivated ac- 
cording to approved, modern methods. 
The early Ohio potato Is the best 
adapted to St. Louis county. 

Rural New Yorker No. 2 and Carman 
No. 1 are the best late varieties. 
. Dipping to prevent scabs is essen- 
tial, the best dips being corrosive sub- 
limate, four ounces to thirty gallons 
of water; formalde hyde, one pint to 
thirty gallons of water. 

Uniformity of seeds insures high 
prices for product. 

Some time during the winter Prof. 
Cooper win hold a demonstration at 
the county farm with the dairy cow 
as his subject. 

"St. Louis county can easily produce 
a potato crop sufficient to answer the 
needs of Duluth and the range towns 
— it is not now growing 5 per cent of 
its normal capacity," said Prof. Cooper. 
"The farmers do not realize what they 
have in the way of a potato producing 
soil. It Is a rich sandy loam that 
should put this county among the first 
in the state as a grower of this prod- 
uct. 

"This Is one of the best kept demon- 
stration farms under my supervision, 
showed signs of having had surface 




Glass Lamps 

Glasj Lamp, has etched 
bowi and chimney, has 
largij receptacle for oil, 
complete burner, chim- 
ney and wick; on spe- 
cial sale this week Cdg* 
at, each VVK, 






Coal Hod& 

Large size, open Ja- 
panned Coal Hods — you 
ought to have one of 
tiiese; on special sale 
this week, at IQo 

each *«'^ 



Oil Cans 

Oil Cans made of heavy 

tin, holds one gallon, on 

special sale this "f Q/» 
wee:<, at each *vV 



This 12-Piece Kitcltten Set 29c 




Combinets 

'\^'hlte, semi-porcelain 
Slop Jars, witii cover 
and ball; on special 
sale this week, ISQ^ 
at each Oif\, 




Twelve-piece Kitchen Sets — Consisting of fork, potato 
masher, egg beater, mixing sp<ion, nutmeg grater, 
large grater, tea strainer, coffee strainer, paring knife, 
cake knife, pancake turner, and oookie cut- 
ter — on special sale this week at, 
per set 



29c 




Fiirc Shovels 

Short handle Fire Shov- 
sls, have large scoop 
and flat handle, nicely 
jap£,nned; on special 
sale this week, Mg» 

at each '^ 





Carpet Beaters 

You will have to beat your rugs, furniture and 
mattresses when you clean house. Try a "Just 
Right" Carpet Beater. I. will do the 
— on special sale this week at, 
each 



Bread Boxes 

Made of heavy tin. Ja- 
panned In colors, gilt 
decorations; tonre In 3 
sizef: on special sale 
this week at — 

Small sue 4fto Each 

!»letlluin Slze...B»c Eaoh 
Large i?"'** *!>« Kaeh 



work 

9c 



^<fPfec£A^f£. 




r 



Curtain Stretchers 

Now is the time that every house- 
keeper needs a curtain stretcher — 
why buy a poor one when you 
can get a good one, with adjust- 
able nickel pins, on special 
this week at, 
each 



sale 




^ 



oo 

Terms $1.00 Per Week. 




4» 



$1.33 l^ 



Your Old Stov4> Taken as 
Part Payment. 




Tea Kettles 

Gray Enamel Tea Kettles — 
first-class goods, strong and 
durable; on sale this week — 

Larse Slse e9c Each 

Medium Sl«e K»o Kach 

Small !!)i>e 4t>c Kaoh 



, Kelly's 3-Room Outfit $69— Terms $1.50 Per Week 



SOCIAL ORDER OF 

MOOSE ENDS MEETING. 

Detroit, Mich., Sept. 15. — The Social 
Order of Moose closed its annual con- 
vention here last night. Rochester was 
chosen at the meeting place for the 
next convention. The following officers 
were elected: 

Supreme president, Byron R. Bronson, 
Toledo; first vice president, W. Hampel, 
Detroit; second vice president, J. H. 
McGllton, Washington; recording secre- 
tary, A. L. Rafter, Toledo; financial sec- 
retary, R. P. Parish, Detroit; treasurer, 
C. J. Welser, Detroit; marshal, C. B. 
Gardener, Washington; member of the 
board of trustees, P. Sullvan, Roches- 
ter. 

m 
X. P. Man Weds Michigan Girl. 

Jackson, Mich., Sept. 15. — Seymour 
Beach t!?onger, for the past seven years 
representative of the Associated Press 
at St. Petersburg Russia, was married 
last night at Leslie. Mich., to Miss Lu- 
clle Bailey of that city. After a wed- 
ding supper Mr. and Mrs. Conger left 
for the East. They will spend a week 
in Xew York and vicinity before sailing 
for Russia. 



A.11 Riglit? 

If not, try 

Grape-Nuts 

FOOD 
"There's a Reason** 

Re^d "The Road to VVellville," in plcps. 



cultivation on an average of once each 
week during the summer. 

"The visitors showed some interest 
when hills were found containing five 
and one-half pounds of potatoes. At 
an average of one pound per hill, with 
the rows three feet apart and hills 
fourteen Inches apart In the rows, 210 
bushels can be raised to the acre. This 
compares favorably with eighty-seven 
bushels per acre, the present average 
of the state potato producing areas 
and shows the differences bet^veen ap- 
proved and antiquated methods of cul- 
tivation." 

Among the Duluthlans at the demon- 
stration were Bishop McGolrlck, C. P. 
Craig, A. B. Hostetter and Maj. 13va. 



TAFT CALLS OFF HIS 
WAR ON INSURGENTS; 
NORTON TELLS CHANGE 



certain states like Wisconsin and 
Iowa and el-sewhere, he was willing, 
in the Interest of what the leaders be- 
lieved would lead to party success, to 
make certain discriminations, but tlie 
president has concluded that It is his 
duty now to treat all Republican con- 
gressmen and senators alike, wllhoul 
any discrimination. 

Follo^v L'sual Rale. 
"He win now follow the usual rule 
In Republican congressional districts 
and states and follow the recommend- 
ations made by Republican congress- 
men and senators, of whatever shade 
of political opinions, only requiring 
that "he men recommended shall be 
good men, the most competent and the 
best fitted for the particular office. 
Sincerely yours, 

"CHARLES D. NORTON. 

"Secretary to the President." 
Disc:ussing the views of President 
Taft, as disclosed by the letter of Sec- 
retary Norton, persons conversant 
with national politics said that they 
should not be taken as a concession 
to "insurgency." A.s the party lead- 
ers view the situation, Iowa Is not 
'violently Insurgent." 

The Iowa Republican platform, it Is 
pointed out, subscribed to "such ef- 
forts as I'resident Taft and his ad- 
visers have made to fulfill the prom- 
ises of the national platform," and ap- 
proved "the effort of the president to 
securo the desired Information for a 
tariff revision through a board of ex- 
perts.' 

AniDng those from whom. It is said, 
the president temporarily withheld 
federal patronage, were Senators La 
Follette of Wisconsin; Bri.stow 
Kansas, and Dolllver and Cunimins 
Iowa, and Representative Hubbard 
Iowa. 



of 
of 

of 



ACCUSED OF BIG THEFT 



(Continued from page 1.) 



his and the welfare and success of the 
party. 

"While Republican legislation pend- 
ing in congress was opposed by certain 
Republli-ans, the president felt it to 
be his duty to the party and to the 
country to withhold federal patronage 
from certain senators and congressmen 
who seemed to be In opposition to the 
administration's efforts to carry out 
the promises of the party platform. 
That attitude, however, ended with the 
primary elections and nominating con- 
ventions wiilch have now beeji held, 
and In which the voters have had op- 
portunity to declare themselves. The 
people have spoken as the party faces 
the fall elections; the question must 
be settled by Republicans of every 
shade of opinion whether the differ- 
ences of the last session shall be per- 
petuated or shall be forgotten. 
Sees Danger to Party. 

"He recognizes the danger that In 
certain cases expressions of feeling 
were so intense as to make It difficult 
In some Instances for factions to come 
together and work for the party, but 
as he stated In his letter to the Re- 
publican congressional committee, he 
believes It can be done and should be 
done. The president Is confident that 
vou will yourselves meet your local and 
"state situation In this spirit, and that 
vou will write to your friends and ask 
"them to do likewise. 

"The president feels that the value 
pf federal patronage has been greatly 
exaggerated, and the refusal to grant 
It has probably been more useful to the 
men affected than the appointments 
would have been. 

"In the preliminary skirmishes in 



(Continued from page 1.) 



turned secretly by a federal grand Jury, 
Feb. 17. 1910, and the existence of 
whlcl was suppressed by the federal 
authorities. 

Three days after the Indictment was 
secretly returned and suppressed, on 
Feb. 20, it was announced that the 
statute of limitations had operated to 



No Trouble to Have 

Beautiful Hair 



(From the Chicago Inter Ocean.) 
A well known New York society 
womjin, renowned for the exquisite 
loveliness of her hair, is reported to 
have said: "I attribute the abund- 
ance and glossiness of my hair to the 
fact that my hairdresser never uses 
water on my head. She uses only 
a drj shampoo, sifting It evenly over 
my head and then brushing it thor- 
oughly — brushing it until all the 
powder Is removed. . 
"She says wetting 
and oolor out of the 
it dull and brittle, 
inquiry she told me 
shampoo herself — simply 
ounci»s of therox with 4 



takes the life 
hair and leaves 
In reply to my 
she made the 
mixing 4 
ounces of 
powdered orris root. She explains 
that the orris root cleanses, while the 
thertx keeps the hair light and fluffy 
and retains its natural color." 



stop possible criminal action in the 

peculiar case. Coincident with this 
ruse by the autliorities, jecret service 
men were detailed to watch Fitzger- 
ald constantly and make a rigid in- 
vestigation of the former teller's finan- 
cial interests and all'airs uiscoverles 
made by these secret service operatives 
resulted in the order for Fitzgerald's 
arrest. 

The Indictment against Fitzgerald 
read In court specifies four counts. 
Three charge embezzlement and the 
fourtii charges larceny. Under these 
charges a maximum sentence of ten 
years irj a federal prls jn, or a fine 
equal to the sum embezzled. Is the 
penalty upon conviction provided in the 
federal statutes. 

Spent Much Money. 
Attaches of the district attorney's 
office declare that sincti the strange 
disappearance of the $17;i,OoO from the 
sub-treasury^ Fitzgerald has done the 
following tilings: 

Organized the Illinois Car Manufac- 
turing c<jinpany with a $50,000 plant; 
organized the Illinois Boli , Nut & Forg- 
ing company, with a large plant in 
Chicago; dealt extensive in stocks and 
bonds; muved from a nuKlest flat to a 
JlO.oOO residence in Rogers' Park, a 
suburb of Chicago; paid for this new 
home and furnished l' expensively; 
lived in expensive style and enter- 
tained friend.'^ lavishly. 

From the time oi tlie returning of 
the suppressed indictment on Feb. 17, 
Fitzgerald was never out of sight of 
secret service men when awake, and 
while he slept operatives were on guard 
at his home or hotel. Tht- former teller 
was followed to his offices down town 
and watched throughcut the day. 
Meanwhile all of his financial trans- 
actions were checked up closely and 
certain investments tracjd to him. 

Tiie arrest came as a complete sur- 
prise to every one e.xcejit the govern- 
ment men interested in the case. The 
fact that secret service men searched 
Fitzgerald's offices and his residence 
Immediately following his arrest leads 
to the belief that he did something to- 
day which hastened his s.rrest. 
Ih Famous Myntery. 
The sub-treasury robbery, which has 
been one of the most baffling myster- 
ies in years in which tl-e secret serv- 
ice has been required :o investigate, 
occurred Wednesday, I'eb. 20, 1907. 
The money was all in $1,000 and $10.- 
0000 bills. Federal officers throughout 
the country were brought Into the 
hunt for the missing money. For 
three years all persons found to have 
000 and $10,000 bills weie sub- 
cted to open or covei t scrutiny by 
secret sei'vlce agents. 

The $173,000 disappeared from Fitz- 
gerald's cage In the sub-treasury, 
where he was employed as sorting 
teller. AVhen questioned regarding the 
disappearance of the money, Fitz- 
gerald said that he had gone out to 
lunch and that when \u: returned the 
money was gone. He was closely 
questioned at the time and was shad- 
owed for months. 

A year after the robbery occurred. 
Fitzgerald was arrested by a private 
detective agency, acting for William 
Boldenweck, the sub-treasurer. The 
charge was not pressed at this time, 
however, and Fitzgerald proceeded to 
institute damage suits against Bold- 
enweck and the detective agency for 
alleged fal.se arrest. 

From that time until his Indictment 
last February. Fitzgerald was not mo- 
lested. 

When asked how he had accumu- 
lated certain sums of money, he ex- 
plained that he had made the money 
In speculation and shon-ed records of 
certain deals in which he engaged. 
Mr. Bolden'weck., who Lb to be suc- 



Sl. 
Jec 



ceeded by Len Small of Kankakee, 111., 
as assistant treasurer in charge of the 
Chicago sub-treasury, sent his resig- 
nation to President Taft on Sept. 8. 
Some Other Ca«ea. 

The robbery of tlie Cliicago sub-' 
treasury stands as one of the largest 
as well as most adroitly executed 
thefts In the history of the treasury 
department. 

The archives of the department rec- 
ord a mysterious embezzlement of 
$100,000 from the New Orleans sub- 
treasury during the Civil war. The 
vaults in the department at Washing- 
ton were rifled of $7:i,000 in 1S72 by a 
trusted employe, who was caught and 
convicted. A few years later, the re- 
ceiving valuts of the same institution 
were robbed of a package of bills by 
a clerk. He also was tried and con- 
victed. 

In October, 1907, the sub-treasury in 
St. Louis was robbed of $61,5o0. 



INDIGESTION IS 
ENDED FOREVER 

No Heartburn, Gas, Dys- 
pepsia or Headache Five 
Minutes Later. 



Nothing will remain undigested or 
sour on your stomach if you will take 
a little Dlapepsln occasionally. This 
powerful digestive and antacid, though 
as harmless and pleasant as candy, 
will digest and prepare for assimila- 
tion into the blood all the food you 
can eat. 

Eat what your stomach craves, 
without the slightest fear of Indiges- 
tion or that you will be bothered with 
sour risings. Belching, Gas on Stoni- 
ach. Heartburn, Headaches from 
stomach. Nausea, Bad Breath, Water 
Brash or a feeling like you had swal- 
lowed a lump of lead, or other dis- 
agreeable miseries. Should you be 
suffering now from any stomach dis- 
order you can get relief in five min- 
utes. 

If you will get from your pharma- 
cist a 50-cent case of Pape's Dlapepsln 
you could always go to the table with 
a hearty appetite, and your meals 
would taste good, because you w^ould 
know there would be no Indigestion 
or Sleepless nights or Headache or 
Stomach misery all the next day; and, 
besides, you would not need laxatives 
or liver pills to keep your stomach 
and bowels clean and fresh. 

Pape's Dlapepsln can be obtained 
from your druggist, and contains more 
than sufficient to thoroughly cure the 
worst case of Indigestion or Dyspep- 
sia. There is nothing better for Gaa 
on the Stomach or sour odors from 
the stomach or to cure a Stomach 
Headache. 

You couldn't keep a handler or 
oiore useful article in the house. 









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12 



Thuf«iiay, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 15, 1910. 




Cbi$ lyeeK's Sunday School Crnon 

^VRITTEN FOSt THE HERALD BY mV. J, S. KiRTLEY. D. D. 




BIMIAV SCHOOI, I.ESS«)X: SKI»r. 18. 

Matt, xxll, 15-;:U. :M-4t{i Three Uucm- 

tionM. 

THE COXMSCTIOX. 

The battle witli His tneinies went 
rlgt'.l on. Alter ilis parables of Judg- 
ment, spoken agiiinst them, they at- 
tacked Him with other questions, with 
a view lo entrap llhn Into saying 
Bomethint; on which tliey or the Ko- 
nians cuuitl bring some charge. Their 
purpijse was to confuse and com- 
promlae Him. They succeeded In 
neiiher. 



Till:: L.K*>iiUX. 

I. 
About TuA.eit. 15-22. 

We omit the text. They asked Him 
about paying tribute to Caesar. If 
He said it was right, that would en- 
rago the Jewish i)Opulaoe, who would 
then bo willing to see them arrest and 
punish Him; It He said it was wrong, 
they would report Him to the Uoman 
Offktrs. who would arrest Him for 
treas >n. if not for open revolt. They 
thought He was in a corner, with no 
way out. But nothing was easier to 
Him than to walk rlgiit out of that 
corner. Ills reply may .iseem an eva- 
rlon, but It was more. It taught hon- 
esty toward those who supplied them 
■with money, tiUelity to civic respon- 
Bibllity, without specifically defining It, 
and tidelity to G<id also. We have been 
finding help in that reply for our duties 
ever since. They were defeated. After 
that the Sadducees tried to entangle 
Him In a question about the resurrec- 
tion, and He exposed them. Then the 
Pharisees come with more questions. 

n. 

About the Greateiit runininntl, 34-40. 

"ilut the lM:arlseos, when they heard 
that he had put the t?adducees to si- 
lence, gathered themselves together, 
^iid one of them, a lawyer, asked a 
iutstion, trying him: Teacher, which 
IS the great commandment in the law? 
And He said unto liiiii. thou sl.alt love 
the Lord thy God with all thy lieart, 
and with all thy soul, and with all thy 
mind. This is the great and first com- 
mandment. And a second like unto it 
Is this, Thou Shalt love thy neighbor 
as thyself. On these two command- 
ments the whole law hangeih, and the 
prcjihets." 

1. DISri'TATION.— The Jews loved 
to dispute anil split hairs, not in an in- 
dependent discussion, but In the 
■Weighing of evidence from their old 
rabbis. They had the commandments 
all divided Into classes, some great 
and some small. The rabbis had di- 
Moses into 365 pro- 
day of the year, 



vided the laws >f 
hiliitions, one f 
and 24S conim.; 
of the liodv, a- 
613 in all. T 
grouped In classe> 
lesser. Therefore 



o for each part 

.;new the body — 

re weighed and 

•ailed greater and 

sin and virtues 



•were greater and lesser. It was very 
puerile — most of It was. 

2. FX'NUAMEXTALS. — Jesus cut 
througii all details and sophistries and 
declared that the greatest law was the 
law that called Into action the greatest 
eltment In our nature, the power of 
love. It also expresses tlse greatest 
element In God's !;iti:re, for John said, 
">Jod Is love." 1 also said "the 
greatest of thf ve," paraphrased 
by Prof. Drummoiid into "the greatest 
thing in the world." It Is what makes 
one most t^odlike and It achieves the 
greatest results of all known powers 
on eartli. It Is also capable of calling 
out and combining all the powers of 
nund and soul In its action. It is also 
ca;.al'le of fixing one on the highest 
object, even on God Himself, and Is 
capable of doing what nothing else can 
do — taking as mucii interest in others 
as In oneself. 

3. SELF-LOVE.— There are three 
right objects of love — God. self. 



others. The law does not com- 
mand one to love himself That Is 
not necvssary. We do that anyhow. 
Love of self is taken as something to 
start with and to compare other loves 
with. Love of God must far surpass 
love of self. Every power of heart, 
soul and mind must love Him. These 
words are used In their popular, rather 
than thcdr scientific meanings. Love 
for God is Inclusive, for it holds all 
other forms of love, as we love all 
that He loves, and It focuses all our 

Fowers on Him. It Is also exclusive, 
or no base or debasing love can exist 
with love to Him. 

Self-love Is tacitly cojnmended, and 
made a standard. One is to love others 
as himself. Then he should love him- 
self spontameously, forgivingly, per- 
sistently, because he possesses his own 
life and that is from God. He must 
iove others In the same way and for 
the reason that they possess the same 
human life as himself, both from God. 
The ability to put oneself in another's 
.place Is tne greatest of human gifts. 
We call it sympathy, which is another 
way of saying love. How we come to 
love God, John tells us — "becaus'e He 
first loved us." Ho-\v It works, Paul 
tells us — from within; he says, "ye 
yourselves are ta;ught of God to love 
one another. " What U leads to, Jesus 
tells us, later — "if ye love me, ye will 
keep my commandments." How It will 
manifest itself toward others, we are 
cle.arly told — "let each este'am others 
better than himself;" "bear ye one an- 
other's burdens and so fulfill the law 
of Clirist." How It will overcome ob- 
stacles we have seen In many cases — 
loving the uncongenial, because there 
are good qualities In them and a soul 
worth helping. 

III. 

.\bout the .Me!«!«lnb. 41-40. 

Now while the Pliarisees were gath- 
ered together, Jesus asked them a 
question, saying. What think ye of the 
Christ? whose son is he? They say 
unto Him, The Son of David. He saiih 
unto them. How then doth David in the 
spirit call him Lord, saying: 
The Lord said unto my Lord, 
Sit thou on my right hand. 
Till I put thine enemies underneath 
thy feet? 

If David then calleth him Lord, how 
Is he his son? And no one was able to 
answer Him His word, neither durst 
any man from that day forth ask Him 
any more questions. 

1. ATT.\CK. — Jesus is the attacking 
party this time. It is not hard for 
him to Impale them on the horns of a 
dilemma. 11 Is not about Himself di- 
rectly, but about the Messiah, prom- 
ised by the prophets and expected by 
the Pharisees. It was not about the 
general fact of the Messiah, but about 
His peculiar origin as taught In their 
scriptures. It was distinctly taught 
that He was David's son and David's 
Lord; but these official teachers of the 
people were denying His Lordship. 
Their inconsistency and Ignorance and 
perversitv needed this exposure. 

2. VIiJTORY. — They are silent and 
defeated. What could they say? It 
was unspeakably humiliating to them 
to be defeated, when they had led the 
attack on Him, after eareful prepar- 
ation for it. Their resources were 
gone. The different parties, who hated 
each other, had united against Him 
and they had been defeated, singly and 
in groups. Having w^on, both In the 
offensive and defensive, Jesus has the 
field and Is left undisturbed the rest 
of the day. It must have been well 
on toward" evening and He ■A-ent out to 
Bethany for the night. His enemies 
were discouraged. The people who 
saw their defeat laughed at tl-.em and 
admired Jesus. It was decided to let 
the matter drop till after the crowds 
should leave the city and then arrest 



DILUTH, SOUTH SHORE & ATLANTIC RY. 



EXCUR 




TORONTO, ONT„ Sept. 5 to 8; Canadian National Exhibition. 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Sept. 1-1 to 18; G. A. R. National 

Encampment. 
DETROIT, Toledo, Cleveland and Buffalo, Sept. 14, 16. 18, 21. 

Popular Fall Excursions by Rail and Lake. Usual Low 

fares. 
EASTERN CANADA, New York and New England States. 

Summer Tourist I-"ares. Tickets on sale every day to Sept. 30. 
For full particulars, write or call on 

A. J. PERRIN, General Agent, 

430 West Superior Street, Duluth, Minn. 



WHOLESALE 

JOBBERS AND 
MANUFACTURERS 

OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA. 

Reliable and Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a Stri^ly 
Jobbing and Manufacturing Business. 



ASBESTOS. 
A. H. Kriegcr Co. 



BAKERS. 
Crescent Bakery. 



BLAST FURNACE. 
Zenith Furnace Co. 



BREWERS. 

Duluth Brewirg & Malting Co. 

Fitger Brewing Co. 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 
MANUFACTURERS. 

Bridgeman-RuBsell Co. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 

Clyde Iron Works. 
National Iron Co. 



GLASS, PAINTS AND BUILD- 
ING MATERIALS. 

Paine & Nixon Co. 



GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Twohy Co. 

Stone-Ordcan-Well • Co. 

Wright-Clarkson Mercantile Co. 



CEMENT AND PLASTER. 
D. G. Cutler Co. 



COMMISSION AND PRODUCE. 
Fitzsimmons-Palmer Co. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

National Candy Co. 
(Duluth Factory.) 

DRUGS. 
L. W. Leithhead Drug Co. 

DRY GOODS. 
F. A. Patrick & Co. 



HARDWARE. 

Kelley-How-Thomson Co. 

Marshall-Wells Hdw. Co. 



FURNITURE. 
DeWitt-Seitz Company. 



LUMBER, SASH & DOOR MAN- 
UFACTURERS. 

Woodruff Lumber Co. 



WHOLESALE AND MAN'F'S 
OF MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

Christenscn-Mcndenhall- 
Graham Co. 



PAPER. 

Duluth Paper & Stationery Co. 

McClellan Paper Co. 

Peyton Paper Co. 



PLUMBING SUPPLIES. 
Crane & Ordway Co. 




Him. But that nlgrht Judas came with 

his proposition to secure Him for them. 



^VHAT THE MASTERS SAY. 

Jesua was far more than a match for 
them. Hour by hour he steadfastly 
met the attack. His straigrhtforward- 
ness put their duplicity to shame, and 
His skill In argument turned every 
spear which they directed at Him round 
to their own breasts. At last He car- 
ried the war Into their own camp before 
the onlookers. Then when He had si- 
lenced them. He let loose the storm of 
His Indignation and delivered against 
them the philippic whioh Is recorded 
the 23rd chapter of Matthew. Giving 
unrestrained expression to the jient-up 
criticism of a life-time, He exposed 
their hypocritical practices In sentences 
that fell like strokes of lightning, and 
made them a scorn and laughing stock, 
not only to the hearers then, but to all 
the world since. — Stalker. 

It was a beautiful exhibition of true 
love when a strong, athletic young man 
consented to give his healthy blood to 
be Infused into the veins of a sister who 
was pining away through dl.sease, and 
thus saved her life. He loved her with 
all his strength. When we love the 
Lord our God with all our strength we 
shall be willing to give Him our best, 
our very life.— Pollard. 



PERTIM::\T QIESTIOXS. 

1. Can one di.^charge his whole duty 
to the state without discharging his 
duty to God? 

3. Is It possible to ally oneself with 
God in everything? 

3. How does self-righteousness pro- 
duce Ignorance? 

4. How can the Scriptures settle all 
our difficulties? 

5. Can one love people properly 
without loving God? 

6. How can one prove that Jesus 
first taught the brotherhood of man? 



u 



OLITICAL GAME," 
DECLARES JAMES 



He Replies to Republicans 

on the Baliinger 

Committee. 

Louisville, Ky., Sept. 15. — Congress- 
man Ollie James, one of the Demo- 
cratic members of the Baliinger in- 
vestigating committee, made the fol- 
lowing statement in reply to one issued 
by the Republican members of the 
committee in Chicago: 

"The statement issued by Senator 
Nelson and his colleagues is only 
positive proof of what we saw demon- 
strated in Minneapolis, and that Is 
that the Republican members of the 
committee did not desire to make a re- 
port upon the Baliinger case until 

after the elections. Their attempt to 
prevent a report was resorted to by 
breaking the Quorum. Senator Root 
arrived In New York on the 6th of this 
month. The committee did not meet 
until the 9th to pass on the Baliinger 
reports. Had he wanted he could liave 
been in Minneapolis. Senator Flint 
stated to the committee positively 
that he would not be present. Repre- 
sentative Olmsted was in Maine mak- 
ing Republican speeches which he 
thought more important than attending 
to his official duties. l-tepresentatlve 
Denby was absent attempting to defeat 
an insurgent for tho senate." 

LEAN TOWARD PROGRESSIVES 



Missouri Republicans Adopt Phit- 
forui After Debate. 

Jefferson City, Mo.. Sept. 15. — The 
Republican party of Missouri adopted 
a platform yesterday that has a lean- 
ing toward progressive ideas, after a 

contest that was one of the most bitter 
which has ever arisen in a Republican 
convention in the state. 

The fight was over the indorsement 
of the I'ayne-Aldrich tariff law and 
the mentioning of Former President 
Roosevelt. Governor H. S. Hadley, who 
Is known as a "progressive," insisted 
tliat the former president's name be 
mentioned as the man w^ho established 
the policy of conservation. In return 
for this, the names of Representa- 
tive Payne and Senator Aldrich were 
written in the tariff plank. 

"The platform Is a little progressive," 
said Congressman Polltte Elvins, a 
standpatter, "but I guess it will be 
about what the people of Missouri 
want." 

The Democrat platform was framed 
without prolonged debate. Both con- 
ventions adjourned after adopting the 
platforms. 

li\'hen Merit Wins. 

When the medicine you take cures 
your disease, tones up your system and 
I makes you feel better, stronger and 
; more vigorous than before. That is 
' what Foley Kidney Pills do for you, in 
all cases of backache, headache, ner- 
; vousness, loss of appetite, sleepless- 
; ness and general weakness that is 
, caused by any disorder of the kidneys 
I or bladder. Sold by all druggists. 



(lEMINSOX SEMENTED; 
j GOES TO SUPREME COURT. 

! Chicago, Sept. 15. — Motion for an ar- 
i rest of judgment In the case of Dr. 
Haldane Cleminson, found guilty of 
murdering his wife a year ago, was 
denied by Judge McSurely yesterday 
and the prisoner was formally sen- 
tenced to Imprisonment for life. 

"Have you anything to say?" asked 
the court. 

The prisoner's lips moved, but no 
sound came forth. 

Scarcely a dozen persons were pres- 
ent in court, although at the trial hun- 
dreds were turned away disappointed. 
The prisoner's mother, a frail looking 
old lady in black, rushed forward and 
asked to be allowed to talk to her son. 
They were allowed half an hour in pri- 
vate together. The case will go to the 
supreme court. 

EUGENE HIGGINS HAS 

TO PAY BIG CUSTOMS FINE. 






I ii' 




IL OLEIi-U^ OF lU 
TTHDKTYLOT 






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N SALE OF LOTS 



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M OlE O'OLOeHC 





i. 



in* 



3 




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Don't Miss It! It will be your last chance to 
buy a lot in Crosley Park at our original prices 
and terms. After this you will have to deal 
with people to whom we have sold. Get in 
now on the ground floor. 



■^ 






SIGOItES I 
ANY LOT I 



BALANCE (FROM $150 to $575) IH WEEKLY SUMS OF FROM $1 to $2--N0 IHTEREST. 

HO PAYMENTS WHEN SICK. 






LONSDALE ByiLOiiyG. 



NO SALES MADE UNTIL ADVERTiSED TIME. 





I DAY AT 

;arnum fair 

Horse Races and Ball Game 
Features of Enter- 
tainment. 



Fine Exhibits of Stock, Vege- 
tables and Women s 
Handicraft 



(By a Staff Correspondent.) 

Today is the big day at the Carlton 
county state fair at Barnum. The im- 
portant part of the sports program Is 
due to take place this afternoon, with 
the free-for-all pace or trot one mile, 
three in Ave, for a ?200 purse as a fea- 
ture. A half-mile pace or tcot for 
Carlton county horses is also sched- 
uled for this afternoon and a ball game 
for a $40 purse will be held during the 
day. 

E.xhiblts of all kinds poured Into the 
fair grounds all day yesterday and the 
accommodations were taxed. Perhaps 
tlie greatest improvement over last 
year's exhibits is to be found in the 
stock buildings. Headed by the Bar- 
num Guernsey association, the Carlton 
county farmers have made great 
strides during the year in stock rais- 
ing. At the head of this class of ex- 
hibits comes the association's herd of 
six registered Guernsey breeders, as 
line a herd as can be found in the state. 
.V $50 silver cup has been donated by 
the state dairymen's association for the 



New York, Sept. 15. — Eugene Hlggins. 
the millionaire carpet manufacturer of 
Yonkers, ran afoul of the customs au- 
thorities when he returned from Eu- 
rope Tuesday, and arrived at a settle- 
ment yesterday by which he was al- 
lowed to pay the foreign value of the 
articles seized, plus the duties. In all 
it cost him almost $3,000 to regain 
possf'ssion of goods for which he had 
paid originally $1 160. The authorities 
were convinced, they said, that Mr. 
Hlggins had no criminal intent to de- 
fraud the government when he failed 
to make the proper declaration. 

Dr. .Vdolph Menu of Chicago, a pes- 
senger on the same liner, who failed 
to declare jewelry appraised at $1,000, 
paid an additional duty of $70 on 
wearing apparel he declared at $300, 
and on which he bad already paid $18 
at the pier, but the jewelry still is held 
by the government. 

■ ■■ - 

Neuro Shot to Ufath. 
Birmingham, Ala., Sent. 15. — Isaac 
Glover, a negro, wanted for murder, 
was shot to death bv a posse of citi- 
zens four miles south of bpringville, 
Ala., last evening. The negro shot two 
members of the posse before he was 
killed. 



The Important 
Problem 

confronting anyone In need of a laxa- 
tive is not a question of a single ac- 
tion only, but of permanently bene- 
ficial effects, which will follow proper 
efforts to live in a healthful way, with 
the assistance of Syrup of Figs and 
Elixir of Senna, whenever it is re- 
quired, as it cleanses the system 
gently yet promptly, without Irritation 
and will therefore always have the 
preference of all who wish the best of 
family laxatives. 

The combination has the approval 
of physicians because it is known to 
be truly beneficial, and because it has 
given satisfaction to the millions of 
well-informed families who have used 
it for many years past 

To get its beneficial effects, alwa3"s 
buy the genuine manufactured by the 
California Fig Syrup Co. only. 



best dairy herd, the requirements for 
entry In this competition being one 
breeder and a trio of cows. The Carl- 
ton Stock market, with Guernsey and 
Holstein herds and F. M. Zlmmer and 
J. 1). Connor with Jersey herds being 
among the more conspicuous entries 
for the cup competition. 

Juilglng Begins. 
The judging on the various exhibits 
is in progress today. Secretary Thomas 
Spencer of the fair association reported 
nearly 300 entries this morning, by far 
the largest list of names of contestants 
ever submitted to the fair. Some of 
tlie entrants have as many as fifty or 
sixty ijxhibitg. 

A vegetable exhibit w^hich Is at- 
tractirg a good deal of attention and 
which bears excellent testimony as to 
the county's ability to withstand a se- 
vere drouth, is that of the school chil- 
dren of Carlton county. The produce 
was raised In their private gardens. 
The business men of the county sub- 
scribed $50 for prizes In this contest 
and the county commissioners appro- 
priate<l $25 more, and as a result the 
childrtm are out in force with a fine 
collection of vegetables of all sorts, 
pumpkins and cabbages being featured. 
H. C. Hanson's big Yorkshire boar is 
one of the probable prize winners in 
the hog class, and Jess Doane, the 
Carlton Stock market, J. A. Bell and 
J. C. Cheeseraan also had Yorkshires 
entered. A. A. Anderson has entered a 
herd of Angora goats that ranks with 
the be.st in Its class entered at the state 
fair a.nd also has a Hock of Oxford 
Southdowna that look like winners. 
G. G. Beck has a fine herd of Shrop- 
shire sheep entered. 

The women of Carlton county are 
out in force and have a splendid ex- 
hibit, Including everything in the way 
of women's handiwork, from pickles to 
oil paintings. 

Big crowds are expected at the fair 
this afternoon. A crowd of visitors 
arrived In Barnum on this morning's 
train, and tonight a special will run to 
Carlton, Cloquet and Duluth, leaving 
Barnum at 6 o'clock and reaching Du- 
luth about 9 o'clock. 

I<teld Sports Snturdar. 
Thei'e are no horse races on the card 
for tomorrow, but a program of field 
sports. including practically every 
kind of track event, will be run off and 
there will be a number of speeches, an 
addre.ss by Alexander McKnight being 
featured. The big fair will close at 
sundown tomorrow night. 

Tlie officers of the fair association 
this year are: H. R. I'atterson, presi- 
dent; WinJield Holmes, vice president; 
H. Gerlach, treasurer; and Thomas 
Spencjr, secretary. The executive com- 
mittee is as follows: 

J. Atkinson, C. B. Oswell, G. Ander- 
son Atkinson; W. W. Beck Jess Doane, 
G, Mossenbring, Skelton; A. C. Wll- 
cutts, R. Jones, A. C. McKusky. Hol- 
yoke; O M. Scott, A. Bentfleld. Charles 
Johnson", Mahtowa; Ed. Watson, H. 
Baldwin, F. A. Watklns, Twin Lakes; 
Steve Tomczak, H. Patrick, F. Ander- 
son, Split Rock; O. Anderson, F. D. 
Vibert, William Kelly Knife Falls; 
C. P. Munter George Mathews, S. Nas- 
lund, Blackhoof; G. H. McEwen, E. 
Johnson. Eagle; C. Morse. J. Wright, 
Ed. ^^alker, Red Clover; L. Roderick, 
Thomas Trepenen, D. Anderson, Lake 
View; F. B McLaren, T. M. Ferguson, 
F. Hiibbegger. Wrenshall; John Peters, 
Jake Mann, Charles Johnson. Kalavala; 
Charles Mark, A. Eskio, E. E. Fisher. 
Thompson; Hon. S. Swanson, George 
Skelton. William W^csley, Moose Lake; 
Ben Peterson, John Medjo, John Swen- 
son. ]3arnum. 

Th(! committee In charge of the 
sportu at the fair Includes: C. F. 
Mahnke, Moose Lake; F. D. Vibert, Clo- 
quet; W\ M. Cain, Carlton; Kay Bar- 
stow, Barnum; Charles Johnson, Mah- 
towa and T. M. Ferguson, Baker. 

WIDOW KILLED ON EVE 
OF HER SECOND WEDDLNG. 



FmsT National Mm 

OF DULUTH 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits, $1,950,000. 

Travelers' Cheques 

Letters of Credit Foreign Exchange 

Checking Accounts Savings Accounts 

Safe Deposit Boxes. 




HAVE YOU SEEN 

THOSE NEW 

BACHELOR APART 

MENTS IN THE 

SHERWOOD 

BUILDINd 




Ahtiuliilfly fireproof.. Just 
Tvhat y<iu «niit — comfort, 
!lei;aat tub batbs nnd Kbo>v- 
*r batiiM. Ucst of (service. 
Convenient nnd luxurlouH. 
Kverj- room elega:itly fur- 
nlHbed.. TerniK lilS to 930. 
.\pply at 11^ Manhattan 
IlulldiuK.. Both 'Phones, 
U25. 



SHERWOOD 
&C0. 






band was run dbwn by a freight train 
several years ago and killed within 
sight o£ his home. 

FIXES BLAMeToR 
NAVAL DISASTER 

Investigating Board Finds No 

Fault With Officers 

or Men. 

Washington, Sept. 15. — Faulty instal- 
lation and design of tlie oil burning 
apparatus of the Drealnought North 
Dakota, were responsible for the acci- 
dent on the battleship on the eighth 

inst., whereby three mi»n w«re killed 
and eleven injured, according to the 
report of the investigating board. The 



explosion took place near Hampton^ 

Road.«. 

The board took much testimony, the 
most important coming from Lieut. 
Commander Grin G. Murfin, in charge of 
the ships machinery. He told how he 
had personally started two of the oil 
burners and was at work turning on 
the third when there was a flash of 
flame which seemed to run along the 
pipes and around to the separating 
tank. He ordered "abandon fire room" 
instantly, but so tierce was the fire that,- 
although every one rushed for the door' 
in the bulkhead, three men perished, 
probably being cut off in the bunkers 
by the flame and noxious gases. 
Of German Ortg-in. 

The board finds that no blame for the- 
flre or the damage therefrom attaches- 
to any one serving on the North Da- 
kota. The plant is of German origin- 
and was Installed by the contractors- 
who buitl the North Dakota. As they' 
guaranteed the performance of the ma- 
chinery for six months, it is believed- 
that they must maKe good the damage. 

Engineer in Chief Cone, commenting 
upon the report, says that it contains- 
nothing that will prevent the continue* 
use of oil as a naval fuel. 




Ws.shington, Sept. 15. — While about 
to board a southbound suburban car 
for t le city, where she intended to pur- 
chase the final articles for her trous- 
seau, Mrs. Eliza F. Williams, who was 
to have been married soon J^o Warren 
K. Jessup of Los Angeles, Cal., was 
struck vesterday by a northbound trol- 
ley car'and iastantly killed. Her hus- 



It is the natnre of •^omen to suffer 
uncomplainingly, the discomforts and 
fears that accompany the bearing of 
children. Motherhood is their crown- 
ing glory, and they brave its suffer- 
ings for the joy that children bring. 
No expectant mother need suffer, 
_ however, d'dring the period of wait- 

ing, norfeellhat'she is in danger when baby comes, if Mother's Friend is used 
in preparation of the e\-ent. Mother's Friend relieves the pain and discomfort 
caused by tho strain or the different ligaments, overcomes naupca by counter- 
action, prevents backache and numbness of limbs and soothes tho inflammation 
of breast glands. Its regtdar use fits and prepares every portion of the mother 'o 
system for a proper and natural ^^ A ^s»^ ^ 

ending of the term, ard it assures ^^« >^».^r \L=i. .rf»v<ev>^^ 
for her a quick and coriplete recov- 
ery. Mother's Friend is sold at 
drug stores. Write for free book for 
expectant mothers. 
BBADFIEIiD EEGULi4.T0E CO., 

Atlanta, Qa. 




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Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 15, 1910. 




18 



- ' *^- -■ 




JL J.J»JC# A 





ANGES 



MOUSER TO BE CITY 
CLERK OF GILBERT 



T 



City Council Recommends 

Bonds (or $20,000 (or 

Sewer System. 

Gilbert, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — At a special meeting of 
the city council Tuesday evening it 
was decided to recommend to the voters 
of the city at the special election to 
be held Sept. 27, that the bond for the 
sewage svstem he $20,000 instead of 
135.000, as flr.st planned on. The voters 
will decide on tlie bond Lssue. and 
should the iirop.i.'fition carry, a st'wage 
uysteni wl'l be installed hero this fall. 

The resignation of Clyde M. Campbell 
as city clerk was received and accepted. 
Daviil M. Mouser of the tjparta Lumber 
company and former edlt>jr of the Gil- 
bert Herald, wa.>= appolnle<l to fill the 
vacancy. 

SANITARY EXPERT 
TO VISIT EVELETH 



■4- 

! 



rJ 



Mrs. Caroline Barlletf Crane 

to Be Entertained By 

Clubs. 

Eveleth. Minn.. Sept. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Preparations are being 
made here by members of tlie Com- 
mercial and Art club.s for tlie reception 

of Mrs. Caroline Bartlelt Crane, the 
tnunii.-ipal sanitary expert, who will 
Inspect local comiltlons Oct. 5 and 6. 
The Uthello theater has been secured as 
the hall for the meeting to be held 
Oct. 6, In the evening at which time 
Mrs. Crane will report her findings 
here and her reconiniendations and 
corrections. 

Mrs. Crane will only v'.slt twelve 
cltie.s on her present trip in this state, 
and Eveleth will have the distinction 
of being the sole city on the range to 
be honored by her presence. She will 
arrive here on Oct. 5 from I>uluth, 
where she will spend five days investi- 
gating Zenith City municipal sanitai'y 
conditions. From here Mis. Crane will 
depart fur P.rairipr'i. 

TO GIVE MUSICALE. 

Ladies of Eveleth Making Elabor- 
ate Preparations for Event. 

Evt'leth, Minn.. St-pt. li>. — uSpocial to 
The Herald.) — Members of the Ladies' 
Aid Society of the First Presbyterian 
church are making elaborate prepara- 
tions for the musical entertainment to 
be griven under their direction next 
Thur.sday evening In the Monitor hall, 
■with musical talent from Duluth and 
this city. 

Ampng the vocalists from Duluth 
•who will take part In the entertain- 
ment are A Flaaten, Miss Delia Louise 
lilblette and Mrs. A. Batson. Instru- 
mental numbers will also be rendered 
at the entertainment, and about fifteen 
musicians and voc-aHsts will take part. 

MARRIED AT BOVEY. 



holm acted as best man. The bride 
was gow^ned in a beautiful cream mes- 
saline and carried bridal rose.s. Mi&s 
Paul is well and favorably known here, 
having made this lier home for some 
time, while Mr. McCloud formerly was 
employed at the Hill mine and has a 
host of friends here who wish him 
every success In life. The bride and 
groom departed on the 7 a. m. train 
on the Duluth, Missabe & Northern 
railway and will spend a short time 
with Mr McCloud's parents at Eau 
Claire. V\4s.. after which they will be 
at home to their friends at V iryinia, 
where Mr. McCloud Is employed as 
timekeeper for one of the local min- 
ing conipanl<»s. 

HIBBING ENGINEER 
KILLED AT UNO MINE 



Edward J. Gardner Loses 

Life While Fixing 

Locomotive. 

Hibblng, Minn., Sept. 15. — Edward 
J. Gardner, aged 20, an engineer at 
the Uno mine, reecived fatal Injuries 
while working under his engine and 

died a few hours later at the Rood 
liospital. He was fixing some piece of 
the locomotive and was lying in such 
a position as to prevent him from es- 
caping when, from some unknown 
cause, the engine and four cars started 
in motion, running over him and cru.sh- 
ing the pelvic bone and IJuring his 
head. 

Mrs. Gardner, the mother, conducts 
a boarding house at the Cypress mine 
at Carson Lake, the son being sintrle. 
The body was removed to the Bar- 
rett undertaking parlors. 

REPUBLICAN RALLY 
HELD AT VIRGINIA 



"Mrs. Josephine Paul and William 
McCloud Are 3Iade 3Ian and ^^ ife. 

Marble, Minn., aept. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Miss Josephine Paul of 
this village was today married to Will- 
lam McCloud of Virginia at the Catho- 
lic church at Bovey, Father Killeen of 
that place performing the ceremony. 
Mrs. R. Tlebman, -sister of the bride, 
.was bridesmaid and E. Serette of Chis- 



James P. Boyle the Prin- 
cipal Speaker of the 
Evening. 

Virginia, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — James P. Boyle of Eve- 
leth, assistant county attorney and Re- 
publican candidate for the state sen- 
ate; John A. Hcaly of Hibblng, candi- 
date for the legislature for tlie Fortv- 
ninth district; N. A. Young of Eveltt'h, 
candidate for county superintendent of 
schools; W. J. Archer of Virginia, can- 
didate for court commissioner, and P. 
S. Cosgrove of Gilbert, candidate for 
county commissioner for the Fiftli dis- 
trict, were speakers at a Republican 
rally held at the Fay opera house liere 
last night. Mr. Boyle was the prin- 
cipal speaker and made an excellent 
Impression. The Virginia City band 
was in attendance and a large crowd 
attended. Mr. Boyle's talk was along 
the same lines as his addresses recently 
made In Duluth and was loudly ap- 
plauded. 

WORK PROGRESSING FAST. 

Walls on the New Episcopal Chnrch 
at Chisholui Nearly in. 

Chisholm, Minn., Sept. 14. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — "Work on the build- 
ing of the new Methodist Episcopal 
church l3 progressing very favorably. 
The bed wall Is all finished and the 
workmen are now building up the 
basement wall, which is of concrete. 
Tiie north -side will be completed by 
Thursday night. 

Rev Keast, the pastor, Is meeting 
with good success in the matter of 
gaining new subscriptions to tlie buildn 
Ing fund. The building will cost, when 
completed, between $5,000 and JC.OOO. 




» • 



JOIN THE LOWER COST OF LIVING CLUB 

Be a producer instead of a consumer, a seller instead of a buyer. Go out 
in the Great Northwest, lake up a homestead claim, raise wheat, oats, 
barley, potatoes, alfalfa, corn, cattle, poultry, and have the world for 
your market. Buy ten or twenty acres of fruit land in one of the fertile 
mountain valleys and live in the open. 

Go to Montana, Idaho, Washington or Oregon, where your money, your 
brains and brawn count for the most in your struggle for independence. 

Special 

Opportunity Fares 

Daily September 15 to October ijy 1910 

^ ^ fi# will purchase a one way Colonist ticket, from St. Paul, 
S> y ^ Minneapolis, Duluth or Superior to numerous points in 
W^ Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon and British Columbia. 
You can stop over and investigate the couiitry on these 
Colonist tickets, and for a small additional amount ride in comfort in 
an immaculately clean berth in a modern tourist sleeping car. 

Two trains daily— The Oriental Limited and 
the Oreconian — both electric lighted. For 
Colonist folder describing opportunities, address 

FRED A. HILLS, 

NORTHERN P.\SSENGER AGENT, 

432 West Sui>erIor Street. 

Dulutii, MJjui. 



The work is being done by the day 
and not a contract job. 

A. J. Llndsaj', house mover, has 
rai.sed up the Finnish church, which 
was blown over by the severe wind 
of Aug. 8. The trustees have arranged 
also to have the plastering repaired 
and the broken window panes replaced. 
It is expected that the building will 
be ready for occupying by Oct. 10. 

LEAVES HIS FAMILY 
WITHOUT A PENNY 



Eveleth Police Endeavoring 

to Locate Charles 

Kangas. 

Eveleth, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special to 
The* Herald.) — The family of Charles 
Kangas, whicli resides on the Fayal 
road, has ben left in a pitiful plight as 

the result of Mr. Kangas' desertion. He 
left home Saturday, leaving the family 
pt.nnilf.ss and without suplies or food. 
Mr. Kangas was employed as laborer 
here. The cause for his desertion has 
yet not been ascertained and the police 
are making a strenuous search for him. 
His family con>~ists of four small 
childrert and for the present they are 
being cared for by charitably Inclined 
residents of thi« city. 



FRANCHISE CANCELLED. 



Regarding 



Chisholm Takes Action 

Its Power riant. 

Chisholm, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — At a regular meeting 
of the city council yesterday after- 
noon a resolution was passed cancel- 
ling the franchise of the Range Power 
company. 

It is expected that the power com- 
pany will rejjist the efforts of the city 
to cancel the contract until it ex- 
l^ires. The company has on its way 
to the city a 40»-horse power engine 
and two boilers, which will be in- 
stalled as soon as possible so as to 
give good and permanent service. 

Since the gasoline engine was prac- 
tically destroyed a couple of weeks 
ago the city has been in darkness and 
tlie power company has been unable 
to furnish power or light. It Is 
tliougiit that some compromise will be 
effected whereby the power company 
will continue to carry out the terms 
of its franchise. 



SCHOOL tEVY 
TO BE LOWER 



* 

'ji t fe 



Amount ' Needed for District 

Will Probably Be Less 

Than Last Year. 



un- 

the 

the 

It 



SCHOOLS CLOSED. 



On Account of Many Cases of Diph- 
theria at Village of Brookston. 

Brookston, Minn., Sept. 1.j. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The village school 
at this place has been closed on ac- 
count of diphtheria, there being a large 
number of cases In town. One case 

has proved fatal and there are seven 
new cases reported. 

FOOTBALL AT GILBERT. 

Fifteen Candidates Appear for 
Practice at the First Call. 

Gilbert, Minn., Sept. 15. — iSpecal to 
The Herald.) — The football season has 
started here in earnest and over fif- 
teen candidates answered the first call 
for practice yesterday, which was held 
on the high school grounds, with "Rod- 
day" Radamacher, the former Gopher 
star, and H. L.. McConnell of the facul- 
ty in charge. 

James Dowling of the DowUng Hard- 
ware company, aus returned from an 
extended business trip in the Zenith 
city. 

Miss Mollie Donovan of the Eveleth 
schools was a recent Gilbert visitor 
and viewed the local schools. 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Kairannunen, -who 
reside on Alinnesota avenue, are re- 
joicing over the arrival oi a baby girl 
yesterday. 

LiittaerauH tu l^^utertaiu. 

Eveleth, Minn.. Sept. 15. — (.Special to 
Tlie Herald.) — The Swedish Lutheran 
churcii at the Monitor hall tomorrow 
evening will give a very entertaining 
program, with musical numbers by 
J'rof. J. A. Swenson of Superior and J, 
Waneiia of Minneapolis. The address 
of tlie evening will be made by Rev. J. 
A. Krantze of the Swedish L.utheran 
churcii. West Duluth. 
• ■ 
Chlshulni Hoy LtMie!* i^ye. 

Chisholm, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Willie Melivich, aged 
'J years, while playing on a vacant lot 
near his home in this city yesterday 
fell face downward upon a broken beer 
bottle and one of his eyes was gouged 
out so that It was suspended on his 
cheek. He was taken to the hospital, 
but it was impo.'-sibie to sa\'e tlie eye. 
m • 
\jtt Coulruct tor tsuiiiua. 

Chisholm, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — At a meeting of the 
water, light, pow^er and building com- 
mission yesterday afternoon, a contract 
for the construction of two settling 
basins with a capacity of 300,000 gal- 
lons of water was let to the American 
Bridge company, the consideration be- 
ing $14,000. Work will begin on the 
basins within a few days. 



Demands for Buildings Last 

Year Increased Rate to 

Unusual Figures. 



The members of the board of educa- 
tion are considering the annual levy, 
which win be axed at the next meet- 
ing of the board, Oct. 7. While none 
of the members of the board will ven- 
ture a prediction, the Indications are 
that the levy will be less than that of 
last year and, on the higher valuation 
of the city, the rate of the school tax 
will consfcciuently be considerably 

lower. 

Dast year the school board levied a 
total of $542,473.47, making a tax rate 
of 14.55 mills. The total sum was dl- 
videde into: General fund, $279,252.67; 
building fund, $200,211.85; and interest 
and sinking fund, $63,008.95. 

The levy and the tax rate were 
usually high last year. Just at 
time the board was considering 
levy the Fairmont school burned, 
was an old frame structure carrying 
littlt; Insurance and the necessity for 
replacing it with a modern building 
caused the levying of $65,000 for that 
purpose. The building fund levy in- 
cluded $90,000 for tile new Washington 
.school and sums for the comnietlon of 
the J. D. Ensign and C. C. Sailer 
schools, causing l*ie building fund levy 
to mount into unusual figures. 

The building fund dAterinines the ap- 
preciable increases or decreases in the 
levy from year to year. The general 
fund increases from year to year with 
the growth of the school system, but 
not in very great amounts. This year 
tlie levy for the general fund will run 
something over $300,000, it is expected. 
The Interest and sinking fund is al- 
most stationary. • 
The Duildiug Fund. 

The building fund is giving the most 
concern this year, as usual. Sites have 
;>een secured for school buildings at 
Fortieth avenue east and Sixth street 
and Twelfth avenue ea.st and Eightli 
street. J^ is very likely the Ijoard will 
decide to build the West Duluth school 
this year to relieve the congestion of 
the Bryant and Oneota schools, as the 
district on the hillside is growing rap- 
idly. Some of the board members may 
decide to allow the school at Twelfth 
avenue east to go over for another year 
and It is considered likely that no pro- 
vision for it will be included in the 
levy. 

An addition to the Lowell school will 
be built within the course of the next 
year, the congestion in the school now 
necessitating the use of an outside 
room for school purposes. The addi- 
tion will Involve the expenditure of 
$15,000 to $20,000. 

Park Point residents are urging on 
the board the advisability of securing 
a site and erecting a four-room brick 
scliool in that suburb to replace the 
Radisson school, which has been 
cause of more discussion before 
board during the past year than 
otlier building, witii tlie possible 
ception of tlie Oneota school. The Rad- 
ib.son people say tliey are entitled to 
better school facilities. On account of 
the large levy for the building fund 
last year, the board is inclined to levy 
this year only an amount needed for 
li::»';)rovemeuts that are absolutely nec- 
essary. 

A petition, said to represent a school 
population of seventy children in the 
Woodland district, has been signed and 
will be presented to the board at the 
next meeting, a.sking that a school be 
opened In that district. A new school 
will be needed at at Bay View Heights 
soon and the board must look forward 
to the erection of a modern school at 
the steel plant location. Unless tlio 
need for a school at \\'oodland is siiown 
to be immediaie, all of those matters 
will probably be laid over for a year 
ill order that the building fund levy 
may be kept down to a minimum. 

'llie city tax rate this year will be 
about 2 mills higlier tlian last year on 
account of the extra levies for the 
maintenance of streets, the construc- 
tion of storm sewers and the paving; 
of street intersections. Members of 
the board of education figure that by 
keeping the building fund levy down to 
figures dictated by necessity, the school 
lev-y will be enough under that of last 
year to have the ta.\ rale decrease off- 
set tlie increase in the city rate. 








ZENITH MUSIC CO. 




TO 



$200 




Zenith 
Music 



1- 



(Syccess ort to Br adbury Myrifr Ci.) 

6 East Superior St. 

PIANOS, 
PHONOGRAPHS, 

RECORDS, 
SHEET MUSIC. 
Band Instruments. 

Musical Merchandise 
of Every Description. 




Popular Mnsic 



"Lucy Anna Lou," "Planning," "Rosa Rigoletta.' 





Sung this week at new Orpheum Theater. Gus Edwards' "School Boys and Girls." These 
songs demonstrated daily at our store. 

"Goddess of Libcrlty'' and all 
Comic Opera Songs 






■^r^ 



- 



man, $3,<00 of his men's savings en- 
trusted to him was stolen from him 
by several members of the construction 
gang, who pounced on him, took a 
satchel containing the money and es- 
caped. 



CAWON AND CORRLPTION 



(Continued from page 1.) 



having six and the Democrats five 
candidates. Lucius Butts, Republican, 
and Thomas N. Gorman, Democrat, are 
candidates for renomination. 



tlie 
the 
any 
ex- 



LiOrimer Cane Fronilncnt. 

Sprlngield, ill., Sept. 15. — In the con- 
eres.sional districts outside of Cook 
county, >jxcepting the Kleventh and 
Thirteenth, Interest In today's prim- 
aries was chiefly in the nomination of 
candidates for the legiiilature. The 
early vote w;is reported heavy in all 
districts wheie there were Kepubllcan 
factional fights. 

Echoes, from the dedlock session of 
the legl.slature which resulted In the 
election of William Lorlmer as United 
States senator were heard in practical- 
ly every district where a Republican 
or Demc'cratic representative or state 
senator who voted for Senator Lorlmer 
was seeking renomination. 

In tho Eleventh district an un- 
precedented vote was cast early. Ira 
C. Copley, runing on a progres.sive Re- 
publican platform In opposition to 
George W\ Conn, Jr., siipiJorted by the 
so-called regulars, forced the fighting 
In every precinct. 

LiOTtfI>.Mi Not In Race. 

The witlidrawal of Congressman 
Lowden from the contest in the Thir- 
teenth district left two Republicans, 
both dei:larlng themselves to be pro- 

5ressive3, to fight It out. They are J. 
. McKcnzie and Reubc-n R. Tiffany. 



The GnuiiiKie oi lOldefiy People 

Goes ou*. to wliatever helps give them 
ease, comfort and strength. Foley 
Kidney Pills cure kidney and bladder 
diseases promptly, and give comfort 
and relief to elderly people. Sold by 
all druggists. 



A Problem Solved. 

For many years successive adminis- 
trations Jiave worked over tlie problem 
of obtaining an easy grad<} over the 
hill from the center of thii city. One 
plan after another has beer suggested 
and the engineering depaitment lias 
had to report the difficulties Insur- 
mountable, either on account of the 
topography of the ground or the great 
cost. 

Finally, City Engineer McGrllvray and 
his most able assistant, Bert FaireP, 
found that the old Howard and Gnesen 
road, above the boulevard, '■^«'ith a mod- 
erate, expenditure could not only be 
made suitable but, to the surprise of 
every one, would afford a very low 
maximum grade. The county commis- 
sioners were quick to see its posslbil- 
ties and promptly appropriated a suf- 
ficient sum to develop the plan from 
the boulevard almost out to Villa Sch- 
lastica. Under the able direction of 
William McComber, a fine road has 
been built, probably the best in tue 
county. 

Within the last ten days, Richardson, 
Day & Harrison have constructed that 
part of the plan between S!xth avenue 
east and Eighth avenue east, and have 
also made a connection r'roni Thir- 
teenth street to the boulev.ird to con- 
nect with the Sundby road. 

The city has appropriated $2,000 
which will make a connection between 
Eighth avenue east and thf boulevard, 
as this runs through a gra^'el hill, fine 
material for the concrete work and top 
dressing Is near at hand. 

The building of this road ii of greatest 
Importance in the development of the 
laj-mlng country back of Duluth and 
will afford an easy and acceptable 
route for street car line to the Catholic 
school for girls and servo the large 
number of. people in Its vklnlty. 

This has been made possible by the 
owners of Chambers' divlsiin vacating 
a part of the plat and laying out a 
new street conforming to the topog- 
raphy of the ground. The building of 
this new street has been accomplished 
in a miraculously short time. Side- 
walks have been built for several thou- 



sand feet and the whole aspect of the 
locality has been changed. 

Sixteen new houses have been built 
in cnambers' division since spring. 
Three have been started within a week. 
No other part of Duluth has developed 
as rapidly as has this vicinity since 
the announcement of the Street Rail- 
way company of its intention to build 
a line up Seventh avenue east. 

The "Own Your Own Home " Idea has 
certainly reached the hearts of our 
people, while tlie generous terms of- 
fered by the property owners has made 
it possible for anyone who could spare 
a dollar or two a week, to now ac- 
quire a site on which he could build a 
home. 

The Chambers' division sale which 
begins on Monday will no doubt be 
largely attended. It offers the chance 
which so many are looking for now. 



.. 



Mrs. Jacob Wilmert, Lincoln, IlL, 
found her way back to perfect health. 
She writes: "I suffered with kidney 
trouble and backache and my appetite 
was very poor at times. A few week's 
ago I got Foley Kidney Pills and gave 
them a fair trial. They gave me great 
relief, so continued till now I am again 
in perfect health." Sold by all drug- 
gists. 



ARTHIU HAMMEKSTFIX 

IS MAUUIED AGAIN. 



New York. Sept. 15. — Arthur Ham- 
mersteln, general manager of the Man- 
hatan opera house, was married yes- 
terday to Mrs. John A. Hoagland at the 
home of F. Butterlck Root, a nephew 
of Senator Ellhu Root, In Greenwich, 
Conn. The ceremony was private. Mrs. 
Hammerstein wa.>i formerlj- the wife of 
John A. Hoagland, a wealthy bakiner 
powder manufacturer of this city, but 
was divorced last Friday. Mr. Hammer- 
stein's first wiff obtained a divorce at 
Reno on April 18. 

• ■ ■ 

If your "big think" just now Is about 
clothes, you'll find "thought food" in 
plenty In the ads. 



GirlM tu 'I'old Tea. 

Ely, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — The girls of the smaller 
clas.ses of the M. E. church Sunday 
school will hold a missionary tea m 
the churcii parsonage next Friday aft- 
ernoon from 4 to 6 o'clock. A splendid 
time Is anticipated, and a large num- 
ber is being provided for. 
e 
Work liuiuj^ .\Ueud. 

Gilbert, Minn., Sept. 15. — ^.Special to 
The Herald.) — Work on the new high 
school building is progressing rapidly 
under the direction of A. Graham of 
Graham & Young, the Hibblng con- 
tractors who are erecting the structure 
for schol district No. 18 at a cost of 
$87,000. 

^ » ■ 

tjiulil at Tovrer. 

Tower, Minn., Sept. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — While at work at the 
Roy Development company mine yes- 
terday a quantity of gold bearing rock 
was excavated. A considerable por- 
tion was shipped away for the purpose 
of assaying. 

GOODWIN NOMINATED 

IN CONNECTICUT. 



MAY DOWN HUMPHREY 



(Continued from page 1.) 

provision of the state primary law 
comes into operation. 

On Secoud Choice Provljaion. 

If the second choice provision oper- 
ates, Revelle's plurality in King county 
will be 3,643 and in the other counties 
Humphreys plurality is wiped out, for 
not many second choice votes were cast 
for Humphrey as compared with Re- 
velle. 

Late returns leave Miles Poindexter, 
insurgent Republican candidate for 
United States senator with a plurality 
of more than 30.000. 






TheBev€ra|e 
For All 
lasae® 






w^^'?* 



fXPOR'^AB^ 



K3 



art 



.^M 



^m^t 



Hartford, Conn., Sept. 15. — The Re- 
publican convention yesterday named 
tlie following state ticket: Governor, 
Charles A. Goodwin of Hartford; lieu- 
tenant governor, Dennles A. Blakeslee 
of New Haven; secretary of state, 
Mathew H. Rogers of Bridgeport; state 
treasurer, Costello Llppltt of Norwich- 
state controller, Thomas D. Bradstreet 
of Thomaston; attorney general, John 
H. Light of Norwalk; representative at 
large In congress, John Q. Tlllson of 
New Haven. 

A platform was adopted which enun- 
ciated party principles boglnnlng with 
an Indorsement of the national admin- 
istration and extendng through a dec- 
laration of policy In state affairs. A 
plank for direct prlni.^rlen was tabled, 
■ ■ 

tiiieuchrM Thlriil^ 
noTfiord'H AeiA Phoaphnte. 

It makes a refreshing, cooling bev- 
erage and strengthenius tonic — supe- 
jrior to lemonade. 



Shafrotb He-uonilnated. 

Denver, Colo., Sept. 15. — As a result 
of the narrow margin by which John 
F. Shafroth was renominated for gov- 
ernor over Dr. B. L. Jefferson by the 
Democratic state convention last night, 
it is expected that there will be some 
trading between the Shafroth and Jef- 
ferson factions today on the nomina- 
tions still pending. 

Governor Shafroth was renominated 
on the first ballot. 

The unofficial count showed 564 votes 
for Shafroth and 537 for Dr. Jefferson, 
with 551 necessary to choice. 

Justice Robert W. Steele of Denver 
was renominated unanimously for jus- 
tice of the state supreme court and 
Congressman F. F. Taylor of Glen- 
wood Springs was renominated for 
congressman at large. 

Pledges of radical legislation con- 
tained in the state platform of 1908, 
for the redemption of which the leg- 
islature was summoned to sit In ex- 
traordinary session by Governor Sha- 
froth last month and the greater part 
of ^vhlch the legislature is still con- 
sidering are reaffirmed In the platform 
to be voted upon. The platform ap- 
proves the action of Governor Shafroth 
in calling the extra session of the leg- 
islature. 

Goea After Gui^grenhelin. 

United States Senator Simon Gug- 
genheim is denounced. The ^platform 
declares: 

"Simon Guggenheim has voted to rob 
the people in order to enrich the cor- 
porations and trusts with which he is 
allied." 

The Payne-Aldrlch tariff law is de- 
nounced as a revision upward In the 
Interests of the trusts in violation "of 
the oft-repeated promises of the Re- 
publican presidential candidate," and a 
prompt and thorough revision of the 
tariff as demanded by the last Demo- 
cratic national convention Is urged. 

A law abolishing the smelter trust 
and regulating smelting charges Is de- 
manded In the Interests of both mine 
operators and miners. 



THERE IS no prepared bev- 
erage of such general popu- 
larity as beer. 

Rich and Poor alike are its patrons and 
are offered equal advantage when ordering 
Fitger's Beer, as there is but one quality 
and that the very highest in the brewers' 
art. 



m 





[^^"^ 



^■^- 



RAILROAD GANG'S 

SAVINGS STOLEN. 



Three Oaks, Mich., Sept. 15. — Deputy 
sheriffs have gone to a railroad con- 
struction camp near here in anticipa- 
tion of trouble among 300 Italian la- 
borers. According to L Gallanti, for«« 




Best By Over 26 Years Tisst 

IS aDsolutely pure, nourishing aad appettzmg. Its mild 
and delicate flavor, togetker "witli its rcfreeking and me- 
dicinal qualities make it ideal ior the kome. Drink it 

witk your meals. It will quiet 
your nerves, aid digestion and 
keep 3/^our body and oi 
good trim to work* 



fmrn ^ 




Gladstone Said: 



>rain in 



"How can I. who drink good 
wine and bltt»r be«r all my 
Ufa, in a comfortable room 
ana amonf • friend*, cool/ 
stand up and advise bard- 
workln* fellow creaturea 
to taka tha pledffaT" 



Fitger Brewing 
Company 



Duluth, Minn. 









'*<*—. 










\ 






1 


1 

1 














' T ! 




t 



IH 




^^ 



14 



f 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 




■1^1^91 



September 15, 193.0. 




CONC 




The Ladies' Literature class, the 
longest established women's club of 
the city, will begin this year the study 
of a four-years' course of nineteenth 
century Knsrlish literature. This year 
the aubject for study will be "The Ro- 
mantic Revival Among English Toets 
of the Nineteenth Century." The first 
ineetInK will be a business meeting 
Thursday afternoon, t<opt. 27, at the 
home of the president, Mrs. L. VV. 
Kline. The outline for the year Is as 
follows: 

Oct. 11 — William "Wordsworth; Ode 
L. W. Kline, leader. 

Oct. 25. — William Wordsworth; "The 
Excursion" and shorter poems. Mrs. 
"W. S. Woodbrldge, leader. 

Nov. 8. — Samuel Taylor Coleridge; 
••Christabel" and "The Ancient Mar- 
iner." Mrs. W. B. Dunlop, leader. 

Nov. "Z. — Byron; selections from Don 
Juan." Mrs. A. E. Walker, leader, 

Pec. 13. — Lecture to be announced. 

Jan. 10. — Shelley; selected shorter 
poenis. Mrs. S. E. Matter, leader. 

J.\n. 24. — Shelley: "Prometheus Un- 
bound." Mrs. C. E. Adams, leader. 

Feb. 7. — Keats: selected odes. Miss 
Anna Carey, leader. 

Feb. 21. — Keats; "Hyperion." Mrs. 
W. (.1. Hegardt, leader. 

March 7. — Lecture to be announced. 

Man-h 21. — Darwin; "Life and In- 
fluence on Nineteenth Century Liter- 
ature." Mi.>;3 Grace Wriglit, leader. 

April 11. — Lecture; "Tlie Scientific 
and Philosophic Movement and Nine- 
teenth t'entury Literature.' John walk- 
er Powell. 



DULUTH MUSICIAN 



Will Conduct Festival of 
Music at St. Paul. 

Horace \V. Keyner returned today 
from St. Paul where the final arrange- 
ments have been completed for a fes- 
tival of music to be lield at the capitol 
city in Maroli and for wliich Mr. Key- 
ner has been entjaged as director. It 
Is a fine compliment that has been 
paid the Duluth musician by tlie man- 
agement of the St. Paul Symphony or- 
ganization in engaging him as director 
of i..e -spring festival. The series of 
concerts will be given the latter part 
of March at St. Paul as a supplement 
of the Symphony orchestra season. Mr. 
Reyner will direct a chorus of 250 
voices and the announcements for the 




H. W. REYNER. 



live concerts promise that the festival 
will he one of the most brilliant series 
for tlie season. 

On tlie first night Elgar's "King 
Olaf" will be presented with Dalton 
Baker of London In the leading role. 
Mr. Baker is a prominent London ba.?so 
and he has created the role In which 
he will appear in St. Paul In London. 

On the second night. Busonl, the 

fTcat pianist will conduct his conceits 
or orcliestra and piano and male 
chorus. The work has been produced 
In London for the first time In June of 
this year and the performance at St. 
Paul in March will be the i.rst given in 
America. 

Tiie third night will be Symphony 
night with Schuman Heink the soloist. 
Selections from "Carmen" will be given 
and from "Trovatore" and the "King's 
Prayer" and finale of the lirst act of 
"Lohengrin" will be given by Mr. 
Baker and chorus. 

There will be a school children's 
matinee in cennection with the festi- 
val In which a chorus of 500 cshool 
children will take part and there will 
be a popular matinee. 

The L'uiuth oratorio society was 
abandoned because of lack of interest 
"Whifn Mr. Reyner was contributing als 
services as director and this recogni- 
tion of his ability coming from the 
capital of tlie state is most complimen- 
tary. Mr. Reyner has also been cn- 
faged to conduct "The Messiah" at 
tillwater at Christmas time, fiegln- 
nlne in November he will spend a day 
•ach week at St. Paul and Stillwater. 
• * * 
There Is much Interest In the course 
of concerts for Duluth, the first num- 
ber of which will be given by Mclba. 
This morning the advance eubscrip- 



KREMOLA 

bold in Uulutli .it 

MISS HORRIGA!^ HAIR SHOP, 

Oak Hail Building— Take Elevotor. 




THE MAN OF 
MYSTERY 



Prof. Carle is probably the most be- 
sought man In Duluth. Men and wom- 
en come from Duluth. Superior and 
from cities hundreds of miles away to 
ask his aid — to learn the things that 
are hidden to them, but which are to 
this mysterious and wonderful "SEER" 
as mere events recorded in an open 
book. Without asking you a question 
he tells your name, tells of friends and 
fcnernies, locates absent ones, reunites 
the separated and causes quick and 
apeedy marriage with the one you love. 
Overcomes your ri%als and all obsta- 
cles that bar your path to success and 
happiness — in fact, tells everything you 
desire to know. Unlike the pretender, 
he makes no charge in advance. Posi- 
tively no fee accepted unless you get 
the truth, relief and help your desire. 
Hours: 10 a. m. to 8 p. m. No earlier, 
no later. Special low fee; limited time 
only, 50c and Jl. 

129 EAST FIRST STREET 

Opposite Armory, Dulutb, aiina. 




Evidently Mrs. Cyrus K. McCormick'a 
unfavorable dictum regarding the hob- 
b!o skirt was not heeded unanimously. 
There came to town yesterday two hob- 
ble skirts that hobbled about six 
Inches from the ankles of the wearers 
and hobbled to some purpose, too, for 
'twas a dull day on the main street of 
this town. 

Tht; corner grocer didn't have much 
to do and the town joker was propped 
against a barrel of Michigan peaches, 
firs: to arrive, loudly wondering if 
summer could "come back." Tnere 
wasn't much in the newspaper because 
it was quiet along O.vster Bay. Strung 
ahmg the main thoroughfare of this 
town were vaiious cit'zens in various 
attitudes of dejection. More than the 
usual quota were keeping the front of 
the St. Louis iiotel from falling out- 
ward. Tlie street car junction at Third 
avenue west was well populated but 
nobody was riding. They were just 
hanging around hoping, like Macaw- 
ber, that something would turn up. 
'T vas one of those days when every- 
body was plunged into what G. Cleve- 
land described as Innocuous desuetude. 

People dispute as to who saw tliem 
first. It is generally conceded that folk 
in the Spalding iiotel block got tho 
first glimpse but people in the block 
to the east say they are in the running 



and truthful citizens who were lolling 
about in the next block stoutly assert 
that although they may not have seen 
them, yet they easily heard them. 

The two hobble skirts sauntered 
leisurely, partly because sauntering is 
always ione leisurely, but chiefiv be- 
cause hobble skirts cannot do any- 
thing but saunter. Sauntering then 
down the main street of this town 
cam^e the two hobble skirts. Strong 
men blushed and weak men paled, but 
everybody kept on looking regardless 
of their wavering complexions. Women 
who had their ntanr.ers manicured in 
Eastern schooLs and who are parlor 
bruke stood transfixed, gazing back 
like Lot's wife 

By the time the hobble skirts had 
passed the St. Louis, their progress was 
a triunph. Men were theorizing 
vaguely about those skirts and women 
were hastily computing their cost. Bui 
thero in always somebody who does the 
wrong thing at the wroHg time in the 
wrong place. Some rougii person, prob- 
ably a horseman, audiblv inquired of 
another coarse citizen, "Bill, do they 
wear strax^s with them things?" 

The .-pell was broken. A smile 
trickled down the main street. The vil- 
lage joker heard the query and al- 
lowed that the wearers didn't "inter- 
fere" ai'yway, as the pads seemed to 
be elsewhere than on their ankles. 



tlons were $2,600 and It is expected 
that by Oct. 1 there will be $4,000 sub- 
scribed for the entire course. Last 
spring the advance subscriptions for 
the symphony concerts amounted to 
only $1,350 and the increase in sub- 
scriptions is evidence of the greater 
interest being shown by Duluth peo- 
ple. 



TREAT FOR CHILDREN. 

Youngsters at the Home See 
Vaudeville Act. 

Seventy-five children at the chil- 
dren's home were given a.rare treat at 
noon today, when one of the acts being 
given at the Orpheum theater this 
week was presented for their benefit. 

There are eigiity-six children in the 
home, all told, but sonie of them are 
mere babies, and were too young to 
attend the entertainment, which was 
given in the big assembly room at the 
school. 

The act selected by the local man- 
ager of the theater for the entertain- 
ment of the children was the "School 
Buys and Girls." They gave an enter- 
tainment lasting half an hour, from 
12:30 to 1 o'clock. It consisted of sing- 
ing and dancing, and to say that it was 
enjoyed by the children Is putting It 
mildly. The homeless little ones were 
delighted beyond measure with it, and 
it is safe to say that the young actors 
never played to a more appreciative 
audience. 

The members of the company and the 
local manager were warmly thanked 
by Miss McGregor, the matron of the 
liome, on behalf of the children. 

Y. W. C. A. CLASSES 



Are Announced for Year Be- 
ginning in October. 

The schedule of gymnasium and 
domestic science classes for the Youn,-< 
Women's Christian association has 
been made out and the classes will 
open early In October. 

Miss Bertha S. Parmelee will be the 
phy.slcal director and the schtdule is 
as follows: 

Matrons — Monday and Thursday 
morning with two classes, one for be- 
ginners and the other for the ad- 
vanced pupils. 

Business women's classes — Tuesday 
and Friday evenings; beginners at 7 
o'clock and advanced classes at 8 p. m. 

Junior girls — Tuesday afternoon at 
4:30 and Saturday mornings at 9:30. 

Teachers — Thursday afternoon at 
4:30 o'clock and Saturday mornings at 
10:30 o'clock. 

The swimming pool will be open at 
the following hours: Monday, 3 p. m. 
to 5 p. m. and from 7 to 9 p. m.; 
Tuesday. 10:30 a. m. to 12:30 p. m.; 
Thursday, 2 to 4 p. m. and 7 to 9 p. 
m. ; Friday, 10:30 a. m. to 12:30 p. m. 
and 3 to 5 p. m.; Saturday, 2 to 4 p. m. 

Gymnasium suits may be ordered at 
once througli Miss Parmelee at the as- 
sociation. 

• • « 

The domestic science schedule will 
be as follows, with Miss Fanny Wil- 
son as instructor: 

General cookery, Monday evenings, 
from 7:30 to 9:30 o'clock. 

General cookery for matrons, Tues- 
day afternoon from 2 to 4 o'clock. 

Maids class Friday evenings from 
7:30 to 9:30 o'clock. 

• * • 

The first of the millinery classes 
was held at the association last even- 
ing as a preliminary meeting. Tiie 
next meeting will be next Wednesday 
evening. Other classes will be or- 
ganized for hours convenient for the 
members if six pupils desire It. 

Informal Afternoon. 

Mrs. C. P. Craig entertained at an in- 
formal tea this afternoon at her home, 
13;.'ti London road In compliment to 
Mrs. W. iS. Bishop of Chicago, formerly 
of this city. 



Events of Interest. 

Miss Lenora Gidding will entertain 
at a matinee party tomorrow afternoon 
at the Orpheum tl^eater. 

• • • 

Miss Adele McClaran will entertain 
Friday evening at her home, 1101 East 
Third street in honor of Miss MoUle 
McDenald. 

• • • 

Miss Hilda Sorenson will entertaiiv 
tomorrow afternoon in compliment to 
Miss Eleanor Carron of Illinois. Cards 
win be the entertainment. 



Surprise Party. 

A p'easant birthday surprise party 
was given in honor of Edmund Kris- 
tensen at his home on Duluth Heights. 
The guest of honor was presented with 
a signet ring. Music and games were 
the amusements of the evening and the 
gu<»3ts were: 
Misses — 

Millie Hogan, Jepsle Edmund- 

Ethel Purcell, Fon, 

Maymo O Connor, Violet IwObertson, 
Lillian Perrott, Marion Robert- 

Hilda Olson, sen. 

May Stewart, Margaret O'Con- 

Theresa Kdmund- nor. 

son. 
Masters — 

Hnrry Conklin, Milton Mahan, 

William Cook, John Stewart. 

Elmer Brayton, Milton Kristen- 

Edmund Kristfen- son, 

son, Gilbert Fawcett, 

Edward Schwartz, Russell Sewry. 
Alex P.lack, 

Home Wedding. 

The wedding of Miss Nellie Plrle 
and W. A. Scott of Blind River. Can., 
took place last evening at the home 
of the bride's sister, Mrs. J. D. Mc- 
Phall of 821 West Fourth street. The 
wedding servlc* •was read by ttio Rev. 



J. A. McGaughey, 
tended by lier sist;r. 



The bride was at- 
■"• Mr. and Mrs. 



tended by lier sist;r. Mr. and Mrs. 
Scott left for a wedding trip to Seattle 
and Vancouver and will return to 
Blind River, where they will make 
tueir home. 

Musical Service. 

A special musical service will be 
given at the First Baptist church next 
bunday evening in charge of Alfred 
Wiley. Mr. Wiley will be assisted by 
Miss Tisdale of Minneapolis. The 
public is invited to attend the service. 

Club Reorganizes. 

The Lakeside Five Hundred club met 
with Mrs. J. A. Klrkswold, McCuUoch 
street, to reorganize for tlie year. All 
the members were present for the first 
time in two years. Mrs. J. I. Thomas 
was elected president and Mrs. Paine 
secretary. The first meeting of the 
season will be held Oct. 4, with Mrs. 
Uallace Wells as hostess. 



Personal Mention. 

Mr. and Airs. Ernest Dunning will 
return tomorrow from their wedding 
H'P Jn the East. They will be at home 
after Nov. 1 at 112 South Fourteenth 
avenue east. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Siewert have re- 
turned from a trip to Oshkosh and 
CThicago. 

• • « 

Mrs. D. Burnett and daughter, Miss 
Coulombe, of 116 East Third street 
have returned from a two weeks' visit 
at Brookston, Minn. 

♦ • ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis T^ hlte of Mari- 
nette, Wis., are the guests of their son, 
Harry White, of 207 Fifty-second ave- 
nue. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Hutchins of 2117 
Jefferson street have returned from a 
visit at the Twin Cities. 

♦ • ♦ 

A. Clyde Emmons of Virginia has 
been the guest of his mother and sis- 
ter at 713 East Second street for a 
few days. 

• ♦ • 

Mrs. B. E. Baker and daughter left 
last evening for New York and Boston. 
Miss Dorothy Baker will attend school 
at Dana liall for the winter. 

* * * 

Miss Gertrude Fogarty of Fifth 
avenue east is visiting friends at Vir- 
ginia, Minn. 



THE EVENING STORY 

IaIty decked 



By Dora E. Poole. 



"Agnes, -what do you think? I have 
Just had an Invitation from Ethel 
Dewsbury, and also one for you. Ob, 
won't It be delightful? It Is her sev- 
enteenth birthday, and we are going 
to have a dance, you know." 

The speaker was a tall, lithe voung 
girl, who at this moment enters the 
room and seats herself with some ani- 
mation before her sister. She Is a 
sweet-looking girl, whose beauty lay 
In the spiritual charm of her counte- 
nance more than In the regular con- 
tour of feature. Her tone Is light and 
innocent, and her lips smiling. 

Her sister, who is languidly reclin- 
ing in an easy chair, almost concealed 
In the depths of the downy cushions, 
lays down the novel she is reading, 
and lifts her cold, proud eyes to her 
sister's with an expression of languid 
indifference. Her countenance is some- 
what similar in feature to her sister's 
but in expression there Is a great di- 
versity. Her whole manner expresses 
self esteem and cold Indifference. 

"Ethel Dewsbury," she says, with 
elevated eyebrows. "I abhor that girl, 
but I suppose I muHt go for the sake 
of politeness. I presume you know 
who else she is going to Invite?" 

"Oh, a good many, I believe," says 
Gladys, Bmtllng. "Harry Fielde Is 
one, you know, and — " 

"Dear me, another abominable per- 
son. If there Is any one I dlslilte it's 
that carroty-headed idiot. Well, go 
on." 

"Ellen, his sister, and Adeline 
Thompson, and Ethel Waters, and a 
good many more," exclaimed her sis- 
ter. 

"Has she invited Jesse Mansfield?" 
interrogated Agnes. 

"I believe so; that is, I am sure of 
it." 

"H'm," says Agnes, for the first 
time revealing some signs of ap- 



A Skh> of Beanty I> a Jey Forevw. 



D 



•trCT. 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUO'8 
Oriental Cream or 
Magical Beautiffer. 

Removes T«a, Pimples, Freck- 
les, Moth PRtciies, Rash and 

Shin rLvuei, aai ever/ 
blcmlih on beauty, uiJ dC' 
,nMdH«ctleB. It Iiu stood 
the tett of (o yarn, and i* ta 
hartnlsfi wa taste it to b« 
»ur* it U properly va^e. Ac 
c*pt no counterfeit of slmilM 
oama. Dr. I- A. Sayre said 
to • lady of tb* hauttoa (s 
f»ti*i>t)i "As rou ladiei witi 
Die th«iil, 1 racomiaend 
•GOUftAljD'S CREAM' u 
[h« le«it harmful of all tha 
•l«in Fro laratlons. " F^riala 
b^ ajl drunl>t.« and Faacy 
Ooodt Oealari in the United 
8t»t«t, Canada and Hutopc, 

t»9kia$, Vft§^ n 6rMt JcoM St. New Yarl| 





urke ^A^ill 

a In January 




TWO VIEWS OF BILLIE BURKE. 

One of the favorites on the American stage. Miss BilUe Burke, is about 
to be married. She is now playing in 'Mrs. Dot." Capt. Frank Gary, who will 
marry her in January, has been In love with her for nine years. He will 
come to this country in October. His best man will be Viscount Torrington, 
who will accompany him on his trip here. Blllle Burke is an American girl, 
although she made her first successes in England and came here with a London 
reputation. Those who do not know her think that "Billie" is a nickname, but 
actually she received this masculine title In baptism. 



proval. "When is it to be?" 

"Next Friday — two days more," says 
Gladys. 

* * « 

Friday is here. Gladys Is patiently 
waiting for her sister to complete her 
toilet, which takes a considerable lime 
to accomplish. Agnes is fond of van 
ity, and dress, and mirror. For fully 
half an hour she has been contemplat- 
ing herself in the aforesaid article, 
disposing some cream ribbons in her 
dark hair, that falls In abundance 
over her 'well-formed shoulders. 

"Are you ready, Agnes?" queried 
Gladys, unable to resist a little sigh 
of Impatience. 

"Almost; how does that hat suit me? 
Do you think my face looks too pale? 
I really think, that 1 shall have to paint 
it '^ 

"Good gracious, Agnes; how horrid 
of you. Yes, positively horrid of you," 
says Gladys. 

'•I don't think paint Is necessary to 
my complexion after all," says Agnes 
with some pride. "Well, come along, 
and — don't look so horrified, dear." 

• • • 

"My goodness, what an awfully 
pleasant meeting." 

"It is the carroty headed idiot, as 
Agnes had pronounced him, who 
speaks as the two sisters arrive at 
Benmore house, after being warmly 
received by their hostess, Ethel. They 
were standnig in the hall, where the 
other young guests sit laughing and 
chattering. 

Gladys takes Itis hand. 

"How are you, Harry?" she says 
frankly. 

"In the best of health. And you?" 
says the lad, cheerfully. 

"Quite well, thank you." 

He turns to Agnes, who smiles cold- 
ly at him, shakes his hands, and, 
without speaking, walks off with easy 
grace in search of Jesse Mansfield, who 
is surrounded by a group of laughing 
girls. Harry appropriates her sister, 
and they stroll carelessly about and 
enter into a conversation. Ethel joins 
them, looking flushed and decidedly 
happy. "Many happy returns of the 
day," remark the two in unison. 

Ethel laughs gayly. 

"Thank you," she says. "I've come to 
ask you if you would be so kind as to 
give us a song like you did last 
Christmas, Harry?" she says. '"You 
t know, we enjoyed it then; you have 
! such a wonderful tenor voice, you 
know." 

Harry laughs, good humoredly. 

"Very well, with pleasure," he suid. 



"We are going to have tea first," 
says Ethel, brightly. "Perhaps Miss 
Agaes would play the accompaniment 
for you; she is a grand pianist, you 
know." 

"Very well," says the lad, with per- 
haps a shade of less good htimor than 
before. "I've got quite a long list of 
these who are going to give us violin 
antt piano recitals, besides sinking and 
that. Nelly Curtis Is going to favor us 
with a piano solo, and Amelia, iter sis- 
ter, you know, a recitation. I wish you 
wojld give us a song, Gladys, dear?" 

Ihe girl smiles and assents. 

Meanwhile Agnes is surrounded by a 
group of admiring young ladies and 
ger.tlemen. Amy Curtis joins the party 
and informs Agnes that Harry Fielde 
would be greatly honored if she would 
play, as he is going to give a song. 
Agnes elevates ner brows witli some 
displeasure. 

'Good gracious," she says, with dig- 
nity. "Have I gut to ac::on:pa-ny that — 
that carroty-headed — " 

"Iiidetd," says a cold voice, "you 
need not do so, miss, If it causes you 
anj- displeasure 

A.gnes colors. S'he had not observed 
tliat he had just Joined the group. 

"I_I will," sh.3 says, with tilted chin. 
"I do not object in tie least." 

"It does not matter. Perhaps some 
one ilse will do so," says the lad, 
coldly; and he walks away, followed 
by Amy Curtis and a few other dam- 
sel. s. 

Agnes proved very popular before tea 
timo, but after the meal was over 
Gladys is the center of attraction. She 
fings so sweetly, dances and laughs so 
ligl)tly. i.nd is so modest and unas- 
suming, that Fhe cannot fail to Influ- 
ence them. Every young gentleman 
wants to dance with her, and the girls 
ard frequently expressing their admir- 
ation of her amongst themselves and a 
few openly to her face; but she hears 
it all in perfect simplicity, and only 
sm.lcs. 

Agnes tries hard to appropriate a 
rather handsome young man, but she 
fai ed to influence him or any other 
by her charnis. A few still remained 
with her a dozen silly, flattering young 
damsels, who only like her because of 
her charming countenance and dress, 
and are somewhat awed by her proud 
antl dignified demeanor. 

At length the end of the evening ap- 
prc'ached, and the breathless flock of 
youthful dancers threw themselves 
upi)n the sofas, and fruits and choco- 
lates are distributed by the young men. 



Gladys sits flushed ard happy between 
•Jesse and the red-hair ;d youth, who are 
both talking and laui?hing and minis- 
tering to her wants. 

. Agnes glances envlouslv acro.«s to 
fhl **^'"*>' sister, only half listening to 
the hlUv conversation of admirers. 
hhe IS busy meditating. Why is Gladys 

h'ir«I ^^''LV^ ,^"** popular? she asks 
herself. She is pretty, certainly, but 
there was something else that influ- 
ences them. What could it be Soine- 
tnlng in her heart told her the cause of 
Orladys popularity. It was her dainti- 
ness, licr Fweet franknes.s and modesty 
and gentle smiles. Alas, in her own 
heart one thM<g reigns only — vanitv^ 
while in Glady.s it is goodness, purity 
and vanity despised. 




DoxlnK the Chll 

Medical men are fu 
lamentable consequenc 
suit from the pernici* 
ing children's ears or 
ing them on the hea. 
however, high time, • 
especially teachers, sh 
quainted with these r 
Bedtime for 

Sunset should be th 
child under 8 years o 
chickens go to roost 
gins to deepen the coi 
begins to droop and 
his cot. The more ne 
who has nothing for 
cept the sun, and wh< 
rainy days is used t 



dren's Earn. 

lly aware of the 
es that often re- 
us habit of box- 
otherwise strik- 
i or face. It is. 
hat laymen, and 
ould be made ac- 
esult."». 
Children. 
e time for every 
' age. When the 
and twilight be- 
mtry baby's head 
he is ready for 
rvous town babv, 
an example ex- 
>, at any rate, on 
twilight atmo- 



sphere at midday, seldom wishes to 
go to bed with the chickens. 

If he lives in an apartment he must 
hear drifting down the hall the tantal- 
izing voices of his elders at dinner, 
and the smell of savory things from 
the kitchen greets his nostrils. But 
hard as it must seem the city mother 
must have even more rigid rules about 
bedtime than the country mother. Her 
child is at a greater disadvantage in 
the first place In not living where ho 
can breathe the pure.«t air in the midst 
of healing country sights and sounds. 
The distractions of city life are so 
numerous and so varied that city bred 
children need more rei'ose than chil- 
dren in smaller towns or t'ne country. 

Betwern G and 6:30 o'clock they: 
should be undressed and put to bed. 
Carlue fur Animals. 

It Is a good plan for every child to 
have some pet as soon as It is old 
enough to look after itself. Teach the 
little ones to watch the habits of the 
birds and animals, and explain to the 
little ones that pussy does not alto- 
gether appreciate being squeezed too 
tightly and that a dog'.s tail was not 
meant to be pulled. Never let dogs 
or cats sleep in the night nursery. 
* • * 

To Avert BroneiiitlH. 

When a child takes a cold It Is an 
excellent plan to take some sweet oil 
and rub the chest with It every night 
and morning. The hand must be warm 
before applying the oil. 



■^ 



1^ 



In a modern store every day Is a 
new day — every day witnesses new 
overturnings of stocks, re-pricings, re- 
groupings of bargains, new ideas In 
"special sales." So that, always, tha 
ads should reflect this store-life, and 
make it interesting to outsiders. 



I 



/P 



» 



OUR STORE IS :<iOW OPEN SATURDAY AFTER.\00.\S « EVEXi:«GS. 

st,toM) A\ i:\ifc: E.\*iT A.\D sii'i:nioK strf:i:t, dili th. 



Cottage Dinner Sets 



« 



50 Pieces 

Friday 
Special 




^; 



Sold All Over at Not Less Than $7.50. 

We have stocked up heavily for Friday's sale, and there will 
surely be something doing among the dishes, owing to this un- 
precedented price-making. This ware is a fine white, semi-porcelain, 

decorated in gold, almost exactly like illustration. Set consists of 
6 cups and saucers, 6 each of three kinds of plates, fruits and oat- 
meals, 2 jugs, 2 platters, 1 covered dish, 1 open vegetable and scal- 
lop. Drop in and give your order — no 'phone orders taken. 

Stock of Fine Dinnerwarc 

Is very complete and only the very latest and best patterns are 
shown. Our prices, too, are very interesting, inasmuch as we are in 
position to buy in quantities at a much lower price than the aver- 
age store. See v s for savings — we are right on the job. 



t 



Ti» I i<-ri 






I 



— - 



:i/ 




\ 




To the Foot Ball Team 

(whose members are under 15 
years of age) that sends in the 

greatest number of 
empty Sweetheart 
Soap Cartons by 

Oct. 10th, we will un- 
iform the winning 
team with a 



FULL FOOTBALL 
OUTFIT 



^f 






The captain of each team should collect all 
the cartons from his members and mail or ex- 
press same to us. Upon determining the win- 
ning contestant we will immediately mail or- 
der on the Kellev Hardware Co. of Duluth for 
the outfi*:. The team sending in the second 
largest number of empty cartons will receive 
a Spalding football, and so on until each team 
has received for their efforts a present. Go to 
it, boys. 

The outfit is now on show in Kelley Hard- 
ware company's window. 

Manhattan Soap Co. 

Clilcag<» Office, 555 West Randolph Street, Cbicugo. 

EVERY SROCER HAS SWEETHEART SOAP IX STOCK 
— IF NOT, HE CAN GET IT FROM ANY ONE OP THE 
DULUTH JOBBERS ON SHORT NOTICE. 



I I « ll^M %. 




\ 




— ~T — 




\ 






' 


r 

\ 



tc 



II 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 15, 1910. 



10 




lIERALDlS WEST 

DUIiUT!! DEPART ME 




home to Lutheran cemetery. Rev. Carl 
G. Olson, pastor of Bethany Swedish 
Lutheran church 



A. Jennvn, SltO North STth 



BRAXCn 
Ave. W. 



OFFICES J 
J. J. Moron, 



SlGir^ North Central Are. 



KEEPING UP HUNT 
FOR THE FIREBUG 



recent 
which 
a few 
The 
ent time 



auction have twenty days in 
to move the buildings off. Only 
houses yet renuiin to be sold, 
center of activity at the prea- 
is at Smithville. where 



Thompson Furniture Concern 

Will Rebuild Plant at 

New Duluth. 

A delegation of city offloials, In- 
cluding Chief of I'olice Troyer and 
Lieut. Wilcox of the West Uuluth po- 
lice, today visited the scene of the 
Incendiary fires at New Duluth. 

Kvery effort is being ma.de by the 
tioliit' dt-partnienl to hunt down the 
fl'ebug, will) has set six tires, practi- 
cally wiping out the business inter- 
ests of the .suburb. As yet^ however, 
no clew has been found. There is a 
rew.ird out of $750 for information 
leading to his arrest. 

C. Hecklinger, manager of the 
TlioMipson Furniture company, says 
that the company will rebuild the 
warehouse and tinishiug building, 
•which was de.stroyed l>y Hre, as soon 
as a satisfactory settlement ca-i be 
made with the insurance companies. 
The loss on the buildings after tiie in- 
surance has been paid will be about 
$lo.ouo. 



a 
crew of men is grading the road bed 
An underground tunnel is to be built 
near here and as an approach a deep 
cut extending for LC^O feet 
nel will be about 500 feet long. 

Grading has 
mont park. 



have 



The tun- 



also begun near Fair- 



BOY SAYS BUAKEMAN 

ALLO\YED -FLIPPING." 

"The brakeman told us we could have 
a ride." 

This is what between fifteen and 
twentv boys told Officer Ek of tlie 
West "Duluth police dLpartment y ester 
day. wiien the patrolman caught 
youngsters lin- d up on a freight 
between Fifty-ninth and bixty- 
avenues. ^ ^, . , 

Tlie bovs were ordered off the train 
and warned not to attempt "Hipping 
trains in the future. Even if 
plovcs do encourage 
the" part of young 
the police, tliis will 
from being liabl.- tn 



the 
train 
third 



train em- 
such actions on 
boys, according to 
not excuse anyone 

iir.).secution. 



^ W ^ A W 'A' 1 

^T^ i\ ■^^ ^» T* -^ ^ 



\VA>TS POLICK TO STOP 

A.NTICS OF ItlUE nOYS 






If (he hoyi* iu your neiKhlior- 
h«H>(l, ilrt»«r «'4t\v.<4 ucros.H y«»Hr 
Ia>«ii. |ila>e«l bail in your front 
jurd. rtc»v kito.M o\er >«>iir h«iui»c 
nud oiherv^i.He inadf tiieiUNelvcM a 
niiLHUiice — \vouidu*t it make you 
period. 

Mrs. Wnlli'D, living ut r,'-Mi 
Wvnt ICiKhlli Mtreet, thlnkn mu 
and han couiplnined (u I lie police 
Hltiuit the nialltT, .statin;; that the 
li«i>.s are dlMrrMpect f ul tu h 
vvlieu »he repro»cti (hem for the 
aiitiCM. 

An ofHcer from the Went Du- 
liidi Niniion wa.H »ent ilowu to In- 
vrMtiKule la.Ht e\eiilnK. Hy the 
tlni<> he arrited, (he lioyM had 
gone, and there «vere no further 
de% eiupuieutti. 



PROCTOR SCHOOL BOARD 

TO IMPROYE FACILITIES. 

Bener facilities have been provided 
the s.-hool children of Proctor follow- 
ing a' meeting; of tho school board last 
evening It was decided to add another 
leache? to the staff and to rent quar- 
ters on the west side of the village to 
accmmocate liie overllow. Since the 
fall term opened, the sciiool has been 
overcrowded. __ 

BOY KNOCKED DO\YN 

BY AUTOMOBILE. 



er * 
•Ir ^ 



* 

<ir saf lii; -> 



' d|E 4^'^' j|c'ip*s)*J^'3|t"'n"v iR '?^ '*' j|k JH J^ JH JH -^ J^ ^ 



WILL SEND BODY TO 

ULEBEC FOR Bl RIAL. 

Undertaker Filatrault this afternoon 
received a telegram from Berlin. N. 
H., giving ;nstrui. tlonB to send tho 
body of George Nault, the laborer, who 
was killed under the wheels of a 
street car on Central avenue Momlay, 
to i^t. Hvacinth. Quebec, where Ihe 
burial will take place. The telegram 
was sent by tho father of tho de- 
ceased. Alphonze Nault. The body will 
be sent this evening. 



HOUSE MOYERS BUSY. 

Canadian Nortliern Ri^ht-of-\Vay 
Is Scene of Much Activity. 

This is house-moving week at West 
Duluth. ^ „ . 

For the next few days there will be 

considerable activity along the new 
right-of-way of the Canadian North- 
ern road In clearing away the houses 
■which were recently sold at auction. 
The purchasers of the houses at tho 



A small boy. about 10 years old, 
whose name was not learned, had a 
narrow escane from, serious iniury 
shorllv after SJ o'clock last night when 
he was struck by the automobile owned 
and driven by N- C. Batley at Central 
avenue and Ramsey street. He w^-^ 
plaving on the street with a companion 
and dodged in front of the car as It 
was making the turn. He turned hla 
back to the car, which struck him 
s.iuarelv. Fortunately he was hurled 
to one "side, out of the way of the 
wheels. Ht picited himself up, and run- 
ning, was lost in the crowd which col- 
lected. i?eeliis the boy scamaper off, 
Mr. Batley did not stop the car until 
called to do so. hy a witness of the 
accident, who offered some caustic 
criticism for his action in failing to 
come to a stop. 



officiated. 

Fred Ora and A. L. Stevenson 
returned from a hunting trip. 

Claude Duvall and family of Sixty- 
first avenue west exi>ect to move to 
Crookston, Minn., this week to make 
their future home. 

At a meeting of the quarterly confer- 
ence of the Merritt Memorial M. E. 
church last evening a call was extended 
to Uev. E. F. Stidd as pastor for an- 
other year. The matter will come up 
at the annual conference next week at 
Fergus Falls and in all probability 
Kev. M. Stidd will be returned to the 
local charge. ^ ^^ ^ 

H. B. Johnson of Carlton is a West 
Duluth business visitor today. 

Se* the new fall hats at Miss Lind- 
gren's, 303 Central avenue. 

For Rent — Steam heated rooms. 
K re idler block. 

Watch repairing. Hurst. W. Duluth. 

COPPER MARKET 
DULL AND WEAK 

Little News to Affect Stocks 
Which Sag Alter ^ 
Opening. 

The copper market opened fairly 
firm and after a fractional advance 
values declined sharply. There was 
considerable selling toward the close 
on stop loss orders, but earlier in the 
day reports from the East said» values 
sagged from lack of support. 

The market was dull and weak and 
in its old rut again and there was no 
news of any description to lift it out. 
Trading was entirely professional. 

Copper exports Wednesday were 
1,410 tons. Since Sept. 1 exports have 
amounted to 11,566 tuns. 

American Saginaw sold at $1.87%, 
Butte Alex Scott, full paid, at Jb, 
Butle-Ballaklava at ?5.75. Copper 
uueen at ::6c, Denn at $2.93%. Oi- 
roux at $7, Red Warrior at $2.50 and 
$2.43^i, Shattuck at $22.75 to $22.87^8, 
Warrior at $5.76, Zenith Lead & Zinc 
at 45c, Amazon at $2.50, Butte & Su- 
perior at $7.2u to $7.37 V2, Calumet <St 
Montana at 90c. Calumet & Corbln at 
45c, Rawhide Royal at 3c and North 
American at $3. 

Amaisaniaicd sold at $63 

62.50, Butte 

6.75, Butte 
Calumet & 



NEW TRIAL IN 
Mm CASE 

Verdict of $15,000 in Sen- 
sational Case Set Aside 
By Court. 

Jeweler Charged Conspiracy 

for Alienation of Wile's 

Affections. 



The United States revenue cutter Tus- 
carora answered the schooners' signal 
of distress and rescued the crew of 
four. 



notwithstanding 
"granted the motion lor 



At Carltott Fair. 



A lar;Te delegation of West Duluth 
people are attending tiie Carlton county 
fair this week, a number taking the 
special train which run from Duluth to 
Barnuni today 

Plaintiff Pays Costs. 

The assauli case against Henry 
Diot-ich was di.smlssed by Judge J. B. 
Flack in the West Duluth justice court 
last evening and the costs of the 
case, amounting to $3.50 were as- 
sessed aerainst tie ccmplaintant, Ber- 
narl Johnson. The trouble grew out of 
a neighborhood nuarrel. 



at $63.75 to $64 to 
Ballaklava in the East at 
Coalition at $iS.oU to $18.25, 
Arizona at $58.25, North 
Butte at $28.50 to $^7.50. Greene at $7 
to $6.75, Sliattuck at $-3, Giroux at $7 
to $6.62 Vj to $6.75. Superior & Pitts- 
burg at $11.25, $11,121,4 and then at 

$11.25. 

• • * 

Globe wired: The attempt of the mi- 
nority stockholders to get control of 
the Live Oak Development company 
failed yesterday when stockholders at 
a meeting in Blsbec elected to the di- 
rectorate Henry Hovland, H. A. Smith 
and S. A. Kauftman, the latter being a 
large Chicago stockholder. The elec- 
tion of these men frustrates a plan to 
transfer the Live Oak property to the 
Lewisohn Interests, who control the 
Miami Copper company. 

* * * 

Closing quotations on the Duluth 
stock exchange today follow: 



Isaac Helstein, Henry Helsteln, Jo- 
seph Fox, John Hel#tein. Joseph Lift- 
man, Morri.s Harley and Robert Ash- 
insky, the defendants In the case 
brought against them for the alien- 
ation of his wife's affections by David 
A. Miller, have been granted a new 
trial by Judge iiomer B. Dibell of tlie 
district court. 

Judge Dibell overruled their motion 
asking lor judgment 
the verdict, but 
a new trial. 

MUler sued for $15,250 and the jury 
returned a verdict of $15,000, one of 
the largest verdicts in a case of this 
kind that has ever been returned in a 
Minnesota court. 

The case was based on an allegad 
conspiracy, said to have been formed 
by the dei'endants in the action, icr 
tlie purpose of breaking up Miller's 
home and the claim was made at the 
time of the trial that this was done so 
that Anna Helstein Miller could marry 
Joseph Fox. 

Miller claimed that he was lured to a 
room in the Clarendon hotel by a 
woman, whose name is Mamie Marsh 
and who bore none too good a reputa- 
tion, on the pretense that slie wished 
to sell him jewelry. Miller was en- 
gaged at tlie time In the jewelry busi 
ness. He was arrested on a statutory 
charge and locked up in tlie city jail 
while the Marsh woman's bail was paid 
the same night of the arrest. 

Miller's wife left him and. claiming 
damages for the breaking up of his 
home, his shame, humiliation and the 
damage done his business. MUler 
brought the action, claiming 
defendants were responsible. 

The evidence was sensational at 
first trial. 



WILSON LEADS 
IN NEW JERSEY 

Princeton President Seems 

Sure of Nomination for 

Governor. 

Trenton, N. J., Sept. 15. — Woodrow 
WMlson. president ot Princeton univer- 
sity, s.ppears to be in the lead for the 
Democratic nomination for governor 
of New Jersey. Col. George Harvey, 
who has been active in promoting Mr 
Wilso.i's candidacy, and James Smith, 
Jr., former United States senator anfl 
leader of the North Jersey Democracy, 
are working hard for the success of 
the distinguisiied educator and uiey 
stick to their claim that he will be 
nominated on the first ballot. 

Fri€:nd3 of Frank S. Kaizenbach, Jr., 
former mayor of Trenton and the par- 
ty candidate for governor three years 
ago. Insist that Katzenbach will be 
the clioice of the convention. 

Sev'jral "favorite sons" undoubtedly 
will receive support on the first bal- 
lot. Of these probably the strongest 
is Slate Senator George S. Silzer of 
Middlesex county. 

Platform in Prepared. 
The platform as agreed upon by the 
state committee provides for a pub- 
lic utility commission with rate mak- 
ing power; favors an employers' lia- 
bility law, "to meet the just demands 
of labor;" favors the extentions of the 
prima.ry election laws to all nomina- 
tions, limits the campaign contribu- 
tions of candidates and requires the 
publication of campaign expenditures. 

PA\ EMENT PATCHED 

AND RESURFACED. 



that the 



the 



Listed Stocka- 



Bid. 



pd. 
pd. 



West Duluth Briefs. 

Judge J. B. Flack of the West Duluth 
ju.^tice court left today for Barnum to 
visit the Carlton county fair. 

The funeral of Carl Herbert, the 1- 
year-old son of C. G. Berg of 4 031 Hal- 
ifax stret. who died yesterday, was held 
this afternoon at 1 o'clock from the 




DISBELIEF OF L 
SAVES BOY'S FUTU 





The following letter tells Its own 
story: 

Duluth. Minn., Sept. 4, 1910. 
Mr. J. H. Norton — 

Dear Sir: — Pamphlet dated the 2nd 
received, read contents, and feel as 
though I should write you and ex- 
press myself in regard to 
pertaining to young 
by evil companions 
the year of 1908. 
the county Jail 
larceny charge, 
held the office of 



the Item 

men led astray 

and drink. In 

I was confined at 

in this city on a 

You at that time 

County Attorney. My 



favorable one, and 



past was not a very 

I felt If guilty or not guilty there 
would be but little mercy or justice 
shown me. The boys in confinement 



with me voiced that you were heart- 
less and that the motto you went by 
was, "once crooked always crooked." 
Prospects to see the outer world for 
years to come looked dim. I knew if 
i should be sent to state prison my 
mother, who is in her declining years 
and a widow, would waste away with 
grief and shame. Why I decided to 
write you a letter one day, I cannot 
say. but for one reason 1 wanted you 
to know the facts of my case. I did 
not. at the time of penning the letter 
think that it would meet with any 
favorable results. If you re-read 
that letter, that is. if you have it on 
file, you will note where I stated to 
you frankly that I thought you heart- 
less, and justice was a thing of the 
past with you. I was misled, my 
mind was poisoned. I took for 
granted the statements made by the 
other Inmates. The day following 
the writing of the letter, when you 
came to the jail and took my hand in 
yours and talked to me as you did, 
I knew that I was misinformed, and 
I felt very much ashamed of myself. 
I could not express my gratitude then, 
so now do so. You are a man, a 
man whose object in life Is to help 
and uplift young men. Your efforts 
have not been in vain. You Ijave 
made many a mother happy, and 
many a young man an honor and not 
a pest to society. I am making this 
statement because I know it to be 
true. To be honest and frank, I am 
sure that I should have always been 
of no account if you had not placed 
confidence in me and trusted me. I 
feel sure that you shall be again 
elected to the office of County Attor- 
nev. During your previous admin- 
istration you have worked honestly 
and faithfully to please the party and 
the public in general, and the party 
and the public wlH not desert you in 
the coming campaign. You have my 
vote and help In the coming event. 
I am, yours truly, 



American Saginaw 
Butte Coalition . . . 
Butte-Ale.-c Scott pt 
Butte-Alex Scott tl 

Butte-Ballaklava 

Calumet & Arizona 

Cactus Development ... 

Copper Queen 

Cordova pt pd 

Cordova fl pd 

Denn-Arlzona 

Duluth & Moctezuma . . 
Giroux Consolidated . . . 

Greene-Cananea 

ICeweenaw 

Live Oak Development 

North Butte 

Ojibway 

Ked Warrior 

Savanna pt pd 

Savanna fl P<1 

Shatluck-Arizona 

Superior & Pittsburg... 
Warrior Development . • 
Zenith Lead & Zinc. . . . 

InllMted Stock* — 
Calumet & Montana.... 

Calumet & Corbin 

Calumet & Sonora 

Carman Cons 

t:;iiief Cons 

Cliff 

Duluth & Sonora 

Duluth-Toroda ■ 

Elenlta Dev 

Keating Gold 

Mowitza 

National 

North American 

Kawhide Royal 

San Antonio 

St. Mary's 

Sierra . • • • 

Ver milion Steel & Iron 

Total number of 



1% 

I8V4 



0%. 
1% 



lOc 
2'i5-i6 



7 

6% 

3^ 

16^ 

27% 

2Vs 



Asked. 



18Vi 
3V4 
5 
6 



2V4 
22 
11 ^i 



45c 

88c 
40o 



80c 
1% 
Ik 



80c 



9c 

2-54 

2c 



58 ?4 

1% 
30c 
30c 
75c 

3 

2 

7 

4 
17 
28 

6 

2% 

1% 

2^ 
22-^4 

il^4 

5% 
55c 

92c 
48c 
lOVi 
90c 

1% 

1"^ 

4 
76c 

6 

92c 

80c 

12c 

3 1-16 

4c 

6 
18c 

2V4. 

3 



ADDITIONAL 
SPORTS 



EVANS HAS BIG 
LEAD IN MORNING 



shares, 

m 



4.160. 



Chicago Player Outclasses 

Herreshoff in Brookline 

Golf Tournament. 

Brookline, Mass., Sept. 15. — After 
throe days of brilliant playing, Fred- 
erick Herreshoff of New York, member 
of the Ekwanok Golf club, went to 
pieces today in the first eighteen holes 
of the third round of match i^lay in 
the national amateur golf cham- 
pionsnip tournament at the Country 
club. 

He was 2 up on Charles Evans. Jr., 
of the Edgewater club, Chicago, at the 
tliird hole, but after that his game 
dropped steadily. He topped his drives, 
missed his second shots and slipped up 
on several sitot puts. At the end of the 
forenoon round Evans was 6 up. 

W. C. i"'owne3 of the Oakmont club, 
Plttsourg, linished the first eighteen 
holes 1 up on H. H. Wilder of the Ves- 
per club. Lowell; Warren K. W-Jod of 
the Homewood club, Chicago, 2 uu on 
J. G. .Anderson of the Woodlawn club, 
Newton, and W. R. Tuckerman of 
Stocklir'i^ge and Washington, 1 up on 
H. Weber of the Inverness club, To- 
ledo. 




SATURDAY, Sept. 17 



Is the day of the opening 
sale of lots in Park Divi- 
sion of the town of Crosby 

GEO. H. C 

608 Lonsdale Building, Duluth, Minn., 




and Crosby, Minn. 



^■^^^i^^w^fm^'^^ 



INDICTS THE 

BRICK TRUST 

Federal Grand Jury Returns 

True Bills in 

Chicago. 

Chicago, Sept. 15. — The so-called 
"brick trust" has been indicted by the 
federal grand Jury here, charged with 
violation of the Sherman anti-trust 
law. Four individuals and three com- 
panies are named as follows: D. V. 
Purlngton, president of the Purlngton 
Paving Brick company of Galesburg, 
111.; C. C Barr, president of the Barr 
Clay company of Reading, III.; H. S. 
Kenkert secretary of the Metropolitan 
Paving "Brick company. Canton, Ohio; 
William F. Brennan, Chicago sales 
agent of the three companies. Tlie 
companies represented by the foregoing 
individuals also were indicted. 

Judge Landis in the Lnited States 
district court issued bench warrants 
against the accused. It is alleged that 
the defendants were engaged in a com- 
bination in res traint of trade. 

THREE DEATHS 
FROM CHOLERA 

Prussian City Has Bacterio- 
logical Examination of 
Victims. 

Danzig, Prussia, Sept. 15.— Bacterio- 
logical examinations following three 
deaths here have established that death 
in each instance was due to Asiatic 
cholera. Fifteen new suspected cases 
of cholera here were placed under ob- 
servation today. 



Suspect In Berlin. 

Berlin, Sept. 15. — Another suspected 
cholera patient was sent to a hospital 
during the night. The suburb of 
Schoenberg also has a new suspect in 
the person of a commercial traveler 
who arrived there recently from the 

Orient. 

_ • - 

If a few more table guests would 
make It profitable for you to keep 
boarders, then Vou have business for 
a Herald want ad. 



DULUTHIAN NOW 
A PUBLISHER 



Herbert L Gooch Has Pros- 
pered Since Moving to 
Nebraska. 



this 
the 



Herbert E. Gooch, who purchased 
week from David I. Thompson, 
Lincoln Evening Star, a daily news- 
paper published at Lincoln, Neb., Is a 
former Duluthian and at one time con- 
ducted a broker's office in this city. 

Mr. Gooch is now one of the most- 
prominent business men of Nebraska. 
He controls a string of thirty broker- 
age offices and is also engaged exten- 
sively in tlie milling business. The 
"Gooch" flour is sold all over Nebraska. 

L. B. Tobln, his business partner at 
Nebraska, also owns an interest in 
the paper. I'olltically, the paper will 
be independent. 



EXHIBIT WILL NOT 

BE SENT TO HIBBING. 



The St. Louis county exhibit that at- 
tracted so much favorable attention 
at St. Paul last week will not be taken 
to the St. Louis county fair, which 
opens tomorrow at Hibblng:. 

"The car containing the exhibit 
reached the city this morning and an 
effort was made immediately to ar- 
range for the forwarding of the car 
to Hlbbing. The wishes of the Hlb- 
blng people were known and the dis- 
position here was to accede to thesg 
wishes, but It was found to be impos- 
sible to make the necessary arrange- 
i^ents. . ,,, ., 

Coming at the late hour It did, the 
request of the Hibbing fair managers 
found those in charge of the county ex- 
hibit unprepared and it was with re- 
gret that they were forced to the con- 
clusion that nothing could be done. 

DRUGGISTS TO WAR 

ON BALE OF NARCOTIC. 

Pittsburg, Pa.. Sept. 15.— A country- 
wide campaign against the illegitimate 
traffic in narcotic and hablt-formlng 
drugs has been begun. The National 
Association of Retail Druggists, in 
convention here, went on record as 
favoring a national law along theso 
lines Steps were also taken to bring 
about a change of ranking of pharrna- 
the United States army. Mil- 
and Roche?t"r are competing 
next convention. , 



Tho patching and resurfacing of East 
Superior street between Sixteenth and 
Twenty-third avenues and of Twenty- 
thud avenue east between Superior and 
Hfth streets has been completed by 
Contractor "I'addy" McDonnell. The 
pavement has now been down seven 
year.-, and the city authoritie state that 
it is in as good if not better shape than 
whc-n it was originally laid. The ex- 
planaton given is that it has settled 
in any spots wher it might and that 
the resurfacing has about the same 
.»ft"oci; as a new pavement laid on a 
conci-ete base. It is al.so pointed out as 
an eiample of the additional life that 
will be given a pavement if it is given 
j)rop.jr attention from time to tme. 
MaiP' of Duluth's street improvements 
have" gono to ruin before their time be- 
caus.a of the fact th?t they have not 
been repaired when tifiey began to show 
the oftects of wear^^ 

TELEPHONES IN THE MINES. 

A Means of Protection to Miners— 
Difftjrent From Above Ground Way. 

New York Sun: Telephone men .say 
within the next ten years every mine 
of importance in the country will be 
equipped with intercommunicating sys- 
tems. Following the disaster at Cherry 
tiae Illinois legislature passed a law 
requiring the Installation of telephone 
systJms in mines as a life saving, pre- 
cautionary measure, and the value of 
the law has been such that other 
3tat>}3 and mine owners are likely to 
fall in line. 

Ten years ago some mine owners did 
put in telephone systems, but they 
speedily were proved useless on account 
of the atmosplieric conditions, tae 
dampness, the gases and the corrosive 
aciJs let lose by blasting and digging. 
These bit into the wires and the 
phones and put the lines out of com- 
mission in a comparatively short time. 
After that little effort was made for 
several years to rig up any communi- 
cating system other than speaking 
tutbes. 

The apparatus manufacturers were 
too busy meeting the demands of the 
aboveground fields to study the needs 
of r.alnes, and not until within the last 
yea-r has' there been any special effort 
to contrive apparatus that would over- 
come the difficulties. It is now believed 
that the former defects of telephone 
systems for mines have been remedied. 
Tne ecenomy of time in communi- 
cating by telephone with the various 
parts of the mine makes a strong ap- 
peal to the miner owner, and the pro- 
tection afforded by telephones through 
quick service in case of emergency and 
the ability in case of a cavein to in- 
form the rescuing parties of the exact 
locE,tlon of the imprisoned miner is 
self-evident. A nmnber of lives might 
have been saved at the Cherry mine if 
the imprisoned men could have guided 
their rescuers. 

The telephone sets made for mine use 
are encased In cast Iron boxes Avilh a 
hard enamel finish through which 
gases, moi-sture and acid fumes cannot 
penetrate. Some have the ringer In a 
sepsirate box on the outside, but also 
protected. Tlie door to the box is closed 
with a pin when the Instrument is 
not in use. To make It waterproof a 
second door must be opened before the 
transmitter an dother parts are ac- 
cessible to the trouble man or inspec- 
tor. 

The wires are brought in through 
pipes. The ringer armature and gongs i 
are enclosed In a hood that protects | 
them v.hlle It does not muffle the 
sound. Special treatment is given to 
pieces of wire exposed. The metal 
parts, such as gong posts and bells, are 
zinc and copper plated and the screws 
are of brass, reducing rust and cor- 
rosion to a minimum. 

"I'he installation is without many of 
the difficulties of air lines. There are 
no poles required and no holes to he 
dug. The wires are run on standard 
wood brackets equipped with glass in- 
sulators. These brackets are fastened 
to timbers or other supports or to the 
Bides of the rifts by means of plugs 
driven into holes In the wall. 

Ordinary line wire is not regarded 
with favor, the best construction call- 
ing" for rubber covered, braided and sat- 
urated copper wires that remove all 
danger from moisture or dampness. In 
some cases the wires are also lead cov- 
ered. 

■ .Most of the mine sets so far manu- 
factured have been sent to South Africa 
and Australia. 



eyes while, say, the family was away 
on a day's picnic. They will duplicate 
the stationery of businesB houses and 
in some way learn that such and such 
a bill is to be collected at a given time, 
or that such and such a party is to de- 
liver certain goods by previous ar- 
rangement. They then present the du- 
plicate bin or order and so come in for 
the booty. 

There is one trick particularly that 
has become classical. A citizen one 
morning met a friend on his way to 
business. He stopped ;o Invite the 
friend to a dinner party f >r the follow- 
ing evening. The two alked for a 
while there in the street .vhen the citi- 
zen remarked that it must be getting 
late. 

He felt in his j^ocket, but his watch 
was not there. 

"You'll have to tell me the time," he 
said, "I've left my watch under my pil- 
low again." 

An hour later a well dressed man 
pulled the knocker at the citizen's door 
anfl asked for the citizen s wife. When 
she came to the door rie introduced 
himself as a business friend of her hus- 
band. He had taken the liberty, he 
said, to send for a fine turkey from his 
ranch, which he begged her to accept 
for the supper party of tl" e evening fol- 
lowing; and there, sure enough, was 
the well dressed man's strvant holding 
a plump gobbler. The citizen's wife was 
greatly pleased and accepted the gift. 
The well dressed man bagged her not 
to mention it, and with the usual com- 
pliments he was turning awav when, 
happening to remember something, he 
said: 

"Oh, yes, Mr. forgot his watch 

this morning, but I mighl as well take 
it to him. It's under the pillow," he 
said. 

The citizen's wife hu-rled upstairs 
and there, indeed, she found the watch 
under the pillow and ga^ e it to the ac- 
commodating stranger. 

That evening the cltisien on his re- 
turn home was provoked when he heard 
the story, as you may im.igine. He was 
out a watch, but at least it had cost 
the ratero the investment of a fine 
turkey. They would have that turkey 
for the dinner party jusi the same. He 
would tell the joke to his friends as 
they ate the bird; and the next evening 
he began relating the jest as soon as 
his guests arrived. 

"But," interrupted his wife, "the po- 
lice caught the fellow, ^■ou know." 
"Caught him?" repeated her husband. 
"Why, of course." she said, "and you 
yourself sent up a man from the police 
court today. He wanted the turkey as 
evidence." 

"And you gave it to l.im?" 
"To be sure I did." 

The ratero had got back his original 
investment. 



GOWNS MADE IN 33HUSSELS. 
New York Sun: "Do you know where 
many of the frocks aie made that 
American women buy ir Paris?" asked 
a man who has lived abroad for many 
years. 

"In Brussels," he went on. "That Is 
about the greatest dressmaking center 
of the world. I know one woman who 
has a dres.smaklng establishment In 
which she employs 600 girls. Her out- 
put is tremendous and there are many 
similar establishments. 

"Every freight train that Icave^ 
Brussels for Paris carries big consign- 
ments of dresses. Labc r is cheaper In 
Brussels than In Paris and conditions 
of living different. Then there is no 



Sunday holiday for the workers in mil- 
linery establishments. The proprietors 
are .so swamped with order.s that they 
keep their hands going. Nothing is so 
tyrannical as the demand for dress. The 
saying over there Is that the physician 
and the undertaker may take their own 
time, but the dressmaker, never. 

"My wife tells mo that she can get In 
Brussels an exquisite hand-embroidered 
gown for $100, and the best turned out 
there — a court dress, in fact, with a 
train — for $140. Brussels is fast becom- 
ing an American shopning center " 
■ 
ORIGI.V OF EMPIRE DAY. 
The king has no more loyal and 
faithful subject in all his wide domin- 
ions, says a writer in the Queen, than 
Mrs. Clementina Fessenden. the founder 
of Empire day, which has now been 
celebrated in her native country of 
Canada for over eleven years. 

The Idea had its first conception In a 
very simple incident. In the year 1897 
Mrs. Fes.senden attended a meeting of 
the Wentworth Historical society, ac- 
companied by her little granddaughter. 
The little girl's pride and pleasure were 
unbounded and the intelligent inter- 
est which, though only about 8 years 
of age, she displayed caused the 
thought to flash through Mrs. Fessen- 
den's mind: "If one child is capable 
of such enthusiasm in what its elders 
in their presumption decide is quite 
above its level, why not another? Why 
should not hundreds and thousands 
find a similar delight in learning the 
history of their own and their mother 
land, Ihat land from which their fore- 
bears came, it may be centuries be- 
fore ?" 

Mrs. Fessenden, besides writing to 
tiie then minister of education and to 
all whD might in any way forward her 
scheme, herself appeared before the 
various provincial school boards urg- 
ing the advisability of a day for pa- 
triotic exercises. Her efforts met such 
success that a meeting of the Dominion 
Teachers' association held at Halifax. 
Nova Scotia, on Aug. 24, 1898, the idea 
was unanimously adopted. Mrs. Fessen-. 
den had in the meantime been thinking 
out her plans for carrying on the work 
and thu.s wa.s .sati.sfactorliy established 
an organization which met with the 
cordial approval of the late queen 
about two years before her death, and 
Empire day Is now celebrated annually 
in the Dominion in close on 40,000 
schools by pupils numbering 4,000.000. 

Empire day, which is kept on the last 
school day before May 24, is given up 
specially to "the history of Canada in 
its relation to the British empire and to 
such exercises as might tend to the 
increase of the interest of tiie pupils 
in the history of thei rown country and 
strengthen their attachment to the 
empire to which they belong. It must 
be imderstood that tills day is not for 
children alone, since Canadian schools 
number among their pupils many who 
have left their early youth behind, nor 
was the call made to Canada only, 
though Uie response was warmest 
there, but to tho whole British world. 



Read The 
HeraldWants 




A Big 

Shipment of 

Beautiful, 

Soft Wool 

and Cotton 

Blankets and 

Comforters 

at Special 

Prices. 



This Is the Sale That 

You Money 



All you need to do is to 



look around in other stores — you 
won't find anv such values, but you will get a better idea of 
what truly great bargains these 'Blankets and Comforters are. 
Every day the department is filled with eager buyers, who 
hasten back to take advantage of these wonderful bargains. If 
you come here first, you'll save time and money. 

White Golden Fleece Ail Wool Blankets 



REGULAR 
^.00 
VALUES 



These are beauties — soft and warm with well 
bound edges. Remember these are single blank- 
ets By the pair they would be $8 or $5; special 



SPF.CIAIi 



$2.50 

EACH. 

$6.50 Gray Wool Blankets Now CJ^ 05 



These Blankets f re doable, soft, fine quality and 
ordinary store they would sell for $7.00 at least 
come in gray, pink, checked 



-and with striped 



in tlw! 
Th-ey 
border. 



A PAIR. 




BUNCO GAMES IN MEXICO. 



More Ingenious rogues than the 
te;-os of Mexico City have yet to 



best values you 



$7.50 Wool Blankets on Sale at $H^Q5 



Four nlnety-fl\^ 
large, good quality 
are being sold for. 



a pair — all-wool, checked patterns — 
-extra Aire values at the prices they 



A PAIR. 



Heavy Gotiton 



Wool 
Finished 
Something extra fine — a soft, fine quality, full 
blanket, with bound edges — splendid value at $3.50 a 
These go on special sale at $2.25. 



Blankets $2.25 



size 
pair. 



A PAIR. 



cists In 
waukee 
for the 



SfhooMer Illt« Reef. 

Chicago, Sept. 15. — A wireless dis- 
patch states that the small schooner 
J B. Newiand struck a reef off North 
Manitou Island in LakeMichlgau today. 



ra- 
bo 
bred, says a writer in the Travel Mag- 
azine. The great PInkerton himself 
fe.l a victim to their skill. He had 
shown some skepticism over the won- 
derful tales he heard concerning these 
gentry and the Mexican chief of police 
felt that it was up to him to make 
gC'od. 

The chief had a private Interview 
with a certain pickpocket who at the 
moment wasn't wanted In the usual 
manner. The result was that the ratero 
before night brought a handsome gold 
watch and laid it on the official desk. 
Half an hour later PInkerton himself 
came In, sheepish but convinced. 

Imagine a porter constantly at your 
side carrying your valise to the depot 
and you are watching him. too. Then, 
after the train starts, you find your 
e\'ix> neatly silt open by a sharp knife j 
and all your shirts taken out. You can- 
not tell how the fellow managed It, for 
h^ not only slipped the garments 
u-ider your eytes, but hid 
ward things under his 
bargain. Yet this Is 
achievement. 

It has become unsafe to deliver 
thing to a stranger In the city of 
icio without a personal order with 
s.>cr^t mark on It. These rascals 
been' known to empty a furnished house 
iu broad daylight 



In pink, blue, grar, green and purple— extra fine quality, 
with bound edges — the regular prices were $3.(5. To close 
out they go, on salo at 



Regular $2.50 Gotton Blankets ^Zr ^/. 05 
A Few Slumber Robes {About 20 Left) 

$2.50 

Special Prices Beln^ Made on 
Bed Gomforters 

$2.25 Bed Comforters ..$1.75 
$2.00 Bed Comforters. _$1.50 
$2.75 Bed Comforters __$2.25 

Special Sale of 
Bed Pillows 



Regular $1,65 

Quality '" ■''""''''' 



Colors 

Filled with clean, sanitary 
filling — mad«a up in big 
quantities for us — a com- 
forter generally selling for 
$1.75 or $1.80 in the or- 
dinary store — 
These go on 
sale here at 



95c 



out 
the stiff, awk- 
jacket In the 
an amateur's 

any- 
Mex- 
some 

have 
house 
under tlie servants' 




A Good $L50 Pillow 
for Only 9Se a Pair 

These 
quality— 
$1.75 In 



covered 
striped 
them by 



Pillows are of fair 
-sometimes sold as 

the ordinary store, 
in extra good, blue 
A. C. A. ticking. 

the pair at »5c. 



size and 

high as 

They ana 

and white 

We offer 



$5 Pillows for $2.95 



o 
Pair 

The famous Toga Pillow, in good 
heavy tick — with good grade of feath- 
ers — a pillow always S'dd for at least 
$5.00, and a big bargain at 92.95 a pair. 






I ■ 






' J i '% « il « L_ ' H iW 10 « 





10 



Thursday, 




THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 18, 1910 






n Own This Beautiful House 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

On Pages 1 9 and 20. 



OonU Pay Rent All Youp Life ! 



Make an ap- 
pointm ent to 
see Henry H. 

Nesbitt today. 

He will tell you 
where these 
houses are and 
will be only too 
willing to show 
them to you. 



The rents in the city are always increasing and they will 
eventually force you to move to thie suburbs. 

Move to the suburbs now — into this house. Have the 
rent money apply on the cost of the house. By doing this way 
you will be your own landlord within a year or two! 

This house is situated close to one of the finest parks in 
Duluth and has the best car service in the city. 

We have chosen six of our best houses to be SOLD AT COST. 
Pay a small sum down and the balance in monthly payments. 

W. M. PRINDLE & CO. 

No. 3 Lonsdale Bldg., Dulutii, Minn. 




This is a six-room house and bath; downstairs fin- 
ished in oak and hardwood, maple floors throughout the 
house; full basement and concrete foundation; plumbing 
and lighting fixtures included. 



FOR SALE— HOUSES. 



FOR SALE— WE HA^ 
not tu advise building 
except such houses 
equipped with heatin 
is now well onto fall 
is short. We are eqi 
you a house In sixty 
honor by day labor •» 
antee behind it, all 
monthly payments, 
these cities bloom wii 
— they fairly smile a 
beauty and defy com; 
terJal. price, workman 
We airspace, we beai 
between roof boardte 
bttween lloors and 1 
and shealing. Send 
p:cturo8 or tall at ou; 
Ings by appointment 
call at your residenct 
Euuiund G. Walton 
Bouth P'ourth street A 
Endlcott building, St. 
change building, L>uli 



WANTED TO RENT. 




.'E DECI1>ED 
in the winter, 
as will be 
g plants. It 
and our season 
iipped to build 
days — built on 
v'ith our guar- 
on time, just 
Every part of 
h our cottages 
t vou in their 
letltion In ma- 
siiip and value, 
nfill, we paper 
and sliinglee, 
■eiween siding 
tor plans and 
■ offices. Even- 
only we will 
if you desire. 
Agency, 114 
(Inneapoiis; 447 
Paul; 312 Ex- 
nh. 



^' \ ^ ' 






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B&^S*^^KS^^ 


^^ 


^M 






'"•"^S^ 




^'mkMim 






^ 


g^^l^ 


^m 


^m 


^1 


^^^^^1 


■^^S^^.'^s'^i 





NEW TOW,'«SITE ON CUYUNA SRON RANGE ! 

SOO RAILWAY STATION 

Large biiuies of iron ore to be mined. Hundreds of men 
will be emplc yed at the mines. 

Wide streets and avenues; cement sidewalks and curbing 
to be laid at once. 

Waterworks, electric light and sewerage system already 
planned. * 

Business Lots $300 to $400 

Residence Lots §200 to $275 

Terms: One-third cash, balance one and two years, 6 
l)er cent. 

Address 



JL^ .r»i 



E. A. LAilb^ ilgeoty 

DEERWOOD, MSNN, 



BARGAINS 

HOUSES AND LOTS 

Brick, seven rooms and bath, hot 
water heat, hardwood throughout, 
electric lights and gas. Price «4t,.noo. 

Eleven rooms and bath, modern, 
fine view of lake, hot water heat, 
good barn, convenient to down town, 
lot 50x140. Price $7,500. 

Seven rooms with bath, modern, 
hot water heat, electric lights and 
gas. This is ii convenient and splen- 
did house. Central location. Price 
fS.OOO. 

Brick, seven rooms and bath, mod- 
ern, fine view, full 50xl40-foot lot, 
ujiper side of street, snap. Price 
94,500. 

Eight rooms and bath. Modern, 
hot water heat. Price 94,750. 

Nine rooma and bath, hot water 
heat, modern. Price 97,000. 

Seven rooms and bath, good store 
loundation. fine basement, hardwood 
throughout, electric lights, gas. very 
modern except heat. Price 94,500. 

Seven rooma and bath, hardwood 
throughout, electric lights and gas, 
splendid sandstone basement, good 
heating plant. Price 95,000. 

Seven rooms, furnace heat, elec- 
tric lights and gas. Price 93,800. 

GETTY-3MITH CO., 

300 Palladiu Dullding. 





Only $10 cash and $10 per month buys 50xl40-foot lots with 
city water and J4"as, one block from Lakeside school. The price 
of each lot is ^450. No payments when sick. Call us up any 
time. 



310-11 COLUMBIA BUILDING. 
Office — Both Phones, 2147. Residence — Lakeside, 19-L. 



FOR SALE — A NE\V^ TEN-ROOM 
house; hardwood llocrs; electric 
llfeUts; city water; fitty-fooi lot on 
Fifty-second avenue west; price 
$l!,6Co. Gus Edstrom, 221 North 
Fifty-second avenue west. 

FOR SALE — SNAP — TEN-ROOM 
house for two famllieis; 65 feet front; 
electric light, water and gas; barn, 
chicken iiuuse, two horses, buggy 
and wagon and" harneiss, 125 chickens 
and pigeons; storm v/indows; |3,5oy, 
on terms. Apply 2315 Wilkins ave- 
nue, Hunter's Park. 

FOR SALE*— NEW -HOl'SE AND LOT 
in centi-ai West end; mugt be sold in 
two weeks. Address B 386, Herald. 

FOR SALE — OWNER LEAVING; 
liouse, hard floors, water, sewer, gas, 
electricity, heating ]. lant and fruit 
trees. London road, corner. |3,30o; 
$1,500 handles. Herald, E 331. 



FOR SALE— A NEW SEVEN-ROOM 
house; bath, all modern improve- 
ments; good location; bargain iX 
taken at once. Owner, 1614 East 
Sixth street. 

I'OR SALE— NEW, MO]>ERN SEVEN - 
room house; corner lot, o'o by HO 
feet. Call at Zenith ]-'ur Co. 



AIM ATTRACTIVE 
iSUBURBAN MOIVIE 

JL-^KGE LOT, GOOD HOFSE, BEAUTIFUL, VIEW, CHOICE 

NEIGHBORHOOD. 

THE HOUSE Is new, contains six rooms, all hardwood floors, stone 
foundation, modern plumbing, enameled tub, electric lights and 
fixtures; all rooms painted in oil; large attic, pantry, closets, etc. 

In short, a very nice, well built, handsomely finished home. 

LOT — A large corner 100x175; graded, sodded and planted with shade 
and fruit trees. 

LOCATION — Hunter's Park, the most desirable part of Duluth. 

VIEW — The view is simply grand, overlooking the park and the lake. 

There is also a good chicken house and large yard with wire fence. 

Just Uie place you are looking for. Price on application. Terms 
Tcry easy. 

STRYKER, MANLEY & BUCK. 



19" NOTICE 'VS 

Our facilitlies and connections for 
buying and selling your lands are 
unexcelled. We are also in the mar- 
ket for timber in Northern Minne- 
sota. 
Xell B. Morrison, H. G. Champlla. 

GREAT NOi^THERifii LA(4n (.O. 

Suite 413, Palltullu IliiUdlng, 

Uiilutli, .Minn. 



ISuy Oood Lots G\%.®^^ 

Sixty 25xl40-foot lots for sale on easy payments for ^450. 
Positively the best bargain in the city. Apply for maps with 
full particulars 



214-15 PROVIDENCE BUILDING. 



W 



HEELER & PARSON 

808 Alworth BIdB- 

Nfw liouse on Thtrty-fourtli 
Hvenue west. $2,000. Easy Urmg. 
FUe rooms, city water, hard- 

wutU. 



CLARKE- 

WERTIN 

CO., 

200 Alworth Bidg.. 

FIHK INSVIIAX E. 



X^ODERPV MOrVIES! 

$7,r>0<> — East Fourth street near Twenty-third ave- 
nue, eight-room frame dwelling finished in hard- 
wood. 

f0,OOO — Ecst Fourth street, near Sixteenth avenue. 
Ten-room frame dwelling, finislied in hardwood. 

(11,000 — East Third street, near Eleventh avenue, 
ten-room frame dwelling, finished in hardwood. 

913,500 — Hunters Park, eight-room frame dwelling, 
finished In oak, just completed. 

$1^500— East Second street, near Twenty-fifth ave- 
nue, ten-room frame dwelling, finished in hard- 
w''"d. 



-^^ItlABILir^pEgTHEFT ANa Ci^ 

..-..^ ^.. '.;..... i^PI«yiE MELROSE 1406 ZENITH 406 

rWdLNAIN BUItblNCv^ 



Small Monthly 
Payments 

Will buy you a lot in 

LAKESIDE 

Why don't you make a start to- 
wards a home. 

LAKESIDE LAND GO 

601-2-3-4-.% Sellwood Oiiildiug. 
Phones 408. 



>/N^>^^N^>^>^>^^^^^>^^N^^^>^^^S^S^i^^^^»<^>^>^^ 



lOOK THESE IP ! 

ie,0<i0 — New six-room house on Ding- 
wall street: 50xl40-foot lot; 
strictly modern, on easy terms. 

$0,500 — Six-room house on Jefferson 
street; lot 50x140 feet; elegantly 
decorated; hot air furnace; a snap 

$TUMM»— Seven-room house on Jeffer- 
t^on street, lot 58xl00-fuot corner: 
new and strictly modern; hot wa- 
ter htat. 

C. H. Graves & Co., 

.100 .vi.woitrji iiiiLDi.Nc;. 



compLtE^te: 

New and modtri. s'x-rouni 

with full basement, large attic, 
hardwood finish, heating plant and 
every modern convenience; lot has 
33 feet frontage on Eighteenth ave- 
nue east, just above Jefferson street, 
very small cash payment and bal- 
c,nce monthly, like rent. 

We also have a 50-foot lot on 
Fifth street near Normal School, 
very cheap. 

e:by Wl oivis>le:y 

515 Pallndiu Dutldlug. 



Lots on Easy Payments! 

On Oneida street, between Fifty- 
first and Fifty-fourth avenue east. 
Three bloclis from car line, two 
blocks from school, three bloclta 
from church. Water and gas in 
street; cement sidewalk, street 
macadamized. Prices $500 to $600. 
$2.=). 00 down and balance $10 per 
month. 

CORPORATE INVESTMENT COMPANY 

Loans, Real Estate. Kentals, 
Torrey Building, I-^rst Floor. 



LAKE FRONTAGE ON LONG LAKE 

On account of urgent demands for 
a little piece of land on a lake I 
have recently platted the east side 
of Long Lake into ten acre tracts. 
Long Lake is located between Cari- 
bou and Grand Lake. Shores are 
wooded and is reached at preser.«» 
by the Clo<iuet River road, 16 miles 
from Duluth. The Canadian North- 
ern runs through corner of land 
and station has been granted at 
crossing of the Swan Lake road, 
one mile south. Price and terms 
reasonable. 

A. W. KUEHIMOW 

715 Torroy Bld«r., Duluth, Minn. 



—-DON'T PUT IT OFF> 

Make the first payment on a home 
now and let the rent money pay the 
balance. Look up these offers: 
seven-room house at Lakeside; 
strictly modern throughout; best lo- 
cation; small amount down, balance 
on easy terms; must be sold. 

Three lots, close to car line In 
West Duluth, near Sixty-second ave- 
nue. Only $125 each. One fine 
building lot in West Duluth, $250, 

EBERT, WALKER & McKNIGHT, 

ai::-15 Torrey Uulldluir. 
"SpeclallHtii In Rapid Deals." 



FOR SALE— WOULD LIKE TO BUY 
good renting property, central East 
end or central West end; $2,000 to 
$5,000. Address D 111, Herald. 



FOR SALE— BY OWNER; AN F.IGHT- 

room house; with ali modern con- 
veniences; centrally located; will 
glv-.i liberal terms. G e09. Herald. 



FOR SALE — FOUR-ROOM BUNGA- 
low, at Lajieside, new, hardwood 
floors, electric lights, street has 
water and gas and sewer. Liberal 
terms. Call 4131 Regent street. 



FOR SALE— AN EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE, 
well built; water, gas and furnace; 
Woodland, near car line; 100 feel lot. 
Zenith 'phono 1048. 



FOR SALE— WOULD LIKE TO BUY 
house and small lot on East Third 
street, about $2,500 or less. Address 
F 471, Herald. 

FOR SALE— SEVERAL RESIDENCES 
on Duluth Heights, which may be 
had at attractive fijjures, if taken 
at once. James Thorburn. eOi Pal- 
ladio building. 



WANTED TO RENT — YOU WILL NOT 
want to rent a home, as you will 
have one ot your own if you buy a 
lot on the easy weekly payment plan 
in Chambers' First and Second divi- 
sion, on Sept. ly. Watch for furtlier 
announcenienis. Visit the property 
at once, it lies below the boulevard, 
between Fifth and Tenth avenue* 
east. 

WANTED TO RENT — ROOM WITH 
board, in private family: central part 
of city. Address R 32 5, Herald. 

WANTED TO RENT— AT ONCE, MOD- 
ern healed small flat or larger flat 
arranged so couple rooms could be 
rented; location must be central; best 
of reference. Address B 300, Herald. 

WANTED TO RENT — RESPONSIBLE 
coui'le want housekeeping rooms or 
will care for home or fiat; reasonable 
rent; best references. Box SI, West 
Duluth. 

WANTED TO RENT — BY A GEN- 
tieman, one or two unfurnished 
rooms in private house; would take 
all or part of meals with family. 
U 359, Hera ld. 

WANTED TO RENT — FURNISHED 
hou-se or flat for the winter, for 
newly married couple. R 364 herald. 



WANTED rO RENT — SEVEN- ROOM 
hcuse, walking distance from busi- 
ness center: must have conveniences; 
references e:<changed. What have 
you to offer a good tenant? Address 
Y 383, care Herald. 



WANTED TO RENT— TWO OR THRBB 
furnished; modern rooms for light 
h oust keeping rent reasonable: give 
full particulars. H. A. H, Herald. 



WANTEr> TO RENT— A FURNISHED 
room \\ith board and jdano for young 
couple: central. E 330, Herald. 



WANTEI* TO RENT— BY SIX YOUNG 

men who can furnish references, 
furnished house or fiat, centrally lo- 
cated, for the winter Address M 6lo, 
titraid. 



FOR SALE— COWS. 



S. M. KANER WILL ARRIVE WITH 
a carload of Jresh milch cuws Fri- 
day, Sept. 16, at 1219 East Seventh 
street. 

FOR SALE — COW. 7-YE\R-OLD. 

three-tjuarter Jersey; Koo<i milker; 
will seli at a bargain. Call at 1128 
Lake avenue north. 



Two very choice lots on the 
upper Bide of Sixth street, 
near Lake avenue; graded 
street and all Improvements. 
One block from school and 
park. Only five minute'M ^alk 
from buHlnesa oeuter of city. 



HERE IS YOUR CHANCE I 



G. A. KNUTSON & CO., 

200 KxchROKe Hulldlnar. 
Zenith 'Phone, R29. 



AGExNTS WANTED. 

AGENTS'^^^^^'START^YOUW^OWN DUSI 
ness, capital not required; advertis- 
ing novelties; fourteen samples mail- 
ed for 25 cents. Pe icil Advertising 
company. East Orange, N. J. 

W A N TED — RELIABl E AGENTS TO 

sell a meritorious mining stock on 

commission basis. Address P. O. 
drawer 441, Duluth. 



SWEDISH MA.SSA(iE. 

A. E. HANSKnT MASSEUR, 400 NEW 
Jersey building Old 'phone 4;:73 Mel- 
rose. 



CLAIRVOYANTS. 

ASTROLOGICAL HOROSCOPE. FREE, 
on business. love, marriage. by 
scientific astrologers. Seiid date of 
birth and lU cents in stamps for 
postage. Prof. Eagle, Saginaw, Mich. 



AGNES BACON, ASTROLOGIST, PALM- 
ist. Penny Arcadt. Prophetic cards 
Price %\. 

M.ME. ANNA— CARD READING, 11 TO 
7; advice in Lut'lness ana love af- 
fairs, 18 rhird avenue west, Dodg© 
block. Zenith &91-D. 



UPHOLSTERING. 



FURNITURE, AUTOMOBILES, CAR- 
riages; reasonable prices. E. Ott, 113 
First avenue west. Both phones. 



DRESSMAKING. 

THE NEW^^METHOD^LmESSMAKlNQ 
school teacnes dressmiaking In six 
weeks; makes dresses for yourself or 
others while learning. 310 West Sec- 
ond street, next Y. M. C. A. building. 
Also evening class. 



PATENTS. 

PAi' Eicr^s" -^^'"'aiX'^about^'^^ ents. 

See Stevens, 610 Seilwuod building. 



MILLINERY. 



MRS. SHARPE, MILLINERY PARLOi:3 
318 West Third street. 




Eight lots on London road with 
lake frontage, 300 to 500 feet long. 
Many lots at Lakeside and Lester 
Park, all improvements in. Easy 

payments, 

90,000 — Ten rooms, modern, central. 
A snap. 

$4.«{0O— Seven-rooms, modern; good 

barn. 
94,-10O — Seven rooms, modern, new, 

worth $5,000. 
94,500 — Two four-room fiats, cen- 
tral. 
94,000— Five and seven-room flats, 

central; rent $44. 

A SNAP. 
94,20<V— Seven-rooms, modern. 
94,10<^— Six rooms, modern — a peach 

— new. 
93.150— Six rooms, modern, all but 

heat. 
94,000 — Eight rooms, modern brick, 

central. 
92,800— Eight rooms, sewer, water 

and bath, Woodland. 
91,500— Eight rooms, down stairs 

finished. 
91,400 — Eight room, four-room flats, 

West end. 

G. A. BUSH 

600 Lonsdale Building. 



BARGAIN ! 




Will buy a two-family house and 
lot on Garfield avenue; rents for 
$20 per month. Perfect title and 
all assessments and taxes paid to 
date. If you are looking for a bar- 
gain and a good investment it will 
pay you to let us show you this 
property. 

Money <o Loan— Any Amount 
Lowest RateH. 



216 West Superior Street. 



Let us lend you the 
money with which to 
build your home. 

Standard Home Co. 

418 Providence Building. 

Dultitl). 

Zenith Phone, 2435. 

Offices open Monday, Wednesday 
and Saturday evenings until 9 

o'clock. 



SOME SNAPS I / 

A AV'eat End Home uf six rooms, wa- 
ter, sewer, electric lig.nt, and lot 
28x95, on Second street, close to 
street car barn. Price if you have 
the cash, $2,100. 

Another Snap — East end, six large 
roms, water, sewer, electric light, 
hardwood throughout; lot 25x140, 
on Jefferson street, $3,000; one- 
third cash, balance easy terms. 

Another One— Close in on Second 
street, eight rooms, modern; a 
beautiful 50-foot lot; street paved; 
it is a bargain and a good home — 
$4,500; half cash. Get it. 

SMITH REALTY CO. 

524 Manhattan Ituilding. 



J. D. HOWARD & CO. COOLEY & UNDERHILL, 



MONEY TO LOAN 

5, 5V^ and 6 per cent. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

Old Reliable Companies. 

REAL ESTATE 

Monthly Payment Plan. 



200-10-11 EUchanse Bnlldlnar. 



FOR SALE 

giriOO Cash — Seven-room house, East 
Fourth street; balance of $3,500 
in monthly payments; hardwood 
floors; fine basement, new furnace. 

$500 Cash— New six-room house 
with bath, electric light, gas, hot 
water heating plant. East End 
near Chester Park; balance of 
$3,000 in monthly payments. 

PULFORD, HOW S 
COMPANY, 

300 Exchange Building. 



Cheap Homes. 

93,200 — Eight-room house, suitable 
for two families; corner lot. East 
Eighth street. 

$2,>00 — Seven-room house. East End, 
5 nap. 

$2,too — Seven-room house, central 

clieap. 

$3,000 — Eight-room house, East Sev- 
(!nlh street. 

94,200 — Seven-room house; modern; 

central. 

$2,650 — Eight rooms, good house, 
central. 

$2,400 — Seven rooms; two families; 

central. 

$1,000 — Five-room house, East Fif- 
i.eenth street; lot 50x140. 

$3,000 — Seven-room house; modern; 

}£ast End. 
$3,200 — Seven-room house, East Su- 

l)erior street. 
$2,2,50 — Five-room house; modern; 

East End. 
$3,250 — Ten-room house; new; East 

(Seventh street. 
$2.80O — Five-room house; modern; 

Twelfth avenue east. 
$2,500 — Corner lot; Twenty-third 

avenue west. 
$2,300 — Seven-room house. West End. 
$2,500 — Ten-room house. Snap. W^est 

.End, 
$1.500 — Four-rooms, Eleventh ave- 

)iue west. 
$3.200 — Five rooms; modern; on car 

]ine; Lakeside, very cheap, and 

many others. Easy payments. 

W. H. LOCKER, 

416-417 Lonsdale Building. 



Now Is the Appointed Time! 

To the Buyer— 

If Duluth 151 to have a population of 300,000 within the 
next ten years, why is it not a good time for men of small 
and large means, to get busy and pick up some of the real 
genuine snaps that this office is now offering. Now don't per- 
mit and pessimist to try to convince you that Duluth will not 
reach this population, in ten years. We are members of the 
ways and means committee and know what we are talking 
about. 

To the Holder-on 

Don't stand on the corner of your lo. and say, 'Ten years 
ago I paid $1,000 for this property, and when I have added taxes, 
interest on the investment, municipal improvements, it has ac- 
tually cost me today about $1,500, or $1,600." Sell your lot for 
what you can honestly get for it and get into the market for some- 
thing else that is ipoving faster, and make more money. Just do 
ac the successful merchant does, turn over your money as often 
as you can and c.o not allow ^axes, interest and improvements to 
swallow up profits and tie up your good gold. Visit with us a few 
moments and we will tell you how, as we have told hundreds 
within the last ten days. 

P. E. DOWLING & CO., 

Real Estate and Insurance. 
910 ALWORTH BUILDING. 




$1,000 cash will handle modern 
six-room house, hot water heat, 
electric light, gas and bath; hard- 
wood finish. Balance (3,100 to 
suit. 

LANIGAN-GARONER COMPANY 

905-906 Alwortii Building. 
Zenith Plione 2417. 



JAMES THORBURN 

604 PALL.4DIO BUILDING. 

Zenitli 'Pbone 617. 

Fire Insurance — Rentals. 

Real Estate — Morignge Loans. 



Tou can be sure about some things 
only by answering some want ads — 
some important things, tool 



M 



To Loan at 
6% Interest. 



A. H. BURG & CO. 



91,800 — 50-foot lot on Jefferson St.; 
walking distance. 

$3,000 — Handsome corner, West Su- 
perior street. 

:ZEIVIXH REALTY CO. 

^ Bit Providence BulIdlnE'. 



We have a corner on First street suitable for hotel 

or commerdal purposes. Improvements now 

on property net 5 per cent. 

$12,500 

R. P. DOWSE (Si, CO. 



106 Providence tiiuiiding. 




General Insurance 



Mvertise In Tbi Utrald 



SAVE TIME! 

TELEPHONE your want ads. to The 
Herald. The rates are the same, and 
we will mail you a bill after its insertion. 

Doth Phones 324 



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Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 

ATLANTIC CITY 

FOR THE 

44th National Encampment 
Grand Army of the Republic 

SEPTEMBER 19-24. 

LOW KXCl RSION FARES via the 

historic baillefleld route. 
LIUERAL STOPOVERS to visit the 
various battietields. 

SPECI.VL TR.AIX leaves Chicago 
10:00 A. M. Saturday, September 
17, passing through Harper's 
Ft'rry and along the historic I'o- 
toniac River in daylight. 

WRITE OR CALL tor full particu- 
lar.-,. 

R. C. HAASE, 

Xf>rth^vr.«terB PanwenBer .Ajjeiit, 

37« Hubert Street, St. I'oul. 



Start The Day Right, 

Feel Keen, Spirited — FIT 



iraxisiiiiltal to liic ciLy a.i.Lorncy ol no- 
nce ol injury in liie ca^se oi iiimll Ol- 
^oo. va. iiifc City of UUi^utli — Received. 

secretary, lioaru ot tire Commis- 
oiui.ers lequcstiiig tUat llie board be 
cvuihorizea lo niuKe an ai>propriation 
lo uetray ilie expenses of me city elec- 
Li'iciau i]i iitleauintj ine couveniion ot 
city eiecLi-iciaus at Omaha — i'lre JJe- 
pax tiaeni. 

Aluiiatjer. Water and L.ight Depart- 
niuiii rciiucstiiig in.inediai.e action on 
ceiiain Uiiia — Ciainis. 

bccreiary of l^ibrary Board trans- 
cript of minutes oi boaru meetiiiij ^'^ 
oepi. — lieceiveU. 

City attorney report on petition ot 
W. v». Alien against lUe location oi 
junk snop at Ao. lyiO \v est .viicnigan 
sut.ei. ^vluerman iioar aslteU mat 
present Uesiring be UearU leia- 
locatiou of such junk shop, 
was oileieU lor 
A. M. Marshall 



tion of the re.soIution. and it was 
Glared adopted by a unanimous 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Pa.ssed Sept. 12. laiO. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



de- 
yea 



BATHC WITH 



HAND 
SAPOLIO 



It pives your skin an exhilarating tingle— 
makes every pore respond. It revives 
circulaiion — Invigorates — CLEANSES. 

All Grocers and Druggists 



^:-^ 



BLOOD POISON 

V CAN BE CURED 

If jca hiva nlr»r». m.ioin p»tch«f la the tiiiialh. •ore 
(hr>at. •r.iptiuua, copper colored ipoti on your bod,, 
(.iliiDt h\:r. iwolea KUodi. paiu< lu the bonef. or ae- 
Tere contioiisd he*dachM, our tpedsl trutment will 
I cure ,i)u. Our DR. PANTER. former chief phyaiciaa of 
I the oririnel CV.k Reiaed, Co.. treated over "i'J.OtH) 
petieuta if th*t C'^mpaojr ia the fifteen ,ean endlne Ms, 
lith. 19<>S. tlie d»te that Company discontinued takiuf 
caiM to tree!. DON'T BK MISLF.D with offers of 
Frae Treatment, that itioiu ate the iTSttm for a short 
I time. RELIABLE CURES AKE ^"0T >RF.E. Our treat- 
ment ha* tViod the test for 25 years and have Dover 
been compelled to offer free Irtatmmits to procure 
patient*. Bt'oklet on Blood Paiton teatimonlaU and 
full information about ,our cas«. FEES. Wtito « 

PANTEK REMEDY CO., 
8alt« 4«« 67 Clark Street, Chlcaco III. 



uni one 

live to tne 

ixua an opportunity 

anyone so aesning. 

appt-aiea on beiiail ol Ine applicant 

u.r saiu license, un iiioUon ot Aiuer- 

mau Hoar t.io yutstion was relerreU 

to tlie neaiiu eoiuinissioner lor in- 

vtaugalion as to lUe ciaiiii set fortn 

in liie petiuon, vvitn tlie retiuest ttiai 

mo report oe inauu to Lias council at 

US nc.\t meeting. 

City clerk reporting receipt and 
iiausuaiial lo tue city attorney of no- 
tice or personal injury iroiu ii^nui Ui- 
son — ICeceived. 

iioaru of i'ublic Works reports on 
petitions tor sewers, as lollows 

in Fnnceion uvnue from 
street to sit. Anuiews street, wUa out- 
let. 

in I<nfth street from Twenty-third 
to T wentv-tourlh avenue west; 

lu w icklovv auey irom U innipeg 
Miciiiijan avenues. 

In itesLorinal street from 
line of Bryant audition to 
sewer Ul becond street; 

In liestorn.al alley from a point 
feel west ol Atlantic avenue 
avenue, witu ouiiei — Urains, 
and Sanitation. 

Reporting award of contract 
pavKig Kieventh avenue east 
secoiiU to Filth sirceis; 

lUcommenuing graniing an e.vtension 
of time to Pasioret-l-a.vrence 
puny tor the grading of rii.vth 
iroiii Kast Cascade street to Four- 
leetiui avenue east — Streets, Alleys and 
Sidewalks. 



By Alderman Storey: 

Resolved. That thfl city engineer is 
hereby directed to make a survey of 
the buildings located on Lots 1. 2, 3 and 
4, Block 139, Portland division, with 
a view of establishing a building line 
easement on Tenth avenue east be- 
tween Seventh street and Seventh al- 
ley. 

Alderman Makowski moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed &ei>t. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14 1910. 



Duluth Is 
following 
wit: 

That a sanitary 



hereby oil 
improvemi 



sewer be constructed 



Jn said city, from 
tant addition lo 




er at Second 



at Board 
instructed 
to be made 



of 
to 



REPORTS OF 



COMMIT- 



STANDING 
TEES. 
To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Bridges, Via- 
ducts and Ferries, to wlilch was re- 
ferred estimate to contractor, having 
considered the same, recommend the 
adoption of tho following resolution 
FRANK MAKOWSKI. 
WILLIAM L. BERNARD. 

Committee. 
RcsoUed. That the estimate to C R. 
McLean in the sum of $964.46, on his 
contract for the enlargement of the 



oxford 



to 



the west 
the outlet 



brid 



.T.*". 



is hereby al- 
hereijy directed that an 
on the general fund, to 



to 



225 
Pacific 
Sewers 

for 
from 



com- 

streec 



Missio.i Creek 
loweJ. and it i.s 
order be drawn 
pay the same. 

Alderman Makowski moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved, Sept. 14, 1910. 



To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Claims, to which 
was referred re<iuest of the manager 
uf tlio water and light df>partinent, 
having considered the same, recom- 
mend the adoption of the following 
resolution; 

LUCIEX MERRITT. 
W. B. GETCHELL. 
LUCIEN A. BARNES. 

Committee. 
P.esolved. That the bill of the Zenith 
^"uriiace conisiany against the water 




T 



AI.LEV8 rXCERlNK S.\LVE, 

Cbtcs Chronic Ulcers, Boae Ulcers, Varices* 
Ulcers, Scrofuioos Ulcers, Mercurlul Ulcers, 
FfTor Sures, Uan^renr, Blood PoUoalng, 
White Sw«'lU.->(f,IVlllkUcg,PoUoned Wounds, 

All Boroi of lon< itamllug. Fu.lilTely iiev-r fall*. 
Erawt cut all poidon Saves expense and sufTerlog. 
OorM permaDent For lalo I'T druijt9>ata Mall 2.<'caud 

Kb «. r. *" ?>■ Mfcicuf E CO.. 8s. vmu }Utm. 



■whi-) want to enjor llfn *hnnl4 

. iy a box of NERVE BEANS. 

Thev relieve nprv.m.^ deoltno aud 

wealciii-Ki-oa; rootiire streiiifth and 

Illd up the sTJitfiu; tuiwt wonderful vitjklliln*; 'itnedy 
for younf ana old. Try a kK>x and note the etttaoi. 11 at 
Boyce Diug Co.. Xt6 Superior St. .Duluth. M'_a- 




MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

By Alderman Hogan: 

Re-solved, Tliat the city treasurer Is 
hereby directed to receive from tne 
owner of lot 157, block o7, Duluth 
proper. Third division, the amount of 
the original assessment levied against 
said lot to defray in full the cost of a 
sanitary main trunk sewer in Eleventh 
a\enue %vest, and a sanitary sewer in 
ThUU street, as full payment of said 
assessment, provided the same is paid 
within hiteen days from the date of 
the passage of this resolution, and 
turther provided that said owner shall 
at the same time pay the sum of %\.j^>, 
the estimated cost ot the publication ot 
this resolution. 

Alderman Hogan moved the adoption 
of tlie resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote ot 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14. 1910. 



-\ 



CHICHESTER^S PILLS 



LadJvat AeL your l>ruMl«t for 
Ch|.«bc«-t«r's Utamon J Uran^ 
I'llU in Rc<l and Wold ir^talllc^ 
l>cie*. teamed with 13::.e KIbboa. 
Tak* no otker. Buy of yoor 
UnacUt. A»k for Ciri.ClfKH.TKB'*, 
DlAllO.Nn BU.tNI) l>II.I.«. fat a«, 
yeankaownasB<ut. Safest. Almyi Reilabia 

SOU) BY DRIQGISTS EYERYWHLR£ 




By Alderman Moore: 

Resolved, That the owner of lot 8, 
bU ck 46, Endlon division, is hereby 
granted permission to connect his 
premises with the sanitary sewer in 
Grevsjlon road, provided said owner 
shall first nie with the Board of Pub- 
lic Works the customary agreement, 
further provided that this permission 
sliall be considered as only temporary, 
and subject to revocation by this coun- 
cil at any time. 

Alderman Moure moved the adoption 
of the resolation. and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12. 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14. 1910. 



and lip-ht plant fund, in the sum of 
$8,921.07^ is hereby approved and the 
board of water and light commission- 
ers are nereby authorized to draw an 
order on tne city treasurer to pay the 
same. 

Alderman Merritt moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted ny a unanimous yea vote of all 
present, on roll call. 

Pas.-ed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



of Public 
cause th; 
tlie westerly side 
east and Second 



KOTICE TO CONTH.VCTORS — 

Separate bids wiil be received up to 

6:00 p. m., Saturday. September 17. 1910, 

for the construction and heating of an 

eight-room brick school building at 

De«rwood. Minn. 

Plans may be seen at the office of 

the Clerk, and at the Duluth Builders' 

Exchange. 

Address bids to C. A. Wright, Clerk 

of Board of Education of District No. 7, 

Deerwood, Minn. 

W. H. WALLACE, 

Architect. 

D. H., Sept. 8, 10. 12. 15. 



By .Alderman Moore: 

Resolved. That the Board 
Works is hereby directed to 
dead pole located on 
of Twentieth avenue 
alley to be removed. 

Alderman Moore moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vole of 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 191>J. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



To the President and Common Coun- 
cil : 

Your Committee on Drains, Sewers 
and Sanitation to which was referred 
the report of the Board of Public 
Works, dated Sept. 9. 1910. relative to 
the petition of Jakole Chmielarz and 
others for the construction of sewer 
in West Fifth street having consid- 
ered the same, recommend the adop- 
tion of the following resolution: 
H. P. CURREN. 
WILLIAM L. BERNARD, 
Committee. 

Be it resolved by the Common Coun- 
cil of the City of Duluth, that the 
Board of Public Works of the City 
of Duluth Is liereby ordered lo cause 
the following improvement to be 
made, to- wit: 

Tliat a sanitary sewer be construc- 
ted in Fiftli street, in said city, from 
Twenty-third avenue west to Twenty- 
fourth avenue west. 

Resolved further. That Board of 
Puljlic Works is hereby instructed to 
cause said improvement to be made 
by contract; the cost therefor to be 
paid out of the permanent improve- 
ment revolving fund; and it is fur- 
ther ordered: 

That said Board of Public Works 
l)roceed in accordance with the provis- 
ions of the City Charter to levy as- 
sessments upon the property benefited 
iiy said Improvement, accocdlng to 
benefits received, to defray the cost 
of such improvement, with such other 
expenses as under the provisions of 
said charter may be assessed. 

Alderman Ciirren moves the adop- 
tion of the resolution which was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
\ote of all present, on roll call. 
I'assed Sept. 12, 1910. 
Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



on Re.stormel street 
the west line of B 
Duluth, to the outl 
street; and 

Resolved, Further,! 
Public Works is h* 
cause said Improvement 
contract; the cost therefor to be paid 
out of the permanent Improvement re- 
volving fund; and it"Ts'further ordered: 

That said Board of Public Works 
proceed in accordance with the provi- 
sions of the City Charter to levy as- 
sessments upon the property benefited 
by said improvement, according to 
benflts received, to defray the cost of 
such improvement, v^ith such other ex- 
penses as under the ptroyisions of 3aid 
charter mav be assessied. 

Alderman Curren moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution which was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 

To the President and Common Council: 
Your committee on Drains, Sewers 
and Sanitation to which was referred 
the report of the Board of Public 
Work.s. dated Sept. 12, 1910, relative, lo 
the petition of W. J. La Brosse and 
others for the construction of a sewer 
in Restormel alley, having considered 
the same, recommend the adoption of 
the following resolution: 
H. P. CURREN, 
WILLIAM L. BERNARD, 
Committee. 
Be It Resolved, By the Common 
Council of the City of Duluth, that the 
Board of Public Works of Uie City ot 
Duluth is hereby ordered, to cause the 
following improvement to be made, to- 

wit: ^ . .^, 

That a sanitary sewer be constructed 
in Restormel alley, in said city, from 
a point 225 feet west of Atlantic ave- 
nue to Pacific avenue, with outlet in 
Pacific avenue to the sewer in Vernon 

street; and .„, ^ „ .a * 

Resolved Further. That Board of 
Public Works Is hereby instructed to 
cause said improvement to be made by 
contract; the cost therefor to be paid 
out of the permanent improvement re- 
volving fund; and it Is.further ordered: 

That said Board of Public Works 
proceed in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the City Charter to levy as- 
sessments upon the property benefited 
by said improvement, according to 
benefits received, to defray the cost of 
such Improvement, with such other ex- 
penses as under the provisions of said 
charter may be assessed. 

Alderman Curren moved the adoption 
of the reolution which was declared 
adopted by a unanltJiOPs yea vote of 
all present, on roll4:<\Ul. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 1-^ 1910. 



of the resolution, aand it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12. 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on I'urchasing and 
Supplies, to which was referred re- 
quisitions, having considered the same, 
recomm.jnd the adoption of the follow- 
ing resolution: 

J. A. MacDONELL, 
LUCIEN A. BARNES, 
C. R. HOAR, 

Committee. 
Resolved, That requisitions of city 
officers Nos. 20243 to 20284 inclusive, 
be and hereby are approved. 

Alderman MacDonell moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and It was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea vote 
of all present, on roll call. 
Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 
Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



J NO. 
J. A. 



To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Streets, Alleys 
and Sidewalks, to which was referred 
estiinal'is to street contractors, hav- 
ing con.'iidered the same, recommend the 
adoption of the following resolution; 
W. S. MOOKE, 
HoGAN, 
MacDONELL, 

Committee. 

Resolved, That estimates to contrac- 
tors, are hereby allowed and it is here- 
by dirtctcd that orders be drawn on 
the general fund to pay the same, as 
follows: , , 

To D. H. Clougn & Co., on their con- 
tract for the relaying, repairing and 
construction of cement and tile side- 
walks, in the sum of ^3.487.42. 

To Thomson & Stewart on their con- 
tract for the construction, repairing 
and relaying of cement 
walk on I'ark Point, 
$1 342 22 

Alderman Moore moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was ae- 
clared adopted by a unaniinous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passi.'d Sept. 12, 1910.^ 

Approved Sept. 14, 19i0. 

To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Streets. Alleys 
and Siiewalk.s, to v#ich was referred 
petition of Imperial Iron Works, etai-. 
lor the vacation of a portion of nrt>- 
second avenue west and portion ol^'^e 
alley between Blocks 248 and 249 of 
the altered plat of West Duluth, Third 
division, having considered the same, 
recommend the adoption of the foUow- 



decedent, together with his final ac- 
count of the admlnistrat on of said 
estate, having been filed it this court, 
representing, among other things, that 
he has fully administered said estate, 
and praying that said fina account of 
said administration be examined, ad- 
justed and allowed by the Court, and 
that the Coiart make and enter its final 
decree of distribution of the residue 
of the estate of said decedent to the 
persons entitled thereto, and for the 
discharge of the representative and the 
sureties on his bond. 

IT IS ORDERED, That »ald petition 
be heard, and said final account ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, at the Probate Court Rooms in 
the Court House, in the City of Du- 
luth in said County, on Monday, the 
3rd day of October. 1910. at ten o'clock 
A. M., and all persons interested in 
said hearing and in said matter are 
hereby cited and required, at said time 
and place, to sho-w cause. If any there 
be, why said petition should not be 
granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be served by publication in the 
Duluth Herald, according lo law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn , September 
8th, 1910. 

By the Court. 

J. B. MIDDLECOFF. 

Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Co., 

Minn.) 
D. H., Sept. S, 15 and 22, IMO. 



be, why 
granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be servea by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., September 
8th, 1910. 

By the Court, 

J. B. MIDDLECOFF. 
Judge of Probate. 
ANDREW NELSON. 

Attorney for Guardian. Duluth. Minn. 
(Seal Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) 
D. H.. Sept. 8. 15 and 22, 1910. 

CITY NOTICES. 

OFTrCE^OF^HE^COMPTltoOrER^^^^^ 
City of Duluth. September S, I'JIO. 
Notice is hereby given that an as- 
I sessment levied to defray in full the 
expen.«e of g.-ading, paving and other- 
1 wise ii"pro\ing Second alley in said 
I citv from Lake avenue to Fourth ave- 
\ nue west, according to benefits, is now 
payable at ihe office of the City 
Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added if payment is not made on 
or before September 26tli, 1910, and the 
said assessment will then bear interest 
at the rate of six (6) per cent from 
August 29lh, 1910 to date of paymenL 
W. S. McCORMICK, 
City Comptroller. 
D. H. September 8 and lo, 1910. D 1«. 



and tile side- 
in the sum of 



EXAMINE FINAL AC- 



County of St. Louis. 
Court. 



To the Common Coit^ciU 

Your committee On Drains. Sewers 
and Sanitation, to 'o;llich was referred 
estimates to sewer contractors, having 
considered the same: recommend the 
adoption of tlie followliig resolution; 
H P. CURBKN, 
WILLIAM L. BERNARD, 
, Committee. 
Res Ived, That estiirt^tes lo sewer 
contractors are hereby allowed and it 
is hereby directed • that orders I e 
drawn on the permanent improvement 
revolving fund to pay the same, aa loi- 

To J. A. Johnson, on his contract for 
the construction of a sanitary sewer in 
Michigan street from Eighth avenue 
west to the sewer in Eleventh avenue 
west, in the sum of fl,662.48. 

To George R. King on his contract 
for the construction of West Duluth 
outlet sewers, in the sum of $8,798.j2. 

Alderman Curren moved the adoption 
of the resolution. 



Ing 



re.-jolution: 
W. S. 
J. M. 
J. A. 



Alderman Barnes requested a division 
of the resolution. 

The question being upon the adoption 
of the resolution allowing the estimate 
to J. A. Johnson, the resolution was 
declared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of ail present, on roll call. 

Possed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 

Alderman Barnes moved that portion 

of the resolution allovviilg an estimate 

^ to Geo. B. King be referred to the city 

attorney with the estimate for report 



declared adopted by 
vote of all present, 



OKKICI.\l. IMtOCKEUI.NCiS. 

Council Cuamijcr. 
Duluth, Minn., Sept. 12, 1910. 
Regular metting. 
Roll call; 

Present — Aldermen Barnes, Berg- 
strom. Bernard, Curren. Getciiell, Hec- 
tor, Hoar. Hogan, MacDonell. Makow- 
ski. Merritt, Moore, President Jordan 



—13. 

Absent — 
"Wharton — 3. 



By Alderman Hector: 

liesolved. That the Duluth-Edlson 
Electric company is hereby directed lo 
discontinue the arc light located at the 
intei-section of of Second avenue west 
and First street, and is hereby advised 
tiiat tne city will pay the cost of main- 
taining said light toward the cost of 
niixintaining the •vvliiie way" on ^aid 
Firs I street. 

.\lderman Hector moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 19 lu. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



Aldermen Shartel, Storey, 



Alderman 
the minutes 
6lh in the 
construction 



Moore moved to correct 
of the meeting of Sept. 

resolution ordering the 
of sidewalks by sulking 
out tho words "A stairway and side- 
walk on tiie westerly side of Thir- 
teenth avenue east from First street 
to First alley" and by inserting in 
lieu tiiereof "A four-foot sidewalk 
stairway on the westerly side of Thir- 
teenth avenue east from First street 
southerly to the ground surface of 
said Thirteenth avenUe east." The 
mluutei were so corrected by a 
unaniinous yea vote of all present, on 
roll call. On motion of Alderman 
Barnes the minutes as so corrected 
were approved by a unanimous yea 
vole of all present, on roll call. 



■ 



PRESENTATION OF PETITIONS AND 
UTHER COMMUNICATIONS. 
Peter Olson, el al., for the establish- 
ment of a building line easement on 
the upper side of liichardson avenue 
In Harrison's Brookdale division from 
Twenty-second to Twenty-third ave- 
nues west; 

Charles A. Olson, et al., for the es- 
tablisnment of a building line ease- 
ment on both sides of Ca;-icade avenue 
fr'.»ir Twenty-second to Twenty-fourth 
avenue west — Streets, Alleys and Side- 
walks. 

Clerk of district court, summons in 
application of Willis J. Holmes to 
register title to certain lands in Hun- 
ters Grass)' Point addition and Har- 
rison's Brookdale division — City At- 
torney. 

Imperial Iron Works, et al., for the 
varaiion of a portion of Fifty-second 
avenue west and Fifty-second alley 
west — Streets. Allevs and Sidewalks. 

H. S. Wenger, et al., for the en- 
actment of an ordinance regulating 
transient dealers — Ordinances and 
Itesolutions. 

Bond of J. A. Sec It as city assessor 
— Finance. 

En.il Olson, notice of personal injury 
— Citv Attorney. 

G. *G. Hartley, transmitting copy of 
letter sent to Board of Public Works 
relative to sidewalk on Faribault street 
from Woodland avenue to Allendale 
avenue— .streets. Alleys and Sidewalks. 
Edward Dormedy. el al.. for the con- 
struction of a sanitary sewer in Fifty- 
fifth alley west from Ramsey street 
to Wadena .street, with outlet — Board 
Of Public Works. 

Applications for license to operate 
ntotor vehicles; 

Application and bond of George E. 
Blackwood for license to sell in- 
toxicating liquors at No. 27 West Su- 
perior street — Police and License. 

Estimate to sewer contractors — 
Drains, Sewers and Sanitation. 

Estimate to sidewalk contractors — 
Streets, Alleys and Sidewalks. 

Estimate to oridge contractors — 
Bridges, Viaducts and Ferries. 

Bills for the month of August — 
Clalin.'^. 

Requisitions Nos. 20245 to 20285 in- 
clusive — Purchasing and Supplies. 



By Alderman Getchell: 

Resolved, That the city treasurer is 
hereby directed to receive from the 
owners of the following described 
property, the amount of the original 
assessment against said property as 
hereinafter set forth, with interest 
thereon at 6 per cent per annum from 
the time at which said asses.sments 
became delincjuent, as full payment of 
said assessments, provided the same 
are paid within fifteen days from the 
date of the passage of this resolution, 
and further provided that each of said 
owners shall at the same time pay the 
sum of $1.50, one-third the estimated 
cost of the publication of this reso- 
lution. 

Tho property and assessmfents above 
referred to are as follows: 

The assessment levied against Lots 
15. 16 and 17. Block 106. West Duluth. 
.Sixth Division, to defray in full the 
cost of a sanitary scwer in Fifty-fifth 
alley west. 

The assessment levied against Lot 
14. Block 123, Portland Division, for 
part grading an'tt improving Sixth 
street. 

Tne assessment levied against Lot 4, 
Block 6"), Endion Division, including 
Lot 4. Block 1, Highland Park Addition, 
for leaving Twentielh avenue east. 

Alderman Getchell moved the adop- 
tion of the re.soIution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



To the President and Common Coun- 
cil; 

Your Committee on Drains, Sewers 
and Sanitation to which was referred 
the report of the Board of Public 
Works, dated Sept. 9 1910. relative to 
the petition of T. F. Phillips and 
others for the construction of sewer 
in I'rinceton avenue, having consid- 
ered tlie same, recommend the adop- 
tion of the following resolution: 
H. P. CURREN, 
WILLIAM L. BERNARD, 
Committee. 
Be is resolved by the Common Coun- 
cil of the City of Duluth, that the 
Board of Public Works of the City of 
Duluth is hereby ordered to cause the 
following Improvement to be made, to- 
wit: 

That a sanitary sewer be construct- 
ed in Princeton avenue, in said city, 
from Oxford street to St. Andrews 
street, with outlet in St. Andrews 
street to the sewer in Woodland ave- 
nue. 

Itesolved further. That Board of 
Public Works is hereby Instructed to 
cause said improvement to be made 
by contract: the cost therefor to be 
paid out of the permanent improve- 
ment revolving fund; and it is further 
ordered: 

That said Board of Public Works 
proceed in accordance with the provis- 
hms of the City Charter to levy as- 
sessments upon the property benefited 
by said imurovement, according to 
benefits received, to defray the cost of 
i'uch Improvement, with such other 
expenses as under the provisions of 
said charter may be assessed. 

Alderman Curren moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution which was de- 
clared adoptoil by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 
Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 
Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



thereon. 

The motion was 
a unanimous yea 
on roll call. 

Passed Sept. li. 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. " 

To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Drains, Sewers 
and Sanitation, to which was referred 
petition of F. B. Harwood relative to 
sewer connection at No. 314 Central 
avenue, having considered the same, 
recommend the adoption of the follow- 
ing resofution: 

H. P. CURREN, 
WILLIAM L. BERNARD, 

Committee. 

Resolved, that the city attorney is 
hereby directed to discontinue proceed- 
ings heretofore instituted against the 
owner of No. 314 Central avenue for 
failure to connect h4s premises with 
sanitary sewer. ^ ,. 

Alderman Curren moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of all 
present, on roll call. . ; 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, .1910. 

To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Jiuance, to which 
was referred bond of j; A. Scott, as city 
assessor, having co-nsldered the same, 
recommend the adoption of the follow- 
ing resolution: ^ 

W. B. GET<?HELL, 
W. S. MOORE/ 

Committee. 

Resolved, that the bond of J. A. 
Scott, as city assessor, in the sum of 
$5,000.00, with the Bankers' Surety Co. 
as suretv, is hereby approved. 

Alderman Getchell moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea vote 
of all present, on orll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



MOORE. 
HOGAN. 
MacDONELL. 

Committee. 

Resolved, That this council deems It 
expedient thut the matter of the va- 
cation of that portion of Fifly-*^econd 
avenue west commencing at the soutn- 
erlv lint: of Polk street and extending 
southerly 400 teet and that portion of 
the alley lying between Blocks 248 and 
•:49 ol too altered plat of \\ est Du- 
luth "I'hird division, commencing at tna 
southeMv line of Pjlk street and ex- 
tending "southerly to the right-of-way 
of the Northern Pacific Railway com- 
pany, be proceeded with, and It Is 
hereby ordered mat the petition there- 
for bo filed of record with the city 
clerk, wlio shall give notice in accord- 
ance with the provisions of the charter 
of the time and place when said peti- 
tion will be iieard and considered by 
the committee of this council on 
Streets, Alleys and Sidewalks, which 
Committee is hereby appointed and 
designated for the purpose of such 
iiearing and consideration. 

Alderman Moore moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adoptod by a unanimous yea vote ot 
all pr-iscnt, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 

T-> the Common Council: 
Your Committee on Streets. Alleys 
anad Sidewalks, to which was referred 
recommendation of tlie Board of Public 
.» orks. having considered the Kame, 
recommend the adoption of the fol- 
lowing resolution: 

W. S. MOORE. 
J. M. HOGAN. 
J. A. MacDONELL. 

Committee. 
Resolved, That an extension of time 
hereby granted to Pastoret-Law- 



ORDER TO 

COUNT. 
State of Minnesota, 

— ss. 

In Probate 
In the Matter of the Esttite of James 

Babcke. Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF H. :i Salmon of 
Biwabik, Minnesota, as r'^presentative 
of the above named decedent, together 
with his final account of the adminis- 
tration of said estate, having been fi'ed 
In this Court, represen.ing, among 
other thing.s, that he has fully admin- 
istered said estate, and praying that 
said final account of saicj administra- 
tion be examined, adjusted and allowed 
by the Court, and that the Court make 
and enter its final decree of distribu- 
tion of the residue of the -'state of said 
decedent to the persons eititled there- 
to, and for the discharge of the repre- 
sentative and the sureties on his bond. 

IT IS OKDEREl^ That said petition 
be heard, and said final a count exam- 
ined, adjusted and allowed by the Court, 
at the Probate Court Rooms in the 
Court House, in the City of Duluth, in 
said County, on Monday, tlie 3rd day of 
October, 1910, at ten o'clo .k A. M., and 
all persons interested in said hearing 
and in said matter are heieby cited and 
required at said time and place to show 
cause, if any there be, why said peti- 
tion should not be grantee. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., September 
7th. 1910. 

By the Court, 

J B MIDDLECOFF, 
■ Judge of Probate. 
(Seal Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) 
D. H., Sept. 8, 15 and 22, 1910. 



OFFICE OF THE CO.MPTROLLEH — 
City of Duluth, September 8, 1910. 

Notice is hereby given tliat an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
expenie of constructing a sanitary out- 
let sewer in Twenty-fourth avenue 
east in said city from. Branch street to 
the .yew er in Greysolcn Road, according 
to benefits, is now payable at the of- 
fice of the City Treasurer. 

A penally oif ten tlO) i>er cent will 
be added if payment Is not made on. 
or before September 26th. 1910, and the 
said assessment will tiien bear interest 
at the rate of six (6> per cent from 
August 29th, 1910 to date of payment. 
W. S. McCORMICK, 
City Comiitroller. 
D. H., September 8 and 15, 1910. D 141 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER — 
City of Duluth, September 8, 1910. 

Notice Is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray in full the 
cxi>ense of extending the sai'.itary 
sewer In Sixtli alley in said city from 
its former terminus at Third avenue 
east, according to benefits. Is now pay- 
able at the office of the' City Treas- 
urer- 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added if payment is not made on 
or before September 26tli, 1910, and the 
said assessment will then bear Interest 
at the rate of six (6) per cent from 
August 29th, 1910 to date of payment. 
W. S. McCORMICK, 
Citv Comptroller. 
D. IL. September 8 and 15, 1910. D 143. 



Bj- Alderman Barnes: 

Whereas, the Village of 
luth has been the scene of six 
ly incendiary fires within 
month, whereby plants were 



New Du- 

suppo.->ed- 

the last 

destroyed. 



Is ... . „ 

rence Company for the completion of 
their contract for the grading of Sixta 
street from East Cascade street to 
Fourteenth avenue east to October 15, 
1910, provided the surety on their bond 
shall file its written consent thereto in 
form approved by the city attorney. 

Alderman Moore moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it w^as declared 
adoptr-d by a unanimous yea vote of all 
present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12. 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14. 1010. 

To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Streets, Alleys 
and .Sidewal'ks, having considered the 
que:itlon of the construction of side- 
walks on Sixth street, recommend the 
adoption of the following resolution: 
W. S- MOORE. 
J. M. HOGAN. 
J. A. MacDONELL. 

Committee. 

Resolved That the city engineer is 
her-'oy authorized, in his discretion, 
after examination of the condition of 
the grading on Sixth street from East 
Cascade street to Fourteenth avenue 
east, to accept such blocks as have 
been completed satisfactorily to him 
and grant permission to private side- 
walk contractors to enter same within 
thirty days after completion, before or- 
dering city sidewalk contractors to 
build walk in case of failure of prop- 
erty owners to construct same by priv- 
ate contract. 

Alderman Moore moved the 
uf the resolution, and it was 
adopted by a unaniinous yea 
all pr ;sont, on roll call. 

Pas.sed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



adoption 

declared 
vote of 



ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 
State of Minnesota, C')unty of St. 
Louis. — ss. 

In Probate Cotirt. 
In the Matter of the Este.te of William 
G. TenBrook, Decedent. 
THE PETITION OF William T. Ten- 
Brook of Duluth, Minne.'-ota. as repre- 
sentative Oi the above named decedent, 
together with his final account of the 
administration of said estate, having 
been filed in this court, representing, 
among other things, thai he has fully 
administered said estate and praying 
that said final account tf said admin- 
istration be examined, adjusted and al- 
lowed by the Court, and ihat the Court 
make and enter its final decree of dis- 
tribution of the residue of the estate 
of said decedent to the persons enti- 
tled thereto, and for th' discharge of 
the representative and the sureties on 
Ills bond. 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard, and said final account ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, at the Probate Court Rooms in 
the Court House, in the City of Duluth 
in said County, on Monday, the 26th 
day of September, 1910. at ten o'clock 
A. M., and all persons interested in 
said hearing and in said matter are 
liereby cited and required at said time 
and place to show causn, if any there 
be, why said petition should not be 
granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Mint.., August 31st. 
1910. 

By the Court, 
J. B. MIDDLECOFF, 

Judge of Probate. 
(Seal. Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) 
Duluth Herald, Sept. 1, 8 and 15, 191^ 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. COUNTY OF 
ST. LOUIS.— ss. 

District Court, Eleventti 
trict. 

Eugene J. Bunker, I'lalntifC, 

vs. 

Great Lakes Radio Ttdephone 
Company, a corporation,, 
Quayle - Larsen Com))any, a 
corporation, Henry Gc uld and 
Mary Gould, his wife, 

Defendants. 

SUMMONS;. 
The State of Minnesota to the Above 
Named Defendants and Each of Them: 
You are hereby sum iioned and re- 
to file your answer to the com- 
of the plaintiff ir the above en- 
action, with the Clerk of said 
at his office, in said County, 
the complaint cf the plaintiff 
on file, within iv.enty (20) days 



OCEAN STEAMSHIPS. 



WHITE STAR-DOMINION 

i'anadlan Ser\ Ice Mail Kteuaiem 
MO.\ TUI:A I. — tiU KUi::C — LI V EKPOOIi 

Weekly .Saiiiiigs. Tiie .Si'i-iiic Uoute ti) Kiirii>e. 
NEW S. !». LAUKE.>'Tl('and MEGANTIO 

l.;irgeal untl ^lo>l M'xJrra Sle.niicrti 

on lliB .St. Lawreaco. 

118 Notre Dame St., West. 121 8.i. Tliini St. 

Muiitrual. Or Lucal ArimiIs. .MJnt.eajiilia. 



RAILROAD TIME TABLES. 

DUIXTlTMiiSABirFN^^ 
ERN RAILWAY. 



Office: 



4::6 WpNt 
'Phune, 



Kiiiierior 
INtU. 



St. 



Leave. | 



.Vrrl»e. 



I f Ulbbing, CliUliolm. Virginia. . 
*7.40 ami-j Kvekth. Coleralne.. tMi.unlain ^ *3.2I pa 

|tl'^>". tspana and tuiwablk. J 

•3.50 pml Hil)biiig. Cl-t,b.)lm. VlrgiiUa. *I0.3I •* 

KveleUi. Colerairie, 

fVlnrtnla. CamjU. Uanler. Fort 1 

•7.10 pmf-i Frani-ei. 1' rt .Vrtliur. »au- F *8.3I Pi 

I i. Uilte. Wanmid, Winnipeg. J \ 

•Dally. tDally except Sunday. 
Cafe, Observation Car, Mesaba Range 
Points. Solid Vestibuled Train. Modern 
Sleepers through to Winnipeg. 



Judicial Dls- 



THE DILLTH & IRON RANGE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 

"VEII-MILLION UOLTE." 



Leave. | 



1 .Arrive. 



•7.30 
13.15 pm| 



•Daily. 



If 



Knife River, Tw > Har- 1 j 
bora. Tower. Kly, Aurora. | ltl2.00 ■ 
i BiwaWk. McKuiley. L\eleth, K •6.30 p« 
; Gillien and | | 

(. . Viralala. J | 

tDaily except Sunday. 



Duluth & Northern Minnesota Ry. 

UfflceM, 510 Lonitdale Hldg., Duluth. 

Trains leave Knife River, 20 miles 
out on the D. & 1. R. R. every day 
on arrival of the train leaving Union 
station, Duluth, at 7:3o a. m. Re- 
turning connections are made at 
Knife River with trains due In Du- 
luth Union slaUon at 6;3w p. m. l •Jiuieclloiu »« 
niaile at Baptism lUver with stage line for Urand 
Maraid and all North Shore pulats when operating. 

NORTHERN PACIFIC railroad; 



many men thrown out of employment 
and considerable loss incurred, there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That his Honor, the Mayor, 
is hereby requested to secure, if possi- 
ble, the offering of a reward by the 
proper authorities for the apprehension 
and conviction of the sup])osed in- 
cendiary, and he is further re(iuested 
to give such immediate police and ae- 
tectlve protection as seems to him 
wise. 

.Alderman Barnes moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 



Alderman 
the council. 



W'harton took his seat in 



REPORTS OF CITY OFFICERS. 
Tne mayor reporting receipt and 



By Alderman Barnes: 

Whereas, there occurred two acci- 
dents on the Duluth Street Railway 
system today, whereby one man was 
killed and a small school girl was 
struck and Injured, and. 

Whereas, this council is desirous of 
having said street railway system 
operated with a maximum of safety 
to pedestrians, therefore, be It 

Resolved, That the city attorney is 
hereby requested to attend the coron- 
er's inquest over the body of the late 
G. M. Ncauht. and take notice of the 
testlmonv thereof relative to the speed 
of the car which struck him. and also 
look up the rules of the company rela- 
tive to the protection of workmen on 
their tracks, and report his findings 
to tho Common Council. 

Alderman Barnes moved the adop- 



To the President and Common Coun- 
cil: 

Your Committee on Drains, Sewers 
and Sanitation to which was referred 
the report of the Board of Public 
Works, dated Sept. 12. 1910, relative to 
the petition of P. B. Sullivan and 
others for the construction cf sewer 
in WIcklow alley, having considered 
the same, recommend the adoption of 
the following resolution: 

H. P. CUrtREN. 
WILLIAM L. BERNARD, 
Committee. 
Be it rpsolved by the Common Coun- 
cil of the City of Duluth, that the 
Board of Public Works of the City 
of Duluth is hereby ordered to cause 
the following Improvement to be 
made, to- wit: 

That a sanitary sewer be construc- 
ted in Wicklow alley, in said city, 
from Michigan avenue to the sewer 
at Winnipeg avenue. r, „ ^ „* 

Resolved further. That Board of 
Public Works is hereby Instructed to 
cause said improvement to be made 
bv contract; the oost therefor to he 
naid out of the permanent improve- 
ment revolving fund; and It is further 

'"'"That^'said Board of Public Works 
proceed in accordance with the provis- 
ions of the City Charter to levy as- 
sessments unon the property benefited 
by said Improvement, according to 
benefits received, to defray the cost 
of such improvement, with such other 
expenses as under the provisions of 
said charter may be assessed 

Alderman Curren moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution which was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all i>resent. on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. - 

Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 

To the President and Common Council: 
Your committee on Drains, Sewcr.s 
and Sanitation to which was referred 
the report of the Board of Public 
Works, dated Sept. 12, 1910, relative to 
the petition of Andrew -Anderson and 
others for the construction of a sewer 
in Restormel street, having considered 
the same, recommend the adoption of 
the following resolution: 
H. P. CURREN. 
W^ILLIAM L. BERNARD. 
Committee. 
Be It Resolved. By the Common 
Council of the City of Duluth. that the 
Board of Public Works of th© City of 



was declared 
yea vote of 



To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on BMre Department, 
to which was referred request of the 
Board of Fire Commissioners, having 
considered the same, recommend the 
adoption of the following resolution: 
JNO. HOGAN. 
W. S. MOORE, 
H. P. CURREN, 

Committee. 
Resolved, that the Board of Fire Com- 
missioners is hereby authorized to draw 
an order on the fire department fund in 
the sum of $50.00 in favor of F. E. 
Hough to defray his expenses In at- 
tending the convention of city elec- 
tricians to be held in Omaha. 

Alderman Hogan moved the adoptloti 
of the resolution, and it 
adopted by a unanimous 
all present, on roll call. 
Passed Sept. 12, 1901. 
Approved Sept. 14, 1910. 

To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Light and Water, 
to which was referred petition of di- 
vision engineer of tlfc^. Minneapolis, .St. 
Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Ry. Co. ask- 
ing for permission to erect Illuminated 
monogram sign posts in place of two 
boulevard lamps at €ixth avenue west 
and Michigan and Superior streets, finds 
that the ordinance providing for the 
erection of ornamental lamp posts pro- 
iiibits the placing of signs thereon. 
This provision of the ordinance was 
adopted as an amendment to the orig- 
inal ordinance, and. In our opinion, is a 
wise provision and that It would be a 
mistake to amend the ordinance to 
cover this or any other case. 
CHAS. J. HECTOR, 
3 A MES A. WHARTON, 
JNO. HOGAN. • 

•> Committee. 
The report was received. 



Chairman Moore ot the Committee on 
Streets, Alleys and Sidewalks moved 
that the question of the award of fon- 
tract for the pavement of Eleventh 
avenue east from Second to Filth 
streets be referred back to the Board 
of Public Works, with instructions to 
posti)one action on said improvement 
lor ninety days, and that the assess- 
ment, paid for said improvement be re- 
turn sd to the parties paying the same 
on proper voucher. The motion was 
declared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote ot all present on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 12, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 14. 1910. 

INTRODUCTION AND CONSIDERA- 
TION OF ORDIN.ANCES. 

The following entitled ordinances 
took their first reading and were re- 
ferred to the Committee on Ordinances 
and Resolutions: 
By .Vlderman Bernard: 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance 
entitled "An ordinance providing for 
the construction of other than wooden 
sidewalks within certain limits within 
the city of Duluth. and forbidding the 
constructiori or repairing of wooden 
sidewalks within said limits," passed 
Sept. 7, 1S91, as amended. 
By A.lderman Bernard: 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance 
entitled "An ordinance to establish 
the width of certain sidewalks in the 
rtty of Duluth," passed May 28, 1906, as 
amended. 



quired 
plaint 
titled 
Court 
where 
is now 

after the service of this summons upon 
you, exclusive of the day of such serv- 
ice; and if you fail to t.nswer the said 
complaint within the time aforesaid, 
plaintiff in this action v ill apply to the 
Court for the relief de nanded in said 
complaint. 

And you are hereby notified that this 
action is brought to foreclose a Me- 
chanic's Lien, upon the premises here- 
inafter described for the sum of Two 
Hundred and Sixty and 95-100 ($260.95) 
Dollars and interest fi-om June 20th, 
1910; that the premises affected by this 
action are described as Lots One Hun- 
dred Forty-five (145) and One Hundred 
Forty-seven (147) Block One Hundred 
Forty-four (144>. Duluth Proper. Third 
Division. St. Louis County. Minnesota, 
according to the recorded plat thereof; 
that the improvement out of whicli 
plaintiff's lien arose is as follows, to- 

wit: 

I'laintiff, between Ma,- 10th, 1910 and 
June 20th, 1910, inclu.dve, furnished 
and delivered lumber and materials for 
the erection and lmp;-ovement of a 
building on said premises and said lum- 
ber was in fact used in the erection, 
construction, alteration repair and im- 
provement of the building thereon. 
J. J. ROBINSON, 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 
Offices 504-6 Torrey Building, Duluth. 

Minnesota. 
D. H., Sept. 8. 15, 22, 29, Oct. 6, and 13, 

1910. 



Leave. | 
♦4.00 pnij. 
•8.00 am'. 
•7.30 pm' 
•B.05 am . 



Ashland and East 

jVsbland and East 

Minn, and Dakota K.\preis.. 
. ... North t'oast Limited 



Arrive. 
>li 13 am 
•6 40pM 
•8.15 •■ 
•6.25 PM 



Lca\e. j 

to . 00 am I 

•I 55 pmj 

•11.10 poll 

•Dallj-. 

Depot at 



"Duluth Short Line.' 

ST. PAUL. 
MINNEAPOLIS. 



Arrive. 
•6.30 ■■ 
t2 05pH 
•7.00 PM 



tDaily exceiit Sunday. 'Phone 211. 
331 West Superior street. 



LukM 



|\| RT H -W£STERN| \N"i] 



Jo.S-r-*^. M€<« O. feX'L 



Lt 
Lt 
Ar 
Ar 
Ar 
Ar 
Ar 



•3 SOyjm +5 l.=lprn|LT 

.■) 3JpmiLv 

10 2tipm>Ar 

3 4nnin .\r 



Dul 

Sup . . 3 'i j|)m 
E CU 8 .i'tpin 
Ma.1. . 3 15am 

Mil 

Jau'le 4 2.5301 
Chi. 7 OOam 



Dul.. .t8 35&m 
Sup. . . 9 03ani 
S.Paul 4 Sopro 
Mpls. . 5 OOpm 



•4 35pm 
4 55pm 
8 55pm 

10 2;.i>m 



7 4i>aaii Pollnian sleepers and chair 
4 .Ouam cari to C'liicag.o. Parlor and 
7 30aniicafe cars to Twin ClUes. Of- 



•Oaily. tExrept .Sunday, ^flfe, 3')2 W. Sup. St.. DuL 

Duluth, Soirth Shore & Atlantic. 



No. e, 

A.M. 



iNo. 8. 
P.M. 



INC. 7 
A.M. 



No. S. 

i P.M. 



^ 



f- 



4-- 



To the Common Council: 

Your Committee ^i^ police and Li- 
cense, to which was referred appli- 
cations for license '^d ' operate motor 
vehicles, having coilidered the same, 
recommend the adoptijOn of the follow- 
ing resolution: 

C. H. HOAR*,' - 
JAMES A. WHARTON. 

* ■ Committee. 

Resolved, That ailplieations for li- 
cense to operate raatur. vehicles upon 
the streets of the city of Duluth. be 
and hereby are granted as follows: 

Blanche C. Falrchild, Roger W. Spen- 
cer George W. Glbeau. Robert Thomp- 
son. E. J. Bunker, AirtTiur Hagen, W^. 
K. Richardson. 

Alderman Hoar moved the adoption 



MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 
Cltairman Wharton of the Sports 
Committee announced that on account 
of Inability to reach all of the alder- 
men from Superior, It was deemed ad- 
vi«able that the baseball game sched- 
uled for Thursday, the 15th Inst., be 
pos-.poned to Thursday, the 22nd Inst 
This postponement 



t7.45 

tB.OS 
P..M. 

t7.55j 
t8.55i 

t7.05, 
t7.45 



•5.00 Lt.. 

•5.15;.... 
A.M. 

•5.40^Ar.. 

•6.30J.... 

•3.50^ 

•4.30' 

*I0.15|. .- 



Duluth ■ 

. . . . Superior 

. . . Houghlfin 
Calumet . . . ■ 

. . . Ishpemliig . . . 
. . . Marquette . . . 
.Sault Ste. Marie. 



..Ar •10.30; 
....I'lO.lS 
I P.M. 
..L»!'m.05| 
lO.lai 
P.M. 
12.20 
11.301 
•5.301 



•r 



t4.M 
t4.M 



A.M. 

ts.io 

tS.ift 





•8.001 

•8.15; 


. . . Montreal . . 
Host ■« 


•8.50 

•lO.OO 








A.M. 

t8.50 
P.M. 

ta.oo 


P M. i 

•7.l0iL».. 
AM. ! 
•7.l8|Ar. . 


. . Montreal . . 
..New York... 


1 AM ; P.M. 

...Ar •7.30 tlO.ll 
P.M. . A.M. 

•7.00| t6.4i 



■was concurred In. 



On motion of Alderman Curren, the 
council adjourned. 

H. W. CHEADLB, 

City Clerk. 
H Sept. 15, 1910. D 154. 



D 



lc:g.\l. notices. 

ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 

COUNT 

State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

S3. 

In Probate Court. 

In the Matter of the Estate of Eliza- 
beth T. Nutting, Decedent. 
THE PETITION of Erwin W. Nutting 

as repreaentative of th« above named 



ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR LICENSE TO SELL, MORT- 

G.A.GE OR LE.ASE L.AND— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis. — SS. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Amanda 

A. Karlenberg, Insare. 

THE PtITlTION OF Martin Karlen- i 
berg, as representative of the above I 
named in.^ane person, having been filed ■ 
In this Court, representing, among other j 
things, that for reasor s stated in said 
petition, it Is necessary and for the 
best interests of the estate of said in- 
sane person and of all persons inter- 
ested therein, lo sell her inchoate In- 
terest in certain lands of the petitioner. 
In said petition described and praying 
that license be to said petitioner, Mar- 
tin Karlenberg as such guardian grant- 
ed to join in the sale and conveyance 
of the said land. 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard before this cjurt, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms in the Court House, 
in Duluth, in said County, on Monday, 
the 3rd day of October, 1910, at ten 
o'clock A. M., and all persons Interested 
in .said hearing and ir said matter are 
hereby cited and required at said time 
aud place to show cause, it any there 



•Dally. tDaily exo«>t Sunday. 
Trains No. 7 and 8. 



Twin 



Clti sieepMi 



THE GREAT NORTHERN. 



Leave. 



STATIONS. 



Arrlv* 



tS.OO am 
•3.25 pm 
•II .10 pm, 
•8.45 am 
•8.55 pm 
t2 20 pm' 
te.OO am 



i ST. PAUL 1 

i and h 

I MINNEAPOLIS. J 

[ Crookston, Grand Korks. 1 
[ Montana and t'oast. J 

Swan Itlver, Hlbblng. Virginia 
St ClojJ. WUmar. Sioux City 



flO.lSpm 
•I.S5 PM 
•6.30 am 
•6.35 •■ 
•7.l5Mi 

tl2.30»H 

tie.ispm 



•Dally. 
re:tdy at 



tDaily 
p m. 



except 
OfBce. 



Sunday. 
SpaUllug 



Twin 
tiot«l. 



City aleciMn 



HOTELS. 

N«w Building. New EquipmaBt— Ratet, $2 and $2.M. 



ConiM- Pint St. and Fifth Ave. Wett. DULUTH. 



New Uulldlng with modtm conrentencea. 
plan, 50c to »2.00 per day. Special rate* by 
321 WEST FIRST STREET. 



EurapMS 
tlie «nk 



M 



1 DEFECTIVE PAGE 

n — n 1 r~ 






i->k«A*B«BaHiB^aaB 



■ «.■ ■# ■^«^*^i»<aHMaii«B^pHC5:=s^ 



.:^ 



s«*S3 



• I ■) ■ » fWf 






4- 



■i;«s^ 



18 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 15, 1910. 



WHEAT DEAD 
ANDJi)WER 

Dttle Business of Any Kind 

Transacted— Stocks Stili 

Increasing. 

Flax Declines and Seed to 

Arrive Regular Takes 

Sharp Drop. 



Puluth Board of Trade, Sept. 15. — 
"Wheal was dead today until toward 
the dose, when short covering caused 
a slight rally in values which had 
Bagged from the opening. No export 
Lusiriess and very little of any other 
kind was transacted today. Winnipeg 
reported that 64,000 bu of Manitoba 
were worked there for export today 

September wheat lost I'sc; Decem- 
ber Ic and May I'gc. Cash wheal was 
on a parity with yepteniber. BarUy 
advanced Ic, oats and rye were un- 
changed and durum lost Ic. 

Flax was moderately active early In 
the session. Values were weaker, xie- 
celpts are increasing and the country 
has been selling lauly liberally con- 
sidering the snuiU amount ot seed 
available for immediate shipment. t?eed 
to arrive by !?ept. 17 Is worth :;c more 
than the current contract. - -ax to ar- 
rive in ten days is Ic over tieptember 
and flax to arrive regular is ^c under 
the current contract. The price on flax 
to arrive dropped lie from yesterday. 
It is :;c over the October option and it 
may be regarded as on a erlatlve basis 
•with Ucioocr. The decline luessages 
a fall in flax prices as soon as 
Beptembt-r deal is out of tlie way 
the leading buyer 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, SEPT. 15. 



September — Opt u. lliyh. 

Duluth 11.13 J1.13 

Chicago 

Minneapolis 1.0y»4 1.09% 

Winnipeg, Oct. .. .i)'J%-%, .99%-% 

December — 

l>uluth 1 

Chicago 

Minneapolis .... 1 

New York 1 

Winnipeg 

Kansa.s City . . . 
St. Louis 

May — 

Duluth 1, 

<'hioago 

Minneapolis 1.14% 1.14% 

NfW York 1.10% 1.10% 

Kan.sas City ... 1 .01-1.%-% 1 .01 

St. Louis 1.051,8-5 l.OS'.B 

Sjutbwestem and WiuiUpeg quotations funilslied \iy 



Low. 
»1.11% 



.99'?8-% 

13a 

■.10%-% 
.06 '4 
.96«4 
.961/4.-96 

.99^2 

.16a 



1.13a 

i'.ii" 
I.O614 
.97 
.96>-i 

.991/3 

1.16a 



l.OSVi 
. 97 1/4 

1.14%a 



Close. 
(l.Ua 

i.OSiia 

.98i4 

1.12a 



1.09%-% 
1.05 

9514 
.95% 
.S'9%-1^ 

1.14%a 



.lOiia 
.0514 

.96% 
.96% 
.99% 



1/4 



1.15a 



1 
1 

1 
B. 



.13%-% 

.09I/& 

.99% 

.04 

E. BuKer 



& 



1 
1 

1 
Co. 



.13%-% 
09% 
.99% 
.04Vi 



Sept. 14. 


?1 


.13'4b 




94% 


1.09%-%a 




99 14 


1. 


13 a 




.99%-% 


1 


. 1 1 14 b 


1 


06% 




971/4 
96% 




99% 


1 


.16b 


1 


.04%b 


1 


15-%a 


1 


11% 


1 


0114 


1 


.06V» 



DULUTH DURUM MARKET. 



DECLMS 



September 
November 
December 



September 
October . . 
November , 
December 



Open. 
.92a 
. .93% 
. .92% 



High. 
.92 

.9314 



Low. 
.91b 

.92% 
.91% 



Close. 
,91b 
.92 1/4 b 
.91% 



Sep 



t. 14. 
92b 
93 1/4 b 
92% 



DULUTH FLAX MARKET. 



Open. 
,|2.81a 
. 2.70a 
, 2.70a 
, 2.66a 



High. 
$2. 81a 
2.70a 
2.70a 
2.66a 



Low. 
$2.7S 
2.67 
2.67 
2.62a 



Close. 

$2. 78b 
2.68b 
2.68 
2.62a 



Sept. 14. 

$2.81 
2.70% 
2.70%n 
2.66 



51.12 1/^.; No 
1 northern 



the 
and 
secures tlie flax that 
he desires tor immediate shipment. The 
principal buyer was instrumental to- 
day in placing flax to arrive at be un- 
der the current contract. 

September flax lost oc, October 2»4c, 
November 2I2C and December 4c. 

Tiiero was \erv little business of any 
kind today. Tlie Chicago board was 
closed on account of elections in Illi- 
nois au ! tile Northwestern markets 
wnlch have been much stronger rela- 
tively than Ciiicago on days when the 
Cnicigo market urooped, v> ere weak 
and dull. 

Cables were lower, Russian Inf.ucnces 
Leliig bearish. Htissia continued to of- 
fer wheat freely. Stuc'.is in all pasta 
of the L nited States show an increase 
and supplies are heavily IncroasinrT 
totii here and abroad. Shii)raents from 
Argentina are expected to be smaller 
than )a;-t week. A semi-official Hus- 
slan report covering sixty-tliree politi- 
cal divisions indicate a yield ot 552,- 
OoO.OOO bu against 708,800.000 bu. Ar- 
gentioe rei>orls were tavorable, recent 
rains being beneficial. The wheat 
acreage In Argentina this year is about 
4 per cer.t larger than that sown last 
year which amoui:ted to 14.475,00'J 
ft. res The crop was 140,000,000 bu. 

The govern:nents rei)ort on world's 
crop^ indicates the belief that this 
years worlds wheat crop will not be 
as large as that last year but that It 
wU; be well above the average in re- 
cent years. Says the report: 

•j'he world wheat harvest which at 
the opening of i91J was progressing 
Bouihward in Argentina and Austra- 
lasia be£an north of the equator in 
February. Starting in Britisii Lidia. 
the operati<»n gradually expanded over 
the magnificent wheat areas of the 
northern hemlspJiere, until they are 
now completed, excepting on small sur- 
faces in the more northerly limits of its 
culture. Tlie total acreage was doubt- 
less the largest in history, the normal 
world area, about 235,000,000 acres, 
having Iteen heavily increased this year 
by alditlonal sowing of spring wheat 
In Russia and Canada. Up to July when 
a fair crop hid already been garnered 
In Argetnli-.a and an excellent one in 
British India, the prospect was for a 
World crcf) l^eavier than any preced- 
ing one. but drouth that month in the 
Bprlne: v.heat belts of North Ai'ierica 
and Russia and an ur.precedentedly wet, 
cojl summer in France are believed to 
have resulted In serirus losses- 

"Ou the contnent of Europe harvests. 
^.n me whole good, have ap- 
parently not realized the expected 
abundance. Thrashings are pretty gen- 
erally causing downward revisions of 
pre-harvest estimate.--; even in coun- 
tries where anticipated quantity i3 ma- 
terializing, coninlaints are numerous 
of deficient quality resulting from 
loilged grain and storm-delayed har- 
vests The situation in F'rance so un- 
eatisfactory a month ago. shows little, 
If any improvement. In Italy and 
Rou'inania actual thrasliing results 
leeni to be modifying to some extent 
the bounteous aspect of the fields be- 
fore narvest. The formerly excellent 
prospects in Germany and Austria- 
Hungary have not been fully main- 
tained; "and the Russia cron, thougii 
Quantitatively mum in doubt, is known 
to have siffered seiiously in quality 
In niany localities from the Oriental 
rains during harvest. In contrast to 
less optimistic opinion resi^ecling the 
Eur.-'P'fan crop, however, may be noted 
a decided veering a.vay from the ex- 
trere pessimism at one time prevail- 
ing respecting the wl eat crop of West- 
ern Cana<la. 



Duluth close: Wheat — On track: No. 1 hard, 
$1.12; No. 2 northern, $1.07-1.110. To arrive: No. 
northern. $1.07-1.10; September, $1.12 asked; December, $1 
$1.15 asked. Durum— On track, in store, to arrlv-e: No. 1, 
September, 91c bid; November. 92 1/4 c bid; December, 91 %c 
nominal. Flax: On track, in ^ tore, $2.80; to arrive $2. <0: 
days, $2.79; to arrive by Sept. 17, $2.80; Septemoer, $2.<8 
bid; November, $2.68; December, $2.6:2 asked. Oats, 34c 
70c' Barley, 64C« 69c; new. 61it7 2c. 

Receipts— Wheat, 200,076 bu; last year. 675.836 bu; corn, 
year, 4,845 bu; oats, 5,708 bu; last year, 
year,.175,418bu;,flax, 2.651 bu: Jast year, -,^-- ^- -^^^ ^^^. ^^^^ ^.000 

flax, 10,241 



1 northern, 

$1.12; No. 2 

12 asked; May, 

91c; No. 2, 89c; 

bid; May, 9514c 

to arrive In 10 

bid; October, $2.68 

nominal. Rye, 



31,741 bu; ba 
8,723 bu. 
Shipments— Wheat, 141,560 bu; last Jfar, 261.405 bu 
year. 4,750 bu; barley. 144,620 bu; last year, 185,260 bu, 
year, 14,701 bu. 



12,637 
68.972 



bu; 
bu; 

bu; 
bu; 



C8!&/ 

last 
last 

last 
last 



IN STOCKS 






Opening Prices Mixed But 

the Mari^t Soon Starts 

Downward. 



lev, 36; last year. 77; flax, 10; last year. 
22"; total, 141; on track, 216. 
• • • 
Foreign wheat mrkets closed: Liver- 
corn, %d lower. 
IJudpest, wheat, 



pool. 1 ';» (& 1 i.sd lower; 



lower 
Paris. 

1(U 1 % c 

• « * 

Car receipts of wheat: 



Berlin, ll^d 
i-sc lower, 
lower; Hour. 



wheat, 
lower. 



%(lil*.^c 



Duluth 

Minneapolis 



Today. 

94 
378 



472 

35 

213 

89.000 

bu 148,100 

• « « 
recelpas of ilax: 



Northwest 

Chicago 

Wlniiieg 

St. l.ouis, bu. 
Kansas City, 



Car 



Duluth .... 
Minneapolis 
Winnipeg . 



Today. 
10 

28 



38 



Last 

Year. 

605 

69 

665 

30 

441 

98,874 
79,800 

Last 
Year. 

22 

128 



250 



Total 

• « « 

Offlci.-il exp rts cf ijrain aiul flour frum the United 
States fur August, with comparisons, follow; 

.\ug. 



. bu 
bbl 



Com. 
Wlieat, 
Flour, 
Wheal 

From Jan. 
Ci'm. bu . . 
Wheat, bxit 
Flour. 
Wheat 



bbl 
autJ 



flour. Ini . 
1, laio— 



flour, bu 



lyio. 
. .. 1,7:5.933 

,.. 2,U62.U4S 
, .. 612.673 

... 4.8iy,070 

...24.883.490 
...11.264.135 
. . . 4. 56". 435 
...31,786.072 



Aug. 1919. 
784.024 
5.805. 4!I5 
587.1126 

5.451. ic:; 

24.219.724 

19,508.600 

5.U84.48J 

42.38y,773 



For 
day, 



Corn and Wheat Bulletin. 

tlie ivieiilytour hours eudiiig al S a. m., TUurg- 
Sept. 15. 



STATIONS— 



Ibtate o! 
I weather 



TcmpentUTft 


^ 


A 


3 


3 


6 


B 


•H 


c 






S 


s 


• 


■*- 



Kaln- 
faU. 



Alexandila .... 

Campbell 

frookslon 

Detroit City ... 

Mal:,ta(l 

MofitevUleo . . . . 

New Clm 

ItDChester 

Wiijiiebugo CUj 
Wl rUiliigion 

.Mutnia 

l..aiig<luu 

Lisbon 

Minot 

Pembhia 

.\berUeen 

.UlllUiuk 

.NUu-liell 

KeilflelU 

UUmari'k 

t)o\ll3 Lake . . . 

Duli'.lh 

ilunu 

La Crosae 

Miiiiieai>oUs . . . 

Mourticail 

merre 

St. Paul 

Winiitpcg 



Cl.udTl 

Cloudyj 

Cloudyj 

Cloudyl 

Cloudy I 

Raiiiiiigl 

Kainliigj 

, .Part cloudy 

Ilaiiiiiig 

Kaiiung 

Clear 

Clear 

Cloudy 

Clear 

..Part cl. udy 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Clear 

Clear 

, Clear 

Cloudyj 

Cloudyl 

Cl*ar| 

. .Part cloudyj 

Cloudy I 

..Part cloudyj 

Clearl 

..Part cloudyj 



76 I 

72 ] 

76 I 

72 I 

76 

70 

70 

74 

70 

76 

70 

74 

68 

80 

70 

72 

70 

70 

70 

70 

72 

68 

72 

72 

74 

66 

72 

71 



38 
34 
50 
32 
28 
54 
40 
38 
48 
44 
36 
38 
40 
42 
48 
40 
42 
48 
48 
50 
50 
48 
58 
44 
52 
58 
56 
52 
42 



c-5 
5I 

' 








.10 
.02 



.08 

.80 







.08 











u 

1 



Jority 
firm. 



of the 
Closing 



offerings, 
range. 61©' 
»» 



Prices 
Ic. 



held 



New Vork <iraiu. 

New York. Sept. 15.— Close; Wheat— September, 
$1.01%; December. $1.05>«; May. $1.08%. Com— 
Septem.:er, C4^c; DcoeniUT, B3c 



Liverpool Urain. 

Liverpool, Sept. 15. — Closing: Wheat 
— Spot dull; No. 2 red western winter, 
no stock; futures steady; October, 7s 
l%d; December, 7s 2iid; March, 7a 



2 Tail. Corn- 
mixed. 5s 7 
ber, 4s 6d; 



— pSot easy; 
1,2 d; futures 
October Is 



old American 
quiet; Septem- 
7 1.8(1. 



THE COPPER STOCKS. 



The following are the closing quota- 
tions of copper stocks at Boston today, 
reported by Paine, Webber & Co., 316 
West Superior street: 



STOCKS— 



I Bid. I Asked. 



Telephone 
Zinc 



Showers fell 
sota, Nebraalia 
1.00 raliilaU 



o>er 
and 



Hetnarka. 

w e»ieni Iowa. Southern Minne- 
ilUsourl. Sibley, Iowa, reported 



H. W. 



RICHARDSON", 

Local Forecaster. 



T indicates 

tFor 24 h urs 
NOTl-: — Tiie 
peraiures and 
tach center 
celved. and 



Inappreclui It ndnfaU. 'For ycsterda}. 

ending 8 h. m.. 75tU meridian lime. 

avtrjge m.tximum and mininiiim lem- 

the average rainfuil are made up at 
from the actual number ef npons te- 
the average rainfall fiom the number of 



slailona rvportlng in .10 Inch cr more. The "lilate of 
weaiher" is thai prevalliiiK ;>t time of observali u. 



TburHday. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Flax, 

Flax, 2.500 Lhj to arrive Septcnilier 

Flax. 650 tu to arrive SeptemUr . 

Flax. 450 bu to arrive September. . 

No. 1 durum. 3 cais 



Casli %>ale.<« 

hard wheat. 2 cars 

hard. 1 car 

Dorvbem, 1.000 l>u to arrive Septeml*r. 

6 cars 

i.Ooo bu to arrive 

13 cais 

1.100 Ini to arrive 

3.00J tu to arrive 

24,000 bu i-n track 

2 cjirs 

l.W'O bu to arrive l.lSVa 

1.000 Ira to arrive 1.12 

1 car 1.12>>* 

3 cars 1.('8 

to arrive Septemlier 2.80 

2.78 

2.79 

2.81 

.92 



nortliem, 
northeni. 
norUiern. 
northern, 
liortiiern, 
nortliem. 
norUieni, 
nortliem. 
ni rthern. 
i.ortheni, 
northern. 
6.80'j bu 



.11.13 
. 1.13H 

1.12'2 

1.13>i 

1.13 

1.13 

1.12% 

1.12^ 

1.13 

1.12% 



No. 1 

Barley. 

Barley. 

Birley. 

Barley. 

Barley. 




THE MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 

\Vhe-it Prices Are Lower AVith 
Slack Cash Demand Apparent. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. Sept. 15. — VS'heat 
prices were lowered today. Spring 
wheat receipts continued to show un- 
favorable comparison with a year ago, 
but the heavy Increase in elevator 
stocks and the slack cash demand more 
than offset the light movement. Sep- 
tember closed %^T4c lower than yes- 
terday. December Ic lower. May 
13-bC lower. Local eletator stocks in- 
creased 900,000 bu for five days. Min- 
neapolis today received 378 cars of 
wheat against 609 cars a year ago; 
Duluth 94 cars again 605 and Winnipeg 
213 cars again 441. September opened 
$1.09; high, $1.09^s; low, $1.0814; 
closed $1.0814 December opened $1.09 --i 
$1.11; low. $1.09341^1 
$1.10 Vfe. May opened 
; high, $1.1474: low. 

closed. $1.13% (&1. 133-4. 
wa<? about steady today, 
to slow com- 
elevators. No. 



high. 
1.09"s; closed. 
$1.14^ M 1.143-^; 
$1.13 3^ It 1.13 1,4; 

Cash whe:'.'. 
Demand continued fair 
ing from both mills and 



.\malgamated 
Anaconda . . . 
Adveiiture . . . 
Ahmeek . . . 
Allouez . 
American 
American 

Atlantic 

Arcadian 

Arizona Commercial . . . 
Butte & Ballaklava . . . 

Boston Corbin 

Butte Coalition 

Calumet & Arizona . . . . 

Calumet & Hecla 

Centennial 

Cons. Merctir 

Copper Range 

Daly West 

Davis Daly 

East Butte 

Franklin 

First National 

Giroux 

Granby 

Greene-Cananea 

Hancock Consolidated 

Helvetia 

Indiana 

Isle Koyale 

Keweenaw 

Lake Copper 

La Salle 

Mass. Cons. 

Mass. Gas 

Mexico Mining 

Miami Copper 

Michigan 

Mohawk 

Nevada Con8olidat«ed. . . 

Nevada Utah 

North Lake 

Nlpissing 

North Butte 

Ojlbway 

Old Dominion 

Osceola 

Parrot 

Pneuntatlc Service 

Ray Cons. ... 

Quin:y . ; 

Santa Fc 

Shannon 

Shoe Michigan 

Superior Boston 

h:Ui>erior Cvippt r 

Superior & Pittsburg.. 

Tamarack 

Tritilt.y 

United Fruit 

L^nited States Mining.. 

do pfd 

United States Oil 

Utah .\pe.\ 

Utah Cons 

Utah Copper 

Victoria 

Winona 

Wolverine 

Wyandot 

Yukon Gold 

Bohemia 

Begole 

Boston Ely 

Cactus 

Cliff 

Chief Consolidated . . . 

Cobalt Central 

Chino 

Corbin Copper 

Cortc-! 

Ely Consolidated 

Ely Central 

Ely Witch 

Fremont 

Goldflcld Consolidated 

Insoiration 

La Ri se 

Live Oak 

Cihio Copper 

Rav Central 

Rawhide Coalition .. 

Shatluck 

South Lake 

Tono Nevada 

Yuma 



62 lA 
38% 

6 
184 

4014 

134 ,^ 

25% 

6 14 

16^4 
5% 
13 
181a 
58 
543 
16 

6c 
66 

■■■5%* 

1% 
10»4 

3% 

6% 
32 

6% 
20% 

2Vi 
17 
2014 

31^ 
33% 
10 

"si"' 

45c 
18% 

4 
47 

20% 
73 

9% 
11 

2714 
514 
35 
124 
13 

4% 
18 

73 - 

1% 

9% 

4914 

8^ 

48 

1114 
57 
51^ 
196 
381/4 
48% 

23 

4514 
2% 
7% 
122 
1% 
3% 
51/4 
11^ 
1% 
1% 

ly* 
ii" 
51.4 

36% 
51^ 
21/fe 
28c 
70c 
10c 



I 63% 

sale 

7 

190 

42 

135 

26 

7 

314 
lei-i 

6 
1314 
18% 
58% 
550 



Close Is Weak at the Lowest 

Figures of the 

Session. 



New York. Sepf. 15. — Movements of 
the opening prices of stocks today were 
slightly mixed but the downward 
course of the leading active issues gave 
the dominant tone to the market. Ca- 
nadian Pacific fell 214, American Car 
preferred 1 and Reading, Minneapolis, 
St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie, Toledo, St. 
Louis & Western preferred and United 
States Steel substantial fractions. 
Western Union rose %. 

Some of the leading stocks receded 
a fraction from the opening figures, 
at which level support began to ap- 
pear, and theer was a general rally, 
mounting to a point in Union Pacific 
and Reading. Bethlemen Steel pre- 
ferred advanced 1%. American Car 
fell 1. 

The market showed signs of selling 
to realize as opportunity offered. A rise 
in Interborough Metropolitan of 1 and 
in the preferred of 1% was taken ad- 
vantage of to sell the list. Iteports ot 
reducing forces in a United Slates 
Steel subsidiary made a weakening 
factor. Northern Pacific, Southern Pa- 
cific, Reading, Norfolk & Western, 
Western Maryland, United States Steel, 
American Smelting and Virginia-Caro- 
lina Chemical declined 1 and Amalga- 
mated Copper and American Ice lU- 
Delware & Hudson advanced 1%. Bonds 
were irregular. 

The market closed weak. There was 
a further sag in prices. The decline 
in Missouri Pacific, Amalgamated Cop- 
per and American Smelling reached 
2V4; Sloss-Sheffield Steel and Reading 
2; Northern Pacific and Atlantic Coast 
Lir.'e 1%, Union Pacific. Atchison and 
United States Steel 1%, St. Paul and 
American Car 1%, Great Northern Ore 
certificates 1%, Wabash preferred II4 
and Pennsylvania, Chesapeake & Ohio, 
Great Northern preferred. National 
Lead and United Railways and Invest- 
ment preferred 1. Kansas & Texas 
preferred rose 1%. 



Florida, extra fancy, 36'8. crate t.75 

Florida, extra fancy, 42'8, crate 3.0a 

CiXliOUMA LEMONS — 
CalUoniia lemons, extra fancy, 300 to 360, box 
Impt'rted limes, per box 

Tl'ALiTOEJS— 

Home grown, tni 

Unme fc'rown, crate 

B.iNAXAS— 
UaniJias, per lb 

Cll.A..NBKltltli:S— 
UeniUne Lignon, bbl 

HIJTTEU— 

Fancy creamery, per lb 

D.'drjr, per lb 

Pacllng, per lb 

ClIEl-:£rE— 

Fill IT full cream, twins, per Id 

Block Swiss, per lb. No. 1 

I'riniosi cnrcse. per lb 

Wheel Swiss, per ID 

Llm jurger 

t<;U!i— 

Sirli:tly fresh candled eggs 

Fresh eg(S£, In cartons 

VIGS ANU UATES— 
Sugared wahiut dates. 10-lb box 

PiANUTS— 

Fan-:y. law. per lb., by the sack 

l^an:y r asted, sacks, per lb 

Kan:y nasled. less thiin sacks 08 

Salted peanuts, 10-lb boxes 1.35 



7.09 
1.25 

1.50 
.SO 

.04 

7.00 

.31 
.25 



.17 
.21 
.10 
.31 
.1» 

.23 
.24 

l.U 

.07 

07^ 



to Mr. Haden, but he Jberated the fe- 
male in the orchard. 

She returned, howe^'er, and entered 
the house, finally building a nest in the 
drawing room. Each day the bird takes 
a short flight, but alw.tys returns home 
for food and .vlei p. If i he door is closed 
she flutters against tie window until 
she is admitted. 



30 -lb pails, 
roasted, per 



lb.. 



S.0» 

.23 

4.50 



50 
50 
50 



Sailed pennuis 
Fan:y Jumbos, 

CIDER— 
.\pple cider, clarified, per kef 

Apple cider, casks, per gal 

Fru.t -cider, lb-gal keg 4 

Blai^kbtrry cider, keg 4 

KasDberry elder 4 

Clierry cider 4 

SIAPLE SYRUP— 
Vermont, per gal 

MAP1.K SVGAU— 
Ii'Wi, assorted pkgs., 30-lL box. per lb 

PUP cons— 

Snowball pop com, 40-pkg box 

Pop corn, shelled 

Pop corn, I n the cub 

KONEY— 
Co'.cirado white clover, per case, 24's. . 

POTATOES— 

Nev potatoes, per bu 

Jen ey sweets, bbl 

ONIONS- 

Onion, yellow, per 70-lb sack 

bpuliiah onions, per crate 

CABBAG1'>- 
Hoiue grow'i, ciate 

> UTS- 
Walnuts, New California, 110-lb sack, per lb.. 

FillKrts. Sicily". Per lb 

Uiaxlls. extra large, per lb 

Pecans, extra lancy poUsheu. per lb 

Almonds. XaragoiUa. per lb 

Mixed nuts. lOj-lb and 50-lb boxes, lb. new 

Cociianuls. per doz 

.Ne\t hickory uuts, large or small, per lb 

Pecans, liultea, shelled, extra fancy, S-lb car- 

I'ms. per lb 

Walnuts, shelled, extra fancy, 511b cartoiu. lb 
AUionds. shelled, extra (»ncy, 5-lb cartons, lb 

liAfEb AND FIGS— 

HiiJowl dates, 70-lb boxes, new 

Hallowl dates. 30 packages, per box 

Fard dates. 12-lb boxes, new 

SuKar walnut dales, P-lb boxes 

Nt» Callfonda figs. 12 pkg box, per box 

Ne» Smynia figs. 5cr wn, 12-lb box. per bos 
Ne-v 8myrrui figs. 7 -crown, 3o-lb box. per box 4.23 

PKEKll VEGETABLES— 
Ea J Claire gretn cimi. per sack, 5 dot 

l.ietluce, leaf, per bu b x 

I.,eltuce. Iiead. Boston, extra fancy, bu 

Beans, string, per bu 

I Beins, wax. horn-? grown, per 

I Beans, green, string, bu 

Or.'.iMis. grten. home grown, per 
Parsley, home grown, per do«.. 
Garlic, rew, Italian, per 10..., 
Ca jliiU'wer, fancy, per bu 



HISTORIC PAGEANT 
IN MEXICO CAPITAL 



V*-rrim H. Mcrxirt. 



LaelcB Merrttt. 



LEWIS H.MERRin 

& COMPANY 



BROKERS 



Bays 



1.75 

.10 

2.25 

.04 
.03 

4.00 

.90 
i.OO 

1.25 
1.85 

2.25 

.17 
.14 
.13 
.15 
.17 
.13 
.70 
.08 

.54 
.35 
.43 

5.00 
2.40 
1.35 
1.23 
.90 
1.25 



Notable Events Since 
of Aztecs j\re Re- 
produced. 

City of Me.xico, Mex., Sept. 15.— Mex- 
ico brushed up on is history today, 
witnessing a pageant which pictured in 
chronological order notable events 
from tlie days of the Aztecs down to 
the establishment of the present re- 
public. , 

The parade, in which 1.200 persons 
participated, passed tlirough the square 
in front of the nat onal palace and 
there was reviewed by i-resident Diaz, 
diplomats and specia ambassadors to 
the centennial ceiebration. Careful at- 
tention had been given to ihe costum- 
ing of the different periods representd 
and the gf r.ernl effect v>as excellent. 



PRIVATE WIRES TO ALL MARKETS 



104 Pr«Ttdcnc« 
Zenith, 707. 



Bolldlne. 

Daluth. 1239. 



■ 



GOLF'S VERBAL HAZARDS. 



.1.25 



lOc 


66Vi 


5% 




iVi 


11 


3Ti 


6% 


33 


6% 


211^4 


21,8 


171^ 


20% 


3?4 


34J/4 


lOi/i 


7Va 


sale 


50c 


18% 


434 


49 


20% 


77 


9% 



New 

Piper. 



York stock Quotations furnisbed The Herald bi 
Johnson & Case. 



STOCKS— 



I Upsn.l Uigh.L Low. I Close. 



.Amalgamated 

American Sugar 

.\nie.lcan 

Ami rlcan 

American 

American 

An^iconda 

Atchison 

HaltimiTe 

br oklyn 



Cdf Foundry 
Locomotive . 
Colli n Oil . 
Smelters . . . . 



21 \ 

6 
37V4 



150,000 bu; flour, 
oats, none; wheat 



Clearances — Wheat, 
4.000 bbl; corn, 29,000; 

and Hour, 169,000 bu. 

• • • 

Broomhall cabled: Weekly Argentine 
estimates shipments wheat, 960,000 bu ; 
last week, 1,120,000; last year, 296,000; 
corn. 3,400,000 bu; last week, 3,561,000; 
last year, 1,097,000. 

« • • 

Duluth car inspection: Wheat — No. 1 
hard. 11; No. 1 northern, 31; No. 2 
northern. 8; No. 3 northern. 1; durum. 
No. 1, 37; No. 2, 2; No. 3, 1; total 
durum. 40; mixed, 1; winter, 1; reject- 
ed. 1; total wheat, 94; last year, 604; 
corn, 1; last year, 1; oats, none; last 
year, 19; rye, none; last year, 5; bar- 



1 northern sold for V^c under to Vic 
above December. Closing cash prices. 
No. 1 northern. $1.09 >fe ({£ 1.10 14 ; to ar- 
rive. $1.09 5i,''a 1.10 »i; No. 2 northern, 
$1.05% Ct 1-06%; to arrive, $1.05% (uJ 
1.07%. No. 3 wheat. $1.03% 'Q; 1.06 ^v^. 
No. 3 vellow, corn, oSVaC. So. 3 while 
oats, 3"2y.(§'33c. No. 2 rye. 70Tt71c. 

aiillstuffs — Shipments, 2,2J7 tons. 
Demand was strong and the market 
active. Prices advanced. Bran in 
100-i)ound sacks, $18.50® 19. 

There was no new feature to the 
flour market today. Demand remained 
slow to fair. Prices held firm at yes- 
terday's decline and shipments less 
than a vear ago. Shipments, 54,496 
bis. First patents in wood, f. o. b. 
Minneapolis, $5.40@5.60; second pat- 
ents, $5.20 (?t) 5.40; first clears, $3.80@ 
4; second clears. $2.60(5 2.90. 

Flax — Receipts, 28 cars; year ago. 
128; shipments, 4. Demand continued 
strong for spot flaxseed at 2c under 
the Duluth September and to arrive at 
3c under. Closing price, $2.76. 

Barley — Ileceipts. 76 cars; year ago. 

136; shipments. 37. Demand continued 

good for all grades of barley today. 

I One large cash house bought the ma- 



8 ¥4 


7 3-16 


334 


161/2 


1 1-16 


2 'A 1 


12 1 


2294 


8Vfe 


8% 1 


40c 1 



5 
181.4 
75 

IV4 
10% 
49^ 

8M1 
49 

11% 
58 

196^ 
39 
49 
36% 

3% 
23 Ms 
46 

3 

8 
123 

1% 

4 

6 
o 

1% 
L- 13-16 

11^ 

1 9-16 

6V4 

16% 
61,4 
2% 

32c 

73c 

lie 
314 
8 Vis 
1 15-1*5 

3^8 

17 

1^4 

2% 
13 
23 

9 

8% 
45c 



&. oiuo 

Kapld Transit 

Chesapeake & Ohio 

Chicago Great Western. . 

C. M. & St. Paul 

Colorado Fuel & Iron . . . 

Colorado Soulheni 

Caiiadlaii Pacific 

Denver & lUo Graude .. 

DlstiilerB 

Erie 

do 1st pfd 

Great Northern 

Kansas City Southern . . 
Louisville & Nashville .. 
Missouri. Kansas ii Texas 
Missouri Pacific . 
National Lead . . 
.Vew York Central 
N. nliern Pacific 
PciinsylTarJa .... 
Prefscjd Steel Car 
Ilepublic Steel & 

Kock Island 

Reading 

Soo Line 

Southern Railway pfd. 

Southern PaclJlc 

Tennessee Copper — 

Tcx.is Pacific 

Union Pacific 

Utah Copper 

United Sutes Steel . 

do. pfd 

Wabash 

do pfd 



Iron 



63?i 
117 

47 

36 

62 V4 

67 

39 

98 H 
104^ 

75 

74% 

22% i 
121 

31 

53 1* 
188 ?» 

30 

ie\ 

25% 

43 
124% 

29 
143Vi 

32 

r.2% 

51VS 

112 

114% 

128% 
34 

30% 
80% 

141%| 

132 
52 

113% 
27% 
26% 

165 
46% 
68% 

116% 
16% 
3S% 



64 


62^ 


62% 
117 
46% 


47 


46% 






36 


C2% 


62% 


62% 


67 


64% 


64% 


39 


38% 


38% 


V8% 


97 


97 


101% 


103% 


103% 


75% 


74% 


74% 


75% 


73% 


73% 


22% 


22% 


22% 


121 


110% 


119% 


31 


30 


30 

^3% 


189 


188% 


188% 
30 


27 


26% 


27 


25% 


25% 


25% 
43 


124% 


124 


124 

20 


ii:i% 


143 


143 
32 


52% 


50% 


50% 


51% 


51 


51 


112% 


111% 


111% 


114% 


112% 


112% 


128% 


128% 


128% 
34 


30% 


30% 


30% 


30% 


30% 


30% 


141% 


139% 


139% 
132 
53 


113% 


112% 


112% 


28 


27% 


27% 
26% 


165% 


163% 


163% 


46% 


45% 


46 


68% 


67 


07% 


116% 


116 


118 


16% 


16% 


16% 


35% 


34% 


34-.« 



bu. 



doz. . 



.60 

.90 

1.59 

1.75 

1.7S 

1.75 

.18 

.35 

.13 

2.50 



Paine. Webber & Co, 



316 West Superior 
LULUTd. 



St., 



BANKERS & BROKERS 



ERANCil OFFICES 

Detroit, 
Milwaukee, Marquette, 

IJutie. Houghton, 

Great Fails, Caluiuet. 



- i 



per doz 23 

90 



fancy, per doz. . 



1.25 

.40 

2.00 

1.75 

2.25 

.35 

1.25 

1.30 

S.OO 

.35 

I.'.IO 

1.50 

1.75 

1.50 
1.25 
2.00 



.e%9 

...8® 

. .13<d 

.7@ 



Radishes, round 

Spliiach. bu 

C^numbers. bu 

Cucumbers, hothouse, 

Eft plant, per bu 

Peji)ers, per bu 

Peppers, per bu 

Betts. new, with tops. Lunches, per doz 
Carrots, nevr. wilh tops. iMjr Lu boi.. 

Pli! plant, home grown, per bjx 

Green peas, per bu 

Celery, Mlclilgan, per bunch 

Htbbard equash, doz 

Pumpkins, dc;: 

Yetlou pluia tomatoes, bu 

aoOTS— 

Table beets, per bu sack 

Table bagas, per bu tack 

Table carrots, per aack 

MEATS— 

Beef, per lb 

Mutton, per lb 

Pork U ins, per lb 

Veal, per lb 

Lamb, per lb 12%(d 

Lard, per ib 

Dkkssuj poultky— 

Htais, fancy, fat. per lb 

Springs, per lb 

Turktys, per lb 22® 

Ducks, per lb 1S@ 

LIVE POULTRY— 

Iliiiis. fancy, fat. per lb \Z& 

Htina. small, per lb 11(9 

Si rings, per lb 15(^ 

Turkeys, per lb 17® 

Ducks, per lb 

tl<«se. per lb 

HAY AND STRAW— 

Choice timothy, per ton 20.00@21.0> 

Ni). 1 timothy, per ton 10.00(320.00 

timothy, per ton 17.00@19.0» 

mixed Umotliy, p^r ton 17.00(^19.00 

mixed tim thy. per ton 11.00@12.aO 

uplands, per ton 15. 00 (£S? 16. 00 

uplands, ptr ton 12.0O@14.O0 

midland, per ton 12.00(^13.00 

midland, per ton 8.00(S10.00 

straw, per ton 6.50® 7.0) 

(triiw. per ton 5. SO® 6.00 



.11% 

.09 

.14 

.10 

.14 

.13 

.17 

.23 
.23 

.20 

.14 
.12 
.16 
.18 
.16 
.12 



TreiiMury Statement. 

Waslilngton. Sept. 15.— The coiKllllon of the treasury 
at the beghinlng of business today was as follows: 

Trust funds— 0;)ld coin, $891,136,669; sUver dollars, 
$485,191,^00; sll\cr dollars of 1890, $3,568,000; aeKet 
certificates outstanding. $485,191,000. 

General fund — Standaid silver dollars in general 
fund, J6,387,304; current llablUties. $98,530,230; work- 
ing balance in treasury offlces, $30, 655, 8 J4; in banks 
to credit of treasurer of the United Si.T.tes, $35,637,- 
593; sutsldiao- slli;cr coin, $19,829,658; minor coin, 
$1,043,239; total balance In seneral fund, $80, 013, 077. 

Kew York Money. 

New Y'ork. Sept. 10. — Moniy (^n call, easy; 1%@ 
2% per cent; ruling rate, 2; clfslng bid, 1%; oflTered 
at 1%. Time loans very dull and steady; 60 days 
3% W- cent, and 90 d:iys 4(3 4%; six monUis, 
41'S^4%- Cl(se; Prime mercantile imper. .")% to 6 
per cent; sterling exchange strong at rec very with 
actual business in bankers' bills at 4.83.6(3 4.83.8 foi 
CO-d-iy bills a;id at 4.86.35 for demand. Commercial 
bills. 4.y3%(5 4.63%. Br.r silver. 53%c; .Mexican 
dollars. 44c. Govenitmenl bonds, steady; raUrcad 
bonds, iiTegular. 

j » ■ ■• 

South St. Haul Livestock. 

South St. Paul, Mini:., Sept. l,i.— Cattle— Re- 
ceipts, 1,100; steady; uuotations unchanged. Hogs— 
lletelpti'. 1.600; market steady tu Idc lugher; range. 
$«.50&9.2o; bulk of sales. $8.80&9.15. Sheep— lle- 

-• -• - • -- laiule, J3.25 



N.). 
N.). 
N.). 
N). 
No. 
N). 
N). 
Rye 
Oat 



Ne^v York. 

New York, Sept. 15. — Butter — Steady and un- 
cliingcd; receipts, 5,:'66 packages; creamery specials, 
stjte dairy, common to finest, 23@29c; process, sec- 
stite dairy, common to fine t, 23@2Pc; process, sec- 
cud to special, 23(*27%c; factory June make, 23% 13 
24c; do. current make, 22(g23c; imUation creamerv-. 
2-l(s25c. Cheese — Steady and unchanged; receipts. 
3,471 boxes; state, whole milk. si)eclal, 15%(317c; 
d'>. fancy, 15c; do. choice. 14%c; do. go d to prime. 
l<i&14%c; do. common to fair. U'%&10%c; skims, 
fiji to special, 2%@12%c. Kggs — Steady and un- 
changed; receipts, 10,705 cases; state Pennsylvania 
aid nearby hennery white, 32(g36c; do. gathered 
white, 29@33c; do. hennery brcwn, 28(g30c; do. 
g.tthered brown, 26S28c; do. fresh gathered extra 
fists, 25@26c; do. firsu, 23(g24c; do. seconds, 
2ig22c. 



Golf has a termindogy of its own 
which is as full of traps for the un- 
wary and inexperienced as the links 
are full of hazards. Here at the very 
start 'are two excellent examples. Al- 
though one may correctly use liie worii 
"links"' with either single or plural 
attributes — "it is an easy links" is quite 
as correct as "they ire easy links" — 
the word itself is always plural. A 
year or two ago. says the LK>ndon 
Globe, George K. Sins fell into this 
trap in discussing the pojjsible intro- 
duction of Latin as a universal lan- 
guage. He pointed cut in the Referee 
the difficulty lliere .vould be in ren- 
dering many modern terms into Latin 
and asked what, for instance. the 
Latin would be for a "golf link." One 
often hears a gold cC'Urse described as 
"a very good link," ')ut to the golfing 
ear it sounds almost as bad kas it 
would be to talk about "fine sheeps." 

"Hazard" again is ; n interesting golf 
word of French origin, which means a 
difficulty of any description on the 
golf course. Thus the definition say« 
"a hazard is any bunker, w'aier, sand, 
path," etc., but a surprising number of 
English golfers, even of some exi«evl 
once, habitually treat the word as if 
it w-ere synonymous with "bunker." Ii 
is finite common for us to receive .de- 
scriptions of links sent by the secre- 
taries of golf clubs stating that the 
"bunkers" consist of such things as 
loads, trees, walKs, ditches or pcmds. 
A bunker Is a hazard, but a hazard is 
not necessariiy a bunker. 

"Bunker" Is Itself another very old 
golfing term, but when and wly It 
came to be used for a sand hole or 
pit on the links is difficult to deter- 
mine. It is, however, not found in 
Mat bison's poem "Tie Ooff," published 
in 1743. Malhison makes use of "gap- 
ing face" and "sandj- face" to describe 
the same thing, and as far as we hfeive 
been able to discover "bunker" makes 
its earliest appearance in the liter- 
ature of the game in the St. Andrews 
code of 1812. This would seem to fix 
its golfing birth abjut the beginning 
of last century. Tiie American golf- 
ers with character: Stic independence 
call fei bunker a "sand catch." 

Another provincial correspondent of 
a London paper was responsible for the 
following: "Golf is now a popular 
amusement with all classes in our 
neighborhood. Even the ladies have 
taken to the game, and manv of them 
may dally be seen upon the downs 
wielding their caddi ?s as to the man- 
ner born." 

The word "caddie'' is simply the 
French "cadet." and was so spelled 
originally in Scotland. It is one of 
the many Scotch Xkords taken from 
the French during the Stuart period, 
and was the term tor any kind of light 
porter before it came to have its lim- 
ited application to the golf club car- 
rier. Other French words still used 
in Scotland are "groser" for "grosseil- 
ller," a gooseberry bush; "ashet" for 
"assiette." a meat lisli; "backet" for 
"baquet," a wooden box, and "baillie " 
— still so spelled In Aberdeen — for 
"bailli," a municipal magistrate. 



renltb, 1404. Uulutb, Slolroae. 221S. 

MARTIN ROSENDAHl 

& COMPANY. Inc. 

COPPER STOCK BROKERS. 



4«4 Went rimt 
Commerctnl Itt; 



Street, 
lldlnic. 



f 



LEE W. FARMER, 

IROA and COI'HEH STOCKS. 

Best facilities for handling out-of- 
town Orders. 
CorrrapoBdrnrr Solicited. 
I>honea. 432. 410 Loniidnle Bids. 



-""■ •- - " -^ ~ - 



»^^, 



B0DE:N m, SMEAD 

UB.MCRAl. UHUKL:RS. 



Blcinbera Daluth Stock Excbansc 



23a Maahettan Bids. 
Dalatb, 3S43. Zealtb, 2354. 

Vermilion Iron Stocks a Specialty. 



I, 



6 

6 1/2 
6 



% MONEY 



Money to Loan on 

Real Estate Security. 

Building Loans. 



W. Ml. PRINOLE & CO. 

I<ONSI>AL.E BUILDINQ. 



celpls. 
&6.25. 



80O; weak; sheep, $1.5064-75; 



Chicago. 

Chicago. Sept. 15.— Butler — Steady; creainerieB, 
24Hfe29c; dairies, 23(a2"c. Eggs — Steady; receipt*. 
5.72 cases; at mark, cases included, 14(al7c; firsts. 
2tc; prlnie flrsls, 23c. Cheese — Stead.v; daisies. 16ca' 
m4c; twins. 15615%c; young Americas. 1B^($ 
H^c; l<ng horns. ISfeieUc- Potatoes — Easy; choice 
to fancy, 86&88c; fair to good, "SftSOc. Poultry- 
Steady; turkeys. 18c; fowle, ISVje; springs, 13c. 
Aeal— Steady; 50 to 60-lb weights, SisSVjc; 60 to 
85-lb Weights, B(3.it\ic; 85 lo ilO-lb weights, 10® 

« > «■ 

HIDES, TALLOW AND FURS. 



No. 1. 



Etecn 




DULUTH. 



SELL TO ARJ^rVE ON BULO:3. 

WYMAN & CO. 

Grain Commission. MINNEAPOLIS, 



THE VANISHING HIRKD GIRL. 
During the last thirty years the de- 
mand for servants has doubled, while 
the supply has Increased only by half — 
in the last decade only by 5 per cent. 
In 1870 there was one to every twelve; 
even in the recent crisis, when the 
cities were filled with unemployed, the 
demand still outran the supply. And 
yet during the thirty years past the 
number of self-supporting women — 
that is, the actual labor market — has 
more than trebU d. 

Forty years ago a woman thrown 
upon her Own resources would tend to 
select houRwork for a living; In fact 
one woman in two did so select. Thirty 
years ago only one in every third wom- 
an entered domestic service. Ten years 
ago only one in four rapped at the 
kitchen door. 

Here are the bids that industrial and 
domestic service makes for the girl, 
says a writer in McClure's. Let us tab- 
ulate them for a better view: 

The home demands long, irregular 
hours, Sundaj- and evening work, ser- 
vility, loyalty, celibacy, isolation, loss 
of caste, conformity, sacrifice of home. 
The home offers good wages, steady 
work; room and board, healthy work, 
training. 

Industry demands efficiency, 1. e., 
speed, skill and (at times) neatness. 

Industry offers independence, social 
life, Sunaays and evenings. Incentive, 
home life, money wages. . 

An unprejudiced reading of this table 
should show why the workingwoman 
prefers shop and factory, with all their 
horrors, to housework. 
* 
A store must be advertised regularly 
— on as sure a schedule as is followed 
in opening and closing its doors. In 
fact the advertising should be the key 
and Interpretation always, to all 
people, of what the store is — what it 
offers. 



CbicnKo Livestock. 

Chicago. Sept. l.^.— Cattle — Heceipts estimated at 
6,000; market steady; bee\es, $4.804i8.:i5; Tcxa« 
6teers. $3.75(a5.y0; '.veslcni steers, $4.40@7.00; stock- 
ers and feeders, $4.006j6.10; cows and heifers, $2.25 
(a6.40; cilves, $6.25««&.50. Hcgs— Kecelpls eslimaled 
at 12<j00; market, lOialSc higher; light, $y.20(a f'.70; 
mixed, $8.45^'?.55; heavy. $8.25619.35; mugh. $8.25 
fti8.55; good lo choice heavy, $8 55(gJ(.oJ; pigs. $8.40 
(S«.50; bulk of sales. $8.65«o-li.OO. Sheep— Heceipts 
tstlroalfd at 25,000; market steady; natlTe, $2.75® 
4 00- western. $3.2d(<j 4.65 ; ye:irllugs. $4.75(a5.7o; 
lambs, native, $5.25^7.10; western, »5.25®7.00. 
» 
Cotton Market. 
New York, Sept. lo.— Cotton opened 
steady at unchanged prices to a de- 
cline of 6 points. .September being 6 
points lower and other positions un- 
changed to 2 points lower under scat- 
tered selling. Cables were fairly steady 
and soon after the opening here prices 
rallied to a net gain of 2(&4 points 
on predictions of an active support de- 
mand, while present bill of lading con- 
ditions obtain, but there was no ag- 
gressive buying and the market looked 
more or less unsettled. 

Spot closed quiet, 5 
middling uplands, 13.80; 
Sales, 2.r>55. Futures 
steady; closing bids: 

September, 13.61; October, 13.14; No- 
vember. 13.07; I'ecember, 13.06; Jan- 
uary 13.01; February, 13.04; March, 
13.09'; May, 13. li:; June, 13.10; July, 
13.09. 

THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 



points higher; 
do. gulf, 14.05. 
closed barely 



t>OX. 



box 



S.S9 
4.00 
5.50 
4.M 

2.7S 



.50 
.40 
.73 



CALIFOR.NTA ORANGES— 

California, late Valencies, extra fancy, 

Calilomia late Valenclas, OS's, per b:x 

California late Valenclas, es.tra fancy. 250» 
Late Valcnc-iaa. txlra fancy. Hi's, box 

ur.RUiES— 

Blueberries, case 

CANT-\LOUPtS— . 

Standard, crate 

Osage melons, crate 

Indiana gems, half bu 

WATEKMELO.NS— 
Missouri watermelons, each 25® .30 

FKCIT— 

Yelkw plums, extra fancy, crate 1.90 

Michigan plums, crate 2.23 

Idaho I'ears. box 2.65 

Miohlgn n Bartlett pears, per bbl 6.50 

CHllfornia -.vhiie Malaga grapes, crate 1.65 

Michigan grapes, per basket 35 

Califoniia Tokay grapes, crate 1.90 

Washington and Colorado peaches, box 80 

APPLES— 

New apples, fancy Tailetles, bbl 3.75® 4.00 

Idaho, box 1.85 

Maiden Blush, btl 4 . 25 

Crab apples, bu 2.50 

PINEAPPLES— 
Florida, eztn foac;. 30*1, ciate 4.23 



.11 

.10 

■ nii 

.14 
.80 
50 
IV&c less thaa salted. 

lb 20 

.16 

.15^ 

.18^ 

.15 

.18 

.06 
.05H 

.'04?4 
avoid 



GREEN SALTED HIDES— 

O. S. Bteeis. over CO lb 

(1. S. sieers, 25 lb and up and 

under 60 lb 

O. S. cows. 25 lb up, branded flat.. 
li. S. bulls, stags and oxen, 40 lb 

and up 

tS. b. long halre<l kips, 8 to 25 lb... 

O. 8. veal kips. 5 to 25 lb 

(J. S. Deacon skhis. under 8 It) 

(1. 8. horse hides 3 

Green hides and calf, 

DHY SALTED— 
Dry ttr. hides, over 12 
Dry Minnesota. Dakota, Wisconsin 

and Iowa hides, o\er 12 lb 

Murralas 

Dry Idp. jnder 12 lb 

Dry sailed hides and kip, 5 lb and 

over, all sections 

Dry sailed calf, under 5 lb, all sec- 
tions 

TALLOW AND GKEASE— 

'.Callow, in cakes 

'.rallow, in bbl 

i.rease. white 

(Jrease. yellow and brown 

Ship in tight two-headed barrels to 

SJIliEP PELTS— 
(}. S. pells, esiiinated washed wool, 

per lb 

(>. 8. sliearlings, each 

Dry murrains, lb 

FUKS— Larger 

ijkunk. black $4.50 

Hkunk, short stripe 3. 00 

iikuiik. long nareow stripe.. 2.50 
^■kunk, broad stripe and wtiite 1.00 

.'iluskrat. spring 70®80 

;iiuskrat. winter ii5lif64 

;»luskrat, fall 41iS40 

.Vluskrat, kits 

Uaccoon 3.10 

:ilink. dark and browii 7.50 

Mink, pale 8.00 

j3ea\er T.50 

Cat, wild 5.00 

risher. dark 20.00 

.riiher. pale 12.00 

fox. red 10.00 

fuz, gray 2.00 

:.yni 30.00 

Marten, dark 20.00 

Marten, dark brown IJ.OO 

Uarten. light br. and pole.. 6.00 

;Veasel. white 1 09 

n'easei. stained, damaged . . .25 



$ .13 



No. 2. 
$ .12 

.16 
.08 

.00 

.10^ 
.12i» 
.70 
1.80 



.18 
.14 
'.16% 
.14 



.04H 

.04!^ 
.041» 
.03V4 
leakage. 



.28 

.15 

.15H 

Medium. 

$3.30 

2.50 

2.00 

.75 



.30 

.20 

.16 

Small 

$2. 50 

2.00 

1.50 

.50 



41®40 

25(3,24 

.10@08 .25(a2l 

2.10 1.6U 

5.50 4.00 
4.00 3.0J 
5.00 3.25 
3.75 2.50 

15.03 10.00 

8.00 7.00 

7.00 8.00 

1 . SO 1 . 00 

25. UO 12.00 

15.00 10. OU 

7.00 4.50 

4.25 8.00 

.SO .29 

.15 .10 

4.51 8.00 
3.00 2.00 
2.40 1.60 
2.50 1.U5 

14(£j20 10@15 

9@12 7910 

4.50(S 7 8.50(<J 4 

55(a350 35@130 

10®15 I&VO 

cross and kit fox. 
and wolverine ctmmand mar- 
prices are for prime No. I 



WOMEN AERONAUTS. 

Among those who will take part in 
the Egyptian aviation meeting is Mme. 
de la Roche. At first it was thought 
that the accident with which she met 
recently while driving her Voisin bi- 
plane would necess'tate P.er abandon- 
ing all Idea of participating In the 
contest, but with cliaracteristic deter- 
mination she has thrown off all the 
ill ertects or ner rxii and is aireacr. 
on her way to Egypt. 

According to th*; Lady's Pictorial 
Miss Kavanagh can now claim to be 
the first English wcman who has con- 
trolled an aeroplane unassisted. Since 
she became a pupl at tlie Grahame- 
White schools at Pau Miss Kavanagh 
has made rapid progress and has al- 
ready to her record several liights of 
some distance on a Bleriot machine. 

Mr. Latham Is also instrucing Miss 
Dorothy Levitt, she having teinporarily 
abandoned lier expert handling- of a 
motor in order to !■ arn aviation. On 
.Mr. Latliam's favorite flying ground 
.Miss Levitt is rapidly acquiring the 
mastery of an Antoinette monoplane. 
It will 'thus be .seen that at the present 
moment of the thn^e practical women 
avlp.tors two favor monoplanes. 

Miss Lillian Blar d, whose ambition 
Is to build a.s well as fly a bi-plane. 
is working with the will of the most 
determined male aviator. Since early 
in November she has spent many 
hours daily on the task of constructing 
her machine, whicli embraces several 
original features. Miss Bland is a 
skillful mechanicia'i and is only con- 
tent with the highest finish in every 
detail of her blp ane. a precaution 
which is lacking in the work of more 
than one British a-.iator. 

WINDOWS OF THE SOLES. 

Mme. Modjeska's reminiscences, now 
appearing in the Century, contain the 
fc llowing letter, which affords a some- 
what startling picture of New York in 
tlie '70s: 

July 13. 1S76 — New York. 

"Dear Mr. Stanlsiaus: It is Sunday 
today, and so quiet. The whole city 
seems plunged Into a deep slumber. 

"We shall stay lure a few weeks on 
account of the Centennial exposition. 
then we intend to <tart for California 
on the steamer Colon, across Panam.i, 
and we probably shall settle in Cali- 
fornia. There are vet many miles be- 
fore us and much anxiety as to our 
t'uture prospects. 

"New York is a monstrous, untidy 
bazaar. The buildings are large but 
without style. Brick or chocolate 
houses (the latter called here brown 
stone), with green vvindow shades, look 
simply awful. Th«! whole city is as 
ugly as can be. But what makes the 
streets look still more unattractive are 



the soles of men's boots In the win- 
dows. 

"Imagine th.it men here have the 
singular custc>m of sitting In rocklngr 
chairs and putting their feet on the 
window sills. You can see and admlr© 
the size of their shoes in the hotel lob- 
bies, the barber shops, the clubs and 
even In some private residences. 
Wherever you turn these soles star© 
at you. "A few days ago we went to 
Central Park, with the desire to take 
a walk and breathe some cooler, fresh- 
er air; but oh what a disappolntmentt 
Most of the trees are too young yet 
to give any shade, and the roads and 
paths are asphalted. The asphalt melt* 
under the scorching sun and poisons 
the air. We returned as soon as we 
found a conveyance. 

■"There is. however, one thing that I 
like quite well. In the evening we go 
to watch the ferries. There are large 
boats on the two rivers that encircle 
New York and carry passengers to and 
from the different suburban towns. 
When all these boats are lit inside, they 
make a pretty sight, and as there are 
many, many of these moving small 
palaces, the whole river looks a» 
though it were on fire." 
■ 

NO END TO IT. 

Judge E. H. Gary, the president of 
the new Iron and Steel Institute, was 
asked by a reporter if, at the reecnt 
convention at the Waldorf in New 
Y(>rk. co-operation had been discussed. 

"No," Judge Gary answered wltti a 
smile, "co-operation and such-like sub- 
jects were not touched on. There 
wasn't time. 

"For co-operation, you know, is, like 
metaphysics, a verv large suVtject. You 
have heard what the scientist said of 
metaphysics? He said: 

" 'Metaphysics Is like a man splittlnjf 
a log. Wlien it is done, he has two 
more to split.' " 

■ 

Phone your wants to The Herald. 
Both 'phones 324. Results are eure. 



■ ■■'■■ 

« 

h 

t 

* 

I 

i ' 

i < 



CITV NOTICES. 

ASSESSMENT FOR CEMENT SIDE- 
WALKS ON MINNESO'AA POINT. 
C»fflce uf the Board of Public Works, 
City of I'uluth. Minn.. Sept. 15. 1910. 
Notice is hereby given that a contract 
has been let for the construction of 
cement sidewalks and that under said 
contract sidewalk has been built on 
Lake avenue and Minnesota avenue: 
and that" the Board of I'ubllc Works of 
said city will mtet at their office In 
the Cltv of Duluth. on Firday. the 
Thirtieth day of September, A. D. 1910. 
at ten o'clock a. m. to make an assess- 
ment of the sum of Fourteen Hundred 
Twenty-six (1426) dollars and Fifty- 
five (55) cents upon the real estate "to 
be benefited by such sidewalks, for the 
purpose of raising money to defray so 
much of the cost of such improvement 
as is assessable. 

All lands situated In said citv and to 
which benefits result from said Im- 
provement will be assessed in propor- 
tion, as near as may be, to the benefits 
resulting thereto from said improve- 
ment. All persons Interested in said 
proceeding shall have the right to be 
present and he lieard at .said time and 
place in relation to the making of said 
assessment. 

OLOF G. OLSON. 

President. 
Official: 

R. MURCHISON, 

Clerk, Board of Public Work*. 
(Sean 
1 L). H., Sept. 15, 16. 17, 1910. D155. 



iAh 



iN'oif. limber 6.50 

iVolf , brush, cased 4 . CO 

Wolf, open 3.25 

Wilf. coyote, cased 3.50 

Bear, blk., br.. grizzle. .17. 50@25 

Bear, yearlings 12.50(al5 

Bear, cubs 7.00(!ilO 

Pox. Uk. and silver gray.80(8'4J0 

Otter, dark and pale 15@20 

Hadger. civet and house cat. 
mountain lion, opossum 
ket j rices. The above 
tkins. Nos. 2. 3 and 4 in proportion. Wisconsin and 
Mississippi river heavy muskrat, 3(s;5c higher; kit*. 2c 
higlier. 



BIRD NEST IN DRAWING ROOM. 

London Daily Mail; A remarkable 
story of a blackbird's sagacity is sent 
by a correspondent from Dudbridge, 
near Stroud. A nest of birds was given 



WHY MOT ? 



Ship us a carload of grntn once In 
other fellow work harder. 



a ivhlle. Oar prlcea will make the 



E. L. WHICH COMPANY, Grain Commission Mercliants, 

DLLVTH. ST. PAl L. MINNEAPOLIS. 



A GOOD FIRM TO SHIP TO 

ATWOOD-LARSON COMPANY, Inc. 



DULrTH. 



Special attention given to cash grains. 
"VN e give all shipments our personal attention. 



MINNEAPOLIS. 



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Thursday, 



THE DULUTI^ HERALD. 



September 15, 1910. 



19 



LOST 



aNO 




AD PRIN 



IN tHE HER AliD IS 




ON A 



DARK HlgHT QUICKEST & gEST RESULTS 



hi 



HELP WANTED-MALE. 

(Continued.) 

to take advantatre of tho popular 
jaynieiit plan to buy a lot in Cham- 
Deis" First and Second division, on 
Sept. 19. It lies below the boulevard, 
betvk-een Fifth and Tenth avtsnues 
east. Only three blocks from gas. 
water and electric light, and the 
street cars assu red. 

WANTED — \ OLNQ MAN STKNOG- 
rapher, about 24 yeara; must bo 
tood RemlnKton operator, with of- 
fice experience and accurate at fls- 
urcs; good opportunity for advance- 
ment for the right man. Apply b 
letter In own handwriting to E. 
Craig, Holland hotel. 



FOR RENT— ROOMS. 

(Continued.) 



FOR RENT- 
venlences. 



-FOUR ROOMS, ALL. CON- 
424 East Seventh street. 



t 



•^0 




WANTt:i>- 


-SALESMAN AND A M.\N- 


ager for 


Duluth. Call 118 Manhattia 


building 


for Mr. Beson, not later 


than 10 


o'clock a. m. 



WANTED — M.\N TO TAKE CHARGE 
of grocery store in small town; good 
wagts; rauat give references. For 
partlculara write Box 7. Carlton, 
Minn. 

WANTED— ENERGETIC SOLICITORS 
to write the best .selling accident and 
health policy ever offered. Annual 
premium $5. If you want a proposi- 
tion that is bound to make you 
money, write for particulaid. xne 
Indemnity Life and Accident com- 
pany. Minneapolis, Minn^ 

WANTED— AT ONCE. TWENTY BOYS. 
W. M. Prindld As Co.. 3 Lonsdale 
building. 

W ANT KD— YOUNG MAN WISHING TO 
do janitor work for business train- 
ing, .^.pply Brocklehurst Busine.ss 
College, 418 West .Superior street. 
next to Spalding hotel. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping. 313 East Su- 
perior street. 

FOR RENT— FIVE NICE ROOMS. 724 
East Sixth street; newly papered and 
painted, electric lights, water, aewer; 
113 per month; water paid. F. L 
Salter. Lonsdale building. 



MONEY TO LOAi\. 



%\%%%%%n%%n^%%%%%\n%%%%%^%%%%%n%%%% 



WANTED — ENERGETIC SOLl^-lTORS 
to write the best selling accident and 
health policy ever offered; annual 
premium. |a; if you want a propo- 
sition that is bound to mako you 
mont'v. write for particulars. The 
Indemnity Life and Accident com- 
pany. Minneapolis. Minn. 

WANT ED — COMPETE5rr GIRL FOR 
geiit-ral housework; small family. 504 
East Second street. 



^\ 



CHEAP LOANS 
On Furniture, Pianos or Salary. 

You Borrow 

$10 and pay Jl^.tio in 6 payments. 

\t\i and pay $28.50 In tJ payments. 

$50 and pay fu5.80 In 6 payments. 

No Oilier Charge. 

DULUTH LOAN CO., 

Cor. Third Ave. \V. and Sup. St., 

307 Columbia Bldg. 

Old 'piiaue, Melrose 2355. 



1$ 



II 



FOR RENT— FLATS. 

(Continued.) 

FOR RENT — NEW SIX- ROOM CEN- 
trally located flat; modern conven- 
iences, on First street; no hills to 
climb; 130 per month. Wahl & Mes- 
ser, oLnsdale building. Both phoDes 
439. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT; 
water Included; gas In kitchen. 2018 
West PMfth street; $12 per month. 

FOR RENT — 704 WEST THIRD 
street; six rooms; bath, city water in- 
cluded; $25 per month. J. D. Howard 
&Co., 216 West Superi or street. 

FOR RENT— FURnTsHED FLAT FIVE 
rooms. Water, gas, electric lights. 
$17.50 per month. 720 West Fifth 
street Flat Q. Inquire. Zenith. 797Y. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 
ON PAGES 1 6 and 20 

(Continued.) 



FOR rent — SIX-ROOM FLAT WITH 
hot water heat, electric light, gas, 
separate cellar with laundry; hard- 
wood floors and finish. Inquire G. 
Krause, 619 East Fourth street. 



»^.5$$$$$««$>»«$$$«$$l$:ii«$$$$$$$$$l$$<>« 



Security Mortgage Loan Company, 
401 illibT WA'AlOiNAL BA-NK BLDG. 

We lend money to salaried people 
and otliers on furniture, piauuM, horsos. 
wagons, etc., for a long or sliurt iiiue. 
and allow liberal discounts if paid up 
belure due. 

YOU CAN GET IT TODAY. 

Security Mortgage Loan Company, 

Mulruse 4693. Zenith 612. 

401 FIRST NATIONAL BAiNK BLDG. 

k'yj>i.\. RENT — SIX- ROOM FLAT. 710Va 
East J* if th street; hot water; $30 per 
month; water and gas range. 906 
East 1? irst street. Zenith 2;;aa-A. 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FLAT, 
first floor; al.so three basement 
rooms. 22 East Fourth street. 



WANTED — GIRL 
housework. 1422 >4 



FOR GENERAL. 
East First St. 



W VNTED— MAKERS AND APPREN- 
tlces at Miss Meining's, 106 West Su- 
perior street. 

WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 1911 East Third 
street. 



WANTED — GIRL, 
nue west. 



229 FIFTH AVE- 



W ANT ED — GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework; good wages; no chil- 
dren. Apply to Mrs. O. H. Clarke. 
1420 East superior street. 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FLAT; WA- 
ter and electric light. Inquire 15 
Fourth avenue east. 



WANTED — PRESS FEKDKR. AP- 
ply at Christie Lithograph & Print- 
ing company^ 

WA.N rKD— BOY 16 OR 17 YEARS OLD. 
to work In drug store. W. A. Abbett, 
2'jri West Sui)erlor street and 932 
East Second street. 



W.\NT ED — PRESS 
rltt & Hector. 112 



FEEDER. 
West First 



MER- 
street. 



WANTED— GCOD SALESMAN; GOOD 
pay for right part/. Apply 416 Lons- 
dale building. 



WANTED — OFFICE BOY. CALL 228 
\\est St^cond street. Ideal Plumbing 
& Heating company. 228 West Sec- 
ond street. 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED TAILOR, 
232 East Superior street. Zenith 

Dye works. 



WANTED — TWENTY-FIVE MEN FOR 
railroad work at AshUuid, Wis.; $2 
per daj-. Will refund railroad fare 
to anyone staying over fifteen days. 
Apply to John Brogan, Northwestern 
ore docks. 

WANTED — A TINNER FOR INSIDE 
and <}Utslde work; steady job. A. O. 
Glese. 106 West First street. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON FLRNITURE, 
iiurses, wagons or any personal ae- 
cuMiy, at ll'e lowest rates of any 
place in llie city, our large clientage 
and tweuly-nve years' experience 
biiould bt) BUftlcieni proof mat Wo do 
Ousiness riglil. Call and see us be- 
loie Closing deal elsewiiere. Duluth 
Mortgage x^oau company, 430 Man- 
hattan buUiling. William Horkan, 
manager. Zenith, i69S-D; old, iUei- 
rose, "il'i'i. 



CilLAi' i-0.iv.\£> * 

On Furniiare, Pianos or Salary, ■jt 

$iu return ^oc a week. * 

\;i^ return i'5c a vveoK. ■}(!• 

$00 rctuin $1.-0 a week. * 

No oilier ciiarges. "ib 

Your creUii is goou uere. ?fr 

DLLL'IH x-lAANCi:: CO., «• 

aul Paliadio Biag. ■St 

Open Wed. ana bat. to & o'clock, rtb 



ye 
'iit 



FOR RENT — FIVE - ROOM FLAT; 
hardwood floors, electric light and 
gas; water paid; rent $23. 219 Sev- 
enth avenue east. Apply Corporate 
Investment company, Torrey build- 
ing. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED SALES- 
lady competent to take charge of 
millinery department; Scandinavian 
lady preferred. John J. Moe & Sons 
company. 

WANTED— GIRL TO ASSIST AT HAIR 
work; splendid chance for advance- 
ment. Apply Miss Horrigans Hair 
shop. 



PROGRESSIVE FIRMS THAT BOOST DULUTH j| 



ART GLASS AND MIRRORS. 



FURNITURE RECOVERED. 



All Jtlnds glass; lowest prices, 
main Bros., 121 First avenue 



St. Ger- 
west. 



ATTORNEYS. 



L SMITH. Attorney, has moved his 
office from 118 to 624 Manhattan. 



BUILDERS' SUPPLIES, ETC. 

THOMSON & STEWART, 226 WEST 
Michigan street, mantels. tiling, 
marble, brick, pressed and common, 
shingle stain, ready roofing, iron 
fencing, lawn furniture, etc. Phones 
667. 



FOR RENT — FOUii-ROOM MODERN 
Hat; very central. S. S. Williamson 
515 Torrey, both 'phones. 



FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM FLAT; 
modern, steam heat. In perfect con- 
dition. $40 per moutli. 518 East 
Third street, flat A. 



FOR RENT— LARGE DOWNSTAIRS 
ftve-room flat; modern except heat. 
Inquire 417 Twenty-seventh avenue 
west. 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FLAT, 
newly painted and decorated; wat^^r, 
gas, toilet, electric light; centrally 
located; $l'J.50. Harris Realty com- 
pany, Manhattan building. 



WANTED 
general 
m. 315 



—A COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
housework. Call after 6 p. 
Second avenue east. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Must be a good cook. 
Two In family. Highest wages. J. 
D Howard, 216 West Superior street. 



WANTED— TW^O COMPETENT GIHL.S 
for general housework; small family. 
Call 416 West Superior street. 



CARRIAGES, WAGONS, DRAYS. 

Farm wagons, open and top bupgles, 
Concords; all styles delivery wagons. 
Ford automobiles. International auto 
buggies, auto delivery wagons. M. 
W. TURNER, 218-220 E. First St. 



Let Forsell do your 
334 E. Superior St. 



UPHOLSTERING. 
Zenith phone 949. 



FURNITURE AND STOVES. 



All kinds at lowest prices. Shapiro, 12 
First avenue W. Zenith 'phone 1032. 



GRADING AND SODDING. 

CALlTldEI^JERr'MEir "ssITT'Sa^E^ 
sodding, grading. Trees, vines, hedges 
trimmed. Everything in gardening. 

LAWN AND GARDEN WORK BY DAY 
or contract. Mel. 4242. Zen. 1197- D. 

H. B. KEEDY. LANDSCAPE GARDEN- 
er; both phones. Black dirt and loam 
for sale. 



MASSAGE. 



DR. WESTLIND, MASSAGE, RHEU- 
matlsm, backache, liver and stomach. 
Lady a.ssistant. 30 East Superior 
street. Rooms 2 and 3. Zenith 2246-X. 

MASSAGE — WEIR MITCHELL SY8- 
tem. Ladies treated at their homes. 
Miss Small, Melrose 3214. 



MUSIC. 



If you want a high-grade delivery wag- 
on or buggy that was built especially 
for this part of the country, for least 
money, call or write for catalogue. L. 
Hammel Co., 300-308 East First St. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 



FOR i:ent- 


—1119 EAST FOURTH 


street. Six 


rooms and alcove. New 


house. Hot 


water heat. $40. N. J. 


Upiiam Co., 


18 Third avenue west. 



NOTICE TO BOUROWEKS. 
We are now making special rates on 
loans from $lo to $iOO on furniture, 
pianos, horses, wagons, etc.. ana to sal- 
aried people, iou can pay your loan on 
our easy weekly or moniuiy plan. Dis- 
count allowed on ail loans paid beiore 
Uue. Loans also maUu ou city and farm 
property. Union Loan company, aoii 
I'aiiadio Bldg. Both piiou es, i.>io. m. 

MONEY TO LOAN — AN i' AMOUNT. 
Mortgages and notes puicUased. Both 
'plioiics. VN esiern Loan company, uii 
laauhattan building. 



W.\NTED — EXPERIENCED STOCK 
and bond salesmen; reference and 
e.xperlence required. Address A. C- 
Bidwell, 72 Pine street, Buffal o. N. Y . 

WANTKD — A FE WGOOD MEN WHO 
are interested In a good money 
making proposition to call at the 
National Co., 5 South Fifth avenue 
west. Moving picture machines 
bought, sold and t.xciia.iged. Have 
a tew good ones left; will sell at just 
one-half the'r cost. 



MONEY ON HAND 'iO LOAN ON REAL 
estate. Apply N. J. Lpnam Co., Xi> 
'i'lurd avenue west. 



SITUATION V\ ANTED— MALE. 



SITUATION WANTED— YOU MAKE 
no payments when sick, no Interest 
or taxes until iyi3. if you buy a lot 
on tile easy weekly payment plan in 
Cl'.ainbers' First and Second divi- 
sion, on Sept. 19. The most ueautltul 
and accessible tract ever put on sale. 
Just below tile boulevard, between 
Fifth and Tenth avenues east. 

SITUATION WANTED — BRIGHT 
youns man with knowledge of ijook- 
keeping, wants position with reliable 
firm. Address Y 29S, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — MIDDLE- 
aged man would like position as 
watchman or some place of trust; 
sober and reljable; can furnish refer- 
ences. Addr ess B iifZ. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— PUBLIC JAN- 
itor and window washer. Prudence 
Robert, the best new window clean- 
er In the city. Zenith 'phone 2291-X. 



Money to loan — any amount. 

Minnesoia Loan company, zoo Pal- 
iadio building. 



CITY PROPERTY LOANS. 

BUY OR BUILD A HoME 

ON MONiHLi PAiMli.NrS. 

C. A. K.XMPPENBEUG. 

300 AND 301 ALWOK'i'H. 



FOR RENT — EIGHT-ROOM UE- 
tached house; Last end; modern In 
every respect. J. D. Howard di Co., 
216 vV'csl Superior street. 



FOR RENT— 16-i:OOx\l HOUSE, GEN- 
irally located; two batlirooms; $60 
per month. Wahl & Messer, Lonsdale 
building. Boiii phones 439. 



BUSINESS CILVNCES. 

EUSlNESS^'cHANCE— WE OFFER TO 
every one with limited means the 
opportunity to secure one or more of 
200 beautiful residence lots in Cham- 
bers' First and Second division, on 
the easy weekly payment plan, at the 
opening sale Sept. 19. Property lies 
below boulevard between l^ifth and 
Tenth avenues .east. Visit this addi- 
tion In advance of sale. 



BUSINESS CILVNCES- FOR SALE — 
At Virginia, Minn., for $600 a good 
clean ottice business paying $150 per 
month clear of office expense. Must 
clo .e de.ll within one week. Address 
poSLo.fice box 312, Virsi nla, Minn. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE — 
35-rooni rooming house; Superior 
street location; long lease; chance 
for party with money. Price $2,000. 
Duluth Locators, 424 Manhattan 
buildi.ng. 



CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS. 

THOMSON & STEWART, 226 WEST 
Michigan street. I'hones 657. Curbs, 
wa.ks, etc. Estimates cheerfully 
given. 



GUN AND LOCKSMITH. 




I E. 



A. ERICK5 0N, 

Expert Gun R.^palrer 

Superior St. Z'snlth phone 



MUSIC AND 




and 9 First 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 
of every descrip- 
tion. Edison pho- 
nographs, b an d 
and orchestra in- 
struments, pianos 
and organs. Ing- 
vald Westgaard, 7 

avenue west. 



510. 



SLIGHTLY USED SHOTGUNS AND 
rifles for sale or ren :. J. W. Nelson, 
5 East Sui>erlor street. Duluth. Minn. 



CORSETS MADE TO ORDER. 

SPIRELL.'V MEANS CORSET PERFEC- 
tion. 50 styles. See them. 531 E. Sup. st. 



CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER. 



Olof Pearson, contractor and 
builder; general repairing. 207 
West First St. Shop, Zenith 
12T4-X; residence. Zenith 6097. 




FOR RENT— SIX- ROOM HOUSE; MOD- 
ern, except heai; East end; vacant 
Sept. 17; $25. 213 Twelfth avenue 
east. 

FOR RENT — VERY CHEAP — HOUSE 
at Mattewa, Minn., tliirty miles from 
Duluth, tliirteen miles from Cariton, 
lot of wood on place. inquire 211 
Third avenue west. 



FOR RE.NT — AN EIGHT-ROOM 
Ut>use, newly papered and painted; 
$15; 4013 Renia streeU inquire 517 
First avenue east. 



FOR RENT — MODERN EIGHT-ROOM 
house, 223 East Third street; $45. 
A. H. Burg, 30O Alworth building. 



MONEY SUPPLIED TO SALARIED 
people, women keeping house and 
otliers, upon tlielr own names vvltn- 
oui security, easy payments. Toiiuan, 
5o9 Paliadio building, 

MONEY 'TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS, 

watches, furs, niles, etc., and ail 
goods of value, *1 to $l,oOO. Key- 
stone Loan Ac Mercantile Co., 22 West 
Superior street. 

MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
larms and timber lands. Guaranty 
Farm i^and company, 416 Lyceum. 

Money to loan — Any amount; low rates. 
Cooley & UnderhlU, 2U9 tJxchange. 



FOR RENT— SEVEN -ROOM HOUSE, 
226 Second avenue east; water, sewer, 
bath, electric lights, hardwood floors, 
etc.; $32.50 per month. F. 1. Salter 
company, Lonsdale building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — CONFECTION- 
ery store for sale; good location; 
good business. Owner leaving city. 
Easy terms; sacrificed for quick sale. 
Deppe Realty Company, 6ol Manhat- 
tan building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — SALOON Lo- 
cated in good live town, doing good 
business; best of reasons for se.iing. 
Duluth Locators, 434 Manhattan 
bu ilding. ^ 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Two-chair barber shop, money mak- 
ing stand; party retiring from occu- 
pation. Price, $200. Address Wm. 
Monahan, Hibblng, Minn. 



CARPET CLEANING. 



Int-drstate Carpet 
Slnotte & Van 
air cleaners and rug 
West Michigan street. 



Cleaning company — 

Norman, compressed 

weavers, 1928 

Both 'phones. 




cylinder 
Superior 



GRAPHOPHONES. 



COLUMBIA GRAPHO- 
phoncs. .A.sk for cata- 
logue of our new double- 
faced ricord.s for 65c; 
also our Indestructible 

records, 35c. Edmoni, 330 West 

street. 



PIANOS, PHONOGRAPHS, 

sheet music; everything in 

musical instruments. Mall 
orders promptly filled. Zen- 
ith Music company, 6 East 
Superior street. 

Musical instruments and furnishings. 
Repairing a specialty. A. Haakonsen, 
at J. W. Nelson's, 5 East Superior St. 




MOVING PICTURE OUTFITS. 



Moving picture machines, 
bought and sold. Nat. Co. 



films & slides 
, 5 S. 5th av. w. 



OPTICIANS. 



C. C. STAACKE, 106 WEST 
street. Open Wednesday 
day evenings. 



STTPERIOR 
and Satur- 



HORSE SHOEING. 

IF YOU HAVE A CRl PPLED^'hORSE 
consult us; all the latest specialties 
In horse .shoeing. IMward Schau & 
Son, 14 Third avenvie east. 



IMPROVED SHOE REPAIRING. 

MONEY^SAVlNGTriAn rSAvT^^ 

saving. While you wait. Gopher 
Shoe Works. 



CHEMIST AND ASSAYER. 



Duluth Testing Laboratory — C. A. 
Graves, Mgr. Assays, cnemical analy- 
sis, cement testing, 514 W. First St., 
Kdison building. 



FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM HOUSE, CEN- 
tral; lake view; all conveniences; 
cheap for the winter. Call at Mrs. 
Morse, 12 6 West Fourth street. 

FOR RENT— FlVE-RoOM FURNlSii- 
ed cottage, 3439 Minnesota avenue; 
gas, water, electric light. inquire 
Bloom & Co., 102 West First streji. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM DETACH- 
ed house and bath; water paid; 
Fourth avenue west; $17.50. Harris 
Realty company, Manhattan building. 

FOR RENT — EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE; 
central; hot water heat, all conven- 
iences: rent $30. Apply N. J. Upham 
company, 18 Third avenue west. 



SITUATION WANTED — WOULD LIKE 
job of taking care of furnace for 
winter. R 362, He rald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
man, e.xperienced in bookkeeping and 
stenography. Address Edward Sun- 
din, 35 South Fifty-eighth avenue 
west. 

bI.TU.VTION WANTED FOR COLLEGE 
graduate, with three years' exper- 
ience in grocery and hardware. Ad- 
dre.-*s U 361, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY FIRST- 
class baker and pastry cook; can fur- 
nish references. D 78. Herald. 

SITUATION W^ANTED— BY MARRIED 
man. position as stock man or pack- 
ing In shippintc room; e.Kperienced 
and can furnish best of references. 
Address F. T., care Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — HAVE YOU 
any carpenter work to have done by 
Job or day. Jobbing. Work done 
right by steady man. A. S. Page, 
201 Denvonshire street. Zenith 
2 302-Y. 

SITUATION WANTED — COMPETENT 
collector would like position; well 
acquainted in Duluth and Superior. R 
7i>l, H-^rald^ 

SITUATION WANTED— AS FIREMAN 
or janitor wor k. Call Melrose 2164. 

SITUATION WANTED — YOUNG MAN 
would like position as bartender. 615 
Baxter avenue, Superior. 



MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A. 
Crosby, 3yj i-'alladio building. 

LOST AND FOUND. 



FOUND— AN OPPORTUNITY TO OWN 
your own loi and then your own 
home In Chambers' First and Second 
division, below the boulevard, be- 
tween Fiftli and Tenth avenues ea.-st, 
above Tenth street. Sale of 200 lots 
on the easy weekly payment plan 
begins Sept. 19. Gas and water al- 
ready wlttiin two blocks of these lots. 
Street cars assured. Inspect these 
lots at once and be on hand. 



FOR RENT— 18 WEST THIRD STREET, 
nine-room modern house; Immediate 
possession. Little & Nolle, under 
American Exchange bank. 



KOH RENT — SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE 
with bath at 431 West Third street. 
Call at Fifth Avenue Clothing house. 



MEDICAL. 



FOUND — PURSE CONTAINING SUM 
of money. Owner can recover i[ at 
St. Louis hotel office upon payment 
of cost of this ad. 



LOST — GOLD WATCH AND CHAIN, 
Monday night, on Eighth avenue 
west and First street. Reward If re- 
turned to 632 West First street. 



LOST— ONE LADIES' PIN; ONE DIA- 
mond surrounded with pearls. Re- 
ward will be paid for Its return to 
312 Torrey building or 2017 Wood- 
land avenue. 



LOST— FRENCH POODLE. ANSW^ERS 
to name of Bond. Reward for return 
to Mr. Artisan, ilio West Michigan 
street. 



SITUATION 
and short 
Herald. 



WANTED 
■order cook. 



AS I'ASTRY 
Address U 355, 



SITUATION WA.NTED- YOUNG MAN 

would like janitor work; has good 
references. U 376, Herald. 



c 



^ 



PRIVATEJ^OSPITAL. 

RS. HANSON, GR.A.DUATE MID- 
wlfe; female complaints. 413 Seventh 
avenue east. Zenith 1225. 



MRS. ANNA RONGB 
midwife. 201S West 
Zenith phone 1894-D. 



— GRADUATE 

Superior street. 



Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife. Pri- 
vate hospital, 329 N 58 Av. W. Zen. 
3173. 



LOST — AN OPPORTUNITY THAT 
will not present itself again if yoi* 
miss taking advantage of the great 
lot sale In Chambers First and Sec- 
ond division on Sept. 19, beginning 
at Eleventh street between Flftli and 
Tenth avenues east, on the easy 
weekly payment plan. No Interest; 
no taxes until 1913. Visit the prop- 
erty in advance of sale. 



LOST — PAIR GLASSES BETW^EEN 
Jefferson school and Thirteenth ave- 
nue eusi; iintl<*r return same to 1306 

East Sacond street. 

LOST— UM BRE LLA WITH INITIALS 
K. W. B., engraved on handle, lib- 
eral reward If returned to 620^4 East 
Fifth street. Call mornings. 

LOST — REDDISH BROWN COW WITH 
white head. Finder please notify 
Mrs. S. H. Irvine, Pine Grove, for re- 
ward. R. F. D. No. 1. 



LADIES — $1,000 REWARD! I Posi- 
tively guarantee my great successful 

"Monthly" remedy. Safely relieves 
some of the longest, most obstinate, 
abnormal cases in three to five days. 
No harm, pain or interference with 
work. Mail, $1.50. Double strength, 
$2. Dr. L. M. Southlngton & Co., 
Kansas City, Mo. 



FOR SAL.E — CONFECTIONERY AND 
grocery store; $300 will handle it. 
Call at 725 West S uperior street. 

BUSIxVESS CHANCES— THREE-CHAIR 
barber shop for sale, price $176; 
terms, $100 down, balance $10 per 
montli. Deppe Realty company, ool 
Manhattan building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — RESTAURANT 
for sale, doing big business; very 
centrally located; bargain price, $37o. 
This Is a snap. Deppe Realty com- 
pany. 501 Manhattan building. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Duluth Engineering Co., W. B. Patton, 
Mgr., 613 Paliadio Bldg. Specifications 
r repared and construction superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage, etc. 



DENTIST. 



KEY, LOCK AND SAFE WORKS. 



OPTOMETRIST AND OPTICIAN. 

Ar"Lr"NORBERQr'2n^^^ 
jierlor street, over Oak Hall. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 



GUST LANDIN, 
ing; amateur 



PRINTING, DEVELOP- 
suppHes, 24 21st Av. W. 



ROOFING, CORNICE, SKYLIGHTS. 



Duluth Gun Shop, Saul San- 
ders, 203 \k'. 1st St. Phones, 
Old. Mel. 31»69; New 2288-A. 



NORTHERN Hardwar*; company repair 
shop. Key and look work. Lawn 
mowers sharpened right. 222 West 
Superior street. Either "phone, 67. 



BURRELL & HARMON, 308 E. Sup. 
Both 'phones. First-class work. 



St- 



RIFLES AND GUNS. 



KODAKS AND CAMERAS. 



Eclipse View Co., Inc., 30 4th Ave. 
Develop and finish far amateurs. 



W. 



Dr. W. H. Olson, 222 New Jersey Bldg. 
All work guaranteed. Both phones. 



EXPERT ELECTRIC REPAIRING. 



BUSINESS CHANGES— AN IRON MIN- 
Ing company operating on Mesaba 
range wants an agent to sell its 
stock. Good commission and salary 
to right party. Applicant must fur- 
nish references L 6y, care 



Herald. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — GROCER Y 
stock for sale; goxxi location; doing 
good business; price, »1,500; terms. 
Deppe Realty cmpany, 601 Manhattan 
building. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE: 
Three-year lease and furniture of a 
most desirably located rooming house 
of twelve rooms, bath and steam heat; 
well equipped tor the winter; central- 
ly located, and occupies one of the 
most prominent locations in this city, 
and will prove a money maker; rents 
for $60 per month, cash $775; on time 
$S50. Deal direct with owner; for 
particulars, call at 229 Fourth avenue 
west. 



RENT— STORES, OFFICES, ETC. 

FOR RENT— W^B HAVE TWO OR 
three very desirable stores for rent 
In central location. Apply N. J. Up- 
ham company. 18 Third avenue west. 

FOR RENT — OFFICES OVER THE 
Big Duluth. Inquire at the Big Du- 
luth^ 

FOR RENT— LOFT; VERY DESIRA- 
ble, on Michigan street; suitable for 
light manufacturing; steam heat; el- 
evator service; cheap rent to right 
party. Charles P. Craig & Co., 501- 
2-3-4-5 Sellwood building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — CENTRALLY 
located rooming house for sale; very 
easy terms; $150 down, balance $15 
per month. Deppe Realty company, 
501 Manhattan building. 



FOR RENT — LARGE, CLEAN BASE- 
ment; steam heated; modern. Krled- 
ler block. 



BUSINESS CHANCES— CONFECTION- 
ery store, located In one of the best 
towns on the range; terms, if de- 
sired. Duluth Locators, 424 Man- 
hattan building. 



MOTORS, ETC. THOS. 
207 West First street. 



H. WRIGHT, 
Melrose 2522. 



FLORIST. 



J. J. Le Borlus, florist, 921 E. 3rd St. 

floral, funeral designs, cut flowers. 



FURNITURE AND PIANOS. 



Polished and repaired. Theo. Thomp- 
son, 336 E. Sup. St. Old 'phone 2828-L. 



LIFE INSURANCE. 



•DO IT FOR DULUTH" BY PURCHAS- 
Ing life insurance in Northwestern 
National, which Invests in Duluth 
gilt-edge city mortgages. George M. 
Marnle, general agent, 18 3rd Ave. W. 



LAUNDRY. 



Model Laundry, i: 
the Mork. " Old 



16 E 
274J- 



Ist 
L. 



St. "We do 
New, 1302. 



MACHINE WORK REPAIRING. 



MACHINE WORK itl-JPAlRING OF 
all kinds. Zenitli Machine Works, 207 
West First street. Old, 2522; new, 
2288-X. 






Grinding and Repairing a 

~ — iSpeclalty. Cltv Gun Store. 
R. C. KRUSCHKE. 
402 West Sujierior Street. 



SHOE REPAIRING. 



HAVE YOUR SHOES REPAIRED 
right at the Champion Shoe Works, 
14 Fifth Ave. W., In Lycetim Bldg. 

SALES AND BOARDING STABLES. 

ZENITH^ SALES^^&'^^OAIU)^^ 

bles; the Racine SatLley company's 
high grade wagons, trucks ana car- 
riages; horses bought, sold and ex- 
changed. Moses Goldberg, proprie- 
tor, 326 West First street. Both 
'phones 553. 



TOWING LINE. 



MANTLES, TILING, MARBLE. 

Superior street. Both 'phones, 656. 
Designs and estima.es furnished. 




JEFFERY BROS. 

Office foot 

Garfield 
Ave. Old 
'phone, 
Melrose 
Zenith 'phone 169. 



TURKISH BATH PARLORS. 



KASMIR'S TURKISH BATHS OPEN 
day and night. Baths under Mcjxay 
hotel. Fifth avenue west. 



PERSONAL. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — MOVING PIC- 
tutre machines; complete outfit; good 
as new. cheap; with fllinn and song 
sets; also big concert phonograph. 
National Employment Co., No. 5 South 
Fifth avenue west. 



WANTED TO BUY. 

"W E ^BtTY^SECOND^^LAND^^UR^^ 
and stoves. 1629 West Superior street, 
cnlth 18»8-D. 



WANTED TO BUY — CAR LOAD OF 
potatoes; state price f. o. b. track. 
Address H. Fitch, Tappon, N. D. 



FOR RENT — STORE; SUITABLE FOR 
grocery or other such business; good 
location; cheap rent to right party. 
Charles l\ Craig & Co., 501-2-3-4-5 
Sellwood building. 



TIMBER LANDS. 

FOR SALE — 170 XcRES TIMBER, 
northern part Itasca county. For 
description, estimate and price, ad- 
dress George McGaughey, Ortonville, 
Minn. 



Mrs. A. Ferguson, graduate, midwife; 
private hospital, 2201 W. Fourth St. 
Zen. 2014-X. 

PRIV.A.TE MATERNITY HOME FOR 
ladies before and during confinement 
Mrs Mary Barrell, nurse, 931 London 
road. Zenith 1597. 



TIMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby, 305 Paliadio building. 

FOR SALE— TWO SECTIONS TI MBER 
land, new sawmill, good bulldlnprs; at 
$10 per acre, or will trade for farm- 
ing land In Minnesota or North ua.- 
kota. J 3 20, Herald. 

TIMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bought and sold. McLeod-Davis Tim- 
ber Co.. 515 Lyceum building, i>uluth. 



FOR RENT — CHRISTIE BUILDING, 
one room 25 by 75 for light manu- 
facturing. Apply Christie Lltho & 
Printing company. 



FOR RENT — LARGE MODERN BARN; 
concrete floor, electric light, gas; 
room for man, etc.; on Fourth alley 
between Third and Fourth avenues 
west; $17.50 per month. Richardson, 
Dav & Harrison. 



AUTOS, LAUNCHES AND BOATS. 

FOR SALE — ONE 16 AND ONE 22-FT. 
launch; will sell cheap. If taken at 
once. H. S. Paterson, foot Sixth 
avenue west. 



WANIED TO BUY — SOME GREEN 
th/me, small quantity, this year's 
crop. Write T. C. Blackman, Vir- 
ginia, Minn 



WANTED TO BUY — 5, 10 OR 20 ACRES 
of land near Duluth; improved or 
stump, with buildings preferred. B 
387, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY— HIGHEST PRICE 
paid for cast-off men's clothing. 
Stone, 213 West First street. Zenith 
1134-D; Melrose 1834. 

auto and car- 
St. Zen. 2013-D. 



PERSONAL — MEET ME EARLY^ SEPT. 
itf at the easy weekly payment plan 
lot sale of Chambers First and Sec- 
ond division. In the heart of the 
i-esidence section of Duluth, below 
the boulevard, between Fifth and 
Tenth avenues east. 

PERSONAL — 25c BIRTHDAY BOOK.S, 
only 10c, at the Penny Arcade. Mall 
i)rder3 promptly filled. Send birth 
date. Address Agnes Bacon. Penny 
Arcade, Duluth. Minn. 

pilRSONAL — COMBINGS MADE INTO 
iiwitches, t1.50; Marinelio parlors, 20 
West Superior street. 



COLORADO-FARM LANDS-MINN. ! FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE. 



PERSONAL — WANTED BABY TO 
looard; good home. Herald, N 304. 

YEARS 
board, 
E 337, 



PERSONAL— YOUNG GIRL, 13 
old, would like place to 
where she can attend school. 
Herald. 



LADIES — ASK YOUR DRUGGIST FOR 
Chlchesters Pills, the Diamond Brand. 
For 25 years known as best, safest, 
always reliable. Take no other. 
Chlchesters Diamond Brand Pills are 
sold by druggists everywhere. 



PERSONAL— PIANOFORTE TEACH- 
er has vacancy for beginners at own 
home, lessons 50c. Herald. B. 297. 



PERSONALS — NOTICE TO ANYONE 
who has lost their hair! I guarantee 
to grow a head of hair or no pay. 
Inquire Mme. Anna, 18 Third avenue 
west. 



PERSONAL— EUROPEAN PIANO STU- 
dio, latest method. 3 Mesaba Place, 
corner Fourth street and Fifth ave- 
nue west. 



WANTED — Old clothes, 
rlage tires. 328 E. Sup. 



WANTED TO BUY — A LARGE OR 
small tract of land for Investment. 
1 69, Herald. 



I buy standing timber, also cut-over 
lands. Geo. Rupley, 615 Lyceum bldg. 



FOR SALE— AUTOMOBILE, CHEAP; A 
4-cyllnder, S-passenger, detachable 
tonneau touring car. with top, glass, 
wind shield, tire irons and Jone.^ 
speedometer; car has just been over- 
hauled and painted at the factory; a 
bargain. Ross Motor Car company, 
1805-1807 Winter street, Superior. 
Wis. 

AUTOMOBILE OWNERS — IF YOU 
want to save some money on new 
tires and tubes ordered for Cosford 
garage, call on George H. Ebert, 
trustee, 315 Torrey building. Tele- ! Guaranteed 
phones: Melrose 3838; Zenith 1234. cleaned. 



BOARD OFFERED. 

WELL P'URNISHED STE.VM HEATED 
rooms, good board 301 E. Third st. 



BOARD OFFERED — FIRST CLASS 
board and large furnished rooms at 
101 Park Terrace. 



PERSONAL — MME. MAY FRENCH, 
female regulator, best of all. Mailed 
In plain wrapper, $2 a box. Orpheum 
pharmacy, 2i»l East Superior street. 



i^ "^ ' 

^ BACK TO THE LAND. *] 

^THE BE.ST INSUR.ANCE FOR THE*! 
Tt INVESTOR. FARMER, LABORING- ^ 
a. MAN. « 

# Why not Invest in a piece of land * 
ji- from' which you can always be ^ 

# sure of an Income, a comfortable # 
^ living, or a home? Bankers con- •*• 

# slder land gilt-edged security, and # 
•Jg. no man or woina i ever bought # 
yi- good acreage and failed to make # 
■*■ money. It is safe, sure, certain. i(- 

# Buy NOW— Don't WAIT. * 

# A few dollars w 11 start you as * 
if- a land owner — we make terms to ^ 
i^ suit. W"e have all kinds of good H- 

# land and have it for sale any- ■* 
^ where on the continent. Call, # 
^ write or plione for details and ^ 
■if maps to * 

# McCARTHY'-BRADLEY CO., # 
j^ • Farm Lands, # 
i^ 104 Board of 1 rade Bldg., * 

# Phones 2377. Duluth, Minn. * 



'OR SALE— 200 BEAUTIFUL LOTS 
will go on sale Sept. 19 in Chambers' 
First and Second division, on the 
weekly easy payment plan. Become 
independent of your landlord and 
own your own home, but you must 
own your lot first. Also buy a lot 
for the children. Visit this addition 
at once and become acquainted with 
its desirability. Location below the 
boulevard, between Fifth and Tenth 
avenues east. Water and gas on 
property; street cars assured. 



PERSONAL — COMBINGS AND CUT 
hair made into beautiful switches. 
Knauf Sisters. 



PJ:RS0NAL — Private home for ladles 
before and during confinement; ex- 
pert care; everything confidential; 
Infants cared for. Ida Pearson, M. D., 
284 Harrison avenue, St, Paul, Minn. 



"VSrlnger 

cantile 



repairing. 
Co., 1627 W 



Interstate Mer- 
Sup. St. Zen. 787. 



PERSONAL— DON'T FORGET. JIMMIE 
Morgan, best electric rug cleaner In 
cltv. Call Zenith 650. Old 595. 



FOR SALE— 30,000 ACRES CHOICE 
cutover lands, on line of the Alger- 
Smith railroad, at low price and on 
easy terms to se: tiers. Alexander 
McBean, sales manager, D. & N. M. 
Land company, 406 Columbia build- 
ing. Duluth. ^^^ 

FOR SALE— 10,000 ACRES IN 40 AND 
80-acre tracts, close to Hlbbing and 
Chisholm; good mirkets; forty an- 
nual payments of $16 each on 40 
acres, or $32 each on 80 acres, pays 
both principal ar.d Interest. For 
further information apply Guaranty 
Farm Land compiiny, 416 Lyceum 
building, Duluth, ilinn. 

FOR SALE — LAJfDS IN SMALL 
tracts to actual sstlers only; good 
location for dairying and truck gar- 
dening. For further information call 
on or address Lt.iid commissioner, 
Duluth & Iron Rar ge Railroad com- 
pany, 612 Wolvin building, Duluth, 
Minn. 



FOR SALE— SEE US AT ONCE ABOUT 
building! If you own a lot In Duluth 
we will furnish all the money nec- 
essary to build your home, which you 
can repay In monthly Installments 
with 6 per cent interest. No bonus 
or commission for making loan. 
Built by union labor by the day for 
Duluth climate. All our houses are 
finished in polished hard wood with 
polished hardwood floors. We defy 
competition in price, workmanship 
and material. Established 1886. See 
us at once. Open evenings by ap- 
pointment. The Edmund G. Walton 
Agency, 312 Exchange building. 



FOR SALE — DESIRABLE CORNER 
lot in Duluth Heights, near car line; 
$125 if taken at once; $50 cash, bal- 
ance easy payments. B 330. Herald. 



FOR SALE— LOT 50 BY 140 FEET ON 
Second street. In heart of city. For 
particulars address "Owner," Herald. 

FOR SALE— LOT, CENTER OF SEC- 
ond street; 50x140 feet; deal direc.t 
with owner. B 333, Herald 

FOR SALE— AT A BARGAIN, A LOT 

25 by 140 feet, on upper side of Su- 
perior street, between Twenty-third 
and Twenty-fourth avenues west. 
Whitney Wall, ToVrey building. 



DYE WORKS. 



BO.VRD OFFERED — COUPLE OF 
young ladles can have board and 
room or man and wife; all conveni- 
ences. In private family. Mrs. L. 
Strum, 523 West Fourth street. 



WATCHES REPAIRED. 



Main Springs, $1.09; watch 
$1. Qarun Bros,. 213 W. 1st. 



CLOTHES CLEANED^^RESSED. 

W. LIPSHIN. CLOTHES CLE.\NED 
and repaired. Alteration done for 
ladies or gentlemen. 12 East Fourth 
street. Telephone, 1657-X new. 



Salts pressed, 50c: pants, 15c. Ladies 
skirts cleaned and pressed. 50c Zen. 
1852-X. J. Oreckovsky, 10 4th av. W. 



JOHN MUELLER, 20S WEST FIRSl 
Street. ... 



ZENITH CITY DYE WORKS — LARG- 
est and most reliable. All work 
done in Duluth. Work called for and 
delivered. 'Phones Old 1154-R; new 
1888. 232 East Sui)erior street. 



FOR S.aLE — OR EXCHANGE FOR 
Duluth real estate; 480 acres choice 
land; clear; all In one body, in cen- 
tral Wisconsin. R303 Herald. 



FOR SALE— EAST END LOTS; BY 
owner: two lots on Second street 
and TCwenty-fifth avenue east, 
•phones 376. G. S- Richards, 
Fifth avenue west. 



Both 
South 



FOR SALE — BEAUTIFUL LEVEL 
high and dry lot, 50 by 140 feet; 
splendid lake view location. Hunter's 
Park, very easy terms. D 80, Her- 
ald. 



f* -»is^' 



i, csi. 



1 



.U.. 



Duluth Dye Works— French dry clean- 
ing; fancy ryeing. Old phone, Mel- 
rose 4191; new 1191-A. 330 E. Sup. St. 



NATIONAL DYEING & CLEANING 
company, 15 Late avenue north. 
French dry cleaning and fancy dyers. 



> 



Both 'phones 2376. 



Northwestern Dyeing: & Cleaning Co.— 
Oldest reliable dyers and French dry 
Cleaners In Northwest. 23 Lake Ave. 
north. Phone*; Kew 1516; old 1337. 



FOR SALE— THREE AWFULLY GOOD 
lots; sell separately; easy terms; 
Close In; from $315 to $500 — V* cash. 
Smith Realty, 524 Manhattan Bldg. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 

REMOVNElTpROMimrYr^ZEM^ 
X. 807 Sixth avenue east. 



REMOVED ON 
BarretU 1122 



SHORT NOTICE— DICK 
£. 4th St. Zeo. 194&-T. 



•^•mrmmr^"-*^ 




\ 


i 

t 

» 




i 


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■ 


A 














=3=;^ 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 15, 1910. 




One Cent a Word lilach Insertion. 
No Advertlsiuiient l-css Tlmu 15 Cents. 

One CVnt n Word Each Insertion. 
No All vert L-enient Less Than 15 Cents. 



TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

— OF- 

BUSINESS 
HOUSES 

Below you will find a 
condensed list of reliable 
business firms. This is de- 
signed for the convenience 
of busy people. A tele- 
phone order to any ore of 
tiiem will receive the same 
careful attention as would 
be given an ord»r placed In 
person. You can safely de- 
pend upon the reliability 
of any one of these firms. 
Old New 

'Phone. 'Phone. 




MEAT MARKETS — 

Mork Pros 

GROCEKS — 

Thatcher & Thatcher. 

liAlNORiCS — 



.1590 



1&9 
1907 



Peerless Laundry .... 428 

Tale Laundry 479 

Lutes Laundry 447 

Trov Laundry 257 

Home Laundry Co.... 941 


428 
479 
447 
257 
1128 


DRKiiGISTS — 

Eddie JeroPimus 1243 

Bovce 1G3 

Smith & Snjlth 2bO 


1027 

163 

7 


ARCHITKCTS — 

Frank L. Young & Co. 4476 




MILLI.\fc:itV— 

M. A. Cox 4576 




TEXTS A>1> AWM.NGS — 

Polrler & Co 


735 



DYK WORKS 

Zenith Ci*y Dye wrorkS.lSSS 1S88 

Northwestern Dyeing 

& Cleaning Co 1337 1516 

Naiiural l>yeing & 

Ciean'ng Co 2376 237^ 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANCE, AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 



John A. Stepbenson, Wolvin building. 
K. r>. Field Co., -03 K.xclian^e building. 
L. A. Larsen Co., I'lovideiice building. 
H. J. Mullin. 4U3 Lonsdale building. 



* ESTIMATES FKEE 76^ 

* UN FANCY HAND-CARVED AND * 

* INLAID FUKNlTLiii::. H 

It* i^ 

•» A. RONNING, * 

* * 
•fr 116 Twenty-seventh Avenue W. ■* 

* a 

FOR SALE — 200 LOTS WILL GO ON 
sale on the easy weekly payment 
plan in Chambers' First and Second 
division, on Sept. 19. Every Jot be- 
low tile boulevard, between Fifth 
and Tenth avenues east. Street cars 
assured. Visit ilie addition now and 
see the property.' only a few min- 
utes' walk up beveniu avenue east. 

FOR BALE — NEW AND SECON'D- 
nand engines, boilers, portatJie saw- 
mills, planers, inaluhers, resaws, pul- 
leys, sliaiiing, hangers and boxes. 
■Piione tol. 

DULUTH ^LACHINERY CO. 

FOR SALE— .MACHINERY. PULLEYS, 
largest slock, wood split and steel 
Bplit, shafting, hangers, belting, wood 
and iron working machinery. North- 
ern Machinery company, Minneapolis. 

FOR SALE — SECONL>-KAND OAK 
doors and finish. N. J. Upham com- 
pany. IS Third avenue west. 

FOR SALE — STEEL RANGE, HEATER 
and sewing machine. 113 West 
Fifth street. 

FOR SALE — A FEW PIECES OF 
high class furniture, cut glass, 
china, oriental rugs, oil paintings 
and graphapiione with 150 choice rec- 
ords at a bargain. 915 East Fourti: 
street. 

10c A DAY WILL BUY THE WORLDS 
famous White. Machines for rent. 
Needles ai;d supplies for all machines. 
While Sewing Maciilnu company, 
next 10 luc store. 



One Cent a Word Fach Insertion. 
No Advertiijemcnt Less Than 15 Cents. 

^TiLF\\lSTED^3i5ALir^ 

* * 

* * 

Ttr- WANTED. * 

if- ■* 

7^ COMPETENT INSTRUCTOR FOR * 

i(. CLASS IN FANCY NEEDLE- *^ 

* WORK. * 

'^ t 

ii. D 66, HERALD. * 

WANTED — STENOGRAPHERS AND 
clerks not to overlook the best op- 
portunity ever presented to own a 
lot on the easy weekly payment plan. 
In Chambers' First and Second divi- 
sion, below the boulevard, between 
Fifth and Tenth avenues east. Only 
a few minutes' walk from the center 
of the citv. Gas, water and electric 
light within three blocks of the 
farthest lot; street cars assured. Sale 
Sept. 19; visit the properly in ad- 
vance. 



WANTED — GIRLS AT MRS. SOM- 
mers' employment office, 15 Second 
avenue east. 

v.- ANTED — GIRLS AT NEW WEST 
End Employment office. 2824 West 
Th t r d street. Zenith 2080-A. 

LADIES — WE ARE PLACING ON 

sale factory sample line of jewelry 
consisting of neck chains, lockets, 
braclets, etc., full line of holiday 
goods, cut glass and ladies' hand 
bags — 25 hand bags, while they last, 
at |1. Keystone Loan company, 22 
West Superior street. 

WANTED — GIRL TO DO HOUSE- 
work. ISll East Sixth street. 

WANTED — A GOOD GIRL FoR GEN- 
eral housework. 1423 East Third 
street. 

WANTED — DINING ROOM GIRL. 
Uiiiuha restaurant, o;:3 West Superior 
street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
liousework. 716 North Flfty-ftftli 
avenue west. 

WANTED — A COMPETENT NURSE 
with references to lake entire charge 
of young baby, at 3ol East Fourtii 

stnret. 

WA.NTED— GOOD GIRL FOR GENER- 
al housework; good wages. 409 South 
Twenty-first avenue east. 

WANTED — SKIRT FITTER. LA 
Fertes, 205 West Superior street. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework; hree In family. 1508 Vi 
East Fourth street. 

> . A .N IK L>— COMPETENT GIRL FOP. 
general housework. Mrs. W. J. Mc- 
Cabo. 2240 Woodland avenue. 



WANTED AT 
kitchen girl 
East Fourth 



ONCE — COMPETENT 
for private family, 301 
street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework, one who can go liome 
nights; two in family; no children. 
Flat 4, U. S. block, between Eisrh- 
teenth and Nineteenth avenues west 



iOit S.\LE — TWO 
Roats with harness, 
perior street. 



AUSTRALIAN 
4fc31 East Su- 



FOR SA-LE CHEAP — IMPERIAL UNl- 
versal heater; used only a few 
moniiis. Call evenings. No. 216 West 
Fifth street. 



FOR SALE— NO. 922 OHIO RANGE, 
3- burner gas plate, oak sideboard. 
Iil9 East l'"ourth street. 



W' .ANTED — STENOGRAPHER WITH 
some knowledge of bookkeeping; 
state experience and salary expected. 
D, 76. Herald. 

WANTED— EVERY SERVANT GIItL IN 
Duluth and vicinity should Investi- 
gate the lot sale on the easy weekly 
payn^ent plan of Chambers' First and 
Second division, on Sept. 19. Visit 
the property in advance and see it 
for yourself. It all lies below the 
boulevard, between Fifth avenue east 
and Tenth avenue east, above Tenlli 
street. Watch daily announce- 

ments. 

WANTED — MRS. LEE FARMER 
wislies a girl for general housework 
who is a competent cook. l&3;i East 
First street. 



One Cent a Word Elach Insertion. 

So Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 
^ • 

HELP WANTED— MALE. 

it- W^ANTED. *- 

■^ Experienced window trimmer; if 
■^ good wages to competent man. 
~J^ Inquire 
it- # 

# THE GLOBE COMPANY, # 
*• 105-107 West Superior Street. ■96- 

* * 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. i ^ ' 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. No 



WANTED— ALL CLASSES OF WORK- 
Ing people to deposit their money on 
the weekly payment plan by the pur- 
chase of a lot in Chambers First and 
Second division, which will be put 
on sale Sept. 19. All lots below the 
boulevard, between Fifth avenue and 
Tenth avenue east. Torrens title; no 
mortgage; no notes to sign; no taxes 
to pay until 1913; no payments when 
sick; no Interest. 



■X' WANED AT ONCE. * 

* 60 STATION MEN. * 

* New railroad contract In Michi- •j^ 
■J& gan. Good prices for earth and t^ 
■^ rock. Free fare; ship daily. C. & # 

* N. W. rallwav. * 
4 NATIO.N'AL EMPLOYMENT CO., * 
■j^- 5 South Fifth Avenue West. # 

* * 

WANTED — ABLF. BODIED MEN FOR 
the U. S. Marine Corps, between the 
ages of 19 and 35; mu.st be native 
born or have first papers; monthly 
pay $15 to $69, additional compensa- 
tion possible; food, clothing, quar- 
ters and medical attendance free; 
thirty years' service can retire witli 
75 per cent of pay and allowances; 
service on board ship and ashore In 
ail parts of the world. Apply at U. 
S. Marine Corps Recruiting Office, 405 
Superior str eet, Duluth, Minn. 

WANTED — 500 MEN TO SEE OUR UN- 
redeemed pledges, 25 shot guns, 50 
rifles, 50 revolvers, 200 overcoats, 25 
fur coats, 200 men's and ladies' 
watches, 200 solid gold rings, 25 vio- 
lins, 15 mandolins, all at great reduc- 
tions. Keystone Loan Co., 22 West 
Superior street. 

WANTED — Men to learn barber trade; 
free Cat.; como now; good opportunity 
Moler Bar. Col., 2 7 Nic, Minneapolis. 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED CLOTH- 
Ing salesman at Fifth Avenue Cloth- 
ing store. 



WANTED— CONTRACTOR TO CLEAR 
land of stumps with dynamite. Call 
at 416 Lyceum. 



W^ANTED — BOY, ABOUT 18 Y'EARS 
old, for office work. Apply In own 
hand writing and give age. B, 301 
Herald. 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED CDOTH- 
Ing and furnishing salesman; must 
be card writer and able to assist 
In window trimming; don't apply 
unless of good character and 
capable of handling high-class trade. 
S. L. Phillips. Houghton , Mich. 

WANTED— ELEVATOR BOY OVER 17 
years. Apply 611 Providence build- 
ing. 

WANTED— WORKING MEN NOT TO 
overlook the best opportunity ever 
presented to own a home of their 
own by purchasing a lot in Cham- 
bers' First and Second division at 
the opening sale, Sept. 19. Only a 
few minutes walk from center of 
city. All lies below boulevard, be- 
tween Fifth and Tenth avenues east. 
Street cars will reach there in a 
few months; gas, water and electric 
lights within t hree blocks now. 

WANTED— OFFICE BOY; MUST BE 
eighth grade graduate. Apply Mar- 
shall-Wells Hardware company. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

SITUATION WANTED— FEMALE. 

SITUATION WANTED — MEN'S UN- 
derwear and curtains to do. 106 
West Second street. 



SITUATION WANTED— IRONING TO 
do at liome; fl.-.e waists and dresses 
to do es pecially. R 375, Herald. 

SITUATDN WANTED— YOUNG LADY 
wlsiie; position sieging in a moving 
picture thea-er. Call 432 new phone. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY 8TENOG- 
raplier, also some expeiience In book- 
keeping and otiice work, desires po- 
sition; left last position of own ac- 
cord. Address B 3s4, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— POSITION BY 
Oct. 1 as housekeeper in hotel or pri- 
vate home; experienced in botli; best 
of references. Address M. K. F., care 
Duluth Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
colored girl 15 years old, as nurse 
or light housework. 116 West Second 
street. 



SITUATIOI. W A N T 
and Ironing to do 
165y-D. 



ED — WASHING 
at home. Piione 



SITUATION WANTED— POSITION AS 
housekeeper by Jieandinavian woman 
Willi child; wages reasonable. Her- 
ald, J. 319. 



SITUATION WANTED — POSITION AS 
housekeeper; widowers, bachelors' 
home or small hotel; experienced in 
bolh. References. M. K. X., Herald. 

SITUATION Vv' ANTED — IN STORE OR 
oflice; by young lady with some ex- 
perience. U 254, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — AS STENOG- 
rapher; Just left school; not particu- 
lar about salary for the ijeginniug. 
U 368, Herald. 

SI T UATION WANTED *— BY YOUNG 

iady in doctor's or dentist's office, or 
general office work; can operate 
typewriter, also private teleplione 
swltciiboard. Telephone, Melrose 
4193. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
lady high school graduate, desires 
position in doctor's or dentist of- 
fice. D 7 7, Herald. 

BY EX- 

store or 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 



FUK KENT— FLATS. 



FOR RENT— FLATS. IF YOU TAKE 
advantage of the lot sale in Cnam- 
beis I'll St and Second division on 
Sept. 19, you will be able to erect 
some tiats and rent them to good 
tenants. Tliese are beautiful lots, 
very accessible, lie between the 
bouKjvard, lieiween Fiftji and Tentn 
avenues cast, and can be bought 011 
the easy weekly payment plan, Willi 
no inteiesi or taxes until 1913. 



FOR I;ENT— NICE FlVE-ROOM FLAT 
will) all conveniences, very central; 
lent izi) per iiioiun. Apply N. J. 
Upliam company, 18 Thud avenue 
west- 



FOR RENT — SI'X-ROOM FLAT. 1031 
East iJiitii street, nardwood floors, 
hot water iieai, gas range; rem 
very reasonable. N. J. Upham com- 
pany, 18 liilrd avenue west. 



FOR RENT — MODERN FIVE-ROOM 
fiat, West end. New phone 752; uld 
'phone iua2, Melrose. Call 230b West 
a irst. street. 



FOR KENT— HEATED FLAT IN EAST 
end; Uue location; Hal in good conui- 
lion. Apply N. J. Upnaiu company, 
18 Tnird avenue west. 



SITUATION 
perienced 
office. K 



WANTED — 
lady cashier, in 
556, Herald. 



WANTED — FIRST-CLASS WOM.AN 
cook to cook for ten men; no objec- 
tion to one or two children. Address 
J 324, Herald. 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general husework. 124 North Fifly- 
si.xth avenue west. 



WANTED — SALESLADY, ALSO ^ap- 
prentices to learn the millinery trade. 
Mrs. Melville, IIS West Fourth street. 



WA.NTED — A NURSE GIRL; GOOD 
wages. 1610 London road. 



WANTEE— SECOND GIRL. APPLY AT 
13'J6 East Second street. 



WANTED — GIPL FOR GENERAL 
ho\:sework' good wages. Call 2401. 
East Third street. 



WA.NTED — LADIES' CLOTHES IRON- 
er. Model laundry, 126 East First 
street. 



WANTED — AT ONCE — COMPET^WT 
girl for general housework. 2615 East 
Third street. 'Plione, Melrose x<^o,i. 



FOR S-ALE — BASE BURNER COAL 
heater. 131 West Fourth street. 

FOR SALE — ONE SMALL HORSE 
and buggy, cheap, if taken at once. 
Also some Dufforpliington chickens. 
6432 Grand avenue. 

FOR SALE— Ci^IEAP; OWNER LEAV- 
ing city; oak and black walnut bed- 
room suites; oak book case; lady's 
fur coat and cloth coat, etc. 314 
Ninth avenue east. 



WANTED— .\ DININo, ROOM GIRL, 
Oliio Cafe, 617 West Superior street. 

WANTED — COMPETENT GiRL 1 OR 
general housework; must be good 
cook; no washing; best wages. Old 
'phone, Melrose, 1001. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; plain cooking- easy 
work. Call between 6 and ^ p. m. 
1710 Jefferson street, east. 



FOR SALE — LARGE OFFICE SAFE, 
practically new. Call 503 Sellwood 
building, or 'phone 408. 

FOR SALE — W.ALNUT SIDEBOARD 
and several other articles for rea- 
bonablc price If taken at once. .Vpply 
14ti2 East Fourth street. 

FOR SALE— ENGLISH SETTER DOGS, 
(registered). 7 months old; also one 
trained dog,' 3 years old. See Gustave 
Olson, 362a Coates street, Duluth, 
Minn., after 5 p. m. Zenith 'phone, 
1983-A. 



FOR SALE— CHEAP; SIX-LID JEW- 
ell range and sanitary couch. 213 
We.«t Fifth street. 

FOR S-\LE — ONE VICTOR GRAPHO- 
phone and thirty records, as good as 
new; also cabinet; will sell cheap. 
Inquire at 4128 West Fifth street. 

FOR SALE — NEW SET OF W^M. A. 
Wise & Co. "Real American In Ro- 
mance; " reasonable. 1214 East Third 
street. 

FOR SALE— ALMOST NEW HOUSE- 
hold furniture. 1214 East Third 
street. 



FOR SALE— 110 FOLDING PORTABLE 
chairs: veneered scat turned; rounds 
In back extra strong; good as new; 
sell clieap National Employment Co., 
5 boutli FiflJi avenue west. 



FOR SALE — REMINGTO.N TYIE- 
writer; good as new; a bargain. Room 
16. Plioenlx block. 



FOR SALE— A FEW PIECES OF HIGH 
Class furniture cut glass, china. 
Oriental rugs, oil paintings, etc., at a 
bargain. 915 East Fourth street. 



FOR S.^LE— GROCERY AND CONFEC- 
tionery store wltli five-room house; 
all conveniences. Corner Fifty-fifth 
avenue west. Main {street. 



FOR SALE— SAFES. OFFICE FURNI- 
ture, architects' and engineers' sup- 
plies, typewriters and supplies. J. S. 
Ttay Co.. 4002 W. Sup. St. Both 'phones. 



WANTED — A CO.MPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 131 East Third 
street. 



WANTED— NURSE MAID FOR CHILD, 
3^ years old; experienced; references 
required. Mrs. J. H. Madden, No. 2, 
St. Elmo apartments, 721 East First 
street 



WAxNJTED — FIRST-CLASS STEAM- 
fitter and helper. Sanitary Plumbing 
company, 34 West First street. 

WANTED — GOVERNMENT EMPLOY^ 
eec. Write for Duluth examination 
schedule, Franklin Institute depart- 
ment 173 T. Rochester. N. Y. 



WANTED — OFFICE BOY. DULUTH 
Paper & Stationery company. 

WANTED— AT ONCE; MAN WHO UN- 
derstands setting up stoves. Apply at 
Garely. S Ea.st Superior street. 



W^ANTED— THREE HEALTH AND Ac- 
cident insurance solicitors; good op- 
portunity for hustlers. Apply 812 
Torrey building. 



(Continued on pace 10.) 



TANIS' SCHOOL OF ENGLISH. 



FOR MEN AND WOMEN OF OTHER 
countries. Day and night school. 
AVinthrop block, corner of Fourth 
avenue west and First street, direct- 
ly east of postofflce. 



HORSES, VEMICLES, ETC. 



LOGGING AND DRAFT HORSES. 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT IN 
East end, only |15 per montii. Apply 
N. J. Upliam company. 

FOR REN T — SIX-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
modijin conveniences; West end. In- 
quiru 329 East Eixth street. Zenith 
'phone, 1109, 

b'OH RENl — SIX-KOOM FLAT; MOD- 
ern. 204 East Fourth street. 

FOR I:ENT— NICE FIVE-ROOM FLAT. 
Modern conveniences. l2lb'/ii East 
Fouiiii street. Hariman O Jjonnell, 
205 Lonsdale buildliig. 



One Cent a Word Eacli Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

foOent^^omsT^^^ 

FOR RENT— ROOMS. ROOMS WOULD 
rent readily if you should build a 
home on one of those beautiful 200 
lots that will be put on sale Sept. 19 
In Chambers' First and Second divi- 
sion. A grand view of the city and 
lake. Visit iiils properry before sale 
takes place; beiow b4julevard, be- 
tween 1' itih and Tenth avenues east 
Will be sold on tne 
payment plan. No inte 
until 1 913. 

FOR RE.VT — NICELY 
room. 9u6 London road; 
6 and 8. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 

PALESTINE LODGE NO. 79. 
A. 1'. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month, at 
8 o clock. Next meeting, 
^^^.^- ^^' l^'O. Work— Sec- 
ond degree. Gorham A. Taylor, W 
H. Nesbit, secretary. 




M.; 



easy weekly 
•est; no taxes 



FURNISHED 
call beiwetn 



FOR RENT— HEATED ROOMS IN 
Dodge building; very central. Apply 
N. J. Upham company, lb Third ave- 
nue west. 

FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS. 210^ 
East Seventh street, upstairs; elec- 
tric lights; water in yaid. 



FOR RENT— FUR.MSHED ROOM. IN- 
quire at 126 West fourth street, 
fiat B. 




IONIC LODGE. NO. 186, A. F. 
& A. M. — Regular meeting* . 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month at 
8 o clock. Next meeting, 

Sept. 12, 1910. Work,— First 

degree. Herbert W. Richardson, W. AL; 

Hugh Burgo. s ecretary. 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER, Na 
^0, li. A. M. — Stated convo- 
cations second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 8 o'clock. Next 
meeting Sept. 14. 1910. Work 
— Regular business. Andalla 
Torrance, H. p., Alfred Le Richeux, 
secretary. 




W 



i<UU RENx — FlVK-KCtOM FLAT. 1515 
South street. Apply on premises. 



FOR REiNT — LARGE FIVE-ROOM 
fiat with bath. 206 East l? ourtli 
Street. Hariman O'Donneii, " 205 
Lontidale building. 

FOR RENT — THREE-ROOM FLAT, 
central; nne view; cheap tor tlie win- 
ter; also nve-rooni fiat, central. Mrs. 
Morse, 126 West Fourth street. 

FOR itENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT, 518 
Laku avenue north. 

FOR KENT— NICE SIX-ROOM FLAT, 
First avenue west and l-'ourth street; 
all modern excepl heal; moderate 
rent to right party; no ciuidreii. 
Charles P. Craig & Co., 501 beiiwood 
building. 

FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM FLAT; 
watt r, sewer, bam and eieclric iigiii; 
In good condition. 1101 West Supe- 
rior street. 



FOR RENT — 
Ui'Stairs, heat 
Fouith street. 



P'OUR-ROOM FEAT, 
and bath. 619 East 



FOR RENT— NICE FIVE-ROOM FLAT. 
Modern conveniences. 12lSi.a East 
Fourth street. Hartman O'Donueli, 
2'.i5 Lonsdale building. 



LUMBERMEN, TAKE NOTICE! 



We now have on hand 600 head of 
big, young, e.'clra quality, 1,500 to 1,80C- 
pound draft horses. 1« rom this large 
number you can select a carload or a 
trainload suitable to your purpose. 
Private sales daily. I'art lime given it 
desired. Every horse sold guaranteed 
to be as represented. 



BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 
Midway Horse Market, St. Paul. 



FOR SALE— GOOD WORKING HORSE. 
1912 West Third street. Call even- 
ings, after 6. 

FOR SALE HORSES; 826 EAST 

Third street. H. Inch. 

FOR SALE — GOOD DRIVING HORSE 
cheap if taken at once. Call 6403 
Wadena street. West Duluth. 

FOR SALE— GOOD HORSE, CHEAP 
Inquire at 428 West Fourth street. 



FOR SALE — GOOD HORSE AT 926 
Fourth avenue east. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM 

Easi, Fifth street. 



FLAT. 618 



FOR RENT — 
modern Hats, 
avenue north, 
avenue north. 



TWO FIVE-ROOM 

612 V^ and 514 l..ake 

Inquire 516 Lake 



FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS; WARM 
for winter; gas and water. 322 West 
Filth street . New phone 1903-Y. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED liOOM FOR 
light housekeeping. 119 14 East Sec- 
ond street. 



FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS IN NEW 
brick fiat; steam heat; also two 
furnished rooms, suitable for light 
housekeeping, wliii all conveniences. 
Reasonable rent to rlgiit parties. 
Call at 1030 west First street. 



A 



General 
T. L M.; 



DULUTH COUNCIL. NO. 6. 
K. <!c S. M. — Regular meetings 
first and third Friday even- 
ings of each month at 8 
o clock. Next meeting. Fri- 
day, Sept. 16, 1910. Work — 
business. Carl E. Lonegren, 
Alfred Le Richeux, recorder. 




FOR RENT— FIVE LAItGE ROOMS; 
nice place. 1218 East b^ourth street. 
Hartman O'Donneii, 205 Lonsdale 
building. 

FOR RENT — THREE CO-MPLETELY 
furnished rooms for light house- 
keeping; all convenlent.es. 623 West 
Fourth street. 

FOR RENT — FUIiNIS iED ROOMS" 
ail conveniences. 113 Vii East Fourth 
street. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOMS UP- 
slairs; water, electric lights and gas. 
932 Seventh avenue east. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT, MOD- 
ern, except heat, gas range, central; 
wattjr. S. S. Williamson, 515 Torrey 
building. Melrose, 958; Zenith, 1136. 



FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM FLAT IN 
Kohagan flats; heat, liot and cold 
water; janitor service: thoroughly 
modern; rent |47.50. Corporate In- 
%'esiment company, Torery building. 



FOR Rent — we have flats on 

Fourth avenue west and Third street; 
otii€'rs in central part of city. A. A. 
Micliaud Company, 314 Palladlo Bldg. 

FOR KENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
conveniences except neat: rent rea- 
sonable; 2617 West Third street. 
Stryker, Manley & Buck, Torrey 
building. 



FOR RENT— TWO NEW FIVE-ROOM 
flats.; tl4 and $16. C. A. Knlppenberg, 
300 Alworth building. 



FOR SALE- 
company. 



-HORSE AT L. HAMMEL 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FLAT; 
bathroom, electric light and gas for 
cooking; ?12 per month. Inquire A. 
A. Flder, 912 East Sixth street. 

(Continued on pase 18.) 



FOR RE.NT _ TW'O FURNlSix^D 
rooms for light housekeeping. 702 
West S econd street. 

FOR RENT — FURNIS HED ROOM ; 
steam heat, electric l:glit, hot and 
cold water. 12 West First slreei, 
upfctairs. rial B. 

FO H RENT— TWO Nl CELY FUR- 
nished rooms, for light housekeepiiig. 
21 First avenue west. 'Jail at Bloom 
& Co., 102 West First s:reet. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM. 1224 
East Fourth street. 

FOR RENT — STEAM-Ht.ATED, FUR- 
nished rooms, with or ^vithout board; 
most central, strictly first-class fam- 
ily hotel in ciiy. 318-120 West Sec- 
ond street. — Melrose. 

FOR RENT — FOUR BASEMENT 
rooms. Call at 12^2 East Fourth 
street alter 7 o'clock in the evening. 

FOR RENT — ONE LARGE; FURNISHED 
front room; steam lieat; electric 
light and bath- 14 West First street. 
Flat No. 2. 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
rooms at 25 Second avenue west. 



DULUTH COMMANDERYNO. 
18, K. T. — Staled conclave 
first Tuesday of each month 
at 8 o'clock p. m. Next con- 
clave, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 1910. 
Work — Rehearsal of business 

and drill. Newton H. Wilson, E. C; 

Alfred Le liicheux, recorder. 

SCOTTISH RITE — REGU- 
lar meetings every Thursday 
evening at 8 o'clock. Next 
meetlrig Sept, 29, 1910. Work 
— Installation of officers. 
Henry Nesbilt, secretary. 





W'ork - 

Keeler, 

retary. 



ZENITH CHAPTER NO. 2B, 
Order of Eastern Star — Regu- 
lar meeting second and 
fourth Friday evenings of 
each month at 8 o'clock. 
Next meeting Sept. 9, 1910. 
- Regular business. Minnie 
W. M.; Ella F. Gearhart, sec- 




FOR RE.NT — BEAUTl.-^UL LARGE 
front room; all inoderr ; steam heal, 
low rent for winter. The Latonia. 122 
East First street. 



FOR RENT — TW^O FURNI^anED 
rooms for light housekeeping. 136 
Mesaba avenue. 



EUCLID LODGE, NO. 198, A. 
F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
iiiontli at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
meeting Sept. 14, 1910. Work 

—Second degree. L. R. Clark, W. M.; 

A. Dunleav.v. secretary. 

DULUTH CHAPTER, NO. 59^ 
R. A. M. — Meets at West 
Duluth first and Third 
Wednesdays of each month at 
7:30 p. m. Next meeting 
Sept. f, 1910. Work — Regular 

business. W. B. Getchell, H. P.; A. Dun-. 

leavy, secretary. , 

DULUTH LODGE, NO. 28, I. O. O. F.— MKET3 
tMiy Frldi'.y e^euLig »t 8 o'ckck at Odd 
Ktlk/ws" hall. 18 Lake nvenue norttk 
-Ntxt meeting liiglit, Sept. iC; bee ncl de- 
gree; £. A Bergslrou. N. G.; G. H. Glut. Uoa, 
Bee.; A. H. Paul. Fin. Sec. 




Ai 



DULUTH EACAMPMKNT NO. 36, L O. 

0. F. — MeeU on tlie geeond and fourth 

Tliuisduyg £X Odd FeUcwa' hall. 18 Lak* 

teiiue north. Neil meeUng night. Sept. 

smoker — everybtidjr come. J. B. Cade, 

P.; L. G. M.".rlow, lUc. fccrlbe. 




FOR 
118 



RENT- 
Norlh 



-FURNISHED ROOMS AT 
Third avenue west. 



FOR RENT— 
West First 



FURNISHED ROOMS. 12 
street, flat C. 



FOR RENT — SlTTINCf ROOM AND 
bedroom ensuite; steam heat, grate, 
electric lights; batii £d joining witii 
hot water at all hour!). Call No. 1, 
Munger terrace. 

FOR RENT — large; PLEASANT 
front room; suitable fo.- two or three, 
In private boarding iiouse, with or 
without board. 109 West Third 
street. Melrose l&bo. 

FOR RE.NT— FOUR ROO.MS; 12 WEST 
Fiftii street; elcctrii: light; gas; 
water: $17 per month. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework, Meiers' hotel. Thirty- 
eighth avenue west, Oneota street. 



WANTED— GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework; easy work; good 
wages. 409 South Twenty-first ave- 
nue east. 



WANTED — A 
with light 
West First 



YOUNG GIRL TO HELP 
housework. Call at 212 
street. Good home. 



WANTED — GOOD CHAMBERMAID. 
151 St. Croix avenue. 



WANTED— A CO.MPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. Apply 515 East 
Second street. 



WANTED — A WAITRESS AT ONCE. 
Call 1909 West Superior street. 



WANTED AT ONCE — UlRLS TO 
learn to make switches, and all 
kinds of hair work; also to learn 
hair dressing. Call at Moisan's 
hair dressing parlors, 212 W^est 
First street. 



W-\.\TEi)— A NTJRSE GIRL. 1203 East 
Second street. 

WANTED — YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIST 
with housework; one who can go 
home evenings. 728 East Fourth 
street. 

WANTED — A NURSE MAID; MUST 
have references. Mrs. W'. R. Peyton, 
1605 East Second street. 



WANTED— EXPERIENCED GIRL FOR 
general housework; must cook well. 
1424 East Second street. 

WANTED AT ONCE — RELIABLE 
girl for general housework. Mrs. F. 
L. Barrows, 12 North Nineteenth 
avenue east. 

(Continued on pase 10,> 




^ 



FOR RENT — NICE, 
nlshed room; suitable 
Fourth street. 



CLEAN FUR- 
lent. 633 East 



FOR RENT— LARGE FRONT ROOM; 
all modern oonvenlences; suitable for 
two persons. 224 FourtJi avenue west, 
upstairs. 



FOR RENT — STEAM HEATED ROOMS, 
bath and use of 'phoae. 219 Fifth 
avenue west. 



HOW D© ¥oy 




H^Tf 



LOTS OF FUN has been made of the 
so-called waste basket hats that have 
been prevalent for a year or two. This 
season in New York and Paris and the 
fashion centers, the women are wearing 
the little turban hats which are as attrac- 
tive as anything that has been created in 
millinery in recent years. 

The Herald's Fashion Supplement to 
be issued September 26th will tell all about 
these hats and all the newest things in 
fashions generally. Some people say they 
are not interested in fashions, but sooner 
or later we all succumb, and even those 
of us who may not be considered fashion- 
able ourselves, like to know what the cor- 
rect fashions are. 

The Herald has made greater prepar- 
ations than ever for its fashion exhibit and 
has purchased its illustrations and fashion 
information from the largest fashion con- 
cern in America. Advertisers andpatrons 
alike will be interested in the special fash- 
ion issue Monday, Sept. 26. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
front room, all conv«;niences; suit- 
able for one or two ladies. Call at 
925 East Second street. 



hall, 
'phone 




K. O. T. M. 

KULUTH TENT. NO. 1— MEIH* EVERT 

.Vfdi.csday, S li p. m.. »V Maecabe* 
i.»U. 'l\ Lake aimue north. Vlsiilng 

numbers always welc me. O. P. Mccal- 

Dun. comraai.der. 505 West Third Etreet; 

J. B. Gellneau. rtcord k(>«!licr, office la 
Hours, 10 a. m to 1 p. m., dallj. Ztaltb 
€13- i 

A. O. U. W. 
FIDELITY LODGE NO. 105 — MEETS 

at Macealiee hall, Jl Lake avenue ncrth. 
i-vei-y TuurHday at 8 p. m. Visiting meni- 
icrs weleuuje A. K. Jackson. M. W.; 
A. E. Plering. reeorder; O. J. Murruld, 
rinancier. 217 East Filth aireet. 




MODKllN SAMARITANS. 
ALPHA COUNCIL NO. 1.— TAKE NO- 

.lee that Samaritan degree metta first 
.ad third Thursdays; beiilficent. »oc nd 
and fiiunh Thunsduys. Lucy A. I'liidy. 
Lady G. S. ; N. B. Merrlaon. G. S 

Wellbanks. icrlbe; T. A. Gall, 

Bank buildli.«. 



S.. 



Wal- 

FllSt 




Iklllnes, 
'phone 



U-MTm> OHDEH OF FORF>;TER8 — 

C( jn Eastern Star. No. 86, meets e»«iT 
flrft and tMrd Tuesday at U. 0. F. 
hall, coiuer Ft arth avenue wret and 
Klisl Btreel. Elizabeth Mllnes, C. K.. 
nom 23, Wlnthitp block; .K. E. Plcrlng. 
secreiaiy, 220 Ea»t Filth atreet; Harrj 
treasurer, room 23. Wuithrop block. Zenitl* 
29;8-X. 




M. W. A. 

IMPE3UAL CaMP NO. 2206 — MEET* 
nt V. O. F. hall. Fourth avenue weit 
Uld First street, second and fourth 
r;esday8 f each month. WUUam TuneiL 
cou:.uI; C. P. F.arl. clerk, btx 411; F. E. 
Uoremua, deputy; address N. V. trclslit 



office. 



FOR RENT — NICELY 
room 13 East Third 
both "phones. 



FURNISHED 
street. Use of 




K. of P. 
—Meets every Tuesday 
r.iU call next raeetlug; 
.s. Fred Wheaton 
N. Cohln. C. C. ; 
K. of R. & S. 



evenlnf. Annual 

Sup. K. of K. & 

will be present. H. 

Cha.rlc« F. Hopklna. 



FOR RENT, CHEAP -- FURNISHED 
room. 630% West Third street. 

FOR RENT — STEAM-L EATED FUR- 
nished rooms, at 20 West Superior 
street. Inquire third lloor. 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for ligiit housekeeping. 7U- 
Wesi Second street. 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room; all conveniences. 119 West 
First street. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM S ; 
tl.50 per week and up, board If de- 
sired. 70J West Tliird street. Inquire 
705 West Third street. 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNIi,-.EED 
room, with conveniences. 119 ^ast 
Fifth street. 




K. of P. 

niAMONT* LODGE NO. «B. K. of P.— 
Meets e^ery m nday evening In Blcan's 
li.ii; comer TwenUeth avenue west aal 
>1perlcr strtet. All knights cordially In- 
ated; work In second rank. M. J. Murray. 
C C • Otto E. N€Uon, K. of B. A S. 




KITCHI GAMMl LODGE NO. 123. K. or 
p —Meets every Thursday evening at Com- 
aierrlal Club hall. Central avenue. W«a 
Duluth. Next meeting Thursday. Jui»» 
so social. All knlghls corjlaiiy ir.vlted. 
O.' W. Iloutln. C. C; C. M. PhUllpfc 
ft S. 



FOR RENT — Lr.lRGE, FURNISHED 
front room, suitable for two; modern 
and reasonable. 130 West Inird 
street. 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOMS; MODERN 
except heat; very central. S. S. Will- 
iamson, 515 Torrey building, both 
'phones. 

FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS AND AL- 
cove; gas range, modern; |25 per 
month. Call 715 West Second street. 

FOR RENT TWO N'ICe7 LARGE, 

neatly furnished rooms in steam- 
heated brick flat. 32 West Second 
street. 



CLAN STEWAUT. NO. 50, O. 8. C— 
Meets first and third Wednesday! each 
uiouih, 8 V. m... at U. O. F. hall, cornel 
fourth avtnue wekl and First street. Next 
regular meeting Sept- 21. Alexander G. Mc- 
. night, ciilef; Don McLennan, secroiary; 
Jolin Burnett, flftaiiclrJ swreurj, 212 
Torrey building. 





ROTAL LEAQT.E. 
ZENITH COUNCIL, NO. 161. ROTAI. 
League— MeeU in K. P. hall flnt and 
third Monday evenings at 8 o'clock. O. 
L llargravea. scribe, care of Northera 
glioe company; K. S. Spn al. arebou, 
wood building. 



S«U- 




avenue 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED OR 
unfurnished rooms, will allow light 
housekeeping. 610 I'ourth avenue 
east. Old 'phone Melrone 606. 



FOR RENT— STEAM-HEATED ROOM 

suitable for two genlieir.en. 110 
First avenue west. 




hall. v»-.;»; 
TwenUeth 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD. 
ZENITH CXnf CAMP -NO 5.-Ml3m; 
eery second and fourth We«^esrtay« aV 
the eld Masonic temple, fifth floor. Mao- 
\uley C C 102 West Michigan street; 
waila'rd Curt'lf. banker. -No. 1. The Glen; 
■Triple Sloan, clerk, 8 bouUi Thlrteenti* 

west. Zenith 'p hone 7L 

rtOYAL AKCANVM, Duluth Council No. 
'4S3— Meets second and fourth Tuesday 
.' eiilngB. MaecaUee hall, 21 Lake avcnu* 
..inh. Cl'inton Btooka. aecreury. 401 
..liimbla building. 

Mesabi Council. No. 1913— Meets first 
tud third Wednesday evenings. Columbia 
end. A. M. Johnson, secrelarj, 117 NorU> 
avenue west. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room, 318 Third avenue west. 



FR RENT— SIX LARGE ROOMS WITH 
all conveniences. 524 Lake avenue 
north. 

FOR RENT — TWO I'NFURNISHED 

rooms, steam heat. Inquire, J. B. 

Erd, jeweler, 29 .East Superior 
street. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHi:D ROOMS. 313 
West Superior street. 

FOR RENT — NICE, CLEAN FUR- 
nlshed room; will rent reasonable. 
633 East Fourth street. 



(Contlnned on PMT* 10.) 



TT" 




NEST NO. 1200 — MEETINGS 
are held on the first and third 
Fridays of each mooUi. Next 
»eet.ng nUjhl, Friday, Sept. 1«, 
St Owls' hall. 116 West S'J- 
perlcr street. Joseph E. Feaka. 
secretary, Tl East Superior siretu 



""■HI 



* 



r 



•r- 





1 






1 

y 

1 












i 
1 




\ 





"■- ■ ^ - -- 



•r 



t»km» . I 



I t 



STOVE REPURS 

WE^ OUVRr'ljrSTOCK'REPAIRS FOR 
10,000 different stoves and ranges. 
C. F. Wiggeris & Son, 410 East Su- 
perior street. Both telephones. 



PICTURE FRAMING. _ 

DECKER'S. 16 SECOND AVE. W. ALSO 
complete line of artists' materials^ 

GUSTAVa UENNECKE, 211 E. SUP. ST, 



I 



.1 



Tl 



W >| lii cr , t. 



" - i - i 



II 




UST 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




VOLUME XXVIII— NO. 138. 



FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 16, 1910. 



TWO CENTS. 



NAME THREE 
INSURGENTS 
INJLUNOIS 

Boulell Among the Regular 

Repubkans Beaten 

Out. 



Cannon and Foss Renomi- 
nated in the Primary 
Election. 



Browne and Many Other 

Democrats Who Backed 

Lorimer Win. 




DRAWS FIRE 
FROMTEDDY 

Barnes Makes Another State- 
ment and Gets Quick 
Reply. 

Roosevelt Meets Pohticians 

at His Office-Haskell 

Deserts Colors. 



MYm GAYNOR IS REGAINING BIS STRENGTH 



Chicago. Sept. 16. — Insurgrents were 
vlctorioiia In three out of the twenty- 
five congressional districts of Illinois 
In the primary election yesterday. 

Henry S. Boutell, atandpat Republi- 
can, who has represented trft- Ninth, a 
Chicago district, in congress for twelve 
years, waa defeated by Frederick H. 
Gansbergen, who conducted his cam- 
paign on an out-and-out Insurgent 
platform. Gansbergen was supported 
by the regular Republican organiza- 
tion. 

In the Eleventh district Col. Ira C. 
Copley, the first man in Illinois to come 
out as an Insurgent candidate, won the 
Republican nomination over George W. 
Conn, who classed himself as a 'pro- 
gressive conservative." This seat now 
is occupied by Howard M. Snapp, a 
standpatter. 

John C. McKenzie secured the Repub- 
lican nomination in the Thirteenth dis- 
trict after a spirited contest with Reu- 
ben H. Tiffany. 

Fo»a aa«I Caunon Win. 

George Edmuud Foss. standpatter 
and ht-ad of tlie nuval affairs committee 
of iht house, won the Republican nom- 
ination in the Tenth district by about 
600 votes after a hard contest in which 

(Continued on page U», fifth column.) 

CALUMET cms 
ARE NOT LEPERS 



CHARLES A. GOODWIN. 

Hartford. Cnn., Sept. 16. — Charles A. 
Goodwin of this city is the Republican 
nominee for governor of Connecticut. 
Mr. Goodwin was the private secretarv 
of the late Governor Lilley and Mrs. 
Lilley exerted her influence in behalf 
of Mr. Goodwin. 



TELLS ABOUT 
POISON FIND 

Scientist Says Death of Sup- 
posed Woman Was Due 
to Drug. 

Big Crowd Continues to Be 

Attracted By Crippen 

Trial. 



New York, Sept. 16. — There was a 
sharp exchange today between Col. 
Theodore Roosevelt and William Barnes, 
Jr., Republican state committeeman 
and leader o£ the so-called "old guard" 
In Albany county. In a published 
statement Mr. Barnes said: 

"No amount of political maneuver- 
ing, use of patronage or personal abuse 
can in the slightest degree obscure the 
one issue which mu«t be fought out to 
a finish at Saratoga. 

"There will be determined the future 
of the Republican party in the state of 
New York for some years to come. 
That parly must determine in its plat- 
form whether it will be recognized as 
the conserving force, wliich has been 
its history, or whether it will follow 
the radical policies of Mr. Roosevelt 
and lose the strategic position which 
it has held in the state of New York 
for manv years as the party of sanity 
and the protector of industry, upon 
which the world of business and labor 
must depend. 

SeekluK 'or "New Gods." 

"I-f it dues not hold to its time- 
honored and successful principles, but 
seeks for new gods to worship, its mis-- 
take will be taken advantage of by its 
adversary. 

"No radical candidate has ever car- 
ried the state of New York. Progress 
in political life is essential to any par- 
ty, but the state leadership which re- 
lies for its strength upon inciting the 
mob can. even if it tries, stem the 
tide which it has created. 

"The Republican party in this state 
has never faced a crisi,>^ so fundamental 
to its existence as it must meet at this 
hour. ' 

When Mr. Barnes' statement W'as 




_-Cop}Tlghied li'l" b>- (itorge Oranlluum Bain. 

MAYOR WILLIAM J. GAYNOR ON HIS COUNTRY PLACE AT ST. JAMES, L. L 

New York SepU 18.— Mayor William .i. Gaynor is rapidly recovering strength after the illness that followed the 
flttemot of James Gallagher to kill him. The wound in the mayor's neck is thoroughly healed, and except for a 
welk voice and the weakness due to the shock and loss of blood resulting from the shooting, his honor Is fully re- 
?[:n*e^ed He spends much time at his favorite exercise— walking— and sometimes helps with the work on his country 
place at St. James, L. 1. 



(Continued on page 22, third column.) 

NEW FINNISHDIET 
BEGINS SESSIONS 



Attorney General Says Jen- 
sen s Daughters May At- 
tend School. 

Lansing, Mich., Sept. 16.— That tne 
four daughters of John Jensen, a leper 
Isolated at Calumet. Mich., would not 
le a menace to the school population 
and cannot be excluded from the pub- 
lic schools, ip the conclusion drawn by 
Attorney General Kuhn. 

The attorney general in his opinion 
states that thorough examination has 
revealed no trace of the disease in the 
daughters, they will not be a menace 
In tne schools if they are disinfected, 
removed from their father and mother 
and kept away fro mthem during the 
school term, and if a monthly or bi- 
montlily examination continues to show 
that they are free from the dread 
malady. 

islanFtrade is 
nearly doubled 

Bi? Increase Shown Under 

Provisions for Free 

Trade. 

•Washington, Sept. 16.— Trade between 
the I'nited States and the Pliillppine 
Islands increased S4 per cent during 
the first year's operation of the new 
tariff law, according to department of 
commerce and labor statistics. The 
new taiiff law provides for the free 
inlercliange of merchandise between 
those Islands and the United States. . 

On Julv 31 last the law liad been in 
effect one year. The total imports 
from tiie islands In tliat year were 
I18.&17.372. an increase of about 50 per 
cent over the preceding year. Tot_a.l 
exports to the islands were $17,517,675, 
an increase of about 10 per cent. 

Chief among tiie imports weie sugar, 
manila hemji. cigars and cigarettes, 
copra and fibers. Sugar increased from 
ll.tiOu.OOO in 1909 to $5,000,000 In 1910. 
The principal exports to the Islands 
were iron and steel manufactures, cot- 
ton cb'lhs, liour, boots, shoes, explo- 
sives, meat and dairy products. 



London, Sept. 16.— Dr. William Henry 
^V'ilcox. scientific analyst to the home 
office, who discovered a deadly drug 
in the body found in the home of Dr. 
Hawley H. Crippen, took the stand 
when the trial of the doctor and his 
typist. Ethel Clara Leneve. for the 
murder of the former's wife was con- 
tinued today, and swore unqualifiedly 
that death was due to poison. 

The i>hysician described the nature of 
the medium used and said that from a 
quarter to half a grain would prove 
fatal. He had found two-sevenths of a 
grain after a lapse of from four to 
eight months and judged that more 
than half a grain had been adminis- 
tered. He found no otlier cause of 
death and expressed the opinion that 
the victim survived the dose an hour 
or more. 

SecondM I'epper TeHtlmon?-. 
Before Dr. Wilcox was called the 
crown introduced medical testimony to 
corroborate that given on Wednesdav 
by Prof. Augustus J. Pepper, patholo- 
gist of the University of London, who 
swore that the body had been dismem- 
bered bv one familiar with the science 



The gruesome exhibits and the un- 
pleasant character of the testimony at 
the last session did not deter the cu- 
rious from struggling to get into the 
Bow street police court today and the 
portion apportioned to the public was 
again crowded. The spectators includ- 
ed the ustial array of women and these 
thoughtfully removed their hats that 
those seated behind them might not 
miss a move of the trembling girl in 

I the dock or of her ccimiianion. whose 
jaunty air only adds to the morbid in- 

I terest in the case. 



May Be the Last One Made 

Up Under the Present 

Laws. 

Helsingfors, Sept. 16. — The new 
Finnish diet, which possibly will be the 
last one as at present constituted, was 
opened formally toda.y by Governor 
Gen. Zein. Its task this fall will be to 
consider a series of measures tending 
to establish closer ties between the 
grand duchy and the empire. 

The attitude of the people to im- 
perial legislation which has been late- 
ly manifested, was exemplified in Pres- 
ident Svinjufvid's speech after his elec- 
tion yesterday. He pointed out that 
these were critical times for Finnish 
autonomy, and said: 

"We are still to undergo a more se- 
vere trial than ever, as the diet has 
been asked to sanction terrible inroads 
in the constitution. Hard times face 
us. but we still survive, handing to 
the generations to come the most pre- 
cious treasure — a spotless standard 
refusing to negotiate the sale of our 
liberties." 



iMf**-if^Nt**^*^ 



PLAN LAWS FOR 
NATIONAL GUARD 

Convention at St. Louis Will 

Be Unusually Im- 

portanL 

Washington. Sept. 16.— The national 
guard convention to be held in St. 
Louis beginning Oct. 3 will be of more 
than ordinary interest and importance, 
in the opinion of war department offi- 
cials. It is proposed to take up the 
question of legislation for ibe national 

'^"The" general staff has shown ius ap- 
preciation of the Importance of this 
convention by detailing ten officers 
of high reputation In 'heir respective 
branches of the servi'-e to attenu the 
convention and deljfev addresses. They 
are Col Erasmus M. Weaver, coast ar- 
tillery and in charge of the militia di- 
vision. Lieut-Ccfl. John T. Thompson, 
ordnance department; .i.*aj. George \V. 
Mclver, Twentieth infantry; Maj. Ld- 
gar RuBsel, signal corps; MaJ. Davis h. 
Stanley, quartermasters department; 
Maj. John F Morrison, general stait; 
Mai Edward L. Munson, medical corps; 
Capt. Monroe C. Kerth, Twenty-second 
infantry: Capt. Lucius R. Holbrook, 
subsistence department, and Capt. R. 
W. Walton, U. S. A., retired. Each will 
deliver an address on the work of his 
special department. 

Maj. -Gen. Leonard Wood, chief of 

staff, will attend the convention, but 

does not expect to deliver an addres.s. 

u 

Army itulluuu iu .'Vight Flight. 

Grand Vllliers. France. Sept. IC. — 
The dirigible ballooii Clement-Bayard 
made a successful night fliglit without 
lights over the positions of the bi- 
vouacked armies which are participat- 
ing in the French maneuvers. 



many americans ik rig day 
inthe.steerage'*'^'^*^^'^* 



Four Hundred Out of 1,120 

on Mauretania Belong in 

This Country. 

New York, Sept. 16.— Eleven hundred 
and twenty steerage passengers of the 
steamer Mauretania, which docked last 
night, were discharged from the ves- 
sel today and all but 400, who were 
American citizens, were sent to Ellis 
Island. 

When Health Officer Doty boarded 
the boat last night he found that the 
m.»nlfest showed. 1,1 22 steerage passen- 
gers and the count revealed only 1,120. 
He would not permit anyone to leave 
the steerage until t^ Wy#tery was 
cleared. Other counts wefe made, and 
still there were but 1.120 persons 

found. 

Today it was found that the mistake 
was miide when the manifest was pre- 
pared, and Dr. Doty gave permission 
to the officials of the line to j elease 
the third-class passen gers. 

WORLD TUBERCULOSIS 

MKETING TO BE IN ROME. 

Wasliington, Sept. 16.— Announce- 
rrent that the seventh international 
ongress on tuberculosis will be held 
in Rome. Italy. Sept. 24 to 30. 1911, 
was ofliciallv made today from the 
headfiuarters of the National .\s8ocla- 
t'on for the Studv and Prevention of 
Tuberculosis. The congress, which 
meets every three years, was last held 
ill Washington in 1908. 



INJEXICO 

Monument Is Dedicated in 

Honor of the National 

Holiday. 

Chile Prepares for Anniver- 
sary of Her Independ- 
ence as Nation. 



POSTOFHCE 
SAFE BLOWN 
AT WALKER 

Burglars Use Dynanute and 

Get Off With 

$1,000. 

Police in Minnesota Towr 

Seek Two Men Seen 

Before Robbery. 

Postmaster's Caution Prevents 

Bigger Haul in 

Stamps. 



Walker, Minn., Sept. IC— (Special to 
Tlie Herald.) — Burglars dynamited the 
Walker postoffice early this morninff 
and got away with about |200 in cash 
and over 1800 in stamps. Entrance tO' 
the building was gained through the 
basement and the job has all the ap- 
pearance of being the work of pro- 
fessionals. The safe was not only- 
cleaned of cash and stamps but the 
money drawer robbed and all registered 
letters were taken. 

Two Eusi>iclous characters were in 
town last evening, and this is the only 
clew which the police have at present. 
Postmaster McBrlde had just received 
several thousand dollars' worth ot 
stamps, a portion of which were in th» 
vault at the First National Bank of 



Walker. 



NEW ENGLAND 

DIET ROASTED 

Doctor Says Mince Pie and 

Beans Are Bad for 

the Race. 



T Jf>' W ^ 'Jfi f\ ^^ ^r* '^ *r^ ^. 

CAUGHT! 



Hi (»»»»»») i t»» »* 






[»»'»» : ; (») M<- »»»******» 



REAR ADMIRAL 
BERRY RETIRED 

Chaplain Tricou of the Navy 

Also Ends Active 

Service. 

Washington, Sept. 16,— Rear Admiral 
Berry, on duly at the Washington 
navy yard as a member of -the' niaval 
examining and retiring boards, and 
Chaplain David H. Tricou. on duty at 
the naval home, Philadelphia, were 
placed on the retired list today' on ac- 
count of old age. 

Admiral Berry is from Tennessee and 
entered the navy in July, 1865. He 
has liad nearly twenty-two years" serv- 
ice at sea and has been a rear-admiral 
since June. 1909. 

Chaplain Tricou is the senior cliap- 
laln in the navy and has the rank of 
captain. He is from Maine, and began 
nis naval career in February. 1872. 
He has had aiiout twelve years' of sea 
service, and has been stationed at 
Philadelphia since November, 1905. 



POWERS WINS 
BY 1U80 VOTES 

Kentuckian Says It Is Com- 
plete Vindication of 
His Career. 

Barbourville. Ky., Sept. 16. — Complete 
returns from yesterda- s Eleventh dis- 
trict congressional primary show that 
Caleb PoWer.s- defeated Representative 
I) C Edwards for the Republican nom- 
ination by ll.l'S^O votes. Powers issued 
a statem.ent today in which he declared 
that the big majority was a vindica- 
tion cf his political career. Powers 
formerly was secretary of state and 
served eight years in jail for hi» al- 
leged connection with "the Governor 
Goebel assassination. 

POPULATIONS OF 
FOUR im^ GIVEN 

They Are Racine, Wis., Cov- 
ington, Ky., Wiikesbarre, Pa., 
and Waterloo, la. 

Washington, Sept. 16. — The popula- 
tion of Racine, Wis., is 38,002, an in- 
crease of 8,900, or 30.6 per cent, as 
compared with 29.Kt2 in 1900. 

The population of Covington. Ky.. 
is 53,270, 'an increase of 10,332, or 24.1 
per cent, as compared with 42,938 in 
1900 Kenton county in Kentucky, in 
which Covington is located, lias a 
population of 70,355, a.s compared with 
63,591 In 1900. 

The population of Wiikesbarre, Pa., 
is 67.105, an increase of 15,384, or 29.7 
per cent, as compared with 51,721 in 
1900. . - , 

The population of Waterloo, Iowa, is 
26,693. an Increase of 14,113. or 112.2 j 
per cent, as compared with 12,580 In I 
1900. 




City of Mexico, fe'ept. 16.— Mexico 
crowned the celebration of her cen- 
tennial today with tie dedication of a 
monument to the independence of the 
republic. 

There was a grand parade from the 
national palace to tht> site of the monu- 
ment in the beautiful Pazzo Reforma, 
midway between thiK city and Chepul- 
tepec, where the ceremonies were held, 
i Ten Thousand soldi ?rs, marines and 
1 urales,- and represt ntatives of other 
powers, were in line. The feature of 
the program was an address by Presi- 
dent Diaz 

The monument is an imposing granite 
shaft rising to a heigiit of 140 feet. 
It is topped with a figure symbolic of 
liberty and the bast is surrounded by 
bronze figures representing the various 
phsj.ses of tlie national life. 
• > " 
Celebrate in Cblte. 
Santiago, Chile, .'k-pt. ]«. — The ar- 
rival today of President Figuer<m Al- 
corta of Argentina and his party to 
take part In the celebration of Chile's 
centennial of lndepeiidei.ee was the oc- 
casion of a splendid demonstration of 
welcome in which government officials 
and thousands of ;lie public shared. 
The guests were accompanied to the 
residence, whicli ihey will occupy 
during their stay. i)y a grand escort, 
and in every way p issible the friendly 
relatijns between Argentina and Chile 
were emphasized. 

SEYMOUR Sm 
SEAT IN SENATE 

Man Who Heidi Office Under 

Cleveland Candidate in 

Connecticut 

Norwalk, Conn., .Sept. 16. — John S. 
Seymour of this rlace. commissioner 
of patents under President Cleveland 
and who presided o .-er the recent state 
Democratic convoition, today an- 
nounced his candidacy for the United 
State senate from Connecticut. The 
next general jissemlily will' elect a suc- 
cessor to Senator Jiot-gan. 

ROB POSTOFFICE; 
ATTEMPT HOUSES 



Detroit, Mich., Sept. 16. — Well 
cooked vegetables, rice and meal as 
opposed to New England mince pie 
and over-baked beans, has made th» 
■graceful, self-controlled Turk the su- 
perior of the r»«rvou«, lank New Eng- 

lander." , , 

This was the contention laid down 
before the Mississippi Valley Medical 
association by Dr. Fenton B. TurcK of 
Chicago. 

"Diet has more to do with the mak- 
ing of great men or the deteriorating 
of the human race to the level of the 
brute than anything else,' declared 
Dr. Turck. 

•Compare that armorplate mince pie 
diet indulged in by all America with 
the two sane meals a day that are 
enabling Turkey to produce the finest 
specimens of physical manhood in the 
world. Mince pie and beans are bring- 
ing aboAit .a race deterioration, not 
alone in Connecticut and Maine." 



OYER 100,000 ARE 
DEAD OF CHOLERA 



Burglars Gel Nearly $2,000 
in Booly at May's Land- 
ing, N. J. 

May's Landing. N- J., Sept. 16.— 
Blowing open the safe in the postoffice 
of this place earlj' todaiy, robbers se- 
cured booty valuid at aMnost $2,000 
and made their escape, it is believed, 
in an automobile, 'line robbers also 
tried to enter se^•eral houses in the 
town but were frightened off. There 
are no night polleemen in the town 
and the robbers worked unmolested at 
the postoffice. 

Fatber Lninbert DyIiiK< 

New York, Sep . 16.— Rer. L. A. 
Lambert of the Roman Catholic diocese 
of Rocliester is reported, from New- 
loundland, N. J., to be dying there of 
hardening of the arJerles. Dr. Lamben 
was born sevent} -five years ago in 
I Allenport. Pa. Ht came into celebrity 
I by his replies to l^obert G. Ingersol. 



Disease Is Dying Out in Rus- 
sia and Threatening Si- 
berian Province. 

St. Petersburg, .Sept. 16. — The cholera 
epidemic, which, originating in South- 
ern Russia, already has claimed more 
than 100,000 victims, is stretching its 
way across Asiatic Russia, and today- 
was officially declared to threaten the 
province of Amur, in Southeast Si- 
beria, separated by the Amur river 
from Manchuria. 

The reports now in possession of the 
saniti-ry bureau show a total for the 
season of 182,327 cases with 83,613 
deaths These include the early re- 
turns for the week ending Sept. 10 and 
the revised figures for the preceding 
week. Complete reports for the week 
of Sept 4 to 10, inclusive, are lacking 
but the totals for the seven da>i5 at 
hand are 7,559 cases with 3,557 deaths. 
The totals lor the preceding week aru 
13,330 cases with 6,187 deaths. 

Yesterday there were 54 new cases 
and 19 deaths in the city of St Peters- 
burg This brings the total number of 
in the capital up to 3,750 cases wittv 
1.310 deaths. 

The totals in the aggregate show a 
falling off of cases and deaths. 

STOKES SAYS HE 
WON BY OVER 5,000 

I Claims to Have Carried Seven- * 

teen oi Twenty-One 

Counties. 

Trenton, N. J., Sept. 16.— Former 
Governor E. C. Stokes today said to a- 
representative of the Associated Presji 
that his advices from all sections of 
the stale gave him a lead of 5.000 to 
7 OOO in the United Slates senatorship 
primary ^'1 last Tuesday. He said lie 
wa." confident that thei^e figures would, 
not be materially changed by the offi- 
cial returns. He claims to have lea 
in the voting In seventeen of twenty- 
one counties, and declares he feels 
c-inlident that the choice expressed in 
the primaries will be resuected by the 
Republicans In the legislature next 

winter. ... . . 

Ex-Governor Stokes opponents la 
the primary were Former Governor 
Franklin Murphy and Congressman. 
Charles N. Fowler. 



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3 THE DULUTH HERALD 




VOLUME XXVIII— NO. 138. 



FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 16, 1910. 



TWO CENTS. 



NAME THREE 
INSURGENTS 
INjLUNOIS 

Boutell Among the Regular 

Repablicans Beaten 

Out. 

Cannon and Foss Renomi- 
nated in the Primary 
Election. 



Browne and Many Other 

Democrats Who Backed 

Lorimer Win. 




DRAWS FIRE 
FROMTEDDY 

Barnes Makes Another State- 
ment and Gets Quick 
Reply. 

Roosevelt Meets Politicians 

at His Office-Haskell 

Deserts Colors. 



MAYOR GAYNOR IS REGAINING HIS STRENGTHjiPOSTOFFICE 

SAFE BLOWN 



Chicago, Sept. 16. — In.«urg:ents wore 
vli-t.'jioiis In three out of the twenty- 
five i-uugressional ilistrictn of Illinois 
In the primary election yesiterday. 

Henry S. Boutell, standpat Republi- 
can, who has represented t\fv Ninth, a 
CJuoago district, in conpres."^ for twelve 
years, was defeated hy Frederick H. 
Gansbergen, who conducted his cani- 
X>ai|<ii on an out-and-out Insurgent 
platform. Gansberg^en was supported 
by the regular Republican organiza- 
tion. 

In the Eleventh district Col. Ira C 
Copley, the first man in Illinois to come 
out as an Insurgent candidate, won the 
Republican nomination ovi r Giorge \V. 
Conn, who cla.-^sed himself as a "pro- 
gressivt conservative." This seat now 
ts occupied by Howard M. Snapp, a 
standpatter. 

J<'hn C McKenaio secured the Roi-un- 
licHU nomination in the Thirteenth dis- 
trict after n spirited contest with Reu- 
ben R. Tiffai-.y. 

Fo>K uutl Cauuoii ^\ i:i. 

George Edmund F<. >-.-<. standpatter 
and head of tlie naval atTairs committee 
of the house, wuu the liepublican nom- 
ination in the Tenth district by about 
600 votts after a hard contert in which 

(Continued' on page I'J. fifth column.) 

CALUMET GIRLS 
ARE NOT LEPERS 

Attorney General Says Jen- 
sens Daughters May At- 
tend School. 

Landing, Mich., Sept. 16. — Tliat the 
four daughters of John Jensen, a leper 
Isolated at Calumet. Mich., would not 
be a, menace to the scliool population 
and cannot be excluded from tlie pub- 
lic schools, if the conclusion drawn by 
Attorney General Kuiin. 

Ttie attornev general in liis opinion 
states that ti'orough examination has 
revealed no trace of the disease in the 
daughters, they will not be a menace 
In tlie schools if they are disinfected, 
renf'ved from their father and mother 
and kept away fro mthem <iuring tiie 
schoi'l term, and if a munthly or '''- 
nionllily examination continues to show 
that they are free from the dread 
malady. 

islanFtrade is 

NEARLY DOUBLED 



CHARLES A. GOODWIN. 



Hartford. Cnn., Sept. 16. — Charles A. 
Goodwin of this city is the Republican 
nominee for gtivernor of Connecticut. 
Mr. Goodwin was the private secretary 
of the lute Governor Lillcy and Mr.* 
LilUy e.verted her infUu-nce in behalf 
of Mr. Goodwin. 




Scientist Says Death of Sup- 
posed Woman Was Due 
to Drug. 

Big Crowd Continues to Be 

Attracted By Crippen 

Trial. 



New York. Sept. 16. — There was a 
sharj. exchange today between Col. 
TluMjdore lioosevell and William Barnes, 
Jr., liei»ublican state committeeman 
and leader of the eo-called "old guard' 
in Albany county. In a published 
statement Mr. Barnes said: 

••No amount of political maneuver- 
ing, use of patronage or personal abuse 
can in the slightest degree obscure the 
one issue whicli must be fought out to 
a finish at Sarat^|ga. 

"There will be determined the future 
of tlie Republican party in the state of 
New Vorlc for some years to come. 
That party must determine in its plat- 
form whether it will be recognized as 
the conserving force, whiih has been 
its histtuv, or whether it will follow 
tlie radical policies of Mr. Roosevelt 
and lose the strategic position which 
it has held in the state of New ^ ork 
for manv years as the party of sanity 
and the protector of industry, upon 
which the world of business and labor 
must depend. 

Seekluic for "New GodK." 

•If it d' es not hold to its time- 
honored and successful principles, but 
seeks for new gods to worsliip. its mis-, 
take will be taken advantage of by its 
adversary. 

■No radical candidate has ever car- 
ried the state of New Vork. I'rogres;- 
in political life is essential to any par- 
ty, but the state leadcrsiiip wliich re- 
lies for its strength upon inciting tin- 
mob can. even If it tries, stem the 
tide which it has created. 

"The Republican party in this state 
has never faced a crisis so fundamental 
to its existence as it must meet at this 
hour." 

When Mr. Barnes' statement was 




AT WALKER 

Burglars Use Dynamite mi 

Get Off With 

$1,000. 

Police in Minnesota Town 

Seek Two Men Seen 

Before Robbery. 

Postmaster's Caution Prevents 

Bigger Haul in 

Stamps. 



( Continued 



on page 

-*- 



third column.) 



— CopjTlplittd I'M" by Oeorge GrantUam Bain. 

MAYOR WILLIAM J. GAYNOR ON HIS COUNTRY PLACE AT ST. JAMES, L. I. 

New York Sei.t 16.— Mayor William J. Gaynor is rapidly recovering strength after the illness that followed the 
nttemnt of James Gallagher to kill him. The wound in the mayors ne< k is tin. roughly healed, t nd except lot a 
weak voice and tl.e weakness due to the shock and loss of blood resulting from the shooting, his honor is fully re- 
cm ered Ht spends much time at his favorite exercise— walking— and sometimes helps with the wcrk on his country 
place at St. James. L. I. 

PLANiLAWsToR^ I MANY AMERICANS K BIG DAY 
NATIONAL GUARD IN THEJTEERAGE 

Convention at St. Louis Will Four Hundred Out of 1,120 



Bis! Increase Shown Under 

Provisions for Free 

Trade. 

•Washington, Sept. 16.— Trade between 
the Utiiled Slates and the IMiilippine 
Inlands increased b4 per cent during 
the first year's operation of the new 
tariff law, according to department of 
commerce and labor statistics. Tiie 
new taiiff law provides l\.r the free 
inlenhange of mercliandise between 
those Islands and the I'nited States. 

On Julv 31 last the law had been m 
effect one vear. The total imports 
from the islands In that ycar_ were 
lis i»l".372. an increase of ab<mt 50 per 
cent over the preceding year. Total 
export.-; to the islands were Sn..'>17,6. j, 
an i:,< rease <>f Sil)out 'lO per cent. 

Chief among the imports were sugar, 
manila hemp, cigars ami eigarettes. 
coi-ra and fibers. Sugar increased from 
ll.lit'ii.Ofit) in litO'J to $t.,liOO,Ot'0 in I'JlO. 
The princip.ll exports to the Islands 
•\^ere iron and steel manufactures, cot- 
ton cloths. Hour, boots, shoes, e.\plo- 
elves, meat atid il r.iry protliict s. 

REAR ADMIRAL 
BERRY RETIRED 

Chaplain Tricou of the Navy 

Also Ends Active 

Service. 

Washington, Sept. IC, — Hear Admiral 
Berry, i-n duty at the Washingt'-n 
navy yard as a member of the naval 
examining and retiring boards, and 
Chaplain David H. Tricou. on duty at 
the naval home, rhiladelphla, were 
placed on the retired list today on ac- 
count of old age. 

Admiral Herry is from Tennes.see and 
entered the navy in Jul.v, 186r>. He 
has had nearly twenty-two years' serv- 
ice at sea and has been a rear-admiral 
since June. 1009. 

Chai>lain Tricou is tlie senior chap- 
lain in the navy and has the rank of 
captain. He is from Maine, and began 
nis naval career in February. 187L'. 
He ha.s had about twelve years of sea 
eerviee. and has been stationed at 
rhiladelphla since November, 1905. 



London, Sept. IG. — Dr. William Henry 
AVilcox. scientific analyst to the home 
office, who disct-vered a deadly drug 
in the body found in the home of Dr. 
Hawley H. Crippen, took the stand 
when the trial of the doctor and his 
typist. Kthel Clara Leneve, for the 
murder of the former's wife was con- 
tinued today, and swore unqualifiedly 
that death was due to poison. 

The physician described the nature of 
the medium used and said that from a 
quarter to lialf a grain would prove 
fatal. He had found two-sevenths of a 
grain after a lapse of from four to 
eigiil months and judged that more 
than half a grain had been adminis- 
tered. He found no other cause of 
death and expressed the opinion that 
the victim survived the dose an hour 
or more. 

SeeoiidN I'epper TeHtiniuny. 
r5eft>re Dr. Wilcox was called the 
crown introduceit medical testimony to 
corroborate that given on Wednesdav 
, by I'rof. Augustus J. Pepper, patholo- 
gist of the L'nlversity of London, who 
swore that the body had been dismem- 
bered by one familiar with the science 
of anatomy. 

The gruesome exhibits and the un- 
pleai^ant character of tiie testimony at 
tlie last session did not deter the cu- 
rious froin struggling to get into the 
Bow street police court today and the 
portion apportioned to the public was 
again crowded. The spectators incKid- 
ed the usual array of women and these 
thoughtfully removed their hats that 
those seated beliind them might not 
miss a move of the trembling girl in 
the dock or of her comiianion. whose 
jaunty air only adds to the morbid in- 
terest in the c.'is. . 



NE?/ FINNISH DIET 
BEGINS SESSIONS 

May Be the Last One Made 

Up Under the Present 

Laws. 

Helsingfors, Sept. 16. — The new 
Finnish diet, which possibly will be the 
last one as at present constituted, was 
opened formally today by Governor 
Gen. Zein. Its task this fail will be to 
consider a series of measures tending 
to establish closer ties between the 
grand duchv and the empire. 

The attitude of the people to im- 
perial legislation which has been late- 
ly manifested, was exemplified in Pres- 
ident Svinjufvid's speech after his elec- 
tion vesterday. He pointed out that 
these were critical times for Finnish 
autonomy, and said: 

"We are still to undergo a more se- 
vere trial than ever, as the diet has 
been aslied to sanction terrible inroads 
in the constitution. Hard times face 
us, but we still survive, handing to 
the generations to come the most pre- 
cious treasure — a spotless standard 
refusing to negotiate the sale of our 
liberties." 



Be Unusually Im- 
portant. 

TN'asliington. Sept. 16.— The national 
guard convention to be held in St. 
Louis beginning Oct. 3 v.Mll be of more 
than ordinary interest and importance, 
in the opinion of war department offi- 
cials. It is proposed to take up the 
question of legislation for vhe national 

guard. 

Tlie general staff has shown ns ap- 
preciation of the importance of this 
convention by detailing ten officers 
of high reputation in 'heir respective 
branches of the servi- e to attenu the 
convention and delive- iddresses. They 
are Col Erasmu« M. AVeaver, coast ar- 
tilierv and in cliarge of the militia di- 
vision. Lieut-Cdl. John T. Thompson, 
ordnance department; .i-aj. George W. 
Mclver, Twentieth infantry; Maj. Ld- 
gar Russel, signal corps; MaJ. Davis S. 
Stanlev, quartermasters department; 
Maj. John F Morrbson, general staii; 
Mai. KdwardL. Munson, medical corps; 
Capt Monroe C. Kerlh, Twenty-second 
infantry: ('apt. Lucius R. Holbrook, 
subsistence department, and Capt. R. 
W. Walton, U. S. A., retired. Each will 
deliver an address on the work of his 
special department. 

Maj. -Gen. Leonard Wood, chief of 
staff, will attend the convention, but 
does not expect to deliver an address. 



.1rni> wuJioou »u \ight I'llgUt. 

Grand Vllliers. France. Sept. 16. — 
The dirigible ballooji Clement-Bayard 
made a successful night fliglit without 
lights over the positions of tlie bi- 
vouacked armies which are participat- 
ing in the Fiench maneuvers. 



on Maurefania Belong in 
This Country. 

New York, Sept. Ifi. — Eleven hundred 
and twenty steerage passengers of the 
steamer Mauretania, which docked last 
night, were discharged from the ves- 
sel today and all but 40U, who were 
American citizens, were sent to Ellis 
Island. 

When Health Officer Doty boarded 
the boat last night he found tliat the 
manifest showed. 1,122 steerage passen- 
gers and the count revealed only 1,120. 
He would not permit anyone to leave 
the steerage until the mystery waj? 
cleared. Other counts were made, and 
still there were but 11 20 persona 

found. , . ^ , 

Today it was found that the mistake 
was made when the manifest was pre- 
pared, and Dr. Doty gave permission 
to the officials of the line to release 
the third-class p assengers. 

WORLD TlBEKdlOSIS 

MEETING TO BE IN ROME. 

Washington, Sept. 16.— Announce- 
ment that the seventh international 
congress on tuberculosis will be held 
in Home. Italy. Sept, 24 to 30. 1911, 
was ofliclallv made today from the 
headquarters of the National Associa- 
tion for the Studv and Prevention of 
Tuberculosis. The congress, which 
meets every three years, was last held 
In Washington in 1908. 



INMEXICO 

Monument Is Dedicated in 

Honor of the National 

Holiday. 

Chile Prepares for Anniver- 
sary of Her Independ- 
ence as Nation. 



Walker. Minn.. Sept. 16.— (Special ta 
Tlie Herald.) — Rurglare dynamited the 
Walker postofflce early this morning 
and got away with about |200 In cash 
and over $800 in stamps. Entrance to 
the biiildlng was gained through the 
basement and the job has all the ap- 
pearance of being the work of pro- 
fessionals. The safe was not only- 
cleaned of cash and stami'S but the 
money drawer robbed and all registered 
letters were taken. 

Two suspicious characters were In 
town last evening, and this is the only 
clew which the police have at present. 
Postmaster Mc Bride had just received 
several tiiousand dollars' worth of 
stamps, a portion of which were in th» 
vault at the First National Bank o£ 
Walker. 



I CAUGHT! 



^jHMHiHMe-lMBMHi^^MHMHM^^^**^^^ 



r ^"^TJ^" ^' yfi" ^ 'T- -^ T* T* 



POWERS WINS 
BY 1U80 VOTE 

Kentuckian Says It Is Com- 
plete Vindication of ' 
His Career. 

Barbourville. Ky., Sept. 16. — Comi»lete 
returns from yesterda- s Eleventh dis- 
trict congressional jirimary show that 
Caleb Powers defeated Representative 
I) C Edwards for the Republican nom- 
I ination bv ll,2}-0 votes. Powers issued 
! a statem.ent today in which he declared 
that the big majority was a vindica- 
tion ef his political career. Powets 
formeilv was secretary of state and 
served eight vears in jail for his al- 
leged connection with "the Governor 
Goebel assassination. 

POPULATIONS OF 
FOUR TOWNS GIVEN 



They Are Racine, Wis., Cov- 
ington, Ky., Wilkesbarre, Pa., 
and Waterloo, la. 

Washington, Sept. 16. — The popula- 
tion of Racine, Wis., is 38,002, an in- 
crease of S,lHtO, or 30.6 per cent, as 
compared with 2'J.102 in 1900. 

The population of Covington, Ky.. 
is 53.270, "an increase of 10.332, or 24.1 
per cent, as compared with 42,93S in 
1900. Kenton county in Kentucky, in 
wliich Covington is located, lias a 
Ijopulation of 70,3.'j5, as comiiared with 
63.r.91 in 1900. , , 

The population of Wilkesbarre. Pa., 
is 67,105, an increase of 15,3ls4_, or 29. i 
per cent, as conii)ared with 51,721 in 
1900. .. . 

The population of Waterloo, Iowa, is 
26,693, an increase of 14.113, or 112.2 
per cent, as compared with 12,5S0 in 
1900. 




City of Mexico. .Sept. 16.— Mexico 
crowned the cerebrtaion of her cen- 
tennial today with the dedication of a 
monument to the ir dependence of the 
republic. 

There was a grand parade from the 
national palace to the site of the monu- 
ment in the beautifal Paazo Reforma, 
midway between this city and Chepul- 
! tepee, where the ceremonies were held, 
i Ten thousand soldiers, marines and 
rurales,- and representatives of other 
powers, were in lir e. The feature of 
the program was ai. address by Presi- 
dent Diaz 

The monument is un imposing granite 
shaft rising to a heigiit of 140 feet. 
It is topped with a figure symbolic of 
liberty and the base is surrounded by 
bronze figures representing the various 
physes of the national life. 
■ 1 ' 

Colebrale in Chile. 
Santiago, Chile, -^t^pt. IH.— The ar- 
rival today of President Figuen.a Al- 
corta of Argentina and his party to 
take part in the celebration of Chile's 
centennial of indeptndei.ee was the oc- 
casion of a splendid demonstration of 
welcome in which government officials 
and thousands of the public shared. 
The guests were ficcompanied to the 
residence. which they will occupy 
durin.g their stay, by a grand escort, 
and in every way l ossible the friendly 
relations between Ai»gentina and Chile 
were empliasiiied. 

SEYMOUR SEEKS 
SEAT IN SENATE 



Man Who Held Office Under 

Cleveland (Candidate in 

Connecticut. 

Norwalk. Conn., Sept. 16. — John S. 
Seymour of this plat'*^' commissioner 
of patents under i'resident Cleveland 
and who prj-sided ever the recent state 
Democratic convention. today an- 
nounced his candidacy for the United 
State senate from Connecticut. The 
next general assembly will elect a suc- 
cessor to Seualcr ViMigan. 



NEW ENGLAND 

DIET ROASTED 

Doctor Says Mince Pie and 

Beans Are Bad for 

the Race. 

Detroit, Mich.. Sept. 16. — Well 
cooked vegetables, rice and meat as 
opposed to New England mince pie 
and over-baked beans, has made the 
•graceful, fcelf-controlled Turk the su- 
perior of the nervous, lank New Eng- 

iander." 

This was the contention laid down 
before the Mitsispippi Valley Medical 
association by Dr. Fenton B. Turck of 
Chicago. 

"Diet has more to do with the mak- 
ing of great men or the deteriorating 
<if the human race to the level cf the 
brute than anything else,' declared 
Dr. Turck. 

"Compare that armorplate mince pie 
diet Indulged in by all America with 
the two sane meals a day that are 
enabling Turkey to produce the finest 
specimens of piiysical manhood in th« 
world. Mince pie and beans are bring- 
ing abo.ut a race deterioration, not 
alone in Connecticut and Maine. ' 

OVER 100,000 ARE 
DEAD OF CHOLERA 

Disease Is Dying Out in Rus- 
sia and Threatening Si- 
berian Province. 



ROB POSTOFFICE; 
ATTEMPT HOUSES 

Burglars Get Nearly $2,000 
in Body at May's Land- 
ing, N. J. 

May's Landing, N- J., Sept. 16.— 
Blowing open the safe in the postoffice 
of this place early today, robbers se- 
cured booty valued at almost $2,000 
and made their escape, it is believed, 
in an automobile. Tiie robbers also 
tried to enter several houses in the 
town but were frightened off. There 
are no nigiit iiolltemen in the town 
and the rol)bers worked unmolested at 

the postoffice. 

■ ■ 

Father Ufiinbert I)y tug- 
New York, Seit. 16. — Hev. L. A. 
Lambert of the R^mian Catholic diocese 
of Rochester is reported from New- 
loundland, N. J... to be dying there of 
hardening of the anterles. Dr. Lambert 
was born seventy-five years ago in 
Allerport Pa. He came into celebrity 
I by h\s replies to Robert G. IngerBol. 



•"Btr 



St. Petersburg, Sept. 16. — The cholera 
epidemic, which, originating in South- 
ern Russia, already has claimed mora 
than 100,000 victims, is stretching its 
way across Asiatic liussia. and today- 
was officially declared to threaten the 
province of Amur, in Southeast Si- 
beria, separated by tlie Amur river 
from Manchuria. 

The reports now in possession of the 
sanitary bureau shovi- a total for the 
season " of 1^2,327 cases with 83,61iJ 
deaths. These include the early re- 
turns for the week ending Sept. 10 and 
the revised figures for the preceding 
week. Complete rei)orts for the week 
of Sept 4 to 10, inclusive, are lacking 
but the totals for the seven <lays at 
hand are 7,.")59 cases with 3.557 death*. 
The totals lor the preceding week aro 
13.330 cases with (<,lh~ deaths. 

Yesterdav there were 54 new cases 
and 19 deaths in the city of St Peters- 
burg. This bring.«: the total number of 
i in the capita! up to 3,7r.o cases with 
1,3 10 deaths. 

The totals in the aggregate show a 
falling off of cases and deaths. 

STOKES SAYS HE 
WON BY OVER 5,000 

Claims to Have Carried Seven- 
teen oi Twenty-One 
Counties. 

Trenton, N. J., Sept. 16. — Former 
Governor E. C. Stokes today said to a. 
representative of liie Associated Press 
that l:is advices from all sections of 
the state gave him a lead of .'.('00 to 
7 Ot'O in the Cnited States senatorship 
p'rimarv ot last Tuesday. He said lie 
was confident that these figures would 
not be materially changed by the oftl- 
cial returns. He claims to have lea 
In the voting in seventeen of twenty- 
one counties, and declares he teela 
confident that the cb.oi.e expressed In 
the primaries will be respected by the 
Ke)>ublicans in the legislature next 

winter. „x , . . i,~ 

Ex-Governor Stokes opponents la 
the primarv were Former G"vernor 
Franklin Murphy and Congress maa. 
Charles N. Fowler. 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 






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1 DEFECTIVE PAGE 



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MBH Wa-i 




Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 16, 1910. 



GIRL GOES TO 

FERGUS FALLS 



Thr^ local pmbate c-ourt has received 
notice from ilie state board of control 
that Viina M. Xiskala may be commit- 
ted lo the stale hospital for tne insane 
at Fergus Falls. 

Tne tflrl was examined as to her 
canity seme time atro and f«uind to be 
Insane. She had been in this country 
but a short lime and it was thouKht 
that sa.- would iie deported. The case 
Js l.ein< looked into bv the immigrant 
Inspfrtor l)ui in the meantime she will 
l>e confined at Tereus Falls. 

She waa brouKht to Duluth from 
Jllouiitain Iron. Minn., wlierc she had 
l>een working some weeks. Slie imag- 
ines that people are continually accus- 
iny^ her or wronjc doing. 

James Babala. .'3 years (dd. was ex- 



'amirie<l In probate court ye.sterday as 
I to his sanity and found to be Insane. 



BOARD HAS 

TO ECONOMIZE 



The monthly report of the board of 
public works shows a balance of but 
I $5. 41';. 40. The total available fund is 
; listed as $92,820.01, and the expendi- 
I Itures to tlate at ?S7,395.61. The ex- 
penses for August amounted to $12,- 
097. 39. This includes $4,379.31 for re- 
pairing streets and alleys; $2,122.33 
I for cleaning streets and alleys; $560.52 
I for cleaning gutters and sewers; and 
l$2.37»>.74 for" miscellaneous expenses. 
The condition of the fund has compelled 
I the board to cut expenses down to the 
lowest possible figure. About lialf the 
'strej; '^leaning pang has l)een laid olT 
and jth T economies put in force. 



DEMOCRATS BELIEVE 
GRAY WILL BEHlECTED 






Why Our Young Men's 
Clothes Are Better— 



(Wj E giv^e more attention and care 
^^ to young men's clothes than 
most any other store. 

To give us what we w^ant, 
several makers employ designers 
who study young men's fashions 
exclusively. 

They have fabric experts who travel all over 
and secure every newest color and pattern. The 
cutting and sewing is done by experienced tailors 
who make nothing but young men's garments. 

We know that active young fellows strain 
and wrench their clothes more than older men; 
and our specifications call for extra durable ma- 
terial in every important part. 

The result is clothes that are all to the good— 
—Suits and Overcoats jammed full of six-cylinder 
style; garments that will make you ''clothes- 
happy" every day you wear them. 



Prices are reasonable — 




TO 



$25 



Advance Sale of Fall 
Top Coats and Cravenettes 

Who wants to li^•e in Duluth without a Top Coat or 
Cravenette — nobody, because nearly every morning and 
evening in the year they can be worn with comfort. We 
are selling all our $22.50, $20 and $15 (f Q "T f* 
Top Coats and Cravenettes carried over jHfj f ^J 
from last season, at one price ^\^9 A ^ 



Out Busy Boys' Department 

Is in charge of George Worcester, \\h>. is su well and favor- 
ably known to the mothers of Duluth boys. He has everything 
this season to meet the demand of the boys for school or dress 
wear. 




Boys' School Suits — 7 to 17 
years, $3.50 to $8.50. 

Oak Hall Special, Suit with 
two pairs of trousers, $5.00. 



Russian and Sailor Suits — 
2y2 to 10 years, $3 to $10. 

Boys' Hats, Caps, Shoes. 
Shirts, Waists and Hosiery. 



KNOX HATS-ROSWELLE HATS. 
EMERY SHIRTS. REGAL SHOES. 




Meet 

Here 

Tomorrow 



SUPERIOR ST. AT SECOND AVE. V^EST. 





Choice of State Committee 
Indorsed By Duluth Mem- 
bers of Party. 

All Have Praise for Ability 

and Personal Worth 

of Candidate. 




In the opinion of Duluth Democrats, 
James Gray is going: to win in the 
gubernatorial race at the head of the 
Democratic ticket. 

While they generally admit Wiat he 
goes into the contest somewhat handi- 
capped by reason of the late .start, they 
say the Minneapolis man should make 
a very creditable run and they do not 
concede the election of Eberhart, by 
any means. 

With John Lind leading the cam- 




**iT PAYS TO PAY CASH." 

THOMASSON' 

-THE FURNITURE man" 

ODD FKI,L.OWS* 1IAL.L BIII.DINO 
IH and 20 Lake Avenue ^ortli. 



DINING TABLES! 




im. 




$15 DINING TABLES $7.95. 

Here is absolutely tlie be.si. Table 
value to be found in Duluth. Also 
2|) other values just as good ^s 
this one. This is a solid oak table, 
tinely polished and finished solid 
Pedestal claw feet. Do not 'fall to 
see this value — high priced stores 
get $20 for this table — our regular 
low price is $15. Special fer one 
day — Saturday— only *7.»5. 

SEE OlIR ENTIRE L!\E. 




tended that Kberhart is vulnerable at 
so many points^that-a good, clean, able, 
energetic Democrat will surelv oe the 
choice of the Vjiais ..of the people. 

T. T. Hudsoi< ^plkking of Mr. Gray, 
said: 

"I knew him piftlcularly when he 
was mayor of Mftmeapolis. He is re- 
garded as a man of good ability. He 
has a very good .-stamiing in business 
aud political eiriles. Mt< Gray has 
been looked upon in the past as a 
good Democrat. In my opinion, the 
committee has made a good choice in 
its selection of a . candidate to head 
the ticket and re^sresent the Demo- 
cratic party of Mmnesota." 

"I have krBDwn-Mr. Gray only in a 
casual way since fie was. fleeted mayor 
of Minneapolis." said I^ert Fesler, city 
attorney. "His Y'ewrs un jj>ubllc ques- 
tions that I heqad him ^fltpress years 
ago were entirely' sati.«fActory to me, 
and with such men as Senator Stock- 
well and ex-Governor Lind standing 
so strongly fo^- him now, I feel that 
he would make the people of Minnesota 
a high-class governor — one Of the same 
kind that the Democrats have fur- 
nished the people of the state in Lind 
and Johnson. Those who think we 
gave them good governors in I^lnd and 
Johnson ought to be willing to try ua 
again with ex-Mayoj Gray," 

Judge Alfred Jaques, Democratic 
candidate for congress knows Mr, 
Gray only be repute, but is sufficiently 
informed as to the man and his 
capabilities to recognize in him a fit 
man for the gubernatorial chair. 

"Mr. Gray's tralvplng and experience 
are such that he is excellently equlped 
to assume the duties that devolve upon 
the cliief executive of the state," said 
Judge Jaques. "He is naturally more 
thorougiily informed on political con- 
ditions than are most men. by reason 
of his long experience as a newspaper- 
man, and so far as ability is concerned 
the commlttee..co;u4d not well have se- 
lected a better^iman :to head the ticket." 
Old Friend's Tribute. 
H. J. Grannis kne\v? "Jim" Gray when 
both were students* : at the University 
of Minnesota and t»he acquaintance be- 
tween the two Jiasi been maintained at 
this time. 

"1 was intimately acquainted with 
Mr Gray at Ihet university," said Mr. 
Grannis today." "He vva.s In the class 
of 1885 and I in the class of 1886. V\ e 
worked together a'6 members of the 
staff of the .\riel, ti\e student publica- 
tion. -Jim' lived with his mother and 
sister, his father being dead. He had 
no easy time of it «« a student, havint' 
to make his way-, tlirough college, 
working wherx lie. ctould as a reporter 
on the MinneanJuIis fca.pers. His char- 
acteristics then '^m-e very much the 
same as they area^w. He was noted 
for his wit and tClieferfulness and ver- 
satility. Gray jgsmi Di'omine^it as an 
orator in those days. He took part in 
most of the universit.v debates and was 
an able talker. He lias always been a 
Democrat. I remember well that he 
was a strong Danxocrat In those days, 
and he has lost rfone of his enthusiasm 
for the party. 1 am glad that he was 
selected to headJthe ticket, for I know 
that if he Is elected he will be a good 
governor." 

E. A. Lindgren, catididate for county 
treasurer on the;Democratlc ticket, who 
has met Mr. Gray in a casual way when 
on btisiness trips to Minneapolis, is con- 
fident tlL^.t the committee made no mis- 
Cake w^j.en it picked him to head the 
ticket. He belleres Mr. Gray's nomina- 
tion will tend, to increase the newspa- 



per strength of the party in this cam- 
paign. 

Edward R. Ribenack, candidate for 
the house in the Fiftieth district. Is 
pleased with the selection made by the 
committee and thinks that with John 
Lind taking an active part in ths cam- 
paign with Mr. Gray, t,he party's 
chances of success are good. 

H. \V. Clieadle, city clerk and candi- 
date for the senate in the Fiftv-first 
distric:, welcomes the naming of Mr. 
Gray as the party head-liner, saying: 

I am glad to know that the Demo- 
crats aave been fortunate enough to 
secure such an able and progressive 
man to make the race. From what I 
have heard I consider him one of the 
most progressive Democrats In Minne- 

Walter F. Dacey. assistant city at- 
torney and candidate for county at- 
torney on the Democratic ticket said- 

"As a University of Minnesota man 
I am of course greatly interested in 
the candidacy of Mr. Gray. His selec- 
tion by the committee seem.s to me 
to be eminently satisfactory. Un- 
doubtedly Mr. Gray's close Identifica- 
tion with university affairs will make 



him the favorite candi<late of the 
alumni of that institution, an element 
in Minnesota politics that is of great 
value to a candidate fortjnate enough 
to possess its favor." 

NO TRACE OF 
GLENN FOUND 



After having thoroughly covered the 
route over which Alex Gh^nn was sup- 
posed to have gone, tie searching 
I party consisting of Michael Guggins, 
I H. W. Aske and A. Osborn returned 
I to Duluth today without Uaving found 
i any trace of the missing c -uiser- 
I The three men started fi-om the town 



I of Mesaba and went to the Spring 
j mine location, as Glenn had done. Then 
they went into the woods and scoured 
the entire country the cruiser was 
Icnown to have penetrated. They 
searched the tract of timber, which' 
Glenn had left to visit, but were unable 
to find any signs of Glenn having vis- 
ited it. Rains since the cruiser disap- 
peared would probably have erased any 
tracks left by him. 

Another expedition is now Tbelngr 
formed to take up the search. The 
tract of timber lies just at the south- 
ern boundary of Birch lake and it is 
thought possible that Glenn may have 
wanderod into an isolated camp of the 
»t. Croix Lumber company on tlie other 
shore of the lake. Cruisers in the em- 
P'.<^J' "i t'lo St. Croix Lumber company 
will be enlistid in the work and a thor- 
ough search will be made of the campa 
of the company and the land in the vi- 
cinity. 

Little hope is entertained by Glenn's 
friends cf flnding him alive, but hope 
will not be abandoned until every re- 
source has been exhausted. 



Big Week-End and Wind-Up Sale Of Good 




Carpenters, mechanics and every 
other person who uses tools slf^ould not 
fail to visit Kelley's this Friday and 
Saturday. ' \ 



1 ^^ To take advantage of the 
* **• savings represented in the 
tool bargains listed below. 

0|ttfl Come and ask our Tool 

**^ expert all you want to 
know about any kind of tool. 



^pil You should be here Sat- 
^* ^ urdc^y -evening and get a 
tree souvenir. 

4lt}l Saturday evening one man 
"Vlrll visitor is going to receive 
free, one of our best high grade 
hand saws. Find out how at Kel- 
ley's. 




Saturday we offer a 2G-inch guar- 
anteed high grade Steel Saw, the 
regular price of which /»tf\^.^ 
is $1.25. the special KHP 
price for Sat. only ^*v^/ 




Nobody knocks this hammer bar- 
gain. The quality is too good, 
the price is so low. It's 1\^ size, 
regular 50c 'and guar- €%f9 ^^ 
anteed, special price ^, /■* 
only •la^,. 



Saturday is your day to buy a 
6-lnch knuckl«-joiht block plane, 
with full nickel trim. /» ■■ 
Regular $1.00 — Satur- Kr|0 
day tool sale price .... ^'"^^ 

We 



place on 



sale Saturday '!_ 
65-cent steel 
squares 



^a-r VrtT^S 



± 



Size 25-rnch tvlth 
16-inch tongues^ and will 
sell them at 

39c 




Levels from 24-lnch to 28- 
Inch size. Fully brass bound. 
Regular p r 1 c e 
$4.50 — our spe- 
olal Sat. pxlce . . 



$3.20 





Buy 
Mai] 
Boxes 
Here. 



pWAR 

118 &I20 WE§T"5UPERI0R:5T. OULUTH.'MrNH, 



12 

Styles 

Mail 

Boxes. 




T 



*^Correct Dress for Women and Girls." 



Proper School Appareling 

For Girls and Misses 




Fall Selections Are Ready! Matefials and workman- 

ship are such as command admiration, and guarantee long and dur- 
able service. Styles are faultless, and the great attention given to 
proportioning and ranges of sizes ^ consummate efficient preparations 
for the outfitting of school girls of all sizes and ages. 

There are no gatherings here of the ordinary "shoppy looking** goods — every 
article introduced into our vast assortments, represent the logical result of thought, 

experience and skill. In short, w^e have brought Giddings Girls' Wear to a 
level so high, that we know no better exainples of Twentieth Century Ap- 
pareling for Young Girls and Misses, than we present to you, right here at your 
very door. 

C*-^,iX^, Youthful Styles, built on the New^ and Nobby "Straight Line" effect, which 

wl*.XLw» fashion now Demands — Unfinished Serges, Basket Materials and Chain ^^'eaves, 

]tlain or trimmed with Herctiles Braids — Soft Peau de Cygne linings, and skillful tailoring. 
Prices $16.50 to $35.00. 

(^ f\^^^* ^^ c^*^ hardly say enough about our Girls' Coats — Booth after Booth is filled 
"w/UQ^LO* to overflowing with coats for all rianner of Girls, from the Toddling Tot to the 
College Miss. But the Mannishly Tailored Coats lor Grammar Grade and High School Girls, is 
a class of Garments that we lay great stress upon — and the Coats with the "Presto'" convertible 
collar, is a new and novel feature that is going to take the eye of almost every girl and mother 
Avho sees them. Prices $15.00 to $29.50. Other Coats' at $10.00 and up. Among the 
Coats for Smaller Tots, Velvets, Velours, Corduroys and Plushes are among some of the most 
stylish — and Chinchilla Coats in big and little sizes, are coats that are newly popular every sea- 
son, because they are the warmest kind of coats, and they always look well and wear well. 
Children's Coats at $5.75 to $15.00. 



Peter Thompsons 
and School Dresses: 



New arrivals in Fall Peter Thompson Suits, have just been 
received, mostl)- in Black and Xavy Serges, regulation braid 
and emblem trimmed, in white or red — sizes 8 to 20 — at $10 
to $29.50. And we are also showing a Very Fine Line of 
Tailored School and College Dresses, in plain and practical stvles. including 15, 17 and 20- 
year sizes, as well as smaller sizes from G years uj). Prices $5.00 to $30.00. 



TT^n ^"UTA^'f Af T -f-nrio ^^^ '^^"^ replete, with Full Fashioned Gar- 
JL O^Xi. WlWCatCl i^llieo ments, in all manner of plain and fancy 
Vi^eaves and in all lengths and shades. Ladies' sizes $5.00 to $25.00. Children's 
sizes 75c to $5.00. Children's Fall Headwear selections in velvet, cloth, fur and 
felt are also complete. 

• _ 

^'The Qidding Corner'' — First Avenue West and Superior Sheet, 



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Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 




September 16, 1910. 



A STAR THAT WINKS. 
Harper's Weekly: There Is in the 

constellation Pegasus a little rarlable 
star that may reasonably be said to 
wink. Two or three times in the 
course of a single night this curious 
8tur can be seen to fade and then to 
brighten like a signal liglit. For about 
two hours and thre»'-qu:iriers it be- 



comes fainter and fainter, then comes 
a change and at the end of two hours 
and three-quarters more it is as bright 
as at the beginning. Unfortunately it 
can only be se»n with a telescope, let 
it lanks as a sun. 

... • ■ 

Phone vour wants to The Herald. 
Both 'phones 324. Results are sure. 



Garment Stocks Fast Wearing Com' 
pletion, and Choosing 
Time Already Ripe. 

Women who revel m first 
choices, or those who need 
apparel early, will do well to 
select now; for many of the 
early arrivals are one-of-a-kind 
garments, and you are liable to 
that the thing which suits you be.st^ 
is already here. 

New Autumn 
Coats 

Tlio season's coats are mostly in 
the semi or seven-eighths fitting 
styles. And with the exception of 
the ever-popular Broadcloths, mate- 
rials are mostly of heavy texture. 
As for instance, the Swagger Zibe- 
lines, Scotch Tweeds, Boucle Mate- 
rials, Scotch Donegals, and Double- 
faced Aviation or Polo Coatings. 
Styles are varied and numerous, i"^^' 

Tncludinir Trig side-buttoned Mili- 
tary effects, with standing collar and 
handsome Braid Frogs looped grace- 
fully across the chest. Such a style in 
fine broadcloth, and Skinner satin lined 
thrnif^Iiout. is but $29.50. llaiul- 
sonie Broadcloth or Scotch Tweed 
Coats, made with Sailor collars that 
convert themselves into long and 
.^hapely revers at the front, and l3utton 
low to one side, are very swapper, in- 
ileed. Prices range from $25.00 to 
$35.00. There are also many Man- 
nish Tailored Styles and Modest Plain 
Tailored Coats, which are stamped 
Handsome thrnui^h sheer "Grace of 
Line." .Also Velvet ami Velour Coats. 




Autumn Weights in 

Natural Chamois 

Gloves 

Reg. $2.00 dt-| OC 
Quality ^JL»ZD 

The washable French 
chamois glove is a hand- 
coverinj? that Is always 
appropriate, dainty and 
durable, for all manner 
of .street and semi-dres- 
ey wear — .\II Ml-xes from 
5Vs <€» 7 — III while, 
f r e a m nnd natural 
ooIorH. 



Coat Prices-$15.00, $19.50, $25.00, $29.50, 

$35.00 to $50.00, 

"Trim" and Stylish Dresses 

The Tailored Street Dress is a garment that the 
Home Dressmaker is heginning to despair of; and wom- 
en now look to the Ready-to-\Vear Fashion EstabHsh- 
ment to stipply this convenient and ever-appropriate 
garment. We liave devoted very great attention to 
dres?.es this season and point with pride to the simple 
and suitable stvlcs in Voile, Panama, Serge, Worsted 
and Henrietta, at $19.50 to $35.00. 



Stunning Hats for Autumn 

' Charming and distinctive styles in Velvet, Beaver 

'and silk. The Favorite High-Crowned Turban, 
the Charlotte Corday and Nobby Brimmed 

Styles share honors in the initial showing which we 
now present to our patrons. Prices $10 and Up. 



Especially Attractive Styles In 
Tailored Linen (D! O 7 C 
Waists at SP^* '^ 

"^ T.i])cral selections in Tailorfcd Shirt styles, bosom- 
plaited fronts, and various tucked and i)laited styles, 
with or without patch pockets. Also Tailored Madras 
Waists at the same price. 



BEGINS WITH 

MURDER CASE AUTOiOBlLE 



80 per cent, no ft^rt 
will be worked. lie Hi 
that the university »au 
have consulted with 
schools before the Aban^ 



liar liardship 

iks, h.owever, 

iritioK should 

le state high 



Criminal Calendar Will Open 

Monday of Next 

Week. 



Serefin Pelros Must Face 

Charge of Killing John 

Hendrickson. 



The criminal calendar will begin 
Monday morning of next week before 
Judge William A. Cant, when before 
a jury, Serefln Petros will be tried 
on a charge of murder in the first de- 
gree. 

Petros was indicted by the Septem- 
ber grand jury and charged with the 
shooting of John Hendrickson on the 
steamer James Corrigan, July 29. 

When arraigned recently, Petros 
pleaded not guilty. }le will be rep- 
resented by Attorney Alexander Mar- 
shall. 

Both Petros and Hendrickson were 
members of the crew of the Corrigan, 
which arrived in port on July 28. 
They had both been ashore at the 
time the trouble arose. 

While rowing back to the steamer 
some of the men claimed that Petros 
should row. He said lie was off duty 
and wasn't required to work. He 
was thrown into the bay for saying 
this, he claims. 

The men evidently though it a good 
joke for they all shook hands and 
agreed to be friends. When the 
steamer was reached, Petros is said 
to have gone to his bunk, which was 
located in the bow of the boat and 
a distance of several hundred feet 
and in a short time returned to the 
engine room with his revolver. 

He kicked in the glass of the win- 
dow, it is said, and pointing the 
weapon at Hendrickson, fired. Hen- 
drickson lived for some days, but 
finally died Aug. 19. 

After the shooting Petros is said 
to have gone to the captain of the 
boat and told him that it was he 
(Petros) who did the shooting. 

Many of the men who sail the 
lakes know Petros or did know Hen- 
drickson, and many of them are 
awaiting the trial with much interest. 



ISJURNED 

George H. Crosby's Touring 
Car Completely Destroyed 
^ By Flames. 

Occupants Have Narrow Es- 
cape When It Plunges 
Down HilL 



being employed there. These the men 
brought in order to justify their re- 
queHt for .something to eat and a place 
to sleep for a few days until they had 
a pay day when they would pay what- 
ever claim the Bethel had against 
tltern. 

Ab the men wanted merely a tide- 
ove^ until they could earn a dollar, 
the Bethel p^erformed the service and 
when pay day came the men on its 
books; came and paid up. Some of the 
men liad need of recourse to the Bethel 
but once; others several ^inies. All 
told, 634 document.^ identifying the ap- 
plicant were turned in and on the 
strjingth of them the Bethel accommo- 
datlons were given. 

Out of food and lodging totaling 
$658.13. only $18.98 was lost on the 
traa.saction, all but that sum being 
turned in by the men on the first pay 
da> succeeding their entrance into the 
Bethel. Business men closely in touch 
with the work of the bethel who have 
knowledge of this particular transac- 
tion have expressed their surprise and 
pleasure ui)on learning how the con- 
fidt^nce of the Bethel superintendent 
and his associates was justified by th^ 
dock laborers. 

This Is only one of the scores of 
instances in which workmen properly 
accredited have been tided over by the 
Bei;hel until pay day. All they sought 
was a bite of food and a roof until 
they could earn enough to pay their 



score and then take ether 
they so wished. 



(luariers if 



GOT HIS CHAN'JE BACK. 

New York Sun: "For scrupulous care 
and trouble taken to return change, I 
have never heard of anything that 
equalled an experience of mine on the 
railroad between Metz and Paris," said 
a National Guardsmari the other day. 
"I had been studying the battlefields 
about Metz and when 1 decided to get 
back to Paris 1 converted most of the 
monev I had into francs. 

"It was a hot day ir August and the 
second-class compart nents were so 
crowded that 1 decided as we stopped 
at a town near the F'rench border to 
change to a flrst-«lasis coach. There 
was a supplement to jAy, and the onlv 
German money I had wa.*? in 20-mark 
pieces. The official who made the 
transfer did not have the proper 
change and while I waM waiting for hlrn 
to 



lion in Germany. I replied that I wa» 
the individual. 

■ 'Come with me. monsieur." he said, 
so I alighted and followed him Into ih« 
station office. 

"There I found that my change had 
been telegraphed on, and he had the 
.•=um due me already counted out. There 
were a lot of receipts and things to 
siKn, and the train was lield up almosc 
fifteen minutes on my account, but I 
got my money and a lot of satisfac- 
tion." 

» 

THE HIGH COST OF LIVING. 
'•Gifford Plndiot," said a New York 
physician, has America's forests al- 
most on the brain. He couldn't lev* 
them more if they were his own pri- 
vate property. 

"Talking to me about the millions 
lost annually in forest fires. Gifford 
_ IMnchot asked, angrily, why the peo- 

come back with tlie 12 marks and | pjg didnt appreciate the proved value 
some pfennigs that be onged to ">«^. t'^e j j forests as thev appreciated the 

train moved off, and 1 gave my money i "V""^" , „, ^ ^» vi»i^h«iu«#f- 

UD for gone still unproved value of Meichnikofl b 

"About ll" o'clock that night the train j lactic acid microbes, 
stopped at a town about half-way to | "He said that in f /t^*t"'-*"^, /,'!** 
Pari^ There was on!- one other occu- I morning a man complained 1o a waiter: 
nant "of mv .ompartment, a man who | "Waiter, this milk Is sour „.„..,^^ 
had eot on at some station in France. "If you use It, then sir, the waiter 
Soon after wi stopped the door of the answered quickly. 'we-U have to -^arge 
compartment was opiMied and a man you extra ^our milk s gone up 
inoulred which of us had given a iO- I tremendously, sir. since they discov- 
maik piece to be changed at the sta- • ered that It cured old age.' 



MUST HAVE HKIIIER MARKS. 

I niversity Oificials Insist High 
School Pupils (Jraduate With Honor 

Students at the Central high school 
must graduate with honor hereafter 
cr they will not be admitted to the 
Minnesota state university. 

To graduate with honor means that 
a grade of 80 per cent will lie neces- 
sary <iuring the last two years of the 
high school course. 

Up to this time a grade of 76 per 
cent in each study lias been all the le- 
quirement needed. The university of- 
ficials state that a student who just 
j slhles through the hlgli school course 
is apt to fall down badly In hi.s uni- 
versity studies. This, they state, la the 
reason for the required higher stand- 
ing. 

Supt. R. E. Denfeld of the local 
school says that as most of the locnl 
stdents pass with at least a grade of 



Mr. and Mrs. George Crosby and 
Chris Johnson, superintendent of Forest 
Hill cemetery, miraculously escaped 
with their lives yesterday when the 
large '\\'inton "Six" automobile in 
which they-were riding plunged back- 
wards down a steep hill at the ceme- 
tery. 

After sliding about thirty feet, the 
big car struck a large rock, which 
brought it to a stop. The concussion 
ignited the gasoline in th.e tank under 
the rear seat. The automobile, valued 
at $6,000, was completely destroyed, 
only parts of the chassis and engine 
remaining. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crosby leaped out just 
as the machine was enveloped in a 
mass of name. Mr. Johnson was not 
quite so fortunate, sustaining a badly 
burned hand. For a few seconds It 
seemed that the occupants of the car 
were doomed to Instant death or serious 
injury. 

It Is believed that In climbing the 
steep hill some part of the machinery 
went wrong, as the engine is powerful 
and there seems to be but little doubt 
but that under ordinary circumstances 
the automoliUe could have made al- 
most any hill. Finding that they 
couldn't make it, an effort was made 
to let the car down the declivity by 
using the brake. The brake evidently 
refused to work properly, and the 
heavy machine dropped backwards like 
a shot. 

SQUARE ACCOUNTS 
WITH THE BETHEL 

Men Tided Over Until Pay 

Day Justify Confidence 

in Them. 

That the Bethel on Lake avenue 
serves humanity In many ways is gen- 
erally taken for granted, but as to 
just what these ways are, the public 
does not always know One of the 
latest examples of Its benevolent work 
is one of the most sall.'^factory. 

The Bethel books, which are open 
to everybody for Inspection at all 
times, show this exhibit. 

Number of identities? 634 

.Amount of tickets issued $656.1.S 

Amount collected ***! io 

Amount lost 18.98 

Those figures mean, in brief, that 
men laboring on the Noi'thern Pacific 
docks not long ago came to the Bethel 
with documents Issued by the dock 
superintendent showing that they were 




^ 

^ 



%mm% 




^^ Correct Dress for Woinen.'^ 



Fall Underwear Lines Now Complete 

In providing warm underwear for dainty and par- 
ticular women, we have scoured the underwear markets 
of the country for underwear that shall be warm, light, 
perfect fitting, elastic and durable. 



We have given the Underwear prob- 
lem thorough and scientific study, 
which develops into the fact that we 
carry no less than 25 Distinct Styles, in 
eight or ten definite proportionings. 

For convenience, every quality, weiglit and 
style has its own name to readily distinguish it 
front those of slightly different style — therefore, 
once Vou have had our underwear connoisseur assist 
you in selecting the proper garment fitted to your 
need and figure, all you need to do thereafter is to 
call for the name that designates the garment you 
desire. 

Children's Union Suits in silk and 
wool, $1.00 and $1.50. 

Ladies' Union Suits at any price from 
$1.00 to $5.00. 





all Footwear 








^Correct Dress /or Women.^ 



I received several more ship- 
ments of Fall Shoes this week, in- 
cluding' a lot ..f Harry H, Gray's 
and Wickert & Gardiner's. These 
sell in the regular way for $4.00, 
$5 00 and $6.0(J. 

My price 

$9 QQ . n 

Li\IU Ui 

"My Way a Saving Way to You. 

I J^ 9P^i^ THE ORIGiPgAL S&ltiiPLE 



SHOE MAN 



11 SECOND AVENUE WEST. 



FIIME HATS! 

The best hats possible to obtain. 

Derbies, Soft Hats, .$5.00. 

DUNLAP ^^^^ ^^'■^ Opera Hats, $8.00 and $10. 

{'rushers. $2.50 to $3.50. 

O'T'rr'T'C/^lVT'Q Derbies and Soft Hats — 
bllliloVJlN O $3.00 to $12.00. 

Siewert Special $3.00 Hats— Have no superior at the price. 
■D^^l^f'r. O^f^ "Ho+o Novelties In the rough mixtures — 

Roelof s bott hlats— j^.^,>„ j,, $5.00. ^ _ ^ 

English Derbies and Soft Hats — 

'Tvveeii ^;iz«'s — .$3.50 



HAT sHor- 



-The most up-to-date hat shop In jjhe ^Northwest — 
J Xpert worlimanship. Any style of men's hats made W order. Bring 
in your old hat if worth doing over. Micliigan Street Floor. 



A. B, Siewert & Co,, 



304 WKST SVI'ERIOR STRKET. 



A Fashion Pageant of New Dresses, 

Suits and Coats 



W 



HY ARE S. & B. 
garments so dif- 
ferent? That they are 
different all are agreed. 
How are they differ- 
ent? 

Ask the women who 
have already bought — 

Every dress that has 
arrived is a copy of a 
French model — wheth- 
er it be $25 or $75. 

Even the plainest 
suits are of fascinating 
cloths — and cut with 
the truest spring and 
grace of line made ne- 
cessary by "silhouette 
styles." 

As to Wraps, from 
plainest, most fashion- 
able serge top coats, to 
butterfly chiffon even- 
ing wrap, "line and 
style" have only one 
rival — quality. 



Newest 
Suits 



hapi^en in here most every day. Yesterday the ex- 
pressman brought us the Swellest Suits we have 
seer, at ^25. I'Vom the department head to the 
stock girls, everybody is 



delighted 



with them. 
Of French serge in navy, bhte and black. The coat is that convenient 32-inch 
length, satin lined, pockets with flaps, sleeves button holed— button trmimed. 
The skirt is gored at the top, with hobble-pleated flounce. . 

Interesting Models at $29.50— In a chic looknig basket weave cloth in 
shades of red brown a-nd black. The coat is satni Imed, the skirt hobble- 

^ ^'^Other Autumn Suits at intermediate prices, grading up to the custom 
built suits— exclusive with this store— $50 to $65. 

Individual c.pies of imported models, tailored to the notion of Pans that 
.show the Old World preference for artistic trimming. Prices to suit the 
shortest and longest purses. 

7V7^.tif^ o^ It i^ to be the greatest DRESS year of many sea- 
i\ t^Wi^O f sons— so Fashion has decided. The complete Gown 

n#-i5 C C^ C is sharing the reign of the Tailored Suit— every 
±yi t^O*>*;^»3 ^^,Q,,^jjn ^^.ju „eed one or several of these graceful, 
convenient One-piece Dresses— simple or elaborate as she may 

choose to have them. ,, . ^ „..„ , ... . , , 

Is the lunic to endure? Will the "hobble" reigp? Wdl the veihng k ea 
continue? We answer vcs to all of these questions, b"t only a view ot the 
gowns will tell vou the whole story. The new skirts- hobble gjvc- J>"t a 
faint idea of their piquincy. grace and charm. The new tunics, longer 
more graceful. Lovely, more practical over-drapenes 
show vou all of them. The moderate prices, too, will . 

stance -a charming silk congregation at $19.50; Silk Poplm Dresses m n;,vy, 
wfsl'naandblack.^nepiece.^of course, at $19.50; Chiffon Evenmg Dresses. 
with low neck and short sleeves at $32.50. 



nd 

We're ready now to 

will delight vou. For in- 



Everything the School Girls Wears: Dresses, 

Suits and Coats— Ready! 



Peter 



New 



Col- 
and 



Dresses for girls from 14 to 20. Their excpiisite lines 
and budding youthfulness cannot fail but appeal to the 
Thompson heart of any girl-$14.50 to $24.50. 

Both tailored and dressy styles. We feature the hand-tail- 
ored Skolny Coats and a selected groupin? of other styles. 

ors are mostly 

irpttilv trinimefl — ot 

in the coldest weatiier. 

from $2.50 to 24.50 

From 16 to 20 years— lovely Suits of navy, English 

Misses* .serge, so popular this fall, with so 

Suits 



mellow autumn shades, also nobby black 

Cnat^ white' checks prettily trimmed-other fu-ry specimens that are 
%^OUlS ^^n^'t^e^j^ ^^ ^.1.^^^ J^^^j^^.^ „, „,.. ,„,,,,,, ^,ather. Prices run 



much 



R 



Suits, $32.50. 

School 
Dresses 



juvenile 
grace aiur charm in its make-up. that we'll promise 
you'll be more than ever a devotee tu S. & B. e.iris 



One-piece styles; rcrge, gored skirt, in all the popular 
Autumn shades, topt with a bonnie plaid waist, velvet tie. 
buttons, serge belt and .serge cuffs, $19.50. 



RADY for the 
Kindergarten 
tots, for th(C 
College lass, for 
Junior.s and every 
age. Vet, perha])S 
we're readiest of all 
with ck)thes for 
"growing girls" — who 
fairly seem to grow like 
mushrooms, overnight. 
Plenty of styles with 
plenty of "let down" to their 
trim skirts. 



Newest 
Waists 



The dressy 
waist matching 
or blending 
with the tail- 
ored suit, in color, is one of the 
markt features of the season. 
Silk effects veiled in chiffon or 
net, new two-color minglings, 
new Persian harmonies — all are 
highly fashionable, and all are 
here. The latest, loveliest and 
most exclusive in Waistdom. 

Taffeta Silk Waists — Pleated fancy 
fronts, knife pleating and buttons for 
$5.00. 

Plain Tailored Waists; others with 
silk embroidery between box pleats, 
at tlie same price (black). 

Chiffon Waists over Persian lining 
— to match any color suit at $9.50. 



Common Sense, 
in Buying Furs 

Be careful wher you buy 
Furs— let's tell you why. 

If you go to a cheap store 
you'll get cheip furs — bound 
to. They ari the poorest 
kind of an investment— look 
shaggy — hair commences to 
fall out in a few months, un- 
til the tie, muff or coat looks 
like a semi-laid head. Of 
course you have to discard 
them and buy another i<et. 

Wliv not buy a dependable 
Bet In the fir^^t place — buy S. 
& B. Furs. ^.very sensible 
woman feels ."^afe in buying 
them. Thev are genuine and 
wear for veai s, till you tire 
of them, in fact. Youll find 
prices fair an^l reasonable. 

Compare them wtih similar 
pelts shown by other stores. 
If you do vou 11 be a stickler 
for S. & B. Furs — absolutely 
the best in the market. 



Newest 
Coats 



A rich, dark 
coat of some 
order will be 
almost i n d i s- 
pensable this autumn — you will 
gather. Beauties of Broadcloth, 
serge and cheviot, quietly distin- 
guisht and rich in comfort. 

Top Coats — for less formal 
wear — and here you enter that 
fascinating class of Motoring and 
Coaching Coats. Many cainel's- 
hairs and zibelines of wintry 
charm among them. 

Mixed Grey «"oa<K, j-emi-fittinK, trim- 
med with buttons and flaps, the kind 
the athletic English wom.in loves, in 
tans Kol'len and russet brown and 
other stmi-sornbre autumn shades, at 
$21.r>0 to fATi, 

Coats of Black Broartoloth, extra, 
heavy — half satin lined, trirnme.; with 
buttons, large pockets, full length, at 
«1».50. 

Just two examples of autumn icadl- 
ness. 



Undermuslin Sale— Extraordinary 

Because they are tousled and somewhat musst, we place on sale 
tomorrow, a miscellany of combinations — Corset Covers — Dress Skirts 
• — and Night Gowns, at^ 

ONE THIRD OFF'' 

from regular prices. They are all exquisite models, usually only a very few of a 
kind; hence we can't class them in tabulated form. 1 his brief mention gives an 
idea of the values offered: 

$125 Corset Covers and Drawers. .. TS** $5.00 garnents at f^'i!** 

$2:00 garments at *1.33 $8iK) t?arn,ents at iJt tf 

$2.50 garments at $1-67 $12 to $25 garments, .all one-third off 

French Underwear — !^ Price 

An interesting collection of beautifully hand-embroidered Gowns, 
Chemises, Corset Covers and Drawers— they, too, being somewhat 
.spoiled : nothing, however, that a tubbing will not wash away and renew 
all their original freshness and beauty. 



FALL STOCKS 

of dainty Autumn 
Neckwear — warm Hos- 
iery and Underwear. 

READY! 

Prices in every in- 
stance are less than 
you'd expect to pay for 
merchandise of such 
superior worth, backt 
by the good name of 
the S. & B. Co. 



XT/^-lj; ^Vhat a world of feminine interest is boxt up in these two words — well it might. 
llieVi^ ^^Q^ fQj. years have styles been at once so gorgeous and so subdued. 
J-fflt^ Small and medium sized Hits— preferably Cloche (bellj and (jreuze effects. 

AJ.U'i'O I arge, larger and largest Hats, in Empire styles. 

Every single one in the Millinery Section today, and there are scores of them, faithfully re- 
flect Paris in her varied moods — gay. gracious, coquettish or serene. 

You can pass an enjoyable half hour viewing them — fitting them on even; you are never 
importuned to buy here. 




1 DEFECTIVE PAGE 

1 1 f^ I 









» 







1 


'" ■ ; 1 


°- 










-*- r 



' »^p rv 



I .I*"! 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



Health Restored, rADMlTD I AT 
Gained 35 Pounds tUtVllLlV LUi 



When your blood is thin, your 
appetite poor, your energy all 
gone and your system gener- 
ally in a run-down condition, 
don't be discouraged. Take 
Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey. It 
will make you well and strong, 
just as it did Mr. Weinstock. 
"1 have been using Duffy's 
Pure Malt Whiskey for several 
years and it has improved my 
health very much. I have felt fine 
ever since and I tell all my 
friends about it. liefore using 
this great medicine I was run 
down in health, had no appetite 
and was losing weight rapidly. 
But since using it I have com- 
pletely recovered my health and 
have gained «>\or :l') lbs. Mr. M. 
Waxier, of 725 Mifflin St., one of 
the friends io whom I recom- 
mended your malt, and who was 
generally worn out, is as pleased 
with the results and benefits de- 
rivotl from the use of same as I' 
am. and we determined to give 
our testimony, hoping that it will 
be the means of helping some 
poor sufferers to better health, 
like ourselves." E. Weinstock, 
No. 44 Xo. 52d St., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 




PURCHASED 

L S. Loeb Buys Corner of 

First Street and Lake 

Avenue. 



Will Erect Business Block, 

100 By 100 Feet Within 

Short Time. 



L. S. Loeb purchaHed this morning, 
through the office of W. M. Prindle & 
Co., the southeast corner of Lake ave- 
nue and First street, 100 by 100 feet. 
The iion.slderation was withheld. A 
Michigan man formerly owned the 
property. 

Mr. Loeb say.s the purchase was made 
for immediate improvement. A busi- 
ness block, covering tlie entire tract, 
will be erected within a short time, 
but Mr. L<oeb has not yet decided upon 
the height of the building, or the na- 
ture of the busine.ss for which It will 
be planned. 

The purchase in an Important one, 
being another step in the trend of 
business interests towards First street 
as an important secondary business 
street. 



Duffy's Pure Kalf Whiskey 



>viH bring a heaithy glow to the pallid 
chet?k. give new energy to the falter- 
ing limbs, strengthen and invigorate 
the Weary body and tlirobbing brain; 
reanimate the vital organs and create 
a new supply of rich, red blood. It 
makes the old feel young and keeps 
the young strong and vigorous. Pre 
scribed by physicians, u.^cd in hospi- 
tals and recognized as a family medi- 
cine everywhere. Thousands of our 
patients, both men and women alike, 
who have been restored to health and 
strength, extol its virtues as the 
Tvorl.i's greatest tonic, stimulant and 
body builder. 

Sold IN SE.\LED BOTTLES 
ONLY by druggists, grocers and 
dealers, or shipped direct for $l.(H) 
per large bottle. The Duffy Malt 
\\hiskey Co., Rochester, N. Y. 



POISON MAY 
PROVEFATAL 

Suicide Attempt of Inmate of 

Resort Will Probably Be 

Successful 



'^~% 



FINE 




ENGLISH 
CHINA 

Composing the Celebrated 



*»niNTON & 
COALPORT" LINES. 

In Open Stock Patterns. 

Service and Dinner Plates 
$25 to $200 Per Dozen. 



g 



BAQLEY 
&C0. 

Known since 18S5 a.s P. D, 

DAY & CO. 
JewHern nu«l miverMniithM. 
SIS Weat Superior Street 
Uuluth, Minn. 



REMARKABLE 




Disappointment in Love Affair 

Said to Have Prompted 

Deed. 



Disappointed in a love affair, Luclle 
Hutchlns, 23 years of age, made what 
will in all probability be a sucoe3.=!ful 
attempt to commit suicide In a resort 
at 253 3t, Croix avenue about 1 o'clock 
this morning by swallowing a largo 
quainty of bichloride of mercury. 

She was hiirried to St. Mary's hos- 
pital wliere prompt efforts were made 
to remove the poison by means of a 
stomach pump. But it la stated at the 
hospital today that there Is practically 
no hope of her recovery. 

This is the third time she has tried 
to take her own Ufa. The previous 
attempts were by the carbolic aclrt 
route, one at Virginia and another at 
McKinley. In one of them she spilled 
a. quanlty of the add on her face, 
leaving a scar. 

It is J?tated that she had been prom- 
ised by a brakeman, living in Superior, 
that he would marry her. and that he 
had failed to do so when pressed by 
her several different -times. Yesterday, 
it a-ppears that some one called her on 
the phone and told her t!iat the man 
would never marry her under any con- 
sideration. It Is claimed that her 
home Is at Floodwood, and that she 
has a cousin living in this city. 
^— — ■ 

You haven't read all of today's news 
that'.") important to you until you've 
read the ads. 



LECTURES 



Don't .Mis.s PayiiiK a \ i.sit to tho Free 

Bakins l.o<*tur»'M in K. P. Hall — 

Mrs. BrUfg.s u <;r<>at Teat-her 

— Onl,v a Few More Days. 



The moat remarkable exhibition of 
bakini? continues at the free baking 
looturea. Hundreds of ladies have ex- 
perienced the greatest delight at wit- 
nuissing the illustrations on easy and 
suicesaful baking. There will be no 
failures on bake day if you apply the 
methods taught by this truly clever 
woman. 

The Janet McKenzie Hill "Cook's 
Book" contains many suggestions that 
you will find of help to you in secur- 
ing results in baking so superior that 
you will value it more than you now 
think possible. Mrs. Briggs shows in 
her work its great practical value, and 
If you have it with you when you at- 
tend the baking school and follow in 
It the work as It is illustrated by this 
expert you will appreciate Its worth to 
foil. Bring the certificate from the 
25c can and get the "Cook's Book" 
and find from it how the most deli- 
cious and appetizing dainties are made. 
Out of town ladies can mail the cer- 
tificate to Mr*. Briggs, care K. P. 
hall. 

At Saturday's class there will be 
made and served the following good- 
ies. They will delight you: Almond 
Cake. Beef Roll with brown gravy, 
and Cinnamon Rolls. 

No misleading water tests made 
with K C Baking Powder. Come and 
•ee the oven teat. 




WILLOW 
PLUMES 

$8.00 Willow P lu mes $ 3.9 5 

$10.00 Willow Plumes.... $ 4.95 
$12.00 Willow Plumes.... $ 5.95 



$14.00 Willovv Plutnes. 



9 7.95 



$18.00 Willow Plumes, 



$10.95 



Be sure to visit our Plume Shop 

before buyiujf your Ostrich 

Plumes. 
I i ■ 



AFRICAN PLUME 



DIrfrt Frwiti" 
farm f You 



17'/ East 
Suiterldr Si. 



Don't have the blues! 
If you did get stung 
on someone's "Tu- 
Fifty Shoes." 
Our oak-tanned soles, 
on any old pair, 
Will make better 
shoes and triple the 
wear! 

The Gopher 

Shoe Shops, 

Duluth and Superior. 




INCREASE IN 
ENROLLMENT 

Public Schools of City Now 
Have 12,243 in At- 
tendance. 



The enrollment in tiie public schools 
of Duluth last evening was 12,243, an 
increase of 907 pupils since the open- 
ijig of the term Sept. 6. In the high 
school, 1.075 students are enrolled, the 
largest number in the history of the 
school. The total enrollment is also 

the largo.st ever recorded at this time 
of year. 

The enrollment Increases from week 



to week all through the school year 
and it is expected tuai all records will 
be broken thi^yemc The total enroll- 
ment at t^e end oflhe year last June 
was l3,ijJW and. if the increase in the 
flgure.s now over those of a year ago 
are a criterion, theftptal figures of last 
year will he ffii- feA^eded next June. 

The growth b>^ *i|^ sciiool system has 
been steady during the past few years 
and is taken sm indicative of the growth 
of the city, fl^e J*]lside district in 
West Duluth has become so settled that 
a new school ■^will -foAve to be erected 
during the codT^e TTT the next year at 
P'ortieth avenue west and Sixth street 
in order to r<3Iev^tiie congestion at 
the Bryant and Oneota schools. When 
the Bryant scliool was built, it was 
tiiought too large, but every room in 
the building is in-uJfe and some of them 
are crowded. J 

The people of Woodland are clamor- 
ing for a school, the real estate sales 
in that district during the past year 
causing an influx of population that 
deman.ls educational facilities. The 
board has already purchased a site 
for a school at Twelfth avenue east on 
the hill, but it is not likely a build- 
ing will be erected there during the 
next year, altiiough it must be within 
two years. 

The board is looking forward to the 
completion of the steel plant and the 
consaquent increa«e in population as a 
development that will require a large 



new school at that point. It is expected 
that the plant will open with 2,t>00 to 
.'^,000 workers, wiio will make their 
homes ntar the site. That population 
will requ.re a large modern school. 

Following is the enrollment up to 
last nigh: by schools: 

Adams. 624; Bay View Heights, 20; 
Bryant. H51 Central high. 1,075; Ely, 
458; Enuirson, 420; Endion, 457; En- 
sign, 3.57; Fairmount, 382; Fond du 
Lac, 50; l.^ranklin, 710; Industrial high, 
147; Irving, 661; Jackson, 578; Jeffer- 
Kon, 842; Kenwood, 20; Kruger, 15; 
Lakeside, 300; Lester Park, 207; Lin- 
coln 638; Longfellow, 507; Lowell. 177; 
Madison, 201; Monroe, 432 Nettleton 
402; Oneota, 201; Radisson, 44- .Salter! 
244; Smiihville, 47; Stowe. 90 Wash- 
burn, 250; Washington, 604; Webster 
110; Whiitier, 122. cuoiei, 

■ , I. 

EPIGRAM ON EXPERIENCE. 

The lane .Senator Piatt had a whim- 
sical waj of wrapping his views of life 
in neat tjplgrams. 

A New York jurist once said to Sen- 
ator Piatt: 

**My son wishes to marry a charus 
girl. Give him some good advice, won't 
your* 

"No," Haid Senator Piatt. "Advice is 
worthies.'*. We iearn only by experi- 
ence. '' 

Here he smiled sadly. 

"And experience," he said, "is, alas! 
a como ifor a bald head." 




September 16, 1910 



DEFENDANT 

GETS DIVORCE 

Claim of Woman Is Denied 

and Counter CImm 

Aflowed. 

Judge Dlbell this mornirig granted 
Walter Budkewic a divorce from iiis 
wife, Anna Budewic and allowed the 
wife no alimony and no interest in tho 

lands and other property owned by 

! the defendant. 

I The action was first brought by 
Anna Budkewic. She is 24 years old 
and he is 30. They were married in 

I Duluth in 1904. 

I In her complaint .she claimed cruel 
and inhuman treatment. She stated 
at the time of the trial that he had 
threatened to shoot her, had called 
her vile names, and told tier to get 
out of his house. 

He contested the case ind aaked 



that he be granted the decree. He 
also asked that he be given a jury 
trial. He made counter claims against 
his wife and the jurv found that she 
liad been guilty of improper conduct 
with a man named Joseph Wipp at 
the Marine hotel in Superior. 

Tlie action is somewliat unusual In 
that the trial was. by jury when 
usually divorce trials are a matter for 
the court to decide. It is unusual 
also in that the defendar.t in the 
action was granted ttie decree and 
that the former wife was given no 
alimony cr interest in her husband's 
property. 

m '■ 
KalMer Will Visit C»ar. 

St. Petersljurg, .Sept. li'i. — The Bourse 
Gazette announces today that Emperor 
William of Germany will visit St. 
Petersburg in November. 



CASTOR I A 

For Infants and Children. 

The Kind You Have Always Bought 

Bears the 

Siguature 



ott:^'^^^?^^ 






25c a Pound Note Paper 
Special Saturday, Pound.... 



15c 



Fine quality chiffon cloth linen finisb paper, pure 
white, smooth writing surface, 5^ quires to the pound; 
special, per pound, 15^. 

25 Envelopes to match, 
prime heavy style for 7c 




Lake Avenui, Michigan and Superior Streets. 



Mrs. Southworth's New 
Books, Special at 



25c 



Populir copyright novels, special cover design on 
each volume, handsome cloth bmdmg, 36 new titles. 
We mertion a few of them. 

Lcive's Bitterest Cup, Victor's Triumph, 
Test of Love, Skeleton in the Closet, Fair 
Play, For Women's Love. Tried for Her 
Life, Lost Lady of Love, etc. Special 25c. 



A Wide 

Choice of 



Handsome Tailored Suits at $35 



It is simply beyond precedent tiie way tiiese smart suits are selling; price partly accounts lor it. Be- 
cause they are suits equal to most suits ^d\d at $45.()0, and partly the smart styles of the suits, for they are 
plain tailored and semi-dressy models, Suitable to wear for any occasion. 



'JM^ 



.—. "i^,' 



fc^:. 



t > 



Here is a suggestion of the styles, pretty Broadcloth Suits, smart f.tyles of mannish mixtures, zibelines, cheviots and 
diagonals, in black and all the leading ^11 colors, 28 to 32-inch length Coats, lined with messaline or satin, in contrast- 
ing colors, newest style skirts ; values up to $45.00 — special for Saturday, at $35.00 



Children's Dresses 

Many Clever Styles 

This popular section is splendidly ready with 
a most complete line of newest styles for the 
young miss at lowest possible prices. 




Nobby Plaid Dresses — In 

neat styles, ages 6 to 14 
years, special at — , 

$2.75 



Pretty Sailor Suits — Of 

sturdy serge in blue and 
brown, nicely tailored;- 
ages 6 to 14 years, spe- 

at «|0«50 

Smart Serge Dress — For 

the little miss from 6 to 

14 years, finished with 

braid or Oriental satin, 

special 

at 



^Sinart New Cheviot Stylish Broadcloth 
Suits, Special at $19.95 

Made of fine all w^ool cheviot, in black and 
colors, in practical tailored styles, coats lined 
with guaranteed satin, newest skirt models. 

An ideal suit for practical wear equal to 
most suits sold at $25; special at $19.95. 



Coats, Special at $22.50 

Smart ankle length, made of fine broadcloth, 
lined throughout with Skinner's satin, be;iuti- 
fully man-tailored throughout. 

Fine fitting garments, equa l to regula r 
$29.50 coats; special for Saturday, $22.5<>. 



Saturday Sal e of Smart New Skirts 

. , ^Just received a shipment of about three hundred stylish new skirts, in Panamas, 
^ '" .^"^ [, serges, mannish worsteds, etc.; ready for Saturday's selling. 

St:i^ish Panama Skirts 100 Smart New Skir1:s 



$5.95 



$9.95 



In plain, pleated and gored styles, strictlynew 
models and colorings, made from mate-ials 
equal to $15.00 skirts. 



Of fiffe^^all wool Panama in black, brown and 
smoke, new gored and hobble effect. 

Regular $7.50 value; 
,- *■' special Saturday 

ALSO NEW VOILE SKIRTS — Made of finest quality wire voile in large variety of 
clever styles. Priced at $12. 50, $15. OO, $16.50 and $18. 50. 



Buy these smart skirts 
here Saturday at 



$9.95 




On the Bargain Square— 

" Women's Flannelette Gowns 
— $1.25 values at. ... . .) .3 . 



Tomorrow on the Bargain Square we feature about a dozen styles 
in Women's Flannelette Gowns, either white or neat colored 
striped patterns; well made; extra full and long; piccly finished 
and trimmed; regular $1.25 values, special''' ^-t f] 



at. 



$1.00 



Children's Sleeping 
Gowns Now Ready 

These cool nights calls for warmer 
sleeping gowns for the youngsters. 
We have a complete line of Flan- 
nelette and Knit Sleeping Gowns, 
with feet. The ideal sleeping gown. 

Small sizes at 50c. 



Large sizes at . 



,60c. 



In the Glove Section- 
Women's 12-Button Black 
Kid Gloves, $2.50 values . 

The Kid Glove sensation of the season; full 12-button length; 
made of soft pliable stock; would be cheap at $2.50; as aQ/\^ 
special for Saturday, at only OVC 

All sizes, 5^ to 7%. We expect a Big 
Rush, so be early to get your size. 



Special Sale Women's Smart 

Gtm Metal Shoes $2.50 

Stylish GuTi Metal .Shoes, slant top button c^^ blucher style, new 
short vamp, so fashionable this season. 

A n ex c ellent shoe for str ett or business wear; 
very trim and s e rviceable; specia l at $2.50. 

Other Stylish Shoes at $3.00 

Are Dressy i*atent Kid and Dull Leather Shoes — With 
cloth tops, button style, very new and dressy shoes, equal 
to must shoes in style and general makeup to most $4. TO 
shoes; special here Saturday, ftf) (\(\ 

New Winter Tans — in Rus- 
sian Calf, Button & Blucher 
Style— Special for $4.00. 




^*^LZt Street and Suit Hats 







Misses' School Shoes — Box Calf and Gun 
Metal and Vici Kid, Blucher and Button 
style — special — 
pair 



$1.48 



Boys' School Shoes— Black and 

tan, dressy and durable; heavy 
soles — special tf«4 ^Q 



pair. 



Final Clearance Women's Sample Hosiery 

In plain and fancies; black and all wanted; regular values up to 75c, O?^^^ 
clearance price, pair , fci Vv- 

'. " A t 



Hair Switches 

$3.00 Value— Special 

$1.98 

24 inches; real human 
hair; "sanitary" switches; 
2-ounce size; sold regular- 
ly for $3.00, special at 
$1 .98. 



Priced From $7.50 to $15 

Again this season we have made special preparation to 
show the largest: line and prettiest Hats at popular prices, to 
be found anywhere. For Saturday's sell we have ready an 
unusual large collection of fetching styles for early fall wear, 
in handsome, simple tailored models. 

Among those of particular mention are the smart tur- 
bans, charming draping mus'hroom effects of silk, satins and 
velvets; some w th wide Oriental tapestry bands two toned 
velvets; other touched off with a charming matalic band, soft 
colorings; each with a distinctive style character; priced from 
$7.50 to $15.00. 

Misses' and Children's Hats 

Large showing of charming styles in Misses' Trimmed Hats 
College Shaggy Hats, New Avon, Seaside, Rosalin, Inez, touched 
off with silk scarfs; priced at $2.75 to $6.60. 

Misses Gloche Shipe Beaver 
Hats, Satin and Felt Hats, $2.50 
to $10.00. 

Children's Beaver 
Cloth Halts 

All colors, black, navy, brown 
and white, with silk bands; regu- 
$2.(X) values, spec a 1 at 



la 



$1.25 




35c Laee Edged Handk'fs, ISc 

Women's tine sheer Shamrock Lawn 
Handkerchiefs, edged with very fine 
lace, regularly 35c ; special purchase, 
while they last at — 18c CAy% 

—3 for DUG 

Gold Plated Hand Bag Initials 

Old English style, 2 inches high — 

regular 50c value — 

at 



25c 




Men's Negligee Shirts — 
Reg. $1 Values; Special 69c 

Just received, another lot of thovse .smart Negligee Shirts 
we sold so many of a week ago, made of fine madras and per- 
cales, in neat black and white effects. 

Pliiin bosoms with attached cuffs, perfect fitting 
— ijood $1.00 values — special at 69^ 



75c Scart Pins, 35c 

The latest novelties in Men's Scarf 
Pins, gold filled, set with brillant 
rhinestones, corals, amythest — a reg- 
ular 75c value — special OC! 
at cJDC 

The Latest Novelties 

Chantecler Hat Pins, Brooches, 
Lavalier and Bead Chains — special- 
ly priced at 35c, 50c 'TC 
and / OC 



i< 



\ 



' 



Wi 



I IIM— 



" » " ■ i^'l " 




I 



J| 



\VIIL KXTKXn THE 
MARQlK-m: liUEAKWATER. 

Bids for work on the extension of 
the hreakwaler at Marquette, a con- 
j.tru(lion \v..rk for which the govern- 
ment has made an apprcprlation of 
$70,000. will be received within a few 
days at the Duluth government engi- 
neer's office. 

The work will consist of the placing 
<if a larpe amount of rock at the piint 
wliere the exlen.^ion is to he made to 
the breakwater, and also the construc- 
tion of the breakwater. 

It is expected that much uf the 
work will be done this fall. 



Sault Passages. 



m k. 



S&iin Ste. Mali*-. MiclK. f^ept U>.— 
(Special to The Herald, t— fp. Thurs- 
day: Selwvn. Kddy. noon; I'aihhniicr, 
Sagamore. 1 p. m.: lieed. '•'»'"''"'!•, ;.;L' 
bePtu. Hubbard. 1:30. '.^"-'V,* . f^^ .', r^ 
Amazon. 3; French. ;i:.U^ A l^-'K^t-V 

Schuylkill. 4:3o: I»'"li',\.»- 'A^" Vo ,' 
6:30; Charles Bradley. _^^ ^iV"'*' "• 
BrlKhtle. Jeiiness. Kads. 7. *»• \- 
Smith. Corsica. S^:30; ^"^P'-^t^-,,^, In- 
land. Princeton. Mana. 10. Maraopa, 
Smaeton. Ka ^i^allc M'>'«""5lS*:t^- i,^: 
l>own Thursday: Cuddy. 1130 a. m.. 
FenobVol. Yosemile. Ishpemlng 1 p. 
m; Midland King. lUack. 'J: ^ate.s. 3. 
l.vman Smith. 3::u.; ..,^nyder Italia 
Wldencr. &: Peter White. Nloore, b, 
Lvmaii .<mlth, 6:30: Corey. «; Crete, 
8 30 Sahara. Shenadoah. Montezuma, 
9- Pen. White. Tomlinison, 10:30; Hi>\>y- 
Security, oil barges 57 and 68, \\:i». 
I'p. Friday: l.inn. 12:30 a^ m., -loyce. 
130- U. H. Brown. 2:30: Wade. 3:30. 
Morgan, 4:30; D. U. Hanna. ;>; Wolf. 
Steel .'i:30; William Livingstone b; 
Fresque Isle. 6:30; I.ynch. 7:30; W ".i^- 
wire. 9; Sheadle. Midland gueen, 9:30. 
Northern Sea. Verona. 10:30. Uown: 
Friday; Morrell, 12:30 a. m.; \V. 

Ames," Manola. 2; KniPr^^'"-,.^,PJ'LJ;I ' 
Ham, 2 30: lakeland 3; '^^^^efeller, 

Brvn Mawr. 3:30; Oliver -»;/"•. ^V-. ir 
Mather. Mitchell, W. H. ^\»'\-. "> ■ l^"' 
bairn. Thomas, lieani. A h. Ames. 
7-30 Pall Hros., S; Imperial, oil barge 
4i C. A. Kddy. Northern Kng Ad- 
miral S:30; Zimmerman, 10. .). J. wc 
"Williams. 10:30; «'asialia. 11. 

Detroit ra.<saj;es. 

Detroit Muh.. Sept. m— .Special to 
The Hcrald.)--rp Thursday: }Vain- 
wrlght. Pere Mar.iuette. terryNo. Ir.. 
Algonquin. 12:1. > p m.. 
i ^- T' •,'>0; Conemaugh. 1:10; 
,■. Briton. Malta. 2:40; 
I KH.K.a. ,.h', Livingston told). h:lo; 
Bulgaria. Tacoma. (■.;....: ^^'""."^rf ' >, iV 
ada 7:2.<: Biansford. 7:30: .1 C Morse 
saskatoon. 7:35; .J. G. Barium. 9.10 
Colgate. 11:20; Stnak.a. 1L45. }y\'^ 
Thursdav: Neilson. barge No. \"'- /]}• 
Paul, r.oon; Roman. 12:30 p. ni.; ^^ alter 
Scran ton. Rouma nia barge t i-ete 
Wteks 12:.-0; .1. B. Woo( d. 1:10: Alex 
Thcfmpson. 1:15: Lehigh, 1 •-'<;• -^d,?.'^,f: 
1:do; Australia. 2; New )«rk. -..0. 
Omaha. George Peavey. 3. j'a''"\^- 
3-'0- Osier. 3:30: Hawa.rd, .lames H. 
Hovt 4: Brazil ♦;:30: Shenango. > J}->: 
Barth. Helvetia.- Marvin, '•l^''- --"PV-Vo 
ritv I'lO; Norwalk (arrived). ^40. 
Wlrnloeg baige. i«:r.O: AN. L. Brown. 
?55*; wfi^ner! Th.unpson. U',- Republic. 
10 10- Fleetwood. 10:2o: Ld Smith, 
barges 10:4;.; Mall. ILlo; i:denbori , 
U 4^. Up Friday: K. L. Wallace 12:30 
am.: NU Intosh, Andasie. 1: HofTe - 
<ineer 1 '0 .'no Owen. Maunaloa. Mai- 
dS 1 50; Wm. M. Mills. 3; Mullen. 3:30; 
Pollock. 4; Hines, barge, ■'•l'^. R.^'^J'f^- 
laer. .loliet. 4:50; Naplgon. ^••-'- .^^^"- 
ney Ashlev. 6; Cole, Taylor 8:10 Ne- 
wona. S;15;- Hemlock. 9; Hoover. Mason. 
9^40; Al .uarshall. 10:10; Kgan 1L30. 
Down Friday: Ionia, 12:10: Chocto^^ 
i; Cataract. 3:20; ^alne barges^^ 4 
Cornelius. 5: Chemung. ']-}^-.^?.,}^^}^l- 
10:35; Utica. Piummer. 10:50; Dundee. 

11:20. 



served Saturday night. It lias become quite popular to dine here 
Saturday night. Scores of the foremost people ""'^jJl'^^^^j!'^ 
each week. This is silent testimony to the goodness of our dmners. 

Come out Saturday uight. Concert by Labrosse's orchestra. 6 to 
8 o'clock. 



^^= 



'*The Shopping Center of Duluth" 



:^ 



New Prices for Shoe Repairing 

IX our repair department is installed the most modern machinery 
1 for doing all kinds of repair work. Skilled cobblers here turn out 
highest grade work at following reduced prices: 

Men's Half Sole?, sov.otl 75<' i Women's Heelf! 25c 

Mens Half Soles, iiailctl 60c- i Boy.s* Half Soles, sewed 65c 

Men's Hei'ls 25c: (Sizes 2 to S'tj.) 

Women's Half Soles, s-ewed . . .60e | Boys' Half Soles. iiailo<l 50e 

Women's Halt Soles, nailed. 45c , Misses' Half Soles, sewed 50c 




■^ 




re cxtraor 

tore Thr 




Bargains for Entire Day 




ary Bargains That Will 

Wil 




8 A. M. UNTIL 10 P. M. 



* off' 



$1.25 Silkoline 
Comforters 89c 

our Fall opening we will 
iffer ten bales of soft Silkoline 
Comforters, the same pattern on 
both sides, tilled with white cotton 
and hand tufted, with fancy color 
worsteds, eipial to any comforter 
sho\\n elsewhere at $1.25. QQ 
our price Ow t 

(Limit, 1 to a <iistomer.) 

Cotton Torchon Laces 3c 

THE kind we see advertised and 
for sale elsewhere as all linen 
at 5c a yard. We sell them only 
for what they really are. Cotton 
Torchons, and they are cheap at 
the price v.e give them to O 
you; per yard c3C 



15c Sea Island 
Percales 10c 

You all know what b'ea Island 
Percales are, and know that 
thev are worth 15c. We have 

been fortunate in securing two 
cases of manufacturers' remnants 
t«ea Island Percales. 36 inches wide, 
light and dark colors, length from 
10 to 20 yards; regular -fl f\ 

selling price 15c; per yard . 1 V/C 

Infants' 25c Hosiery 10c 

SIXTY dozen Infants" Cashmere 
Hose, black, white and fancy 
colors. These are manufacturers' 
seconds, and the regular price of 
the goods is 25 c. This was a 
fortunate purchase, and we give 
our patrons the benefit of 



10c 



11;40 a. n». 
Wick wire. 
Chicago 
I'ganda. 4 



it; per pair 

Women's $6 Fancy Waists $3.49 

WOMEN'S Silk, Messuiine, and lace trimmed Wai.sts, also all Lace and 
Net Waists, beautifully trimmed, with yoke, lace frills and insertion, 



colors cream, white and pink, and white and blue. The silk and lace 
trimmed waists have panels and medallions in front, and both lines will be 
shown here tomorrow for the flr.=t time. They are worth 

$6.00, but for a business builder, our price ia 

(IJmit, 1 to a t;ustomcr.) 




Port of Duluth. 



Arrivals: Malieioa, tichiUer, Nettle- 
ton Mather, H. P.^ Bu,.e. ^an »>-• 
light for ore; Germ^an. AngUme. 

Peter-on. Kllwood, coalV Norns, >t|^^; 
D W Mills, light for lumber. Noith 
Wave. Juniata, package freight 

ri^uarture KriUH'- ^ «" Hlse. \Al- 

l^epariure^ XV ^> Con.^t ituticn. 

wood. t«>ivaaia, ^''^, '„ w i{(>eer« 

VIctorv J. ^^• Dunham. H. H. Jtoger.. 

}^^^.^X''T''!^- -l^ivtS^i'^'o^^; 

HoldVn Hght; Wright, Donaldson, 
limbl?; J . T. HutcMns.,n, .gr am. 

S Mnetreu hojH at tho Salter ^ 
X fc.Iiool want to Uarn t.. cook. * 

11^ The tftris seem to he tnkliiK up * ^ 

^ YeKterday the .a.ieteen I.oy^ * 

1 "I Seuteld t« ask that the.v be jt 
m Klveu l«»trtiotIou In the art «if f 
•V domestic aclence. * 

« '^Ir. Ueufelrt i>r»>nil«ed that If ^ 
J |.o'«.HlbIe tt«y ^^ould be given reg- * 

i '"riVe^'on there will be nineteen -^ 
Z -find-.' Thvv .,ni be all ready * 
^ when In MlnneKOtti \^ouien get tiic » 
* liBht to vote. "* 

Phone your wants to The Herald. 
Both -pho nes 324. Hesult.s ar e sure. 

i^N OUAFOR OX ORATORY. 
William .lonniugs Bryan Pacing tlv^ 
promenade deck of tne Celtic, talked 

"'-r,T'orJ{or is only great, he said 
-when 1 e ha.s a great subject. The 
foundation of oratory is truth. 

•Truth v.'in always prevail in the 
end. I once heard a true orator get 
a hissing. But he smiled and said. 

"nvhen a stream of truth Is ooured 
on rod-hot prejudices, it is nu wonder 

^^-And'then." said Mr. Bryan, ^the 
hissing turned to hearty applause. 




lines win ue 

$3.49 



P. & W." Special School 

Suits at $3.95 

QUITS with much of the style that "dad's" has. 



|HE throngs of enthusiastic shoppers that filled 
this store all day last Sattirday was indeed an 
._^,„ imposing merchandising spectacle. Even with 
111 extra salespeopk for the day we were taxed to our 
utmost to serve all expeditiously. 

At this time of year (between seasons as it were ) 
it has been customary for us to give our patrons some 
very ^.extraordinary inducements to do their shopping 
in the morning and thus lighten the afternoon and 
evening rush. 

Saturday We Begin to Inaugurate 
Our Morning Hour* Extra Specials 

Rare bargains that are distributed throughout 
the various departments of the house and to be sold 
only during the morning hours. Here's the list of 
goods that'go on sale as the clock strikes 8, and will 
be taken off promptly at high noon. Watch the clock 
and these: 



From 
8 o'clock 
Until 12 



usy Buyer s All D ay Saturday^ 

1 , 4l,^^ +nio-l ff 



Bargains for Entire Day 

8 A. M. UNTIL 10 P. M. 
$1 Cape Gloves Only 59c $1.25 Knickerbocker 



'' $3.95 



These suits are built for service and wear for 
good strong bt>ys that are hard on clothes. Made 
with double breasted coats and knickerbocker trous- 
ers, shown in medium and dark colored 
cloths, at 

$1.25 Knickerbocker Pants, 69c 

M.\DK from serge, corduroy and mixtures of all- 
wool — strongly sewed and re-enforccd at all 
wearing points — knickerbocker styles; 
worth $1.25, special Saturday, at 



69c 



.Another lot of dark patterns — in straight or 
knickerbocker styles — well made — sizes 6 >| Q 
to 14; special, at t*?!* 



^ J 



Little Tudor Sleeping Garments 

UST the ideal garment to keep the little ones 
cozy on the cool night. Made from good qual- 
outing flannel in pretty pink and blue stripcs- 





ANOTHER shipment of Ladies' 
Cape Gloves, in 1-clasp style, 
grand wearer, will giv? splendid 
satisfaction. Some houses (?Q 
sell them for $1 — at 0«/C 

75c and $1 Popular 
Books 43c 

OVER twelve hundred titles. 
One thousand of ihiese have 
sold at 7 5c and $1. They are 
beautifully bound, plainly printed 
on good paper. Come and see 
them for yourselves. They are all 
we claim. Saturday 
only 



M' 



Pants 69c 

;OTHERS, here is a chance to 
fix your hoy DUt economically. 
Listen: About f>00 pairs of Boys' 
Knickerbocker I*&ni8, sizes from 6 
to 15, In serge, worsted, cashmere 
and corduroys, worth up to £*Ck^ 
$1.26. Saturday only ...-O^C 

50c Salad Bowls for 25c 

FOR this opening we will offer 
500 beautifuly decorated Salad 
Bowls, in floral and fruit decora- 
tions, handsome colorings, and a 
grand assortment to select from. 
They are cheap to anybody 4t^(* 
at 50c. Saturday only . . . ^OC 

(IJnilt. 1 to a customer.) 

Women's $1 Underwear 75c 

THIS is an opportune time to prepare lor the cold weather. We will 
place on sale for cur opening days, two cases of Ladies' Vests and 
Pants in clouded gray -olor. Helvetian make, sold regularly, and bought 
by us to sell at Jl.OO, but for this big day they are to sell at '7^f 

$1.50 a suit — or per garment • wv» 



43c 



(Limit, 3 to a customer.) 



itj 

sizes 
at.. . 



2 to 6 years — special value 



50c 



Men^s Negligee Shirts 55c 



15c Pure Linen 
Doilies 22C 

„out 5,000 pure Linen Doilies— round, 
and square shapes— fringed edge— full 
bleached — sizes 4. 6, 8 and 10 
inches — imported from Belfast, 
Ireland— doilies that sell the 
country over, and right here in 
Duluth. too — at 15c; Saturday, 
from 8 to 12, per OlA^^ 
do;ien , 30c : each . . ^ / 4» 1^ 

Limit, 1 dozen to a customer. 



Modish Cloth 
Dresscjs $18.50 



C TUNNING new garments from Panama, 
*^ serge and broadcloth, in colors, brown, navy, 
green, gray and black. Styles are plain tailored 
or handsomely embroidered or braided — .some 
have lace yokes, while the skirts may be made 
plain pleated or hobble effect — 
specially priced Saturday, at. . 



1 5c Outing Flannels Only 9c 




Dirt Cheap 



To close up an estate, we must 
sell at once, regardless of value, 
two fine building lots. Location: 
I'PlLtT side Sixth street, near 
Lake avenue. Newly gradetl 
street: water, sower and gap. 

Spot Cash Will Buy One or 

Both Lots at H41F PRICE. 

Act Quick! 



C.A.KNUTSON&CO 

209 Kxcliange IJulhllnt?. 
Zenith 529. 



CTIIRTS fashioned in accord with the latest 
style note in men's wear from selected per- 
cales of light, dark and medium colors — at- 
tached cuffs — coat styles — spe- CC 
cial Saturday at nJ%^\^ 



Our Millinery Supremacy 

THE opinion of critical women during our Opening Days about our 
Millinery has proven our claims for style supremacy this season. 
"How beautiful,"' "How lovely" and "How reasonable" were 
remarks of approval that permeated the Salun. 

Tn our line there is widest range for selection, no rnat- 
ter whether the turban be desired, whether the medium 
mushroom shape or the large picture hat of Gains- 
borough dimensions. Prices in every instance are 
surprisingly low. 

For Saturday we are making speciaj showing 
of turbans and dress hats at $10 and $15. 

Children's School Hats $1 

STUNNIXG little mushrocjm and sailor 
shapes of felt, in all colors, trimmed with 
bright and Persian ribbons; just the thing for 
children's school hats; selling at $2.48, $1.98 
and $1.00. 

More elaborate hats for misses, better 
quality felt and more elaborately trimmed, at 
$3.50 to $6.50. 

School caps— In all colors, 50c, 75c and 
$1.50. 



For Saturday's selling, 8 to 12, (and in the afternoon, if the lot lasts) 
we offer two cases of outing flannels— extra heavy— full width and 
fleeced- retails regularly at l5c— Saturday we offer them m 
the Basement Bargain Bazaar at, per yard 



9c 



$18.50 

Handsome Voile 
Dresses $25 

MADE from selected quality voile of firm tex 
ture, in models that are plain tailored or em 



Women*s 75c Outing 
Night Gowns 39c 



broidered, braided '^r trimmed with taffeta bands 
and lace yokes. These garments incorporate the 
wanted style ideas, and are shown in pleasing 
shades of blue, gray, tan and 
black — sizes 34 to 42, at 



$25 i 




Flannelette Night 
Robes 69c 

\\ ADE from e^iira quality 



A 




T 8 O'CLOCK, we place on sale 25 
dozen — not one more — 
Outing Flannel Night Gowns — a 
splendid assortment of patterns and 
colors — full length and width — gar- 
ments that sell regularly at 75c, but 
special Saturday morning, from 8 to 
12, while the lot lasts — 



at, 



Limit, 2 to a customer. 



39c 




outing flannel — good 
styles and colors — military col- 
lars — full size — spe - 
cial Saturday, at. . 



Ribbed Underwear $1 

MEN'S natural gray worst- 
ted derby ribbed Shirts 



69c 



and drawers — French neck 
shirts — drawers have strong 
sateen band — just the weight 
for present wear 
—at 



$1 



Up to 39c Hat Pins 10c 

AGR.'W'D bargain for women, right when they will need 
pins for their new hats. There's just 500 in this lot — as- 
.sorted styles, selected from our regular stock — goods that for- 
merly sold from 25c up to 39c ; Satiirday morn- H £\ 
ing from 8 to 12 — they will be offered at — each i VfC 

Limit, 3 to a customer. 




Quick Clearance of Go-Carts 

EVF-RY carriage of our complete and well selected stock now offered 
at big reductions. Our line is replete with every style from the 
simple little collapsible cart to the handsomely finished and upholstered 
English perambulators. 

Willow Carts Half and Less 

THOUGH the season is about over for 
willow carts, still at these prices none 
can afford to pass them by. All have rub- 
ber tires, steel frame and gear and nicely 
upholstered — reduced as follows: 

$11.75 values, now $4.75 

$12.75 values, now $6.50 

$17.50 values, now $8.00 

$20.00 values, now $8.75 

$21.00 values, now $9.50 

$12.75 Collapsible Carts $7.98 

'OLLAPSIBLE carts — with steel gear 

and frame — rubber tired wheels — wood 

body — English leather hood — colors, black 

and brown — $12.75 values 




Men's to 50c Import- 
ed Half Hose 1 5c 

FROM our regular stocks we have select- 
ed about 85 dozen Men's Imported Half 
Hose — black and colors and fancy combina- 
tion.s — goods that formerly .sold at 25c, 35c, 
39c and up tC' 50c — all sizes in the lot — of- 
fered from 8 until 12 Saturday, H ^ 
at, per pair X OC 

Limit, 6 pairs to a customer. 




Showing and Sale 

of Tailored Suits 

at $19.50 

/' y\ T no other store in Duluth will you find good 
■*»■ suits under $20. There's but one manu- 
facturer so situated that he can produce stylish 
garments at this price and we are one of the 
six stores that gets his entire product. 

Suits are made from selected serge, broad- 
cloth, worsteds and mixtures of most desirable 
hues, cut along the arbited lines — well lined and 
finished. Coats are 30 to 36 inches long and 
skirts are plain or pleated— selling tf^l Q CA 
Saturday at «P 1 V*%j\J 

Finely Tailored Suits $25 

'••T^HE suit we sell at ?25.00 is the equal in every 
* way of what higli-priced specialty stores sell 
at from $5.00 to $10.00 moic. They embody the 
same high style and selected materials, and are 
pres.'=cd into a shape that remains permanent through 
the life of the garment. They are to be had from 
serges, cheviots, worsteds and mixture cloths of 
latest weave and color — matchless val- 
ues anywhere, at 



$25.00 



$7.98 



Lyon'sTooth Powder 
2 Cans for 25c 

A CKNOWLEDGED and 
A. analyzed the best Tooth 
Powder on the market. Sold 
regularly in all stores at 25c 
per can. For an unusual 
Saturday hour bargain in 
our Drug department, we of- 
fer them from 8 to €J ff 
12, at 2 cans for ^OG 

Limit, 2 cans to a cus- 
tomer. 



25c Marshmallows 
10c Lb. 

FINE quality fresh Marsh- 
mallows — goods that will 
melt in your mouth — made 
light and fluffy. These are 
regular 25c quality here and 
everywhere else they are car- 
ried. Saturday we offer 1,000 
pounds of them from 8 to 12 
o'clock^— at per 1 /\_ 

lb lUc 

Limit, 2 lbs to a customer 



^: 



^ 



Such Chances at Furniture Buying 
Were Never Before Given in Duluth 

OUR determined effort to clear remaining furniture within the next few 
days has resulled In prices being reduced to an almost ridiculous 
point. Spirited buying has followed 
this measure and the stock is fast 
disappearing. Tak*- your opportunity 
tomorrow and savo one-third. 

Leather Rocker, golden oak frame, 
regular $38 value — now $25.34. 

Leather Chair, golden oak frame — 
regular $38 value — now $25.3,3. 

Leather Chair, mahogany fran-.e — * 
regular $33.50 value — now $21.83. 

Leather Rocker, mahogany frame, 
regular $33 value — now $22. 

Leather Chair, maffogany frame — 
regular $32 value — now $21.88. 

Early English Rocker, Spanish 
leather, plain spring seat and tufted 
back, regular $22.!)0 value— now $15. 

Golden Oak leather seat and back 
Rocker, with sprin? seat — regular $22 
value, now $14.67 

Mission Morris Chair, adjustable 
back, large leather cushion — regular 
•;26 value — now $17.34. 

Ail Charles Stickley's hand-built 
fume*l oak furniture — One-Third Off. 



y 



=*=- 



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6 



Friday, 



THE DULUTiH HERALD. 



September 16, 1910. 




Esterly 

Watches 

Are 

The 
Best 



Lowest Prices. 
Best Guarantee. 




Write for Our Special Stove Catalog— 

Your Credit Is Good. 



Splading Hotel 
Jeweler 

428 W. Superior Street. 



OPENING ;[r 

TUESDAY, SEPT. 20th 

COFFIN'S DANCING ACADEMY, 

18 Lake Avenue North. 




*1 



ARE YOU SURE OF YOUR CLOTHES, SIR ? ARE THEY ALL WOOL ? 



'Nipson System" and "Quality, 
our Modernized Credit Plan of Graduated Payments. 



\0W IS THE THIE TO DO VOIR 

DYEING 

Easy Dye for stoncll work Ls the 
best to be lui' Works Mke mag'lc. 
No acids or salt necessary to set 
color for dyeing and is Instantaneous 
in either hot ur cold water. 



SoM by 



I 



WIRTH'S 



RED CROSS 
DRUG STORE 



13 WEST SIPKUIOU S'lllKICT. 
Free Delivery. 



PROGRESSIVE FIRMS 
THAT BOOST THE 



WEST END 



Reliable 
-Dealers 

wtio will 

^^^~^^"^~~"~^ (111 your 

orders proinptly witti re- 
liable goods and first 
cla&^ woj-Kmanstilp: 



CLOTHING. 



BUY Y'lL'R CLOTHES AT WELL- 
berg's. thf quality store. This i.s the 
store where you tjet sonii'thlng for 
your ■ Jirst ruc-'lveJ a full llii.- 

of I- -, and tneu'.s f urni:iiiings. 

li*27 .. , > iicrior street. 



ELEITIIR SUPPLIES. 



"i'ou'll not be shocked at your electrical 
bill and supplies if bought at Petor- 
»oas Klec Co.. 22l'J VV. Sup. St. 




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/^iter tne salesman nas aemonstratea ne can snow you DOtn in quaiiiy ana price, ask him to explain 
It should -especially appeal to the man of salary, with family expenses; or the young fellow who is just "start- 



*««^ 



" ■ I 



{Men's Department — Main Floor.) 



We particularly want to call your attention — to riv.et your attention to the fact that we have ''Specialized" for Fall and 
Winter on one-price, and that price is $20.00. While we have suits to sell at $15.00, $25.00 and $30.00, we have put forth a 
special effort to bring togethicr under one roof from 12 of the largest tailor shops in the world the best in the "New 
Browns," grays. Conservative fancy worsteds, plain Hockanuni blue serges, and blacks, to be had in Duluth for 



$20 



We must not forget to say a word 
about the exceptional values we 
are giving in Fancy Cheviots, 
Velours, Worsteds, Plain Blue 
Serges, and Blacks 
for 



$15.00 



FALL OVERCOATS— $15 and $20 
"PRESTO" 

Black rain and convertible Dress 
Overcoats, $15. OO, $20.00 and 
$25.00. 



In our higher-priced suits, \ve are 
showing a very attractive display 
both as to style and finish, I'ariety 
and quality in fabrics, and high- 
class work- 09C 9. 09 A 
man ship for y£3 Ql ^OU 



'PRESTO' and 'CONVERTIBLE' 

Overc<}ats in the very newest 
'"swagger" winter cuts and mater- 
ials including blacks, 50 to 54 
inches long, also the plain "Ches- 
terfield," 44 to 48 inches long, 
$15.00. $20.00 and $25.00. 



We have o^er 900 Suits and 500 Overcoats ready for your selection. 

LADIES'^SUITS DRESS AND DNE-PIECE SUITS Fancy & Plain BROADCLDTH CDATS 

$ 1 9.50 to $39.50 $ 1 2.50 to $47.50 $ 1 0.00 to $32.50 



!i 

l; 



Piush and Pony 
Coats 

$12.50 to $37.50 



Fur Sets From 

$ 1 2.50 up to 

$150.00 



Millinery Mens Hats 

$4.50 to $12.50 $2.50 

Sweaters for the Family" 50c to $10. 



FIRE IN.SLRANCE. 

Protect your in companies that 

pay losses i-r jiupi.y. W« have tlieni. 
\Vcsierii li^.-aity Co.. Vi'il W. Sup. St. 



(iRUCEUS. 

VIREN &. SWa:so. I.,. FINE QRoCER- 
les; prompt delivery. 2130 \V. 3rd St. 

I>aviddon &. Olson, dealers In staple and 
fancy grocerie.s, full line fruits and 
vegetablus. ISH Pied. A v. Zun. ;il4 5 



HARDWARE. 



JOHN'S' >N & PKTERSON, BUILDERS' 
hard^vare; fill line carpenter tools. 

C. F. GUSTAKSON HAS THEM— FIN- 
e«t variety of guns to be found in city. 



For.sbers-H»'nry Co., dealora in build- 
ers' iiardwate and tools. Cor. 2Jth 
.Vv«j. \V. and 3rd St. Zen. 1448-Y. 





8 East Superior Street 



Men *s & Women *s Shoes 
$2.50 to $5.00 

Shirts, Neckwear, Underwear 
and Hosiery 




8 East Superior Street 



mlm^m^ 



i ' 



WESTEHD 




NO CAUSE OF 
DEATHFOUND 

Post Mortem Examination 

Does Not Solve Mystery 

of Woman's Death. 



Ll-NCa ROOM. 

TRY MY LUN'CH— JUST LIKE MoTH- 
er's. 2i)03 \V. Sip. St. Opt-n all night. 



MLSIC. 



P1AN')S. ORGANS. MUSK'AL MRR- 
chandise; Victor, Edison prrapho- 
phone.s. A. F. Lundholm, 1928 W. Sup. 



8. Jentoft, musical Instruments and 
furnishings; repairlnjf a specialty. 
2la3 \V..'3t Superior .street. 



3IEAT DEALER. 

FOR FRESH ANI» SALT MEATS CALL 
at Trousdal, 2103 West Third street. 
Both phones. 



A. BRoMAN, FRESH AND SALTED 
meal.s; dtjiiverles promptly. Zen. 16S1; 
Mel. 1044-L. 193-' West First street. 



BUY YOUR FRESH AND SALT MEATS 
at L.irson .iros., .i,Sth Ave. \V. and 
Thir.J St. Zen. 14«2; old, M-lro.se 382. 

PLl.MBLNO AND HEATING. 



JAMES G<>I:MAN— YOUR PLUMBER 
estimate's furnisiied; jobbing work 
promptly attended to. The shop 
wh^-r..' prices are right. 1 Twenty- 
third avenue w-st. Zen. phone 607 



IMlOTOyRAPHERS. 

I MAKE A SPECIALTY OF^FINE 
canier.i portraits, enlarging views. I 
also handle a full line of frames O 
E. .Moilan, 2302 W. Sup. St.; Zenith 
I'h..!u- I.'i29-D. 

Proofing, cornice and sky~ 

LIGHTS. 



Canned Spinach May Have 

Been Responsible for 

Fatal Illness. 



RO<>FlN(i AND SHEET METaL 
woi k, tin and copper-smiths. C. L. 
Burinan. Zenith phone 424-A; old 3899 
Mr*!rust>. 2005 West First street. 



RESTAURANTS. 

TRY ONE OF OUR SQUARE MEALS. 
Oi>en all hours. Twentieth Avenue 
cafe. 



SHOES. 



IF YDU WANT QUALITY, BUY YOUR 
shoes at Jutin's, 2013 West. Sup. St. 



Was canned spinach re.spon.slble for 
the death of 18-year-old Kathryn 
Beaumont, who was found dead at her 
home, 2122 West Fourth street yes- 
terday morning? 

A post mortem examination of the 
body yesterday afternoon at the under- 
taking establishment of Olson & Craw- 
ford failed to reveal the cause of 
death. The examination was conducted 
by Dr. C. L. Haney and Dr. A. J. Bra- 
don. 

Absolutely no trace of disease was 
found a-s a result of the examination 
and the mystery Is far from being 
cleared up. However, the stomach waa 
taken out and there will be a chemical 
analysis made of Its contents today 
at the laboratory of tlie board of health, 
by Dr. Tuohy, city chemist. 

It was learned yesterday that the 
young woman had purchased some 
canned spinach at a grocery store and 

nad also bought some canned sweet 
potatoes. That .she had eaten some of 
the spinach during the afternoon is 
also known, but whether or not this 
•vas responsible for her sudden death, 
will probably not be learned until a 
'jliemi'.ai analysis is made of the con- 
tents of the stomach and of the apinacli 
some of which was left after Mrs. 
Beaumont finished her meal. 

Dr. G. L. Haney. who was called on 
the case soon after tlie dead body was 
discovered by her husband, made a 
careful search aliout the place and 
states that with the exception of some 



tablets for antiseptic purposes, there 
was no other poison in sight. 

Beaumont Is responsible for the 
statement that his wife was not used 
to cooking and housekeeping, but says 
that she was learning quickly and on 
the day of her death, she had baked 
a pie, a cake and other pastry. Just 
why, she would buy canned spinach and 
canned sweet potatoes, when the fresh 
articles are nuw In season, is not 
known. 

At the post mortem examination yes- 
terday. Dr. Haney and Dr. Braden both 
agreed th it the woman probably died 
between the hours of 6 and 8 o'clock 
Wednsjday evening. She was not dis- 
covered until after 2 o'clock yesterday 
morning when Beaumont, who is a 
Northern Pacific fireman, returned from 
work. 

At 4 o'clock, she was last seen alive 
by her groceryman who sold her the 
canned spinach. 

Tlie body was removed today from 
the undertaking rooms of Olson & 
Crawford to tiie home of her parents, 
W. C. Maddox of 1528 Elmira avenue. 
Superior. The funeral will probably b& 
held Sunday. 

agitationIor 
railroad y. m. c. a. 



Movement for Branch in 

West End Is Gaining 

New Force. 

Aglation has started anew at the 
West end for the establishing of a 
railroad Y. M. C. A. branch building In 
this .seclton of the city. 

There are between 300 and 400 young 
men in the West end who are employed 
by the Northern Pacific road alone and 
could easily avail themselves of the oj)- 
portunitiea afforded by becoming mem- 
bers of the a.s30ciation, provided that 
there was a branch In this end of the 
city. 

A canvass which has recently been 
made among young men wiio are em- 
ployed in factories and other concerns 
show ttiat over 200 are enlisted In 
favor of the movement. The directors 
of the assciatin in Duluth have at vari- 
ous times considered the proposition, 
but nothing as .vet has developed. 

WANT new' pavement. 



avenue west aTid Third street, is ex- 
pected to return tomorrow from Rock- 
ford, III., where h© has been attending 
the sessions of the general conference 
of the Swedish Baptist churches of the 
United States and Canada. Rev. Mr. 
Nelson was one of the principal speak- 
ers at the affalA^ 

West Eiid Shortrails. 

The funera}, of Aharles Upstrom, the 
laborer, who' died from injuries re- 
ceived when struck by a street car on 
Garfield avenue Monday evening, took 
place this afternoon from Olson & 
Crawford's undeyiaking rooms, 2010 
West Superlorr stifiet. Rev. Carl Q. Ol- 
son officiating. Interment was at 
.Scandia cemiitery. : 

Rev. O. A.J ElttKJuist of Minneapolis 
was the principal speaker last evening 
at a festival givfn by the Men's club 
of Bethany Swew|^ Lutheran church 
Twenty-third avenue west and Third 
street. The subject of his lecture was 
"The Intluence of Swedish Americans 
on American History." The musical 
program was furnished by Prof. Swen- 
aon of Superior, Prof. A. H. Oberg and 
the choir. 

Prof. A. H. Oberg, who for the past 
few years lias been organist at the 
Swedish Mission church. Twenty-first 
avenue west wlH- soon leave for St. 
Paul, where he has accepted a similar 
position in the Swedisii Mission church 
of that city. 

Mrs. Neil BalUI© and her sister, Mrs, 
Erma Hutchinson of 312 North Twen- 
ty-third avenue west, have returned 
from a ten days' lake trip. They visit- 
ed a number of the lower lake ports. 

Mrs. T. J. McKenzIe will entertain 
the members of Circle No. 3, of the 
Ladies' Aid Society of Central Baptist 
church at lier home, 3206 West Third 
street, this evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Iverson have re- 
turned from the Twin Cities. 

Mrs. James McCoy of 27 North Twen- 
ty-ninth avenue west will leave in a 
few days for Portland, Or., where she 
will make her future home. 



GUNNER ON IOWA 
IS NAVAL HERO 

Risks His Life in Vain Effort 
to Save His Ship- 
mate. 

Washington, Sept. 16. — Cool courage 

and strong nerves were exhibited by 

Emil Falk, a gunner's mate on the 

battltjslilp Iowa, Sept. 1, when he 

plungfed overboard between the steel 
hull of the battleship and a lighter 
alongside, from whlcli she was coaling, 
in the effort to save the life of a ship- 
mate, James E. Stanley. 

Thtj Iowa was lying off Annapolis, 
Md., at the time and Stanley falling 
from the forecastle of the ship, was 
stunned by striking the lighter and 
slippi.ng between the two vessels, was 
drowned. Falk dived several limes to 
see If the body could have come up 
under the lighter. 

Th .3 act. Acting Secretary Nicholson 
declared, was fraught with the great- 
est danger, due not only to the prob- 
ability of being crushed between the 
hulls but also to the probability of 
drowning by being cauglit underneath 
tlic ligliter. 



S«;oonil Officer S-wept <)%'erboard. 

Algiers. Sept. 16. — Second Officer 
Gunnel! of the steamer Swazl was 
swept overboard and lost during a 
fierce gale on Sept. 4. The Swazl was 
in command of Capt. Abbey, and 
sailed from New York on Aug. 31 for 
Marseilles and other ports. 



N. J. UPH AM CO.j^ 

STORKS AND HOUSES FOR RENT. 

Property for sale in all parts of 
the city. 

18 THIRD AVENUE WEST. 



West End Commercial Clnb Will 
Ask Improvement of Street. 

Several matters outside of those of 
routine importance, are expected to 
come up this evening at the regular 
monthly meeting of the West End 

Commercial club, which will be held at 
the office of George M. Jensen, secre- 
tary, at Twenty-first avenue west and 
First street. 

Amng other things the club will en- 
deavor to get a resolution passed ask- 
ing the council to see that Superior 
street between Eighteenth and Twenty- 
first avenues Is repaved. Repairs are 
useless, it is argued, as the paving now 
in use has no foundation. 
■ » 

Pastor at Conference. 

Rev. Swaney Nelson, pastor of the 
First Swedish Baptist congregation of 
the Swedish Temple, Twenty-second 



SWEATER COATS 

We I^ye just received our Fall and Winter line 
of the Famous "BRADLEY" Sweater Coats. If 

you enjoy seeing the most beautiful and perfect- 
fitting sweater coats that the markets afford, you 
will make it a point to see our window display. 
The "Bradley" Sweater Coat is the coat of a gentle- 
man. As we believe that you are intierested in 
good, honest merchandise we are certain that you 
will see (Mr display of same. 

Chas. Mork & Co. 

Clottitng, Sl\oes an<cl F'urnisl^iiiigs 

1&30 West Superior Street. 



WEATHER HALTS 
NAVAL PRACTICE 

Heavy Seas Make Use of 

Guns on Battleships 

Impracticable. 



U. S. S. Kansas, at 
ern Drill Grounds, by 
Portsmouth, Va., Sept. 1' 
tune and the weather h 
ing their part In the an 
practice of the Atlantic 
much vim, and as a co 
somewhat disrupted the 
Admiral Seaton Schroec 
of the fleet. Only five 



Sea, on South- 
Wireless, via 
5. — Father Nep- 
ave been play- 

nual fat! oattle 
fleet with too i 

nsequence have I 
plans of Rear I 

er, commander 
of the fifteen I 



battleships liave completed their night 
target practice. 

Last night two target rafts parted 
their lines. In securing the drifting 
floats two men were washed over- 
board and it was only after great dif- 
ficulty that they were rescued. 

Admiral Schroeder's plans call for at 
least four more days of practice. 

$15 and $18 Suits Only $10. 

All-wool materials in brov.ns, grays 
and blues, at the Three Winners, 116 
East Superior street. 
. ■ 
Taft Golns <o New Haven. 

New Haven, Conn., Sept. 16. — An- 
nouncement is made that President 
Taft will attend the meeting of th« 
Yale university corporation in this 
city on Monday. 

Guethe Statue UeclHlon Delayed. 

Berlin, .Sept. It;. — Ti:e committee 
charged with the selejtion of a design 
for the statue of Goethe, to be erected 
in Lincoln park, Chicago, has post- 
poned the matter of reaching a de- 
cision until tomorrow. 




&npmat$5 

Fall Hats 

You may not knov just the kind 
of hat you want— but you will 
when you see our new Fall Shapes 
and colots in the Stetson, Mund- 
heim and Gordon Hits, 
$3.00 to $i).00 

FaU Shirts 

A splendid gatheri ig of the new- 
est ideas in Fall shirts — plain and 
pleated — a wide range of designs 
— fabrics and coloring, 

$j.oo to $:j.50 

WX* Douglas Shoes 
$2.50 to $5. 




0k n' 



Boys^ Clothing 

The kind that wears — the kind 
tl.at keeps its shape and looks well 
as long as the boy wears it. Our 
Skoluy'H Clothes for Boys is Just 
that kind — we want all parents of 
boys to see it. Wide range of pat- 
terns and price. 

We make a specialty of $5.00 
suits for boys. 

Fall Neckwear 

You can't have too many ties — 
now's the time to stock up — here's 
the place to do it in. You can't go 
wrong in our splendid Fall assort- 
ment, 25c to $1.50. 



iOM 



(f 



Kenney & Anker, 



Duluth, Minn. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



^ 



4 



r 




Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 16, 1910. 





BIELOW THE BOyiiVA 
BETWEEN FIFTH AN 
TENTH AYENUES EA 



We want to stir you to action on this proposition. 

We want you to investigate and see if any other Real Estate firm can, or will offer you such a splendid 
opportunity to buy a home site. 

The lots are High, Dry, Level, away from all smoke or dirt, yet within easy walking distance of the 
business center. They are beautifully laid out, nice size and depth. 

Chambers' Division lot buyers will beprotected against loss if out of work through sickness 



THESE LOTS OFFER THE BEST I 




EfJTF 




LLSli 



THAT WAS EVER. PRESENTED TO THE PEOPLE OF DULUTH. 




. Will Von do and See the Property Now— You'll Not Be Urged to Buy— We lino« Von Will 
D Be S» Well Pleased That Vou Most Talk Akut the Properly aud Ilial Will Be Advertising lor lis. 




nCHawR IIW- B O eny we offer at our 
Cr-at Sale on the liuli. Is In a district which 
l.^id never been boomed. The growth up 
Sixth Seventh and Eit;hth avenues east has 
been natural and kgltimate, the simple ex- 
pansion of boundary lines. Now, with the 
Kieat increase in population, which will come 
with the Ste^l Plant— wltli the Street Car— 
with the new roads into the country around 
—makes its use for huiues a necessity. 







EXOH^^OE eUiLOING 



V W^i~x eri 

I REASON No. 13 ence'of Z^j-^earsTn 
selling real estate in Duluth, we say 
that never before has such an <ipport un- 
ity been given for a Safe — Sane — Sure 
investment in real estate as wt offer in 
Chambers" Division on the 19th. 




MILLIONS 
EXPENDED 

large Sums Spent By New 
Yorkers on This Sum- 
mer's Vacations. 

Uncle Sam's Customs Sleuths 

Still Running Down the 

Smugglers. 



New York. Sept. 16. — Many millions 
of dollars have been spent solely on 
vacations by New Yorkers during the 
sunimer Just closing, according to the 
calculations of hotel and transporta- 
tion men In this city, who are today 
summing up the results of the season. 
More than $1,000,000 has been left in 
European resorts by the wealthier 
voyagers from this island, it is esti- 
mated, while hundreds of thousands 
in money have been scattered about 
the summering places of almost every 
neighboring state that boasts cool 
woods or shore. In vacation trans- 
portation alone, it is shown that the 
people of this town have together 
spent a vast fortune from the Fourth 
of July up to the present week. In 
board bills, rent and special summer 
living expenses several million dol- 



lars more are calculated to have been 
expended by the returning vacation- 
ists. Though slim seasons are re- 
ported frora some summer resorts, it 
is known that Gotham never took 
more vacation or paid better for it. 
Soc-ial Smugglers. 
Plotting to expose vast smuggling 
frauds, which they believe are per- 
petrated each fall by returning mem- 
bers of the highest social set, the 
custom house authorities of this port 
are today preparing to use heroic 
measures in stripping and searching 
every one whom they have reason to 
suspect. For months before the re- 
cent seizure of jewels among the Adri- 
ance party, seeret service men are 
now known to have been scouring for- 
eign fields of purchase, striving to un- 
earth clews to the widespread smug- 
gling schemes which they assert are 
entered into by many of the most 
prominent people. Before the army 
of foreign tourists is finally disem- 
barked on home soil, it is strongly in- 
timated by Uncle Sam's sleuths that 
several society lights may be turned 
low as the result of their activities. 
Stations Spread. 
With^he opeing of the second mam- 
moth terminal depot to connect the 
heart of Manhattan Island with the 
tracks of all the continent. New York- 
ers are today for the first time in 
history seeing real railroad trains 
enter the island by burrowing be- 
neath the Hudson and Fast rivers. 
Close to both bunches of tracks thus 
tied together from every end of the 
continent, the whole web of street car 
lines of Greater New York is already 
prepared to focus and bring the trav- 
eler from the most distant point di- 
rect to his very doorstep. For the 
same fare that the railroads collect 
for the last few miles of his train 
journev, the arriving passenger can 
soon ride over this town from end to 
end from the great mouths of the new 
railroad portals to the country. 
Tlio Pastors' Pay. 
That scores of ministers in this 
metropolis are paid over $5,000 a 
year is an announcement of the gov- 



ernment statisticians that has today 
surprised every one here. While 
$15,000 a year is paid in some cases 
to spiritual shepherds of Fifth ave- 
nue flocks, the records show, salaries 
of several thousands are not at all 
uncommon, while the country's aver- 
age ministerial stipend of $663 is here 
the exception rather than the rule. 
Offers t)f $16,000 and even $18,000 a 
year have been made for preachers 
bv the wealthier congregations from 
time to time, while investigation 
shows that houses, horses, pensions 
and even automobiles are often added 
to such inducements. According to 
this startling report, Gotham pays 
her spiritual advisers better than any 
city in the world. 

Still Striking. 
No more persistent strike has ever 
parlayzed any line of business here 
for a longer time than that of the 



WHITE HOUSE 
CONVENTION 

President's Cabinet Will Begin 

Series of Meetings 

Next Week. 



th'jy have been together for some 
W(reks investigating particularly the 
efiicacy of tlie land laws for the big 
territory. Secretary of the Treasury 
MacVeagh and Postmaster General 
Hitchcock will report on the pros- 
pects for t!ie successful operation of 
tlie postal savings bank system. Sec- 
retary Ballinger will be in the con- 



ernment land, the to a! area of public 
phosphate lands no^^ withheld from 
entry being 2,500,OUO acres. The areas 
examined contain more than 267,000,000 
tons of high-grade phosphate rock, 
very little of which his yet been mined 
and it is probable that the deposits ex- 
tend far beyond the areas examined, 
forminng perliaps the largest phosphate 



public to beware of straps in street 
cars. 



STEALS A STREET CAR. 



sultation with reference to conserva- j field In the world, 
tion events, and possibly in view of 
recent developments in his controversy 
with Former Forester Gifford Pinchot, 
something Important may occur af- 

fafV^fdminiSrauon."''''""'''''' "^''^ '""^ ! Infestcd AVith Germs, Spread Eye;;-i^e- 



STREET CAR STRAPS, 



'50,000 cloakmakers, who are today 

threatening to drag out their fight 

for some time to come. For two 

full months this labor struggle has 

kept the East Side in a turmoil, and 

even the efforts of a dozen of the 

most accomplished arbitrators in the 

country have apparently failed to 

push it toward settlement. As blood- 

j shed and violence are breaking out 

Constantly while this sorry strike 

1 wears on, it is not unlikely that the 

\ authorities may soon be compelled to 

! bring both employers and employes 

•1 to terms. 



',*-'r^}t'" 



'M^'' 



N£W TOWNSITE ON CUYUNA IHON RANGE ! 

SOO RAILWAY STATION 

Large bodies of iron ore to be mined. Hundreds of men 
will be employed at the mines. 

Wide streets and avenues; cement sidewalks and curbing 
to be laid at once. 

Waterworks, electric light and sewerage system already 

planned. 

Business Lots 9300 to $400 

Residence Lots $200 to $275 

Terms: One-third cash, balance one and two years, 6 
per cent. 

Address 

E. A. LAMB^ Agenty 

DEERWOOD, RIINN. 



A Man of Iron Xerve. 

Indomitable will and tremendous 
I energy are never found where Stomach, 
i Liver, Kidneys and Bowels are out of 

order. If you want these Qualities 
' and the success they bring, use Dr. 

Kings New 1-lfe Pills, the matcliless 

regulators, for keen brain and strong 

body. 2.".c at all drnsgists. 

plansIre 
being prepared 

Saranac Lake Architects Will 
Build New County Tuber- 
culosis Sanitarium. 

The plans for the new St Louis coun- 
ty tuberculosis snaitarium are being 
prepared by Scopes & Fenstman of 
Saranac Lake, N. Y. They are being 
rushed and actual work will being just 
as soon as they are ready. The archi- 
tects who have planned a great num- 
ber of these institutions about the 
country will be in Duluth within a few 
days to look over the land selected 
by the commission some time ago. 

The St. Louis county sanitarium will 
be located on eighty acres of ground 
at Midwav. It will be erected on the 
cottage plan and there will be in- 
cluded in the group an administration 
building. 

The first eanitarlum was built at 
Saranac Lake. This point is considered 
the center of the anti-tuberculosis 
movement. 

A local man will be employed as su- 
perintendent and the architects will 
employ him. They will be responsible 
for the erection of the building- 

As all matters pending were con- 
sidered at the last meeting of the 
commission, another meeting will not 
be necessary before work is com- 
menced. 



Burrows' Defeat and Chair- 
manship of the Senate 
Finance Committee. 



Washington, Sept. 1«. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Beginning Sept. 21, day 
of the calendar end of summer, will 
begin a series of cabinet meetings at 
which all the members of the presi- 
dential family are expected to be pres- 
ent and discuss executive matters, as 
in committee of the whole on the 
state of the union, as it were. 

The meeting will last several days, 
and at it each member will make re- 
port of his achievements during the 
summer. President Taft. it is under- 
stood, will discuss with the cabinet 
the main features of his forthcoming 
annual message to congress. 

The White House convention should 
be an unusually interesting cabinet 
event, drawing to its deliberations 
members from all parts of the coun- 
try and from beyond its confines. Sec- 
retary of State Knox, who has been 
spending the warm period at his sum- 
mer home at Valley Forge, Pa., will 
report on the international relations 
of the United States, particularly with 
reference to Nicaragua. Secretary of 
War Dickinson, who Is now on his 
way homeward from the Orient, is ex- 
pected to be on hand with an up-to- 
date report on the Philippines status 
as well as on the Pacific islands pos- 
sessions of the United States. Attor- 
ney General Wickersham and Secre- 
tary Nagel of the department of com- 
merce and labor, will report their con- 
clusions with respect to Alaska, where 



As the White House meeting will 
be but little over a month prior to the 
congressional elections, it is to be ex- 
pected that the president and the cab- 
inet will take into earnest consider- 
ation the condition of the campaign 
and do what may seem best to pro- 
mote the election of a Republican 
majority in the house. 

Senator Burrows' Defeat. 

The defeat of Senator Julius C. 
Barrows by Representative Charles E. 
Townsend for the term in the senate 



Diseases in Pittsburg. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Sept. 16. — Pittsburg 
is now afflicted with an attack of sore 
eyes, and opticians and oculists wno 
have been examining into probable 
causes declare that most of those af- 
flicted have gathered the disease 
through holding to straps in over- 
crowded street cars. 

The idea is that those holding to 



beginning March 4 next is one of the straps will insist on rubbing their eyes 
mcfst notable events of this years or nose against th3 straps as they 



Man Takes a Suburban Joy Ride in 
Indiana. 

Columbus, Ind., Sept. 16. — The po- 
lice are looking for the man who stole 
a street car and took it out for a joy 
They think they know the man, 
ave not yet made an arrest. Some 
one broke into the local barns of the 
Central Indiana Lighting cQ«npany, 
late at night, and took out the car 
that runs to Orinoco, a suburb of this 
city. 

Residents along the line were awak- 
ened by the noise of the car, as it 
was being driven at a high rate of 
speed. The car was driven to the end 
of the Orinoco line and back to '.he 
business part of the city, where the 





Don't Persecute 
your Bowels 

Cut out cathartica and Mirgadrei. They Ua brutat 

••-Kanh— unnecei«*ry. Try 

CARTER'S UTTLE 
UVER PILLS 

Purely TejeteUe. A<a 
gendy on the tiTei, 
eliminate bOe, ana 
soothe the delicate 
memhrane of 
o< the bowel 
Cart Con 

Satioa. 
Ml* 




Carters 

ITTLE 

IVER 
PILLS. 



Heavy Blue Serge Suits $10 

At the Three Winners Clotliing com- 
pany, 115 East Superior street. 



Sick Uaa^cke aa4 laiiKCttiem. ai nalKoiii know. 
Small Pill, SmaU Do»e, Small Price 

' " Genuine munbeai Signature 



James G. Blaine was speaker of the 
house. He has been in congress con- 
tinuously since 1873,. and with the ex- 
ception of two years he was a lead- 
ing member of the house, serving 
prominently as a member of the ways 
and means committee and as speaker 
pro tempore. He came to the senate 
ill January, 1895, and has been one 
of the strong members of that body, 
having been for many years chair- 
man of the committee on privileges 
and elections and a member of the 
finance committee. The friends of 
Senator Burrows had hoped in the 
event of his re-election that he would 
succeed to the chairmanship of the 
f.nance committee upon the retire- 
ment after next March of Senator 
Aldrlch, as the Michigan senator 
ranks next to Aldrlch. Next in line 
of promotion in order of seniority on 
the committee is Senator Penrose. 

The finance committee consists of 
fourteen members, nine of whom are 
Republicans and five credited to the 
Democrats. Since the last apportion- 
ment of members Senator Daniel has 
died. After next March, when there 
will be another adjustment of senate 
committee memberships, six other sen- 
ators will have been eliminated, Ald- 
rlch, Hale and Flint by voluntary re- 
tirement and Burrows by defeat on the 
Republican side and Money by volun- 
tary retirement and Taliaferro by de- 
feat on the Democratic side. The re- 
maining members in the order of sen- 
iority will be Penrose, Cullom, Lodge. 
McCumber and Smoot. Republicans, and 
Rally and Simmons, Democrats. 
Waterway Convention. 
The deep waterway convention at 
Providence was a hignly successful af- 
fair was well attended and marked by 
enthusiastic renewal of expressions of 
devotion to the broad and comprehen- 
Mve policy of river and harbr improve- 
ment Inaugurated by the river and 
harbor congress at its last session. 
The Interest and zeal of the members 
of the minor organizations proving- of 
vast help to the parent body. The next 
meeting of the Deep Waterways asso- 
ciation will be held It. Richmond, \ a. 
Increaited Vae of Cemejit. 
More cement was made and used in 
•he I'nited States in 1909, according to 
■he United States geological survey 
statistician than in any preceedlng 
year, and the price per barrel was 
lower than ever. The production in 
1908 was 52,910,925 barrels, valued at 
$44 477 653; the production in 1909 was 
64,196,386 barrels, valued at $51,232,979. 
The increase was chiefly in the output 
of Portland cement— 62,508,461 barrels 
valued at $50,510,385 as against 51,- 
072 612 barrels in 1908, valued at $43.- 
S47.679. ,, ^^ ,, 

The geological survey calls attention 
to the availability of low grade phos- 
phate rock making of exceeding im- 
portance, the discovery of enormous 
phosphate deposit.s In Idaho, W yoming 
and Utah, many of which are on gov- 



CREDIT 

IS x>ii<« 

HE 



CHEER UP! 

BE HAPPY! 



Spread around the gospel of sunshine. 
Look prosperous and you will invite 
prosperity. 

We help you to dress welL We gfve 
you the best values you can find in MenX 
Women's and Children's Clothing in this dty-and you ca« 
charge your purchases. 

Splendid values— the best styles— lowest prices— courteous 
treatment to all— these are the things that are bring, 
ing us more customers every day. 

If you give us half a chance we can easily con- 
vince you that this is the place for you to buy. 



Hea's Ssits, 116, • 
Sia. 120. 125 
MeQ'i OreiCMts, 

llOaBiop 
MSB's BaU, 

%\M to $4.09 
Ken's Raincoats, 

$16 sBd 118 
Boys' and Cbii&ieB's 
Suits, }4 Bp to 116 



Ladta' Fan Slits, 
$i6,$lt,$2»tO|S6 

Ladte* FaU Coati, 

%nM op to 125 
Lattes' Fall Bats, 

$3 to 112 

Ladies' Silk Waists, 

$4.06, MM, yiM 

Udios' Silk Pettlcts, 

$4.0* up to I19.M 



FALL OPENING 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24. 1910 



/<J5i 



M ENTER <(.aOH 
HOSENB^SCQ, 



122 EAST SUPERIOR STREET, 

Open Saturday Evening Until 10:30, 







— — ,r 



'»r 



«*•• 



t 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



septemoer 16, 1910. 



NEWS AND VIEWS OF POLITICS 
AND POLITICIANS 



Campaign for Election of Gray to Be a Record Breaker- 
West End Republicans Will Meet Miller is Roasted by 
Moose Lake Paper— Judge Jaquesand McKnight's Expenses 



Minnesota is due to witness the most ( declining to accept the nomination, 

but iliere Is one reason I have not 



; 



strenuous campaigrn In its history as a 
result or the election of James Gray 
of Minneapolis to head the Democratic 

state ticket, ac- 
HottoHt C'anijiiilK" 
In Tbc- 
iitiile'n History. 



tordinK to infor- 
mation brousl't 
to Duluth by men 
wlio were in St. 
Paul yesterday when the iJemocratic 
state central committee was in session 
and the Mill City man was made the 
nominee in place of Joliii l.iiid. 

"The selection of Mr. Gray to head 
the ticket wa.s unanimously approved. 
so far as 1 could learn." said Harris 
Bennett this ni>rning. 'Everyone who 
kn<iwa Mr. Gray knows lliai lie is an | 
ideal man for the g.jveriiorsliip, and , 
tliose who do not liai)peu to be per- | 
sonully acquainted with liim. know 
from general report tlial lie is able, i 
honest, I'ar-sighted and in every way j 
endowed with the iiuallties that are ] 
needed in the makeup ol a dependable ; 
exet utive of a great dtalo like Minne- I 
sota. I 

"John Llnd Is going to get into th* 1 
tiglit 111 earnest. He will stump the 
entire state, 1 understand, in belialf of" , 
Mr. Gray, and there is every reason to 
look forward to the most exciting con- 
test we liave ever had in Minnesota. 
Mr Gray and his friends are going 
iirto the flgiit to win, and 1 have no 
rotts.m to doubt that lie will l>e elected. 
His Hepublioan opponent is the weak- 
est man the Kepublicans have ever 
tried to foist on to the state as gov- 
ernor, and wllii a strong, tearless and 
Independent man like Gray as its can- 
didate the Democracy should score an- 
otlier victory this fall. 

"As a member of the committee I 
supplied the only note of dissent in the 
meeting, and that in the friendliest 
way. it was my intention to vote lor 
William K. McKwen for the nomina- 
tion, but when the situation became 
clear to me. and it was apparent that 
Gray was the unanimous clioice, I told 
the members of the committee what 
iiiv intention had been in respect to 
McKwen and then joined with the 
others In support of Gray, who Is cer- 
» I inly a good man for ilie place. Mr. 
,^, ]■; wen's time will come, and I an; 
:.::!:ly of the opinion that the Dulutli 
man is a future goveruor of Minne- 
sota." 

John Llnd Spenkfi. 

Jolin l.ind wa.s called upon to speak 
and he said; 

I won't even try to thank you at 
this time. 1 must say I am delighted 
at t'le true spirit of Democracy dis- 
played iiere within the last fifteen 
minutes. 

I have given certain reasons for 



If you want the funds of St. 
Louis county Judiciously expend- 
ed, 

VOTE FOR 

John Tischer 

FOR COUNTY COMMIS- 
SIONER, 2nd DISTRICT 




CAN YOU 



see why yuur i'all Suit and 
Overcoat should cost you more 
than $13, when by coming here 
you have the choice of 300 all- 
wool patterns of the latest 
shades and designs. Your suit 
or overcoat is perfectly tail- 
ored, cut according to your in- 
structions with a positive guar- 
antee of Fit, quality and work- 
manship, or no pay. It is your 
future business we want — not 
this one order. 

TROUSERS TO 
OROER; $5.00 



Ucmm 

UNION TAILORS. 

333 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

Zenith Phone, 2436. 
J. H. McMULLEN, Manager. 



stated before. I will give it now. I 
am a good deal of an old warhorse 
and politics don't interest me very 
much unless there is something of a 
fight. It is too easy to be elected 
governor on the Democratic ticket 
tnis fall. 

I want to repeat what I said in my 
first letter to .Mr. Day that the victory 
of Democracy would not mean 
much with a candidate of whom it 
could be said tliat lie was elected be- 
cause of some personal reason. We 
are going to elect Gray and when 
we do we will have a Democratic 
party In power In Us own liglit. 

1 am a parly man, but only to a 
cer'.ain e.xtent. I iiave always thought 
it necessary to have a party organi- 
zation, but llie party is not an end 
In itself. It is only a means to an 
end and that end is good govern- 
ment. 

When a pai ty ceases to become a 
means to tliat end and comes to stand 
for Llie interests of its leaders and 
for other selfish interests, it is mori- 
bund. That is wliat is the matter 
- Willi tlie Republican party in Miiino- 
sota. 

Wo will win this time because our 
party voices public opinion and we 
have taken the first step in nomi- 
nating James Gray. He is a young 
man of ability, wonderfully endowed 
intellectualiy, a ' man of family, 
model of a husband, father and citi- 
zen. He is a product of our town 
slate university, and every alumnus 
of the university Is proud of "Jim" 
Gray. Nine out of ten of them will 
be f.>r him. 

There Is a well-defined sentiment 
in this state on one question. We 
may differ on prohibition and as to 
our personal habits, but the thing 
tiiat stares people in the face is 
"Sliall we as a commonwealth be 
dominated bv the breweries In our 
municipal affairs? 

We will liave no higher power than 
the law. 
The re-election of Frank A. Day as 
chairman of tlie committee insures that 
the campaign will be no picnic for the 
Republican.s, as they have had reason 
to realize in the last few years. Mr. 
Dav will be ably assisted in the work 
of "managing the fight by Harvey W. 
Grimmer, who was made secretary of 
the committee. Mr. Grimmer, who was 
the late Governor John A. Johnson's 
executive clerk, has demonstrated time 
and again thai lie is one of the clev- 
erest political workers in the state. He 
first came into state-wide notice as 
I>oIitical writer on the old .St. Paul 
Globe, in the first Johnson campaign, 
and ills work in belialf of the tlien 
comparatively unknown Democratic 
candidate was admittedly of great 
value. Tliat Governor Johnson appre- 
clateJ Mr. Grimmer's efforts In his be- 
lialf was indicated by his selection for 
the executive clerkship, which position 
he occupied from tlie time kie suc- 
ceeded Cleve W. Van Dyke until after 
Governor Johnson's death. 
« • • 

There will be a meeting of the West 
End Republican club this evening in 
Sloans hall, Twentietii avenue west 
and Superior street, at whicli James 
P. Boyle of Eveleth. 
Baj-le candidate for state 

>Ink(-N \tIdreMs senator from the For- 
Tonigbt. ty-ninth district will 

be the chief speaker. 
Mr. Boyle has made such a favorable 
impression in the western part of the 
city that the demand for his appear- 
ance there once more before the prim- 
aries was strong and it was arranged 
to hold this special meeting In com- 
pliance with tlie many requests made 
by voters. 
Boyle's popularity Is not confined to 
! the Seventh and Eighth wards of the 
i city, however. All over the range 
he is considered to be ideally equipped 
for service in the senate, and even in 
Virginia, the home town of his brewer 
opponent, he has been accorded the 
most flattering reception and assured 
of very general support. 

.\t a meeting In Virginia Wednesday 
night he made the main talk and was 
frequently Interrupted with applause. 
Other speakers on that occasion were 
N. -\; Young, candidate for superin- 
tendent of schools; John A. Healy, 
legislative candidate, and W. J. Archer 
9f Virginia, candidate for court com- 
I missioner. These men and L. A. Sul- 
I '' cove. West Duiuth's legislative can- 
didate, and C. T. Knapp of Chisholm, 
also a candidate for ihe legislature, 
I will probably speak at toniglit's meet- 
ing. 

» « « 

The Moose Lake Star Gazette, taking 
for its text the sentiment that votes 
and not words are what count in the 
career of a congressman, devotes more 

than a page of its 
3Illler current number to 

Im Given Another Mr. Miller and his 
Drubbing. failure to represent 

the Eighth con- 
gressional district at Washington. 
Editor Mahnke is strenuous in his op- 
position to Mr. Miller's renomination 
and make it a point to say he is not 
a candidate for any office, elective 
or appointive. He is in the fight all 
the time, on the stump and in hla 
paper. Mr. Miller's record is the basis 
of all his onslaughts, and in tue article 
publihsed this week he says: 

In the organization of the house 
we are told that Mr. Miller went into 
caucus and there worked against Joe 
Cannon, but of this we have no rec- 
ord, but we do know that when on 
the floor of the house the name of 
Joseph Cannon was proposed for 
speaker. Clarence B. Miller voted for 
him apparently without any hesi- 
tancy. Following his record all 
down througli that memorable or- 
ganization we find that he is lined 
up at every turn of the road with the 
Cannon organization. The special 
privileges knew that It was neces- 
.sary to have Cannon as speaker of 
the sixty-first congress If they in- 
tended to enact Into law the present 
tariff, wliich is conceded by men who 
know to be the most outrageous 
tariff ever forced upon the American 
people. 

Mr. Miller In his endeavor to prove 
his Insurgency calls upon U. S. Sen- 
ator Nelson. He seems to think that 
the HonoraVjle Knule is in a position 
to renominate him as. congressman 
from the Eighth Minnesota district. 
Is It Knute Nelson whom Mr. Miller 
is responsible to for his actions as 
congressman from the Eighth Min- 
nesota district or .s It the people of 
this district who should see whether 
or not Mr. Miller's votes in W'ashlng- 
ton proved him to be of the pure, 
dyed-in-the-wool Insurgent. Knute 
Nelson says that he advised Mr. Mil- 
ler to go into caucus and abide by the 
decision of that caucus. Apparently 
Mr. Miller was more Interested in 
what Knute Nelson told him to do 
than In the promises that he had 
made the people of this district in 
Ills campaign for election. Apparent- 
ly thesH promises at that time re- 
ceived no consideration at his hands. 
Apparently he did not care what 
promises he had made to the people 
of this district after he had been 
elected as their congressman, for on 
every vote that the Cannon organiza- 
tion needed to further Its cause and 
hold Its control in the organization 
of tlie house Clarence B. Miller was 
there with his vote and cast It FOR 
tlie organization. 

If you believe In legislation for 
specall privilege, if vou believe in 
maintaining the old Canon organiza- 
tion which controls legislation In our 
national house of representatives, 
then vote for Clarence B. Miller, but 
after you have voted and If Mr. Mil- 
ler should be renominated and elect- 
ed as the next congressman from this 
district and laws are not passed 
which you believe are right and for 
the Interests of the people, do not sav 
that you have not been warned. You 
have his record as it appears upon 
the congressional records in Wash- 
ington and this Is what you should 



go by in determining liow vou sliall 
vote. 

Mr. Miller's war cry two years ago 
was "Let the voice of the people he 
heard," and we say in all earnestness, 
in all sincerity, for we believe that 
the congressional scrap this year 
calls upon the manhood of the Amer- 
ican citizens of this district to deter- 
mine whether a mans promises made 
before election shall be followed out 
after election, "Let the voice of the 
people be heard." 

The Moose Lake paper reprints the 
Collier's article, republished some days 
ago by 1"he Herald, in which Mr. Mil- 
ler is shown up by Mark Sullivan, and, 
in fact, makes this week's edition dis- 
tinctively an anti-Miller number, full 
of the spirit of insurgency. 

In connection with the McKnlght 
campaign, an amusing story is going 
the rounds. It is about Judge Ja- 
ques. the Democratic candidate for 
congress, who has been accused by 
Miller papers of financing the Mc- 
Knight fight. Judge Jacques strolled 
into McKnight headquarters the other 
day and found Dick Jones on the Job. 

"Are you Dic-k Jones," asked the 
judge. 

"Yes, I am," admitted said Dick. 

"Well, I want you to go easy on 
the expenses of this campaign. I un- 
derstand that I must foot the bills. 
Better be cautious." 

Dick promised to do that. He says 
the judge is a fine fellow, in spite of 
his opposition to extravagance. 
♦ * ♦ 

One of the amusing features of the 
congressional contest In the Republi- 
can party In this district Is found In 



the cagerne.sa of the Miller contingent 

to claim monster 



Abont the Bager 

Crowd* 
That Hear Them 



attendance at the 
meetings ad- 
dressed by the 
congressman. The 
McKnight men are frank enough t« 
admit that tUk v.j^ers o* the district 



interested in hear- 
\\w at this stage of 
Insurgent candidate 
to say that he "had 



are not a whole Ic 
ing the eagle scte 
the game, andtthe^ 
himself is cor.Tent 
a good meeting." % 

It was given oik the other day that 
Mr. Miller tajB^ « meeting in Anoka 
that was attendea by about 1,400 peo- 
ple. A letter from Anoka says that 
the crowd Ava« sta^ll. In Anoka 1,400 
people would constitute some throng. 
And that's tl» v/#y It goes, all along 
the line. ' - 

Some people can win on a bob-tall 
flush, however. 

Following Wednesday night's rally 
at .Sandstone, McKniglit is declared to 
be the favorite there. A letter from 
an apparently unbiased souice says 
that the opera house was filled when 
McKnight spoke. Alex Kelly was mas- 
ter of ceremonies, and he had a pro- 
gram of vocal and instrumental music 
for the entertainment of the voters. 
Mr. McKnight's appeal was addressed 
to the honest, independent voter. 

Mr. Miller and Mr. McKnight both 
spoke at the Carlton county fair at 
Barnum yesterday,. Mr. Miller going to 
Moose Lake last flight. Today both 
will speak at Mora, where the Kani- 
bec county fair is being held. In the 
evening ho will be at Ogilvie, and to- 
morrow in Princeton and Milaca. 
Monday Mr. Miller will devote to Rock 
Creek, and he WlH return to Duluth 
Tuesday morning to vote, "and to bo 



congratulated." according 
Hughe.s, his secretary. 



to 



Mr 



D. H. Lawrence and John Dwan 
of Two Harbors are giving all Minne- 
sota Ciindidates for office a striking 

example of how to 



Rivals, 

Not Aittagonlnts, 

In Lake. 



dwell in pea c e 
and amity, even 
though in politics. 
Mr. Dwan is a 
candidate for county attorney as a 
Democrat, and Mr. Lawrence is in the 
field for the same office as a Repub- 
lican. They are not casting steam 
shovel loads of mud on each other, 
however, just because they are oppos- 
ing caidldates. Each Is free to admit 
that tl e other is a fine fellow and cer- 
tainly would make a jim-dandy coun- 
ty attorney. Mr. Dwan has held that 
office before, quite a few years ago, 
Mr. Lawrence was approached some 
time ago by some of his friends with 
a requjst that he file for the office, Mr. 
Dwan being simllary approached by 
another group. 

Neither candidate is making a figlit 
for the place, each being content to 
let thij voters make their own free, 
unsolicited choice. 

• • • 
The Young Men's McKnight Repub- 
lican club met last evening at Mc- 
Knlghn headtiuarters Tlie attendance 
was njt large, but the enthusiasm of 
those present was notable and it was 
arranged to do some energetic liuslling 
for McKnight in the few days remain- 
ing b?fore the primaries. Secretary 
Jones and others are holding noon 
meetings every day. McKnight will 
address a number of gatherings at 



shops and factories tomorrow. 
• • • 

The advisory council of the Repub- 
lican clubs of Duluth was scheduled 
to hold a meeting at headquarters in 
the Palladlo building last evening, but 
it didn't materialize a while lot. 
» 

A Three-Key Lock. 

A lock making concern in Aus- 
tralia is finding a ready sale for a type j 
of lock that requires tliree keys to , 
operate. It is in realitv- three locks 
in one, connected in sucli a way that 
the keys must be used in manner 
specified in the combination. One of 
the best preservers of health during 
the summer months is (Jolden Grain . 
Belt beer. Its purity and whole- 1 
someness has made It a home bever- 
age. Order of your nearest dealer or 
be supplied by Duluth bi*anch Minne- 
apolis Brewing company 
> ■■ 
COTTON GROWING IN INDIA. 
Washington Post: "Experiments 

that have been made In India in the 
growing of American cotton seem to 
demonstrate that it can be grown suc- 
cessfully there." said Capt. E. V. Web- 
ster, owner of a large tea plantation 
in India. 

"If it turns out that India can grow 
a long staple cotton, it v.-lll be of im- 
mense benefit to Europe*, where the 
demand for long staple cotton Is ex- 
ceediiigl.v active owing to the shortage 
of the supply from Ame:ica. It had 
been expected that the .'ultivation of 
Egyptian cotton In India would prove 
a success, as the early experiments 



gave .«aiisfactory results, but it ap- 
pears now that the successful cultiva- 
tion of Egyptian cotton In India i« 
practically impossible. 

"The climate, it seems, is unfavor- 
able, and while the cotton reaches ma- 
turity, the quality is Inferior. Last 
year there were uo sowings. It was 
explained that the deterioration in 
quantity and quality was due to bad 
cultivation on the part of the 'ryots,' 
and that unless cultivation should be 
Improved and sufficient irrigation ob- 
tained as early as March and April, 
there was no likelihood of Egyptian 
cotton being a general field crop In 
India. 

"The government of Bombay is tak- 
ing steps to obtain these conditions, 
but though sufficient water mav be 
obtained in the spring, it is difficult 
to see how the system of cultivation 
can be improved. The 'ryof is con- 
servative, and once having tried, with 
small success, the cultivation of the 
long staple Egyptian, he is not likely 
to try again. The government, there- 
fore, will have to turn to America and 
other countries in its efforts to estab- 
lish a long staple crop In India — In 
fact. It already has turned to America. 
An acclimatized American variety 
known as 'burhi' continues to give suc- 
cessful results in the central provinces 
and in Bengal, and the area under 
cultivation Is being gradually e.x- 
tended." 



0-v-e-r-c-o-a-t-s. 



We are showing eighty-seven dif- 
ferent styles of pure wool materials at 
I >10, $15 and $20. Three Winners Cloth- 
ing company, 115 East Superior street. 



Warm Underwear for 
Women and Children 

Women s Fleeced Union Suits 
at 



50c 





co/Lr/ffSTyiyEEMsr^" s£/Pcma/F srfffFJ. 



Hosiery Snaps 

Wool and Fleeced llo^c, So^- 
and 15^. 

Women's and children's Wool 
Hose, at 25f . 

Fleeced Hose for children and 
ladies ;it 15^. 



Coats 




in Full Array of 
CoIor$ and Sizes 

For Misses and Women 

We predict a Coat season, and from previous ex- 
periences you have learned to know that we seldom 
err — hence choose your coat as early in the season 
and as soon as possible, while assortments are c<im- 
plete. No need waiting — you might as well have use 
out of your garments these chilly evenings — and days 
also, for that matter. 

Women's Black Coats— ^16.50,^15, ^12.50, ^10 

and 




Women's Colored Coats — $18, tf^ 1 ^ CT^ 
$16 50, $11.50 and .^ 1 ^•OVj 

Misses' Snappy Coats, smart in every detail — sizes 13, 
14, 15. 16, 17 and 18. i)riced at $14.50, |h ^ fLt\ 
$12.50, $10.00, $8.50 and ^ L .^\J 

Women's Black Plush Coats, full ^ 1 Q ^/\ 
52-inch length ^ 1 3r«^V/ 

Women's Black Short Coats — tt ^ ^rt 



Extensive Display of New 
Fall Dresses at 

$12-50 to $18 

Smart dressers will appreciate our timely showing 
of Tailored and Fancy Wool Panama, Velvet and 
Serge Dresses for fall and winter, all newly arrived 
and correct in every detail. The Hobble Skirt effect 
predominates. 

Beautiful New Serge and Panama Dresses, trimmed 
with Persian and gilt button ar- ^ 1 ^ ^^ 
rangements, at only ^ \ ^ % ^ ^/ 

New Velvet Dresses, navy and green shades, touched 
up slightly Avith Persian trimming ^ % /^ ^/^ 
on the cuffs and collar,v price only. . ^ J| 0« JV/ 



Black and Colored Taffeta Dresses, 
embroidery trimmed, special price. . 

Dresses for the School Miss — serge, navy and gar- 
net — sizes 14, 16 and 18 — priced - - - 
at 



$12.50 



$8.95 «p 



Women's Suits — P)lack. brown, navy and green — 
$19.50, $18.00,$16.50 ^ " ~" 



and 



$14.50 




Willow Plume Sale! 
$15.00 $Q Qll 

Plumes for \3%^ %3 

Whenever the word "Sale" is mentioned by 
us, you can wager that a real, real saving is 
to be made on the article advertised "on sale." 
No misleading statements in our ads. We 
built our reputation on that — and no 
unless IT IS a Sale. 



Sale" 



These Willow Plumes come in black or white, 
fully 24 inches long — lustry feathers, fluffy 
and full. They were picked up as a snap by 
our millinery buyer while in New York — full 
worth of these Plumes is $15 ^ ft O A 
each ; on sale at , ^ \M* ^9 C# 

20-inch Plumes of the same kind as described 
above — value $12.50 — on 
sale at «^. .. 



$r.98 




Marabout and Oth er Furs 

Complete Stocks 
Ready 

The Style Booic says 'Marabout" — surely 
there never was anything more practical de- 
signed for women's early fall Neckwear than 
a Marabout Scarf. They're inade of soft Os- 
trich feathers and come in black and brown. 
Muffs to match. 



Marabout Scarfs and Shawls 
$6.50. 

Muffs to match at same prices. 
Black Fox Sets— $16.50. 

Black Hare Sens— $12.50. 
Black Coney Fur Sets— $6.50, 
Blue Wolf Fur Sets— $19.50. 
Brown Fox Fur Sets— $12. 50. 

Mink Fur Sets— $47.50, $39.50, 
and $32.50. 

Black Coney Fur Scarfs — $1.25 



A Sale of Sample Waists 

G ni Garment company, one of the big waist 
hous«sa of the country, sold u.s all their travelings 
men'.'! samples of Taffeta Waists, at 40 per cent dis- 
couni ; hence we offer: 

$5 and $6 Taffeta Waists at $3.9d 

Taffeta and Messaline Waists, in black, navy, brown, 
tan, blue, rose and Copen, all made up for this fall 
— up-to-date in every way — regular values range 
mostly at $5.00 and $6.00; a few In the lot worth a 
tritle less. Sizes 34, 36, 38, 40 and ^^ OA 

42. Open back or front. ^Choice ■ • ■ ^4^«^0 

$3 Nun's Veiling Waists % 1 .98 

White Nun's Veiling Waists for fall and winter 
wear, all-over embroidered; also Jap silk waist.s in 
black and white — values $3.00. ^ 1 QA 

6am])Ie sale price ^ ' v^^J 

$1.75 White and Colored Tailored Waists QA/^ 

— choice at ^%3\^ 

Inclijded in this lot are black and tan wai-sts, made 
up of a fine repp, and also white tailored waists — 
with embroidered trimmings. Sample OS^r* 

sale price 70C 

Our regular stock of waists is complete for fall an(i 
winter and you will find many new novelties here in 
the vw-ay of Persian, Net, Messaline, Plaid Taffeta and 
Other materials that are new and correct in style, as 
well as reasonable in price. 



You Can See More Hats Here in 30 

Minutes Than Your Milliner Can 

Make Up in Six Months ! 

There was a time when you had to go to your dressmaker to get your coat or suit made. Now it's a 
thing of the past — same is true of millinery. Why bother your head aboui; the style of hat you want made, 
when all that burden is taken off your shoulders by the best millinery designers in the country and the re- 
Bult — a hat ready trimmed? If you don't like It you will fancy another. Hurely you can find your favorite 
here among 600 hats, every one different and what's more — You pay only about a third of the milliners' 

price. Why not come In and look, even if you don't intend to buy? You 
can get some good Ideas as to how you would want your hat to be made If 
you still think it necessary after viewing our hat parade. 



We Sell Good 
Shoes for Less! 




Tailored Street Hats, the high 
crown models, made up of silk, in- 
tended for young 
women and misses 



y ui aiirv, iii- 

$3.50 



Plain tailored turban hats for 
the middle-aged and elderly ladles 
— choice at 92.50 
and 



$2.00 






Persian Hats — ^the real Persian 
style that fits deep down the head. 
No two alike. Individual models. 
Your choice at 
only 



Trimmed Hats range in price from 
$3. (to to $12.50. Over 300 hats 
at M.50, $5.00, $5.50 and $6.00. 

Misses' Hats in all shapes and col- 
ors, Intended for th6 school miss 
as well as young ladies. Persian 
effects and large poke bonnet 
phapes — $4.95, $4..50 
SS.fiO and 



> 



Untrlmmed 
and other 
from $3.95 
to 



$5.00 

"isk. Gauge 
■n stvles — at 

$ 1 .25 



shapes — Fisk, Gauge 
well known styles — at 



$3.00 



Girls' Hats of felt, mushroom 
shape — choice at />0 .^ 

only VOC 

Thu wee little girls can also get 
here their cute little mushroom 
hats of felt and velvet — hats at 
$1.75, $1.50, 
and 




The heading says in a few 
words what we are doing in the 
shoe line for women, misses, boys 
and children — and new it's up to 
you to make us prove it. 

"Radcliffe" Shoes for ^^ e/\ 
women ^^mSr*^\3 

"Kris & Rose Co.'s" Special 
Shoes for worn- ^O ^^ 
men .' ^4^«^\/ 

"Patrician" Shoes for ^'^ fr/\ 
women, $4.00 and... ^^^s^/VI 

"Bcrnalda" Shoes d» 1 JF C 

for women ^1«4*^ 

"Walton" Children's QA/^ 

Shoes, $1.25 and iTU^/ 

Boys' Shoes, $1.4S ^ 1 J^ 

Girls' Shoes, "Peter Pan" and 
"Velvet Line," $2.0C» ^1 ^ C 
down to S» I •^^ 



Bargain Table 98c 
S|>ecial 

Odd and End pairs of wom- 
men's Oxfords and chil- 
dren's Shoes, val- ^ Q 
ues ranging $1.50 ^QC 






^'v 







L 



-, — 71- 



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"••• 



■——I- 



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■riUri II , ( 



mm. 



•^K. 



41 



DEFECTIVE PAGE |, 




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Friday, 



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THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 16, 1910. 



9 



^ 



-h— ^ 



HUGE EXTRA 
DIVIDENDS 

Big Profits Piled Up By Col- 
ton Mills Under High 
Taritf. 

Many of New England Mill 

Companies Are Close 

Family Concerns. 



Kew York. Sept. 16— The immen!=e 
profits which a hi«h protective tariff 
on cotton Koods has enabled the null 
companies of New KnKland to amass 
and distribute among their sharehold- 
ers are only vaguely shown by the reg- 
ular dividends which they pay. The 
real profits are revealed by the huge 
e.xtra dividends these corporations de- 
clare with periodical regularity. 

Many of the mill companies are such 
close family concerns that there is no 
way of learning what their profits 
are. Thev guard auch figures Jealous- 
ly But that the public may learn Just 
how much profit there is in manufac- 
turing cotton goods when foreign com- 
petition is stifled and tlie consumer is 
charged 'all the trade will bear. a 
dispatch from I'rovidence, li. I- to the 
World presents some figures showing 
whal several of the big mill companies 
have earned during the last decade, 
under the Uingley tariff which has now 
been further increased by the Payne- 
Aldrich bill. 

The Amoskeag Manufacturing com- 
pany has an authorized capital of 
fti 000 000, of which 15,760,000 has been 
Issued. T. Jefferson Coolidge and Sec- 
retary of the Navy George von L. 
Meyer are among the directors. The 
company has mills at Amoskeag, Mass., 
and Manchester, N. II., where It manu- 
factures about 117,000,000 worth of 
Einghums, denims and women's worsted 
drill goods every year. Its assets in 
lyoa were valued at $12,193,849, of 
■which <3.4C3.238 Is represented by a 
Eurplus accumulated from undivided 
profits. 

One C'oncerm'H Bie Output. 
The Amoskeag Manufacturing com- 
pany in its fiscal year of 19oi.-09 manu- 
factured 185.35fe.778 yards of cotton 
cloth, two yards for every human -elng 
In the United States. 

In 1S9S the Amoskeag company paid 
a 6 per cent dividend; in l^yS, 9 per 
cent; in 1900, 10 per cent, and an extra 



dividend of 15 per cent; in 1901, 1902, 
19ti3 10 per cent; In 1904, 10 per cent 
and an extra dividend of 25 per cent; 
in 1905 an<l 1906, 10 per cent; in 1907, 
K) per cent; in 1908, 16 per cent, and in 
1U09. 12 per cent. Its last half-yearly 
<livi<U'nd, July 1. was paid at the 12 
jier cent rate. 

Thus in the twelve years of its pres- 
ent organization this company has paid 
altogether 169 per cent on its J5,760,- 
000 of outstanding capital, an average 
of 14^ per cent per annum. And at 
the same time it accumulated a surplus 
of $:i.463,238 — almost another 60 per 
cent on Its outstanding capital. 

The Pacific Mills company is another 
great cotton manufacturing concern 
wliich does a tremendous business in 
sheetings and has mills at Lawrence 
Mas.s Its capital stock is $3,000,000, 
and on this capital it has declared the 
following dividends since 1900: 

I'tOO 10 per cent, regular and fin ex- 
tra 20" per cent; 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 
10 i>er cent; 1905. 10 rer cent and an 
extra 10 per cent; 1906. 12 per cent; 
1907 12 per cent and an extra 20 per 
cent'; 1908. 12 per cent, and 1909, 12 per 
cent and an extra 4 per cent. 

These dividends make a total for the 
ten vears of 152 per cent or an average 
of 15 2-10 per cent per annum. They 
mean that In ten years the holders of 
the $3,000,000 of stock have received in 
dlvdends $4,560,000. 

Remarkable Dividend Record. 
G. AVigglesworth, a well-known New 
England cotton man, is a director in 
the Pacific Mills company and also in 
the Pepperell Manufacturing Company 
of Biddeford, Me., which has a still 
more remarkable dividend record. The 
Pepperell company manufactures sheet- 
ings, flannels, drills, Jeans and shirt- 
ings, and Its outstanding capital stock 
Is $2,556,000. 

This company's assets in 1909 were 
valued at $5,483,060, and its record 
shows that since its incorporation in 
1899 it has paid a regular dividend of 
12 per cent per annum, beginning in 
1900. In addition to this regular divi- 
dend it has declared and paid the fol- 
lowing extra dividends: 1900 'the end 
of the first year). 10 per cent; 1903, 20 
per cent; 1905, 35 per cent; 1906, 50 per 
cent; 1909, 25 per cent. 

These extra dividends amount to 130 
per cent, and added to the 120 per cent 
of the regular dividends they show a 
distribution among the shareholders of 
:;50 per cent altogether In ten years, or 
an average of 25 per cent. 

The American Thread company pays 
15 per cent annually on Its enormous 
capitalization, and its great rival, J. & 
P Coats, Ltd., which has several mills 
in New England, pays 6 per cent on 
$1' 500,000 of cumulative preferred 
stock, 20 per cent on $15,000,000 of reg- 
ular preferred and 30 per cent on $22,- 
500 000 of common stock. It has paid 
these huge dividends every year since 
1890. when its present organization be- 
gan. 

Smaller Compaolen Prowper. 
Less pretentious companies are 
equally prosperous in their smaller 
wav. The Plymouth Cordage company 
of "pivmouth, Mass., has assets of $6,- 
"94 440 and a capital stock of $2,500,- 
OOo" Its regular dividend for several 
vears has been 8 per cent, but it de- 
clared extra dividends of 6 per cent 
in 1908, and 3 per cent in 1900, a total 
of 14 per cent in extra dividends, 
which joined to the 56 per cent of 
regular dividends from 1903 to 1909, 
seven years, gives an average distri- 



bution of about 11 Vi per cent per 

^'^Thr* Bates Manufacturing ^oj^P^JJ^ 
of Lewiston, Me., has assets of ^-O^J'" 
800 and a capital stock "' J^,2'^.M'^"„ 
For several years it has declared a 
regular dividend of 10 per cent, and 
in 1406 and 1907 it declared extra 
dividends of 25 per cent eacli year. 

The <;reat Falls Manufacturing cm- 
nan v has mills at Soniers worth, N. H., 
and has a capital stuck of $1,500,000 
and assets of $3,011,022. In 1900 it de- 
clared a regular dividend of 10 per 
cent and an extra dividend of 10 per 
cent. For the next four years its only 
dividend was 10 per cent per annum 
but in 1905 and 1906 the dividend was 
raised to 11 per cent, and for 1907, 
I'JOS and 1909 the regular dividend has 
been 12 per cent, with no extras. 
Pay» 12 Per Cent. 
The Dwlgiit Manufacturing company, 
which turned out in 1909, 55,000,000 
yards of cotton and woolen goods, has 
an outstanding capital stock of $1,200 - 
000 and assets of $3,268,099. From 1900 
to 1904, inclusive, this company paia a 
12 per cent dividend each year; in 
1905 and 1906 its dividend was 16 
per cent and since th.en it has paid 
1 2 r>€*r CGit 

The Cornell Mills at Fall River, 
Mass.. turn out 14,000,000 yards of cot- 
ton and print cloths a year, and the 
company's assets are valued at $64r),- 
583 Its capital stock Is $400,000 and 
it has paid the following dividends re- 
cently: 1906, 12% per cent; 1907, 16 
per cent; 1908, 17 per cent 1909, 18 
per cent. For the first half of this 
year its dividend has been at the rate 
of 12 per cent. . , , ,., 

The story of such dividends could 
be prolonged Indefinitely, and were 
access possible the records of sev- 
eral of the large private mills, more 
astounding tales of profits would be 
revealed. Yet the men who own these 
mills worked tooth and nail till their 
good friend Senator Aldrich got 
through a still higher protective tariff 
which, they expect, will mean still 
bigger annual dividends. 



The 

Original.^ 
Guaranteed 
Hosiery • 



See Our Line 
of Guaranteed Hose 



Don't darn hose. Don't wear darned hose. 

We'll sell you six pairs of soft, light-weight, cool, stylish 
hose and give you a signed-in-ink guarantee that they'll 
wear six months. 

UGleproomosiera 



i 



ftdtptaaj 



"TOR MEN WOMEN'^^ AND CHILDREN 

Better value in hosiery has never been offered. 
From 25c to 50c per pair— $1.50 to $3.00 per box of bIx pairs. 
All colors. 



Three pairs "Holeproof" Silk Sox guaranteed three 
months, only $2. 00— warranted pure silk. 

Come and see the original guaranteed hosiery- 
genuine "Holeproof." Try one box. 
The trade-mark shown above is your assurance that 
these are the very best hose ever made. 



ftcii L' 3 Pas. 
OtUce, IVilA. 



(62) 



OAK II V I.I. CLOTHING CO., 

1 LOAN & lk\i:ko()S. 

KENNKY & AXKEK. 




HOME FOR MAD POET. 

Offer to Take Her From Asylum 
and Give Private Care. 

Toledo, Ohio. Sept. 16. — Miss Jennie 
Dlckerson, poet and famous prima 
donna, may be released from the State 
Ho<?pltal for the Insane here, where she 
has been a patient for eighteen years, 
if the hospital directors will act favor- 
ably on the petition of a number of 
Cleveland business men who <Jeslre to 
place her in a private home where she 
may spend the remainder of her life 
under their supervision and care. Their 
Utter lo the »'ospital officials follows: 

"Our attention has been called to the 
case of a woman Inmate of your insti- 
tution who has established a reputa- 
tion as a verse writer. 

•We will Kladly put up bonds and 
place Miss Jennie Dlckerson in any pri- 
vate home you recommend. Our so- 
ciety is composed of well-known bus- 
iness men of Cleveland and was or- 
Kanizod for the purpose of h^'P'"?,/ 
few unfortunate people who have dis- 
played an unusual ability in one of the 

^"^Miss Dlckerson is well educated, had 
marked success as a priam donna and 
writes verses freely. Her bf'st Poem, 
which attracted the Cleveland societj, 
is entitled "The Dream Worlds, and 
reads: 

The sordid things In life we always see 
Seem but the face of Satan, unmasked, 

A world to suit my fancies then would 

iDe 
One of unmixed joys felt constantly. 
A world where harsh notes never jar 

Where ears are never moist with grop- 
ing fear; ,^^ , ,. , . ^„ 
Where music mingles with delight all 

And voice of Happiness rings always 
clear. 
The history of Miss Dlckerson's life 
is a chain of tragedies, and it w^Jis In a 
Cincinnati vaudeville house that she 
was first suspected of being mentally 
unbalanced. __^___^__ 

IXF.WTILE PAUALYSIS 

BAD IN UHODE ISLAND. 

> 

Providence, R. I., Sept. 16 —An epi- 
demic of Infantile paralysis which 
began earlv in the summer, has spread 
to an alarming extent throughout the 
state Statisiics compiled by Dr. 

Gardner T. Swartz, secretary of the 
state board of health, show that from 
June 1 until this date 122 cases, three 
of which are said to have resulted fa- 
tallv were reported to the board. Only 
10 vet cent of those afflicted ever re- 
covered. r>r. Swartz says the others 
became paralyzed for life. 

The infection first made its appear- 
ance among infants, but ^t is attack- 
ing persons up to the age of iO yeais. 



Beauti 






f 



At Wholesale Prices ! 

SURELY, this is a waist event that 
many women will not care to miss. 
Here is a collection of dainty silk waists 
possessing a truly persuasive charm. To 

see them is to zuant them. 

Such pretty patterns and becoming colorings! Such 
fetching trimmings. Such jaunty, nobby styles. It's the ^-^^^ 

that will appeal to you | jn Quf Suits aiid Coats 

most, besides wonderfully 
low prices. » 




Every woman needs more waists 
than she usually has. Her supply 
Is always behind. This is her op- 
portunity to "catch up." This as- 
sortment includes great values In 
black waists, latest styles, cluster 
tuck front and back. Here is a 
$4.50 Waist 
that we have 
marked only . 



back. Here is a 

$2.48 



This Is a most charming assort- 
ment of black taffeta waists of ex- 
tra quality silk. Every style now 
in vogue is represented. These 
have cluster, self-strap and are 
button trimmed. The new style 
sloeve prevails. ■ Tou will find the 
choosing easy and expeditious. 
These "waists 
are priced at 
tach 



and expeditious. 

$3.50 



Unimpeachable tailoring, style, fit, finish; in this sea- 
son's showing of our tailored clothes. 

Here is an assortment that is easily worth $5 more than 
wfask, and it behooves the economically inclined shoppers 
To not neglect viewing our $15 special. They are made of 
beautiful worsteds. Scotch tweeds and cheviots 
in all the new plain mannish styles, and tne 

newest weaves. Your size is here, at 

The size assortments will never be so complete as they 
are right now, and If you think $20 is the price you want 
?o pav. we will give you a suit of quality that you cannot 
get elsewhere at this price. These include the practic- 
able mannish worsteds, serges and novelty 
weaves. They have 32-inch jacket, and the 

new style pleated skirts, at 

We know vou save $10 on this assortment we sell at $25. 
Merely see'ing this lot will convince you of their unusual 
worth. The newest shades and best fabrics enter in the 
making of these suits. Every one Is most beautifully 
tailored and they give the most fashionable 
lines to the figure. Before buying elsewhere, 
see these suits first, at 



:i 1 C 1 1 1 •:* ^-« ^ v./ ». 

$15 

ete as they 

>e you want 

you cannot 

the practic- 

$20 

sell at $25. 

elr unusual 

mter in the 

beautifully 

$25 




M„.J 

IIS A't h^4 Juprno 



rn f Start 



Duluth 



These Suits Are Favorites 

I This is a widely varied display of styles strikingly at- 
tractive Made up of novelty tweeds, semi-fitting, full 
54-lnches In length. These have reversible military, or 
shawl collar; with belt st/ap, with German f l^'-^^^ttons^ 
Comes In black and tan. A regular value at $15.00. Our 
special price only $10.98. 










DUGTION 





Regular $30, $35 and $40 Suits & Overcoats 
Made to Order Tomorrow tor 







h^ 



»* 






.i-- 



?<» 



-f*. 



^x^ 



'^{^J 



<«. *-' 







^?i' 



^^^ 



i^J!^i 



m 




One thousand new and beautiful fall and winter 
fabrics to select from. This sale is to 
take place TOMORROW, so as to 
start the Fall Season going and to keep 
my tailors busy during the warm spell, 
so that I will have them on hand when 
the cold weather begins. 

A great opportunity for men to order a suit or overcoat from real new 
Fall and Winter goods. Regular price $30, $35 and $40 for only $16.50 
and $21.00. No man can afford to miss this sale, especially at this time 
of the year. 

I guarantee perfect fit, latest style, best trimmings, just as good as 
though you paid the full price of $30, $35 and $40. I want every man 
in Duluth and Superior to come into my store and look at the beautitul 
goods at these prices. 

I want my tailors to work steady and I know that these prices will do 
it. Be on hand early Saturday morning so as to avoid the afternoon 
and evening crowd. 






123 West Superior Street 



^*3:l 






SHERIFF SEIZES 
ALCHEMIST'S HOME 

Judgment of $60,090 Is Held 
Against Dr. Frederick 

lange. 

Scranton, Pa., Sept. 16.— Although he 
startled the world by the announce- 
ment that he could transmit base 
metals into ingots of pure silver, Dr. 
Frederick W. Lange has not been able 
to satisfy his creditors, and as a re- 
sult his residence has been seized by 
the sheriff. Unless he pays the interest 
on $60,000, judgment held against him, 
the properties will be offered at public 
sale on Oct. 1. 

Efforts were made to find Dr. Lange's 
brother, Louis A. Lange, who is secre- 
tary of the new Schiller Building & 
Loan association, hut he could not be 
found here. The association is one of 
the largest investment enterprises of 
its kind in the United Stales, and its 
shares are held by thousands of the 
city's wage earners. The officials of 
llie association admitted that Loujs 
Large lias left tlie city, but declare 
that he would return. They say that 
thore are no irregularities in his ac- 
counts with the association. 

Dr. Frederick W. Lange and his al- 
leged discovery of the secret of the 
ages came in for much publicity fol- 
lowing the strange death of Charles C. 
Dickinson of New York, a few months 
ago. Mr. Dickinson, known through- 
out the country as a financial wizard, 
came to Scranton to witness a demon- 
stration of Dr. Lange's powers, with a 
view to supplying capital to exploit 
Ills discovery. There was an experi- 
ment in the doctors laboratory, dur- 
ing which Mr. Dickinson stood near a 
crucible and watched the fusing of 
base metal with silver by Intense heat. 
Fumes thrown off by the mixture de- 
veloped a condition In the capitalist's 
lungs that led to his death from pneu- 
monia. Dr. Lange declared that Dick- 
inson's death was a severe blow, but 
that It did not detract from the Im- 
portance of his discovery. Prepara- 
tions were made to tloat a stock issue, 
but It l8 not known whether any stock 
was sold. 

So great was the public interest in 
the manner of Mr. Dickinson's death 
that Dr. La..ge had to offer some ex- 
planation, and in doing so he" supple- 
mented it with a description of his 
alleged discovery that read like a pagts 
from the chronicles of the alchemists 
of old. Four years ago, he said, while 
experimenting with a process for the 
reduction of the cost of making silver 
chloride, used In dry cell electric bat- 
teries, he ran across his wonderful se- 
cret. 

■ ■ — — 
Tnft 53 Yearn Old. 
Beverly, Mass., Sept. IC. — President 
Taft was 53 years old yesterday. Many 
congratulatory letters and telegrams 
were received by the president at his 
summer home on Burgess Point, but 
there was no particular celebration of 
the day. _ 

Have Your Clothes Pressed Free. 

Buy your clothes at the Three Win- 
ners and they will press your clothes 
free of charge for tWg years. 



IfBALANCE TRADE AGAINST THE 
UNITED STATES THIS YEAR 



Washington, Sept. 16. — The balance 
of trade, which the statistics of the 
last tliirty years have generally shown 
to be largely in favor of this country, 
has turned over. It now stands $1,000,- 
00) on tlie other side of the ledger for 
the hrst eight months of this calendar 
year. The month of August brought 
to the United Stales $3,503,435 more 
in trade than it look out. 

From that condition students of 
economics may draw conclusions as 
varied as tliey may be numerous. One 
is that there has been no readjustment 
of prices in the United States since 
the panic of 1907— another is that the 
balance of trade has been against us 
for a long time without showing In 
the statistics of merchandise because 
Americans spend $150,000,000 a year 
in Europe and more millions are paid 
for ocean steamship freight ra^es to 
the German and British banks. 

However, it is generally expected 
that the condition of national banks 
at the close of business on Sept. 1 ,now 
being compiled, will verify the latter 
conclusion in a measure, and it Is pre- 
I dieted that the gold imports for Au- 
gust, wliich amounted to $9,668,183, 
ai-e but the forerunner of the flow of 
gold to come from Europe in Septem- 
ber and October in settlement for sliip- 
ments of grain and cotton. l 

UxportM of Gold. I 

But in spite of the intlow of gold for 
August, the excess of exports of gold 
for the first eight months on the calen- 
dar year is more than $10,000,000. 
That' is said to be about the natural 
proportion, for this is a gold-produc- 
ing country. . . , * 
Representations from the banks or 
the country are reassuring to treasury 
officials because the reports indicate 
that the Interior banks have strength- 
ened themselves for the crop move- 
ment and may not make any unex- 
pected calls on the money centers Ihe 
formation of emergency currency as- 
sociations at the suggestion of Secre- 
tary Mac Veagh is expected to relieve 
any situation that might come about 
from the Interior banks hoarding 
their money. Some of the hearty sup- 
r orters of the law believe It may offset 
the position the treasury Ms in because 
of the foreign trade situation. 
Xreaanry In Handicapped. 
It is pointed out that with the bal- 



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ance of trade against the United States 
and the working bals nee in the treas- 
ury at its present coiuUtion, the emer- 
gency currency Issue la the most likely 
aid the banks would have at hand. It 
is admitted that the treasury could not 
do now what it did in 1907 to help the 

\Vha.t fche heavv .rrop exportatlons 
of the next two inon.hs will do to the 
balance of trade will be watched with 
a great deal of Inten^st. 

BEARSlREMOViNG 
TO THE SOUTHWEST 

Seem to Be Traveling to 

Some Goal in New 

Territory. 

Thief River Falls, Mian., Sept. 16.— 
(Special to The Herald.)— The great 
number of black l-ear which infest 
this part of the s'.ate Is something 
which no local hunter or naturalist 
can satisfactorily e.cpiain. The bears 
all appear to be moving in a general 
southwesterly direction, despite the 
fact that a Journey continued in this 
direction will brini; them more and 
more out on the c pen prairie. This 
city is at least sixty miles from the 
dense woods of Beltrami county on 
ihe east, and many miles from even 
brush country, but this open territory 
in Ked Lake count,- appears to have 
no fear for Mr. Bruin. Males and fe- 
males and cubs are being cliased and 
killed nearly every day by the farm- 
ers and their boys. .\11 the local papers 
recite stories of bear killing and hunt- 
ing and these incidents have become 
so common that little attention is now 
paid to them. Thi animals are not 
vicious and always seek cover in some 
brush patch when the men and dogs 
pursue them. They are very fat and 
many persons are experiencing their 
first sensation of actually tasting bear 
steaks. Chicken hunters see many of 
them In their travels, but not being 
armed for big game, generally give the 
animals all the room they require. A 
few adventuresome ones, however, have 
not failed to attacic at close quarters 
with bird shot, but without success. 

It is probable tl-at some migratory 
instinct Impels ther» to make these an- 
nual pilgrimages which bring them 
into the settled parts of the state and 
to their death. Wt at the movement Is 
cannot be explained. At first it was 
thought to be caused by the forest 
fires and possibly this may have aided 
the movement, bu: every year wit- 
nesses the same migration. It cannot 
be the need of food as they are all in 
good condition and they do not appear 
anxious to molest the sheep and hogs. 
A few cases of their stealing small 
pigs have been tola, but they seem to 
bo merely traveling along to some 
goal to the SouthA vest. 

WOODS THAT BURN BEST. 
Domestic Engineering: Contrary to 
a widespread beliof that hard woods 



give more heat in burning than soft 
varieties the scientists at Washington 
are contending that the greatest lieat- 
ing power is posi-cssed by the wood of 
the linden tree, which is very "soft. 

Fir stana.s next to linden and almost 
e(iual to it. Then comes pine, hardly 
inferior to fir and linden, while hard 
oak possesses 8 per cent less healing 
capacity than linden, and red beech 10 
per cent less. 

OWL THAT KILLS SPARROWS'. 

Rome Sentinel: A trapper in the 
southern part of the town reports that 
he caught a woodchuck in one of his 
traps last week and that when found 
the animals liead had been ealen by 
one of the large owls that are so 
plentiful hereabout this season. 

The next day the man In making his 
round.H saw tne owl in a tree above 
the trap apparently wailing for the 
trap to provide him with another meal. 
The woodchuck eating owl is of the 
varietv that is said to be destroying 
so many English sparrows this winter. 




RHEuri/iitsM 



A known remedy 

the reputation of 

6088 

has bc«n grov/ing 
for &Xteca year* 

"We Recommend 6088" 

These words come from 
the lips of RELIABLE 
DRUGGISTS who have 
watched the wonderful 
effects of this wonderful 
remedy for nearly a gen- 
eration. _ 
Asl£ YOUR DRUGGIST- 
if he cannot tell you write 
Boolilct free. 



us. 



GUARANTEE: 

The makers of 6088 author- 
ize your Druggist to refund 
your money to you if re- 
sults are not sat^factory. 



-. 



MATT. J. JOHNSON CO. 

Mir. ^ ST. PAUL, MINN. 



I Save You Money on 
Shoes and Shoe Repai 




Men*s and Women's Shoes 

$2.48 ""> $2.98 

Men'8 soles sewed, 65<. 
• Women's soles sewed, 50<. 

^1 A|l|# The Sample 
Vi^»^"»"^ Shoe Man 

11 SECOND AVENUE WEST. 





1 


• 


i 










» 

























I 






MMi in 



1 



.4 

I: 



lo 



Friday, 




t 



i 



mn ^m* 



=E^ 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



■ I »l f >« !■ 



September 16, 1910. 



AN END TO SKIN TROUBLES 

Ac-tion of Poslam Is Rapid — Easy to 
Prove \\Jiat It \VilI Do. 

"To think," says Mr. L. J. Cooper. 
North Haven, Conn., "that I have been 
trying everything (to cure eczema) for 
fifteen ywirs, and now poslam has 
done It. The first application etopped 
all the Itchingr." 

When a remedy Is available like 
poslam, which in all .skin troubl«is 
stops itohinj? and accomplishes cures 
so rapidly and readily, there is really 
no reason why such affections should 
be allowed to go unchecked, particu- 
larly as no one is asked to purchase 
poslam without Mrst obtaining and 
trying one of the free trial packages. 
This will be .sent by mail to any one 
who will write to the Emergency 
Laboratories, a 2 West Twenty-fifth 
street. New Voi k city. 

While primarily intended for the 
treatment of eczema, acne, tetter, bar- 
ber's and all other forms of itch, etc., 
poslam promptly cures all the lesser 
skin affections, such as pimples. 

^- '^ J f,.' f>r blisters, red noses, in- 
flamed skin, rash, herpes, sun- 
burn. rle;irs the complexum and keeps 
the skin in healthy condition. 

A special .10-cent package of pos- 
lam is prepared for minor uses, and 
this, as well as the regular two-dollar 
jar. is for sale by all druggists, par- 
ticularly the lA-ceum Pharmacy and 
W. A. Ai)bett s in Duluth and the A. 
E. Holmberg I'lui,' »'o.. in Superior. 




\\'c ha'. cted for our 

trauc, wiiii K-cat vare, the best 
shoes produced by the country's 
n;ost U'lted sh.oe manufacturers 
— the best ah le- ''■ t money and 
experience c -ecure — and 

we're at your service! 

We've shoes for men, women, 
young men and misses — we've 
special shoes for spec al require- 
n.ents and there's no limit to 
which our si)'.endid shoe service 
will not gu to satisfy our pa- 
trons. 

As well and favorably as our 
good shoes are already known, 
you'll see new evidence of our 
leadership in Fall and Winter 
Footwear we're now showing. 

Our prices are $1.LX) to $2.00 
less than regular price, but they 
are not convincing until you 
learn the splendid values. May 
we show you some of the 
World Best Shoes? Any style 
to select from. Suppose you 
come in tomorrow and see 
them. 

Men's and Women's 



and 








SAMPLE SHOE SHOP 

'•Look for the Blue Sign." 
Third Avenue W. and Mich. St. 




Duluth'srietropolitan Cafe. 
The Best in Everything 

ENTERTAIN.ME.NT BV 

FLO CUSHMAN and 
FLAATEN'S ORCHESTRA 



OLD GUARD 
IS STUNNED 

Democratic Victory in Maine 

Takes the Republicans' 

Breath Away. 



Put New life Into the 
Democratic Party 
Everywhere. 



Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. 16. — A 
Wasliington special to the News says: 
That the Democratic victory in Maine 
will put new life into the Democratic 
party everywhere is admitted even by 
the Republican leaders. The prevailing 
view here is that it will inspire the 
Democrats in New York, New Jersey, 
Ohio, Indiana, Nebraska and in other 
slates to redouble their efforts in the 

campaign just about to open. It is 
not going beyond the bounds of truth 
to say that tlie old-time Kepublicuix 
leaders are stunned by the result. 

Tliey had e.xpected a falling off in 
tlie Republican vote in Maine, but they 
were not prepared for any .>^ucli over- 
whelming defeat. Wliile state issuos 
undoubtedly had something to do vvitii 
ilie size of the Democratic vote, tlie 
luct is, say persons who were in the 
.state during the campaign, the two 
gieat isiues about wliicli the people 
talked most were the tar.if and e.\- 
iruvagance in Federal expenditures. 
Apparently a majority of the voters of 
ilaine liud come to the conclusion that 
a Democratic victory would be a gjod 
ihing for the llepui>lican party. 
Naturally, uf Course. 
Xaturaily tlie politicians are wonder- 
ng how widespread this movement is. 
It is being pointed out that if it has 
gained any such headway in other Sic- 
lions of the country as it has in Maine, 
the Keiiublicans stand to suffer an 
overwlielming defeat in November. Of 
Course if the voters of the country 
generally should do what the voters of 
Maine have done, the new house of 
representatives would bo Democratic 
by anywhere from forty to seventy- 
rive majority. What tlie Republican 
campaign manager would like to know 
is whether conditioii.s are similar to 
those in Maine. About the headiiuart- 
ers of the two political parties nere 
today there was a genera! disposition 
to jiredict that the result in Maine will 
have an effect on the Massai-huseiis 
situation. For some time the national 
political managers have been hearing 
tliat tliere is at legist a possibility of 
Mas.saciuisetts going Democratic in No- 
vember. Tlie Republicans have laughed 
at tlie suggestion, but now that Maine 
l;as spoken they are half willing to 
admit that anything might happen in 
Massachusetts. 

The Effect In >'e>T York. 
The effect of the victory on the situa- 
tion in New York state will be watched 
Willi the keenest interest. The pre- 
vailing opinion here is that it will In- 
fluence the New York Democrats to 
put up a strong ticket and to make a 
platform that will appeal to the voters 
of the state regardless of former po- 
litical alliances. New Y'ork is, of course, 
the great political prize hung up for 
the coming campaign. The ijoliticians 
of national repute agree that if the 
state shall go Democratic in November 
by a good big majority it will point to 
the election of a Democratic president 
in iai2. 

Next to the Empire state Ohio Is re- 
garded with most interest, partly be- 
cause it Is the president's own state 
and partly because It is the home of 
Judson Harmon, who is apparently in 
line for the Democratic nomination for 
president. 

After New Y'ork and Ohio come In- 
diana and Nebraska, states in which 
the Democratic national managers be- 




Sickly 

Wipe it off your otherwise 
g-ood looking face — put on that 
good health smile that CAS- 
CARETS will give you — as 
a result from the cure of 
Constipation — or a torpid liver. 
It's so easy — do it — you'll see. 

9IS 
CASCARETS 10c a box for a week's 
treatment, all drue^lsts Bl^grest seller 
u> the wtr-ld. Million boxe« a month- ' 



lieve their party has a fair show of 
winning. The talk of the day is that 
if the result in Maine points to Demo- 
cratic victories in the states above 
mentioned, it also makes Democratic 
success possible in New Jersey, Minne- 
sota and some of the far Western states 
that have been regarded as safely Re- 
publican. On the whole the Democrats 
are seeing big things, and it is only 
natural that they should. 

UemocratM Stick to Party. 

It seems altogether likely that one 
effect of the Maine outcome will be to 
influence Democrats in various states 
not to be led away from their own 
party by the insurgent Republican 
movement. 

Roth national campaign committees 
have recently noted the fact that in 
several of the Central West states the 
Democrats were more than half dis- 
posed to help the insurgent Republi- 
cans, particularly in the election of 
members of congress. This situation, 
it is pointed out, exists in states and 
congressional districts in which the 
Democrats seemingly have no chance to 
win. The politicians were saying today 
that it will be surprising if the Maine 
landslide does not result in Democrats 
everywliere sticking to tlieir own party. 
May Ctaauee Their Program. 

It is generally understood inat the 
Republican congressional campaign 
committee will hold a meeting shortly 
to consider the Maine result and decide 
whether the plana for the congression- 
al campaign shall be changed in any 
respect. This <?ommittee started out to 
conduct a stamipat campaign and the 
Republican candidates it supported in 
Maine were standpatters. The com- 
mittee has up to this time insisted on 
defending the tariff legislation, al- 
though it has, at the request of Presi- 
dent Taft, indorsed the tariff commis- 
sion scheme. 

Many «>f the leaders are now con- 
vinced that if the committee continues 
to insist on a defense of the tariff 
legislation some such outcome as that 
in Maine awaits standpat candidates 
for congre.ss everywhere. The insur- 
gent liepublican nominees for congress 
are making their campaign wholly in- 
dependent of the standpat national or- 
ganization. 

Some Republican Losses. 

It is only naiural that the old Re- 
publican organization should be some- 
what discouraged witii the record of 
this vear. Here are a few of the losses 
suffered by the old Republican party 
since the beginning of the year: 

Eugene N. Foss, Democrat, was 
elected to congress from Massachu- 
setts on March tt by a plurality of 
5,040; James S. Havens, Democrat, 
elected to congress from New Y'ork 
over "Boss" Aldiidge, in Ai)rll by a 
plQrality of 5,s;Jl; C. C. Atkinson, 
Democrat, elected to congress from 
Missouri. Feb. 1. by a plurality of 3,778. 

Since the opening of the year 
Eugene Hale of Maine, Nelson W. Aid- 
rich of Rhode Island. Frank Flint of 
California and riamuel H. Plies of 
Washington, standpat Republican sen- 
ators, have announced tliat they will 
retire from public life. Julius C. Bur- 
rows, standi)at Republican, was de- 
feated at the primaries in Michigan, 
and among the old machine representa- 
tives tor renomination are Duncan 
McKinlay and James McLachlan of 
California, John A. T. Hull of Iowa, 
Charles S. b'cott, James M. Miller, Will- 
iam A. Calderhead and AVilliam A. Ree- 
der of Kansas, Ralph D. Cole of Ohio 
and William H. Stafford of Wiscon- 
sin. Tlie politicians everywhere are 
confused. What does it all mean? is 
a question that is being passed down 
the line, and no one seems to be pre- 
pared to answer. 

REPORT WILL BE 
PUBLISHED SOON 



Work of Roosevelt Country 

Life Commission Not 

to Be Lost. 

Washington, Sept. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald. > — The announcement made 
by Henry Wallace, of Des Moines, the 
new president of the National Con- 
servation congress, that the work of 
what was known as the Roosevelt 
country life commission is to go on, 
and that Its report will be published, 
lias been received here with Interest 
by the officials of the department of 
agarlculture. Many of the farm ex- 
perts of the department made import- 
ant contributions to the information 
gathered by the famous commission 
which was put out of business by the 
Tawney amendment to the sundry civil 
bill of 1909, and these men are natur- 
ally glad to know that, after all. the 
results of their work will be given to 
the public. 

President Wallace announces that the 
report will be published in Chicago, 
and given wide distribution. When 
Repre.sentative Tawney of Minnesota, 
sticceede.i in getting his amrndment in 
the sundry civil bill, the activities of 
both tho country life commission and 
the naticnal conservation commission 
were declared at an end. and all the 
valuable information which had been 
gathered bv the farm commission was 
left unoublished. Practical farmers 



I » ^ ■■ i» lyw ii» ^m ' 



STEEL PLANT LOTS FOR SALE 

ON EASY RAYMENTS 



BY- 



THE CARNEGIE LAND GO. 



107 OAK HALL BUILDING. 



Call or Write Us for Parttoutars. 



CniCKERING, 
FISCHER PIANOS 

Eaaj- Paymeuta. 



Hovviard,Farwcll&Co. 

120 Bast Superior Street. 
'Phoneiti Zeu. 1478- X — Slelroate 1752. 

W. J. Allen, manager; Fred it. Mann, 

expert piano tuner. 




Syiiie 



FOR , 

WOMEN 



Perfect in reitulta becftUM it dilates. 

f!o othsr method thorou^'hl^ cleanses. 

I'hjsieiuis aodorB* ttii> new dilktin^ 

principl*. Dilators lukda of German 

•liver, cannot corrode or break . ijich 

Heaitli Syringe ia fitted for coccec- 

•a witb doucli« baff alluwiagci>n!*Caiit] 

vr. A*k jraur dru^Eist for Tkc{ 

Hcaltli or aend stamp for Fre« 

illustrated book. Correspondeaue 

coolklrrtia) — plain sealed letters. 

THE FfFJkLTH CO..90 West Street. New Yo* 
FOR SALE BY E. M. TREAOWAY. 





THE GREATEST HEAT 

On earth known to science is made by 
volcanoes. The next greatest is made 
by "PITTSTON" Anthracite. Order 
now. 

"PITTSTON" ANTHRACITE, 
"The Coal of Quality." 

PinSBlJRGH COAL CO., 

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*" Fresh -Air Heaters 





and R^jchaMson Boilers 



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best heating apparatus possible to make. 

They heat where others fail— give best satisfaction. 

Send for descriptive circulars* 

SOLO BY KEALY-McFAOYEN PLUMBING & HEATING COMPANY, 327 W. FIRST ST. PhOOM 178. 



Wi^r^ii'^f^ra^yii^f^srar^^^ 




THERE'S not a man in 
town interested in good clothes 
who won't be interested in ex- 
amining these new arrivals from — 



Hart, 
Schaffner 





Copyright Hart ScbafFn 



You'll find pleasure in looking at 
them; more pleasure in wearing them; 
there will be pleasure to us in both. 

A^ew colors are iji graySy 
bf o wn s, ta n s. You ng m en *s 
styles a special feahtfe. 

Suits $18.CK) to $35.00. 
Overcoats $15 to $40. 




Clothcraft Suits and Overcoats $10.00 to $25.00 

This Store is the Home of Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes, 

KenneycS Anker 

409-411 West Superior Street, Duluth, Minn. 






iHTkllV> 



as well as the technical experts who 
(.ontributfd to the. w«ik both regretted 
tlie fail*ure to allow the publiration of 
the report, which meant that all the 
expense- incurred and the hard work 
of the members of the commission and 
the scores of collaborators had gone 
for notliing-. 

The country Ufa report is understood 
to contain many things with an Im- 
portant bearing on the advancement of 
agricultural interfesi-s, and much new 
information relating to phases of farm 
life to which littM attention heretofore 
has been paid. One of the principal 
topics whi'h It treats is the relation 
of women to farm life, and the little 
which has been done to lighten 'her 
l)urden. Man's work has been advanced 
through the invention of labor saving 
implements of all kinds, the report 
shows, and the work of the farmer's 
wife, for the most part, has been al- 
lowed to continue along the same lines 
which were followed out on the farm 
of 100 years ago. The report also 
treats all phases of farm education, 
crop improvement, distribution of prod- 
ucts, and farmers' co-operative organ- 
izations. 




Less Expenses 

Enables the Three Winners at all times 
to save you from $5 to |10 on your 
suit or overcoat. A trial will convince 
you. 



HOOSIER'S HONEYMOOX. 

Spoiled \\ hen Bride Is Arrested on 
Charge of Bigamy. 

Noblesville, Ind., Sept. 16. — Mrs. Pearl 
Knotts, striking in appearance, an in- 
telligent conversationalist and a bride 
of a week, Is in jail in this city on the 
charge of bigamy. She was arrested by 
(^hief of Police Eador as she stepped 
from an interurban car from Indianap- 
olis, where she formerly lived. 

Mrs. Knotts was arraigned before 
Squire Matthews and bound over to 
await the action of the circuit court. 
Her bond was fixed at $500, which she 
could not furnish, and went to Jail. 

Ernest Lohrman of Indianapolis, who 
claims to have been the first husband 
of Mrs. Knotts. came to Noblesville and 
had the warrant Issued for the arrest of 
the woman. 

He told the police that they were 
married In Chicago In 1905 and sep- 
arated last March, while they were liv- 
ing at Indianapolis. 

Soon after they parted, 'he said, he 
applied for a divorce and the case Is 
pending In the Marion county courts. 

Mrs. Knotts says fhe was under the 
Impression that Lohrman had secured 
the divorce, otherwise she would not 
have married KnottaT 

Don't BreflOc Down. 

Severe strains on the vital organs, 
like strains on Machinery, cause 
break-downs. YoiJ can't over-tax 



Bargain Sale of 



— 




■AriPOki 



% 



stomach, liver, klineys, bowels or 
nerves without serloflos danger to your- 
self. If you are w^ak or run down, 
or under strain of a^y kind, take Elec- 
tric Bitters, the mafchless, tonic medi- 
cine. Mrs. J. E. Van de Sande, of 
Kirkland. 111., writes: "Tliat I did 
not break down, while enduring a 
most severe stcaln, for three months. ! 
is due wholly to Electric Bitters." Use 
them and enjoy^ hettlth and strength, i 
Satisfaction positively guaranteed. 60c ' 
at all druggists. . , ^ 



Tomorrow at 1 o'clock 

WAIT FOR IT ! 

The LAST best thirty lots in Crosley 
Park at bargain prices to clean up 

B** ONE DOLLAR DOWN IS ALL YOU HAVE TO PAY TO GET IN ON THIS SNAP '^M 

W.M.PRINDLE&CO. 

Lonsdale Building 
NO SALES MADE UNTIL ADVERTISED TIME ! 



t*m 




I 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




,L^^- 



--■ji»*r«'*'i««'*4^li«P**:i *-■ --'^-* 



^amtm^ 



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Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 16, 1910. 




EGG PRICES 
GOJGHER 

Increase Is Sufficient to Draw 

Out Some Storage 

Stock. 



CeoPKe Palmer has reached home here 
aftt-r a walk of 8.500 miles. He 
started from here the first of last De- 
cember, walked to Ban Francisco, from 
there to New York and thence back 
here. 

SAYS IT IS EASY TO 

SWINDLE THE BANKS. 



New York, Sept. 16. — Adolph Roth- 
barth, the hop merchant who confessed 
that In the last three years he vic- 
timized New York banks for more than 
tlOO.OOO, would be free today if he 
had not grown careless and submitted 
conflicting statements to two banks, 
from one of which he sought to bor- 



row to repay t^e cjfclier. The credit 
men compared ^Bd caught him. 

"All you nee(V' he said while in his 
cell in the Tombs, "is a presentable 
address, respectable clothes, a good let- 
terhead and a statement of assets. 

"When 1 first went to a bank for 
money I told them I might need as 
much as $150,000. They told me to go 
ahead and submit the statement of 
assets, and they would lend me all I 
wanted. So I submitted a false state- 
ment. Any one could have done the 
same." x^ 

SEES HIS FATHER 

tOMMlT SUICIDE. 



St. Leuis, Mo., Sept. 16. — Harvey Mc 



Dcnnell. a freight office clerk, tele- 
phoned the Wiggins Ferry office to 
re.'jcue a man who had Jumped from 
th} Eads bridg-e at 4:80 o'clock yester- 
day afternoon, and when he reached 
home he learned the man was his 
father, Thomas Francis McDonnell. He 
found the body ther»; and the family 
in distress. The elder McDonnell was 
a native of East St. Louis, and is be- 
litved to have left property valued at 
150,000. 

TAFT AND BALLINGER 

BOOSTED IN PLATFORM. 



Pavne-Aldrlch tariff Mil were indorsed 
by the state Republican convention 
here todav. United States Senator 
Francis E. Warren A'as chairman of 
the convention. 

Attorney General ^V. E. Mullen of 
Sheridan, Wyo., was nominated for 
governor. 

ALL HARMONY AMONG 

MONTANA REPUBLICANS. 



Rawlins, Wyo., Sept. 16. — President 
Taffs administration. Secretary Bal- 
linger's conduct In office and the 



Missoula, Mont., S'^pt. 16. — The Re- 
publican state convention adjourned 
after a harmonious S'ission. The much- 
talked of Insurgent stampede failed 
to materialize, the party's platform 
recommending nothing more radical 
than the direct elect! «n of Unted States 



senators. At the nighf session a com- 
pron.ise platform was adopted which 
was the result of a heated session of 
the resolutions committee lasting six 
hours. The contest in the committee 
was over the Introduction of a resolu- 
tion Indorsing Mr. Roosevelt to an ex- 
tent which the stand-patters thought 
was slighting to the administration. 
The compromise platform indorsed 
both Taft and Roosevelt and conimenag 
the Montana congre.«sional delegation. 
■ 

Reduce the Cost of High Living. 

Buy your fall clothes at the Three 
Winners and you can save from $5 tp 
$10 and at the same time wear the 
best clothes sold In Duluth. 



Poii^t B3 Kiisied 

By ^isrepro" 
6entations and 



Fake Sales ! 

Tlio original MANUFAC- 
TURER'S OUT-LET SALE 
will open its doors to the pub- 
lic on Mf about Sept. 24th, at 
15 East Superior street, (^oppo- 
site IJijou theater). A certain 
clothing store knowing that 
we are about to announce a 
Manufacturer's Out-Let Sale 
on Sept. 24th, and seeing our 
posters tiiroughout the city an- 
nouncing this great sale, are 
trving U> take advantage of our 
advertisements by announcing 
a Manufacturer's Out-Let Sale. 
This is the method they pursue 
to deceive the public, and try 
to unload old .shop-worn 
merchandise and bought-over 
Stocks. If you are looking for 
real bargains in Ladies', Men's, 
Young Glen's, Boys' and Chil- 
dren's wearing apparel — wait 
for our opening. You will not 
be disappointed — no old mer- 
chandise, but all new, up-to- 
date goods. 

Watch daily papers for fur- 
ther announcements. 

MANUFACTURERS' 
OUTLET 

M. COOK, Proprietor. 

15 East Superior Street — Oppo- 
site Bijou Theater. 



New Fall and 
Winter 

SHOES 

for Men and Wo- 
men and School 
Shoes for Boys 
C-irls Arriv- 
ing Daily. 

W. ®.L. 

218 W. SuDerior St. 



Potato Prices Soaring—Dairy 
Products Unchanged- 
Good Apple Crop. 



The price of ejirgs advanced sharply 
I his week on account of a decrease in 
tlie fresh supply. Values advanced suf- 
ficiently hitjh to draw out stock which 
WTfiit into storage houses last spring. 
Fresh eggs are quoted at 25 cents and 
storage eggs at 23 cents. The egg mar- 
ket is in a reasonable condition and it 
was expected that prices would ad- 
vance with the advent of fall. Re- 
ceipts from the country are falling off 
and reecivers have been forced to uraw 
upon storage stock to supply the de- 
mand. Storage eggs are of good qual- 
ity and liave met with a satisfactory 
demand. The high-class trade prefers 
fre.'ih eggs and supplit.s have been sut- 
ficient to meet this demand as the in- 
different trade has been supplied- with 
storage eggs, which have proved satis- 
factory as to quality. 

* « « 

A feature of the market was ad- 
vance in i»otato price* and the drop in 
the value of sweet potatoes. Potatoes 
last week brouglu 80 cents to 90 cents. 
Tills week they are quoted at $1 to 
$1.10 a bushel. Potatoes are prob- 
ablv as cheap now as they will be any 
time this year. The potato crop is 
short and a readjustment of values 
has been in progress. Receipts are 
moderate and the demand is good. Jer- 
sey sweet potatoes wlilch sold at $5 
a barrel last week are quoted this 
week at $4.50. Increased supplies 
exceeded the demand and receivers 
were under the necessity of reducing 
prices in order to move stocks freely. 

* • « 

Dairy products remain unchanged In 
prices. The butter and the cheese 
markets were firm. The supply and 
demand continued on an equitable basis 
and receivers moved stocks satisfac- 
torily. 

* * • 

The New York apple crop gives 
promise of an abundant yield and prices 
for apples probably will be much lower 
as soon as the New York varieties 
come into the market. The crop of 
new gallon apples Is short both In 
New York and Michigan. The short- 
age in the former state Is estimated at 
from 40 to 50 per cent, while the 
Michigan crop will not make more than 
half of a normal yield. 

* • « 

The tomato market promises to be 
firmer. Wet weather has retarded the 
ripening of tomatoes in the Maryland 
and Delaware peninsula and the out- 
put of canneries will be greatly re- 
duced. The Maryland yield will be 
several hundred thousand cases short, 
some estimates placing the shortage as 
high as 1,000.000 cases. The acreage is 
lower than usual so that with favor- 
able weather, the yield will be far 
under normal. In the canned goods 
world, tomatoes have been the weak- 
est line, but from now on values, it 
Is believed, will be much firmer and 
will rule higher as the season ad- 
vances. 

* >i> • 

Michigan peaches came into the mar- 
ket this week and an active business 
was transacted. The quality of peaches 
this year, both from Michigan and the 
West, is better than In several sea- 
sons. Prices are moderately reason- 
able. The trade is unusually active 
on account of the excellent quality of 

the fruit. 

« « « 

The supply of spring chickens has 
increased greatly in the last week and 
although the demand is good it has 
not kept pace with the Increase In re- 
ceipts and prices have been shaded. 
Meat prices are mixed. I'ork loins are 
higher and lamb is slightly cheaper. 
Beef is fractionally cheaper and mut- 
ton is a shade higher than last week. 




COLLECE FKATERMTY 

ME.\ HOLD SMOKER. 



All the Late 
Song Hits 




mM 



In Columljia Double 
Disc Records at 65c 
Columbia Indestructible Cylin- 
der Records. 35c, will not break or 
wear out. Be sure and hear the Co- 
lumbia Grafonola, Graphophones 
from $25 to $225. 

EDMONT, 

330 WEST SI IM::UIOH STUERT. 



If You Need 
Soiiiething 

Very choice for a gift you will do 
well to come In and see us. We 
have a beautiful line of gold, silver- 
ware, diamonds and latest novelty 
goods and would be pleased to 
show them, whether you buy now 
or later. 

T. E. Reinhart 

7 Ka.st Superior Street. 



Si.x colleges and universities were 
represented at a smoker held last night 
at the St. Louis hotel by the Duluth 
Graduate Association of Phi Gamma 
Delta. They were Minnesota, Wiscon- 
sin, Chicago, Northwestern. Syracuse 
and Lafayette. The evening was spent 
in swapping yarns of life in the dif- 
ferent Institutions, discussion of the 
merits of the various football teams, 
and singing. Refreshments were served. 
The next smoker of the association will 
be held in Nove mber. 

WANT PASTOR FOR 

ANOTHER YEAR. 

At the last quarterly conference held 
previous to the annual conference meet- 
ing of the Methodi.st Episcopal church, 
a standing resolution was passed re- 
questing tliat Kev. Ciiarles Oaten, pas- 
tor of the Lester Park M. E. church 
be returned as pastor for another year. 
All of the boards had excellent reports, 
especially the ladles' aid society which 
reported having collected $654 during 
the past year. 

Mr. Oaten will leave Sunday evening 
for th'.- conference meeting. 

LAST MEMBER OF THE 

MAYBRAY GANG CAUGHT. 

San Antonio, Texas. Sept. 16. — 
United States secret service men ar- 
rested A. L. Whitney. alias Boono 
Kidd, alias Green B. Morris, the only 
missing member of the so-called May- 
bray syndicate, on a train at >.ew 
Braunfels, Texas, and brought him to 
this city, yesterday, where he was 
placed In jail. He Is under Indict- 
ment at Council Bluffs, Iowa, on the 
charge of conspiracy and violation of 
tlie postal laws. Whitney Is charged 
with being one of the most active pro- 
moters of the Maybray gangs' oper- 
ations. 

CALEB PO>VERS IS 

NAMED FOR CONGRESS. 



( 



^: 



— . SILVERWARE 

When you want silverware, come 
In and see us — we have one of the 
largest and best lines in the city. 

J. QRUElirN. 
Third .Vvenue WeMt and First 

Opposite Wolvln Building. 



y 



Subscribe for Tbe Herald 



London, Ky., Sept. 16. — By a decisive 
majority of more than 7,000 Caleb Pow- 
ers defeated Congressman D. C. Ed- 
wards for the Republican nomination 
for representative from the Eleventh 
congressional district of Kentucky in 
the primary election. Congressman 
Edwards Is serving his third term. 
Powers, who defeated him for renom- 
Inatlon, made his race upon an appeal 
to the voters of the district to eive him 
the nomination as a "vindication" of 
his alleged complicity in the a.s.<5asstna- 
tlon of Democratic William Goebel In 
IttOO. ^ , ^ 

Powers, who was secretary of state 
at the time of the murder, was con- 
fined In Jail for eight years, his first 
three trials resulting in conviction and 
the fourth In adisagreement. Last 
vear Governor Wlllson swept the court 
"records of all the cases remaining un- 
tried in connection with the Goebel 
muider, granting pardons to Powers 
and several others. 

• ■ ■ 

Wulks SyMO MileN. 

Oklahoma City, Ukla., bept. 16. — 




DDiEGT irmM MIANUFACirURERS TO COiSU 

OUT OF BUSINESS 




OWING to the crop failures many retailers in the drouth stricken country 
have cancelled either part or all of the orders that were placed with the 
manufacturers early in the season, causing an overloaded condition in the cloth- 
ing market. Now there is no better loser than a manufacturer, and as soon 
as they realized the situation they asked us to help them dispose of a part of 
their surplus stock. 

THE RESULT — $75,000.00 worth of new fall Overcoats, Suits, Un- 
derwear, Hats, Hosiery, Shoes and General Furnishings for men, young men 
and boys were consigned to us to sell as we saw fit, cost or value not considered. 

Here is the consumers opportunity to buy direct from the manufacturer 
way below the wholesale cost. Sale starts Saturday morning, Sept. 1 7th. Re- 
member we only have a limited time to dispose of this enormous stock as we 
are going out of business, therefore if you want to take advantage of the great- 
est clothing sale ever held in Duluth you will be here early. 

Here Are Jus! a Few of the Sansatienal Bargains-Hundreds of Bargains Equally 



as Or 






tiat Spaee Will Not Premit Us to ientlon Will b« on Display Tomorrow. 



50 dozen men's Ties, 
worth up to 50c, your 
choice at this sale — 




Arrow and Barker 
Collars, everywhere 
15c, choice — 



A big lot of men's pure wool Under= 
wear and some silk plaited, worth 
up to $3.00 a garment— your choice 
tomorrow, per garment — 




Men's 75c Overalls, 
choice at this sale — 




Two hundred boys' Knickerbocker 
Suits, worth up to $7.50— choice 




Hen's Fancy Hose — 
regular 15c values, 
choice tomorrow — 

Boys' Suspenders — 
regular 25c values, 
choice per pair — 





Monogram and Elgin $1.50, $1.25 
and $1.00 Shirts— your choice 




A big lot men's lightweight 
Underwear— worth up to $1, 
your choice tomorrow at — 




Suits, Overcoats, Shoes 
Hats and Gloves at less 
than mfrs. cost. Come 
and see for yourself. 

No exchanges, no re- 
funds, no laybys dur- 
ing this sale. 




This stock was con- 
signed to us and must 
be sold regardless of 
cost or value. 

No exchanges, no re- 
funds, and no laybys 
during this sale. 



I 




§XfIE STORE THA. r IVIADE GOOD. 




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13 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 




September 16, 1910. 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER. 

—ESTABLISHED APRIL 9, 1883— 

Publlshnl cvrry r\i'nin5 e\o<pt Sunday by 

THE HERALD COMPANY, 

Herald Buildins. Opposite Postofflce Square, 
422 and 124 West First St., Dulutli. Minn.. 



Euten-J as Mcond-clajn matter at the Duluth postofflce under the act of con- 

(leu of Murch 3. 1878. 



TKI.KI'H<»\KS — Hell and Zeultb: 

Business office. 324. Kditorjal Rooms. 1126. 



OFFICIAL PAPER CITY OF DULUTH. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

(By mail payable in advance.) 

paily, one month 35 I Dally. .si.K months $2.00 

Daily, three months. .$1.00 ( Daily, one year 4.00 

.Sntiirday Il(>rnlcl. oue year $1.00 

\*«-ekl> Ileruld, aav year 1.00 

Bemituiioes may be maile by check, poslofflro oriler. regiitered letter or «- 
pn-« or.ler. Malve all reinllianrei payable tj Tlie Hcnld ComDany. GUe p<J8t- 
Mfice aJdreM l<i full, liid ;,Jliig s:ale aiul ooiinty. 

BY CARRIER— CITY OR SUBURBS. 

I>ai!y. one week ; $.10 

Daily, one month 45 

Daily, one year 5,00 

.'^il■ -Hers will confer a favnr on the clrcuLition dcpRrtraeut by callluB 324, 
*^' ' •'■■•*. .ind nuking k.iovTii any iMmpIaint of service. 

It !■> !iii;i nam whin desiring the addresi vt jjur paper changed to glTe both 
tne (jid haI new addrejisea. 



the 



Though Minnesota has made a start, in general 
compliance with this agreement has been small. 

The Sun is not correct in assuming that the Federal 
government owns no swamp lands. It owns some in 
Minnesota, and it should co-operate in the work of re- 
claiming them. 

The Sun is correct when it says: "Most of the land 
after reclamation would be of marvelous fertility. It 
is the accumulated humus and decayed vegetation of 
centuries." We had supposed humus and decayed vege- 
tation to be the same thing, but let that pass. The fact 
remains that swamp lands when reclaimed provide the 
richest soil imaginable, and therefore that they should 
be drained as speedily as may be. 



THE 0PE|J COURT. 

(Readers of The Herald are Uwtted to mafee free use 
of this column to expresa their Ideas about tUe topics 
of general interest. Lettefrs slieulj not exceed 300 
words — the shorter the better. They most lie written 
on one side .f the paper aJMy. iind they must be ac- 
companied in etery caae bj'the.' »»iime and address of 
tlie writer, though these aeed li«t be pubilslied. A 
signed letter Is always moK eflS^ftive. howoer.) 



STATUE OF Dl WVI 

FOR COURTHOUSE. 



the 
the 



^' t- Inilutli Hfrald accepts advertising contracts vvMth 
the d.stintt eisarantee tliut it has the largest circulation 
of any newspaper publislied In Minnesota outside the Twin 
Cities. Its value as an advertislngr medium is apparent. 



J.tC US never forr/ct that an act of goodness 
1^ of itself an act of hap}) in ess. JTo reicard com- 
imj after the event can compare icith the sweet 
re tear d that icent tcith it. 

■=— J/'( If r itt J/'itlerlifi rl\ 



JAMES GRAY. 

Had the Democratic party in Minnesota nominated a 
3veak or unworthj^ man for governor, it would have 
failed conspicuously in its duty to the voters of the state 

Happily, it has not done so. In James Gray of Min- 
neapolis it has picked a man whom any citizen can be 
proud to supp..>rt, and who, befoic the campaign is over, 
M"ill have enli.sted a large and warmly enthusiastic fol- 
lowing without regard to party. 

It is true, as The Herald said when the Lind declina- 
tion was made final, that the delay has given an appar- 
ent adv:intage to the Republican candidate, Mr. Eberhart, 
and has permitted the Republican organization to set up 
quite a tidy lot of fences. We feel assured, however, 
that before Mr. Gray has been engaged many days in the 
campaign into which he will plunge immediately, mat- 
ters will wear a very different aspect, and those recently 
built fences will lose much of their whitewashed tidiness. 

Mr. Gray's candidacy should appeal to every class. 
His is an eminently respectable figure, and there is a 
Strong appeal in his career. From a worker in the woods 
he won his way upward, giving himself a thorough edu- 
cation, ami being graduated from the University of Min- 
nesota in 1885. His time since has been spent largely in 
newspaper offices, and of late years he has practically 
been editor of the Minneapolis Journal. While he has 
alwaj'S taken an active part in public affairs as a good 
citizen should, his only previous participation as a public 

official was as mayor oi Minneapolis, in which capacity 
he gave an excellent administration. He is in the prime 
of life, and ihe age of 4»^ finds him gifted with a winning 
personality of great charm, a vigorous physique that will 
stand him in good stead in the whirlwind campaign he 
must put up to cover the state between now and election 
day, and notable powers of insight and expression that 
fit him peculiarly for the high responsibility that has 
come to him — unsought, like his previous venture into 
public life; for he has never been an officeseeker. 

The Democratic state central committee did wisely 
when it re-elected Frank A. Daj- as chairman. He has 
sho%vn his capacity in previous campaigns, and he can be 
counted upon to direct a vigorous, aggressi\e battle into 
which the candidate himself, John Lind and other force 
ful figures will throw their best efforts. 



CAPITULATION ? 

President Taft's amazing and ingenuous letter to 
Republican partj', issued through the backdoor by 
hand of his private secretary, is being puzzled over today 
by many minds of many bents. Its meaning isn't alto- 
gether clear, and its purpose is vcxingly opaque. It 
seems at once a confession and a vague promise. 

The confessional aspect, however, is clear enough. 
The president admits two things of which be has been 
accused, and of which his supporters have been ready to 
acquit him on the ground that the accusations were par- 
tisan distortions. 

He admits that up to the present time he has with- 
held patronage from insurgent senators and congressmen 
with a view to clubbing them into line. 

He admits that during the recent campaigns for nom- 
inations he has intervened in behalf of standpatters and 
against insurgents, and that he did so at the dictation of 
party "leaders"'. "In the preliminary skirmishes in cer 
tain states, like Wisconsin and Iowa and elsewhere," says 
the letter, "he (the president) was willing, in the inter- 
ests of what the leaders believed would lead to party 
success, to make certain discriminations." But now "the 
president has concluded that it is the duty to treat all 
Republican congressmen and senators alike, without any 
discrimination." 

In other words, under the crafty guidance of Aldrich 
und his machine, the president tried to club insurgents 
into swallowing administration measures which would 
have put reform back a decade, and later tried to bring 
about the defeat of the insurgents whose co-operation 
with the Democrats in congress whipped these danger- 
ous measures into passable shape. He admits it, acknowl- 
edges that the people have rebuked it at the primaries, 
and promises that he won't do it again. 

With Aldrich going. Hale going. C&nnon going, Bur- 
rows going, and the reactionaries everywhere falling in a 
widespread popular revolt against their domination, the 
president, if he had clung to such advisers, would pres- 
ently have found himself alone. His letter manifestly 
was born of a fear of such loneliness, and of a desire to 
creep under the tent of the progressive movement. It is 
a humiliating confession and capitulation. 



To the Editor 

On the first 

house there is 



of The Herald: 

floor of tlie new court- 

a fine place for a statue 



pt Daniel Greysolon "DuLhut. I think 
Duluthians generally cherish the 
memory of this great explorer and I 
suggest that by popular subscription 
or some other method of raising the 
money, we get busy. On the first 
floor there is an indenture in the wall 
of .solid marble that fates the outer 
doors. The marble is beautiful as it 
is and it is, of course, the first spot 
that is seen on coming through the 
doors. A statue of this man in this 
place would be as appropriate as it 
would be striking. it is the proper 
I place and the idea, I tliink. would find 
favor with a great manv. 

,^ . , A tJUBSCRlBER. 

Duluth, Sept. l.j. 

"JI3DIY" GRAY AND 

THE NEWSPAPER MEx\. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

\V uen in Miunfapollii in the ad- 
ministration of James Gray, Demo- 
cratic nominee for governor, I had oc- 
casio'i to see something of the inner 
workings of the mayors office. The 
newspaper men would feather in Mavor 



wlien asked if there 



Gray's room and 

was "anything doing," the mayor 
would issue a stereotyped statement 
which the newspaper men would re- 
ceive calmly and without visible signs 
of emotion. 

When Mr. Gray had concluded the 
writers would lean back in their 
chairs, put their feet ou the mayor's 
desk, and reijuest of him, ■Now. Jim- 
my, old boy, cut out the straight stuff. 
Wliais the news," and •Jimmy" wouM 
smile, hand over a cigar or two and 
relieve his mind of anything that was 
on it, leaving to the discretion of the 
newspaper men as to what should be 
printed and what should be withheld 
from tlie public. 

I think Mr. Gray will get the votes 
of every newspaper man in the state 
who knows him even the fellows who 
j are writing editorials against him. 
My own opinion is that "Jimmy" Gray 
will make one of the best governors 
the state ever had. 

OLD NEWSPAPER MAN. 

Duluth, Sept. 15. 



NEW JERSEY AND ILLINOIS. 

Yesterday's political developments brought strong en- 
couragement from New Jersey, where the Democrats 
showed great intelligence in nominating President 
Woodrow Wilson of Princeton university for governor, 
and milder encouragement from Illinois, where insur- 
gents replace standpatters in three out of the twenty-five 
congressional districts. Illinois might have done better; 
Xew Jersey hardly could have done better. It is the 
duty of tiie Democratic party, in these days of revolt 
against the Republican party, to nominate the best and 
ablest men available, and in New Jersey, as in Minnesota, 
the Democrats have done exceedingly well. 

The Illinois returns would have been pleasanter to 
contemplate if so many of the Lorimer Democrats and 
Republicans in the legislature had not been renominated. 
Lee O'Neil Browne, charged with handling the money 
that bought Lorimer's senate seat, is renominated, and 
the fact is no credit to Illinois. 

Cannon's renomination by a plurality smaller than 
usual but still aniple is a sop to the speaker that few will 
grudge him, whatever may be thought of the district that 
continues him in office. 



DRAINAGE—STATE AND NATIONAL. 

It is a vitry unusual experience to The Herald to find 
itself agreeing, even partially, with President Taft and 
the Xew York Sun when they are in accord. It is nearly 
as unusual, but not quite, to find occasion for disagree- 
ing with ex-President Roosevelt. 

This situation arises over the question of whether 
drainage of swamp lands shall be done by state or na- 
tion. President Taft says the states should do it. Col. 
Roosevelt was going to say that the nation should do 
it, but compromised after Taft had announced his opin- 
ion, and said that both should share it. The Sun agrees 
thoroughly with Taft, and not at all, of course, with 
Roosevelt. 

Says the Sun: "These lands, covering not far from 
80,1X10,1 "00 acres in the aggregate, are now owned either 
by the states or by private individuals. A large part of 
this vast area, about equaling the combined area of the 
six Xew England states, Xew York state and Xew 
Jersey, was in possession and control of the Federal 
government sixty years or so ago. Under the swamp 
land law of 1850 more than 60,(A)0,()00 acres have been 
ceded to the various states in which the land is situated. 
The cession carried a general agreement that the trans- 
ferred districts would be reclaimed by the states. Some 
of the land has passed into private ownership. A very 
small part of it has been reclaimed by individual enter- 
prise. The states have done little except to beseech and 
urge the Federal authorities to do for them that which 
for moral, legal and economic reasons they should do 
for themselves. The frequently advanced argument that 
if the government can bring water to arid lands it can 
with equal propriety drain water from swamp lands is 
utterly untenable. The lands in process of reclamation 
by irrigation are owned by the government. The swamp 
lands belong to states and private individuals." 

There ought to be no trouble about draining the na- 
tion's swamp lands and apportioning the cost. XV'ither 
nation nor state should drain private lands free. The na- 
tion should not drain state lands free, nor should the 
state drain federal lands free. 

The important thing is to get them drained, and they 
are sure to stay wet so long as nothing is done but 
stand around and argue about who is to do it. Perhaps 
the best way would be for Federal and state govern- 
ments to co-operate, and assess the cost pro rata to each 
acre. Then if swamp lands privately owned benefit 
they will be made to bear their share of the cost. 

The government gave the swamp lands to the states, 
and the states by accepting them agreed to reclaim them. 



not alone 
re(iuire a 



GIVE MAIL CLERKS 

THEIR SUNDAY OFF. 



To the Editor of The Hei-ald: 

I always thought it was the desire 
of the letter carriers themselves to 
have a distribution of the accumulated 
mail on Sunday morning, so that their 
work on Monday morning would be 
lighter. As I now understand it they 
do not wish the practice to continue 
and I for one think their wishes 
should be observed. I live a block and 
a half from the postoffice, have a 
heavy mail, for an individual, but for 
years I have not botlu'ied going even 
that far for the Sunday mail. In my 
opinion it is an unhealthy fad, 
called for, unjust. 

I cannot say, however, that 
opening of the general delivery is 
necessary for the accommodation 
transients or travellers, but for 
regular Duluthians who Itave 
mail delivered as well as ours 



un- 



the 

un- 

of 

the 

their 

is tlie 



delivery 
It ever 



occasion for an open Sunday 
does not exist any more, if 
did. 

T. W. HUGO 
Duluth, Sept. 15. 



a delicate task to 
licate task to frame 
well, and met the 



CEANGING THE CONSTITUTION. 

At the recent meeting of the American Bar associa- 
tion President Libby said that rapidly changing condi- 
tions will shortly require a change in the Federal Con- 
stitution. 

That is very shocking information for those who hold 
up the Constitution as a sacred institution that must not 
be touched or changed in any way, and that must be 
honored to the letter no inatter how greatly conditions 
may change from those visible to the able but none the 
less very human individuals who framed it. In most 
cases it will be found that those who preach so fervently 
the sac redness of the Constitution are men who honor- it 
chiefly because of the bars it puts before the advance 
of democracy, and the protection it offers to vested 
rights which long ago became vested wrongs. 

Says the W^ashington Star: "Mr. Libby is 
in the opinion that new conditions will soon 
change in the Constitution. But, when undertaken, the 
task will be most delicate. In calling a convention for 
that purpose the door will be opened for the introduction 
of all propositions, and many will be presented. Variety 
will be the spice of the docket. A number of the older 
states have written new Constitutions; and their dif- 
ficulties — only multiplied many times — will be the na- 
tion's when the latter begins work." 

That is true enough. It will be 

amend the Constitution. It was a de 

it, but it was framed marvelously 

needs of conditions that existed then most admirably. 

When it is amended it will be amended as ably, and will 

meet the needs of present conditions — alv.ays providing 

the people have full control and the convention is made 

up of men who truly and honestly represent the people. 

Surely the American people are as capable of making a 

constitution now as thev were 121 years ago. , , , , , • i , 

-, r , , . . '• J ^ at^ J. j^^ always keeps his word, is always 

Most of the shuddering about the delicacy and peril I oh time, and prides himself on his 

/-.f clnnmtKT tli-^ r ^.i cf if „f i,^., l^ .1^., u ..u i I respectabil ity, whlcli indeed is his chief 

oi cnanging tne t.,otistitution is done by those who are 

beneficiaries of the conditions most needing change. 
There is no real danger in a constitutional convention, 
except the danger that the people will not control it, and 
that those who do control it will so warp its aims as to 
strengthen the protection now given to special privilege, 
and to weaken the protection given to the people of the 
nation. And there is little danger of that in these days. 
If the convention were so controlled, and its work di- 
rected to the service of privilege, the result would be 
rejected by the people. And if a too wild ra'dicalism by 
any chance should make the Constitution an insecure 
foundati(5n for national peace and prosperity, the people 
would reject that, too. 

There is no peril in trusting the people. They are 
conservative enough to handle any branch of their own 
affairs for their own good, and that is the sole purpose 
of any Constitution — to serve the people and to work 
for the greatest good for the greatest number. 



Buriiirlariug: — .\ Pour liivinK. 

The writer of the "interpreter's 
House" ill th« September American 
Magazine says: 

"It i.s impossible as well as un- 
profitable to seud all scoundrels to the 
penitentiary, 1 atti not particularly 
anxious to send any of them there. I 
am so hard to amuse with the suffer- 
ings of human beings that I get no 
fun at all out of the thought of even 
a burglar punished for his sins. If ho 
is a i)ersislent burglar, practising his 
art in my neighborliood, 1 am g'.ad to 
have him removed. But I don't care 
where he is removed to. I might be 
In favor of the government paying 
him enough to make it worth his 
while to leave o££ burglaring. It 
wouldn't cost much. Picturesque em- 
ployments seldom pay well. Like pir- 
ai'y and bribe-taking, it is an ex- 
tremely un remunerative employment. 
The average income of an independent 
gold miner, working twelve hours a 
day and changing his shirt once a 
month, is about 1 1.8.5 a day. I should 
say that the average, income of an 
ordinary, industrious luirglar, such a 
craftsman as might call on you or 
me, after deducting the cost of masks, 
jimmies, chloroform, revolvers, etc., 
is rather less than this. The stati.-;tics 
are, of course, hard to get at. The 
modesty of burglars is proverbial, but 
from personal aciiuaintauce among 
tliem while 1 was a newspaper report- 
er I know they are underpaid. They 
are perpetually in straits for ready 
money, they live in poor surroundings, 
their children are badly clothed. Al- 
coholism does not account for their 
condition, for they must be abstem- 
ious during working hours. They are 
not wasteful or extravagant. Only in- 
sufficient means can be the cause of 
their habitual despondency and an 
air of apprehension about the future 
so incogenial with the supposed ro- 
mantic nature of their calling tliat -it 
might better become a widow or or- 
phan whose funds are safely Invested 
in some of the magnificent properties 
listed on the New York Stock ex- 
change. Of course, a combination of 
burglary and gold mining might be 
profitable. It ha.s been so in the past. 
.And a burglar who couhl get into such 
an enterprise as a New York street 
railway company might grow very 
rich. Or he might bo asliamed to 
take the money. But putting all 
questions of morals aside, I could not 
conscientiously advise any young man 
conuneiuing life to take up burglary 
as a profession. Willi the greaiesi 
talents, he could not expect to make a 
fair living. Tiie most proficient and 
successful burglar I have known, a 
man who would scorn to !>reak into a 
private residence, but confined him.self 
to tlie strictly commercial and con- 
servative business of safe-blowing, 
was glad at the end of his career to 
take a position as messenger at a 
racetrack." 



! The Wall Street Broker. 

! Life: The Wall Stre&t broker is prac- 
i tically a new species of mankind that 
i has come into existence in comparative- 
I ly recent times as the world goes on. 
I Nothing just like him has evei existed. 
i He is a gentleman by demeanor and 
' a gambler by profession. He is of ab- 
solutely no importance in lue world's 
i economy, as he creates nothing and 
■ trades only on the toil of others. 



is his 
asset. Yet Ills whole standing de- 
pends entirely on the weakness of 
others. He lives on the rake-off that 
results from a contest of fools. 

The Wall Street broker as a rule lives 
on the fat of the land. He knows 
something of everything. He has 
traveled and can talk about architec- 
ture. He has reail and can quote Kip- 
ling or Shakespeare. Oftentimes he 
is a socialist in his opinion — but not 
in his actions. 

The Wall Street broker has feelings. 
He is often sentimental and may be 
good to his wife and childien. It is 
not unusual for him to be simple in 
his tastes. He is likely to be the mem- 
ber of some church. 

Then what is the matter with him? 

Why, nothing. Who said tiiere was? 
Anybody who can make a good living 
and oftentimes a fortune by producing 
absolutely nothing' Is entitled to re- 
spect. 

And the Wall Street broker does it. 

If you doubt thi.'' watch him when he 
travels about in bis automobile and 
wtih his retinue of servants. Dear old 
Wall Street: Dear not only to the 
country but to all o£ usi Don't we all 
pay for it? 



A FATAL THIRST. 




regions below the diaphragm, 
B collected in groups, which ; 



A. O. Swain has gone to Minne- 
apolis to meet his wife, who will h«»re- 
after make Duluth her hom* 



•••Mr.s. 
Dr. F. B. 
spending 
brother, J. 



Fernando 
S:iles of 
a fe^v 
M. Root. 



Bancrol't and Mrs. 

Sparta. Wis., are 

Gays with their 



By Bill Nye. 

Prom the London Lancet we learn 
that "mf;ny years ago a case was re- 
corded by Dr. 0tto of Copenhagen, in 
which 495 needles passed through the 
skin of a hysterical girl, who had prob- 
ably swallowed them during a hyster- 
ical paroxysm, but these all emerged 
from the 
and were 

gave risti to inflammatory swellings of 
some size. One of these contained 100 
needles. Quite recently Dr. Bigger de- 
scribed before the Society of Surgery 
of Dublin a case in which more than 
3u0 needles were removed from the | witii Mr. and 
body of A woman. It is very remarlj- i^ake Park. 
al^ie in how few cases the needles were 
the causu of death, and how slight an 
interference with funciions their 
presence and movement cause." 

It would seem, from the cases on 
record, that needles in tlie svstem 

mollf'ion'^itltv" '^'^^ digestion and pro- '^'Mrs C. r. R.^rrett of Tower aas 
mote lon«evIt>. gone to Minneapolis where '■he will at- 

For instance, we will suppose, that tend the slate conv-ention ol the W C 
the hysterical girl above alluded to, ] T. U.. which meets todav 
with 495 needles in her stomacii, should days' session. 



TWENTY YEARS AGO. 



Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date, 189D. 



J 



♦♦*Dr. Elmira Y. HowarJ. a noted 
physician of Cincinnati, Ohi >, returned 
home today after a two weeks' visit 
Mrs. Eniil hchmied at 



♦•♦Mrs. F. C. Fleishman and daugh- 
l?r 1 "^^■«* returned from Houghton, 
-Mich., where ilrs. Fleishma i has been 
vi.siting her daughter, Mrs. Livingston, 
will reside at Lakeside. 



Til 



for a four 



absorb the midsummer cucumber. 
Tliiiik how interesting those needles 
would make it for the great colic pro- 
moter! 

Wo can Imagine the cheerful smile 
of the tucumuer as it enters tlie 
stomach, and, bowing cheerfully to the 
follicles standing around, hangs its 
hat upon the walls of the stomach, 
stands its umbrella in a corner, and 
proceeds to get in its work. 

All at once the cucumber looks sur- 
prised an<^ grieved about something. It 
stops in lis iieaven-born colic genera- 
tion, and pulls a rusty needle out of its 
person. Maddened by the ijain, it once 
more atticks tlie digestive apparatus, 
and oiict more accumulates a ciioice 
job lot of needles. 

Again and again it enters into the 
unequal contest, eacli time losing- 
ground and gaining ground, till the 
poor cucumber, v.iih assorteil hard- 
ware sticking out in all directions, 
like the hair on a cat's tail, at last 
curls up like a caterpillar, and yields 
up the victory. 

Still, this needle business will be 
expensive to husliands, if wives once 
acquire t le habit and allow it to obtain 
the mastery over them. 

If a wife once permits this demon 
appetite for cambric needles to get 
control o'. the house, it will soon secure 
a majority in the senate, and tlien there 
will be trouble. 

The woman who once beg;ins to tam- 
pei' with cambric needles is not safe. 
Slie may tliink that she lias power to 
control her appetite, but it i.s only a 
step to the maddening thirst for the 
soul-destroying darning needle, and, 
perhaps, to the button-hook and car- 
pet-stretc.her. 

It is safer and better to crush the 
first desire for needles tiian, wlien it is 
too late, to undertake reformation 
from the abject slavery to this hellish 
thirst. 

We once knew a sweet youncj crea- 
ture, with dewy eye and breatli like 
timothy liay. Her merry laugh rippled 
out upon the summer air like the joyful 
music of bald-headed bobolinks. 

Everybody loved her, and she loved 
everybody, too. But in a thoughtless 
moment siie swallowed a cambric 
needle. This did not satisfy her. The 
cruel thraldom had begun. Whenever 
she felt depressed and gloomy, tliero 
was nothing that would kill her ennui 
and melanclioly but tlie fatal iieedle- 
cusiiioii. 

P'roni this she rapidly became more 
reckless, till tliere was iiardly an hour 
that she was not uhder the iniluence of 
needles. 

If she couldn't get needles to assuage 
her mad thirst, she would take hair- 
pins or door-keys. She gradually 
pined away to a mere skleton. She 
could no longer sit on one foot and 
be happy.. 

Life for her was filled with opaque 
gluom and sadness. At last she took 
an overdose of sheep-shears and mon- 
key-wrenches one day, and on the fol- 
b>wing morning her soul liad lit out for 
the land of eternal summer. 

We should learn from this to shun 
the maddening needle-cushion as we 
would a viptM', .T.n<l I'^vei- i'^!l a He. 



a^V^^^*"- ^^'^^^'^K?- ^^- •^- Carr enter. Rev. 
and :\lrs. L. M Noyes and Mr. and Mrs. 
Wallace Warner have left for North- 



MINNESOTA OPINIONS. 



Why .Not iiirl >«'OHt!tf 

Life: The Hoy Scout movement, 
suggested originally, we l)elieve, by 
Ernest Thompson Selon, and taken up 
ill England by Gen. Buden Powell, is 
growing in tliis country very rapidly, 
and will probably soon be another pic- 
uresque feature of our more or less 
picturesque civilization. 

The boy scouts are a large army, 
graded according to age and general 
ability. 

A boy is placed according to what 
he can do and the measure of his 
honor. He must be able to make a 
camp, hunt and fish, walk long dis- 
tances, be familiar witli w^oodcr.ift. 
rescue people in emergencies and prove 
his self reliance in many ways. Unless 
politics t)r graft gets into this new 
ought to prove effective. 
c(jnflne 



the movcinent to 



machine it 
But why 
the boys? 

Why not have girl 
could be taught, for 
To wasa dlAies. 
learn the use 
we^r simple 
avoid slang. 
iielp motiier. 
learn sometliing about 
care of a young baby. 
speak respectfully to their 



To 
To 
To 
To 
To 

take 
To 

ents. 



scouts also? They 
e.Kami)le: 



of a broom. 

clothe-s. 



how to 



par- 



I'ulitlcn. 

Life: The game of politics, like chess, 
is of ancient and obscure origin. Its 
invention, however, is u.sually ascribed 
to the <levil. It was pla> ed witli vary- 
ing success among the Egyptians and 
}iabylt>nic.ns, and has coniiniied in fa- 
vor down to the present day. On one 
side is the I'ublic and on -the other 
is the I'oliticiaii. "Now, watch care- 
fully!" says the latter, and nonchal- 
antly he manipulate* the walnut shells. 
The prob em is then for the I'ublic to 
guess under wliicii siiell the pea is. 
Or, to change the figure, the game 
may be likeneil to the marriage service, 
in which the Politician swears to love, 
honor and obey the Public. ^Vitllill a 
week, hov.-ever, the bride usually pro- 
ceeds to ReiKj. 

"Entrutl your public affairs to me," 
says the Politician, "and 1 wnl mis- 
manage them to the best of my uls- 
ability, waste your money, raise the 
tax rate aiul corrupt the legislature. 
And wha: will I charge for all that? 
Oh, a m'jre l)agatelle — tlie liifierence 
between what thing.s are worth and 
what yiiu pay for them." 

Is it any wonder the Public holds 
such a iiiHi: iii iionor and e.^teem? 



In 



RrftcftioiiN «»* « liaeheior. 

New York Press: Mo.st anything 
the world will wear out but red hair. 

Law runs in some families just like 
ugly tempers In others. 

Y'ou can tell when a woman has cold 
feet by the scared look on her hus- 
band's face as fall begins to approach. 

If a man could mal»e a great reputa- 
tion by ha.rd work he'd rather try to get 
a little money easily by gambling. 

The exasperation about getting any 
money is all the things your family has 
to spend on it instead of letting you do 
a little. 



Tbe Jii<1i;;e SooreK. 

September Lippincot t's: .Several law- 
yers in a Soutliern city were- discussing 
tlie merits and demerits of a well- 
known n\ember of the bar who had 
been gat! ered to his fathers, when one 
of the party related an incident of the 
time when he had studied in the old 
man's office. 

It seems that the Inefficiency of the 
copying clerk there kept the judge con- 
tinually ^vorked up to the point of ex- 
plosion. One day a wire basket fell 
off the lop of the clerk's desk and 
scratclved his cheek. Not liaving any 
court-phiHter, the young man slapped 
on three postage stamps and went on 
with his work. 

Later In the day he had occasion to 
take certain papers to the court, and, 
forgetting all about the stamps he 
put on his hat to go out. At the door 
he met the judge, who raised his head 
and fixed the clerk with an astonished 
stare. 

'•-Anythng wrong, sir?" stammered 
the hewil tiered clerk. 

"Yes, sir, there is!" thundered the 
old gentl.jman. "You are carrying too 
much postage for second-class matterl" 



But They're EnUeavorerit. 

Wabasha Herald: Don't get rattled 
just because you have to explain to 
your wife tliat the Epworth league 
and the National league have nothing 
in common. 



SeoIdluK I'ayu l:Ilkiaii. 

Albert Lea Times Enterprise: The 
Abruzzi-Elkins engagement is reported 
again, and with it comes th i usual de- 
nial of Papa Elkins. If the old gentle- 
man is so opposed to the marriage why 
doesn't he keep the girl at home and 
not let her be wandering c. round l^u- 
rope? 



A Little Too, Anyv-ay. 

Ortonville Herald-Star: !• seems 
be the political faie of Mr Bryan 
be just a little too late or just 
too early with his great issues, 



to 

to 

littl.j 



Ou 



Diflerliiis OpluIonN. 

Red Wing Free Pre.^.i: Some men 
seem to think that if they can not 
share another person's opinijn on some 
public question they must become thai 
l>erson's mortal eneniv. They .seem to 
be ignorant of the fact that it is quite 
possible for men to differ without ceas- 
ing to be gentlemen. 



A Very General Relief. 

Mesaba Ore: The ne.\t national con- 
gress will be nearer to being a popular 
body than was the last one, and it will 
also be considerably neare • a Demo- 
cratic one. 



Why Alice I*ufl'N Paper Pipen. 

Waverly Star-Tribune; Ae cannot 
just quite under.stand what difference 
It makes wh.ether Alice Longwortii 
smokes cigarettes or just plain che- 
roots, but since the news seems to in- 
terest the public we suppo.-e It is be- 
cause she wants to make "lar§;e 
smoke" like her dad. 



IS some 
in China, 



China Xot So Slow. 

Hinckley Herald: Tlfer.i 
5,000 miles of railroad buili 
but China is not such a slow country 
as it is claimed to be, because seeing 
the inevitable results the guveriiment 
has stepped in and taken charge of 
all roads and is projecting iiem Itself. 



Where DoeH It Leare Taftf 

Atlanta Constitution: I'or weeks the 
most ingrained stand-patterii have been 
repudiating Cannon and v^annonisin, 
Aldrich and Aldrichism. 

The rejection, from such source, of 
Cannon and that for wliich he stands 
does not lack in elements of patiios 
and, partially, cowardice. Many of the 
old-line "regulars" now mosi vehement 
in their repudiation of the speaker are 
responsible for the system of which 
he Is out the expression and the scape- 
goat. 

He is a creature of their own malt- 
ing and maintenance. They were 



ready enougli to glory in liis tyranny, 
so long as it brought them the fruits 
of patronage and political strength 
and even measurably escaped public 
condemnation. 

Now that he stands isolated as the 
principal representative of the old 
regime with courage to defend its doc- 
trines and precepts, his previous 
idolators seek to save their own lildea 
by joining the pack at hiti back. It 
is a species of chicken-heariedness in- 
separably from politics, bu. none the 
more savory. 

Where does this Insurgency that has 
now become instead a party revolution 
leave President Taft? 

If U>gic c'lunt.s and consistency I'ules, 
how can he escape being engulfed in 
the storm that has overtakeii the Bour- 
bon element of his party? 

At a time when he could have re- 
deemed his pledge to tiie people by 
aligning hiniseif with the jirogressive 
sentiment, he was uptiolding tlie hands 
of Cannon in li-.e hou.se. Ablrich in tlie 
senate. Ai a time when the insurgents 
were making possible even a siiadowy 
redemption of party jiledge? by grace 
of the Democrats, he was nailing La 
Follette and Dolliver and Mi rdock, and 
allowing his name to be used in de- 
vices of intimidation. 

T!ie victory has been w<>n without 
his aid — desjiite his opposi ion. Now 
that oposition has become political 
suicide, with wlial curious End incred- 
ible grace will come a profession of 
the new faith witli the deck on the 
last stroke of the hour that sounds the 
death knell of tlie very things for 
which he stood with Aldrich and Can- 
non at a time wlien he had the mak- 
the new tariff bill in the hol- 
his hands. 



ing 

low 



of 
of 



AbMtraetioUN. 

Ellis O. Jones In Life; 
are the salvation of our 
its institutions. 



Abstractions 
country and 



While employers' associ;itlons are 
in a continual quarrel with labor 
unions, abstract capital still maintains 
Its love for abstract labor. 

Although concrete divorces go on 
increasing at an alarming rate, none 
the less does th.e abstract home remain 
the irreslstilde cornerstone of our ab- 
stract morality. 

Even if graft seems to insinuate it- 
self Into every department of our pub- 
lic affairs, there is no lack of abstract 
patriots standing firmly for al>stract 
honesty. 

In spite of the fact that the trust 
Idea seems to be flourishing, alistract 
economists do not abate their staunch 
and sturdy advocacy of abstract com- 
petition. 

Notwithstanding the fact that our 
representati\-e.s spend all tlndr waking 
hours in building their o^vn fences, 
nevertheless they do not fail abstract- 
ly to represent and abstract public 
opinion. 



es- 



.\dniiiLtHt rations. 

Life: AH administrations are 
sentially the same administration. 

More specifically an administration 
is a political event coverinj? a period 
of time. 

All administrations begin with prom- 
ises; the vaguer the promises tiio 
more the public expects. 

After a little the adn' !nlstratlon 
realizes that something mu?t be done 
to convince the public that promises 
which have never been riaie nave 
been kept to the letter. 

In order to do this. It is merely 
necessary to convince the pjblir; that 
whatever has been done is exactly 
what has been promised. TSils [3 very 
easy if the promises were sufficiently 
vague to begin with. 

As soon as the public Is convinced, 
It is time for an adrninistraion to be- 
gin to talk about an extension of 
term. 

When the question of term is once 
thoroughly opened. It is time to in- 
troduce more promises. I'roceed as 
before ad lib. 

Aministrations, like history, repeat 
themselvea. 



^ 



DEFECTIVE PAGE ^ 



•^ 



f 



T7 



field, Minn., 
gregational 



to attend the 
conference. 



annual Con- 



♦♦♦Mr and Mrs. W . G. Dickenson of 
National City, Cal., expect to leave in 
a few days for their home. Their 
stay m Duluth has l)een much longer 
than anticipated, because of the bene- 
fit to Mr. Dickenson's health. 



*•♦. 



r.«io ^ ,"°?" today Miss Carrie Blake 
Otis and C>;rus B. Wagar were mar-. 
"^,fj'>' Jhe Rev. Dr. Dunn at the resi- 
dence of t.ie brides parents. Mr and 
MIS A. c. Otis. It was a ouiei home 
cerem.my. attended by onlv intimate 
lanuly triends as guests. Hoare's or- 
chestra furnished theVnusic and Thurs- 
ton the wedding breakfast. Mr and 
Mrs. W agar will make a short wedding 
trip through tlie South, and on t lelr 
return will reside at 131 East Second 
street 

♦♦♦The board of education is looking 
about for three lots on ihe plateau 
back of Tliird street and west of 
Eighth ave.uie west, with a view of 
erecting a new school building to ac- 
commodate the children in that section. 



A )iOMENT AMTH THE WITS. 



je 



St. Louis Post-Dlspatch: The king's 
ster looked out upon the angry mob 
surrounding the royal palace. 

".\fter you, Aljihonse," he said, and 
despite the extreme gravity of the sit- 
uation the king and all his courtiers 
laughed m the hearty Castiilian fash- 
ion. 



London Tit-Bits; Mrs. Newrich (who 
has adve.'tised for a pianist • — So vou 
are the music teacher that answered 
my advertisement? 

"Yes, nia'an. 

"Well, .sit down here and play a cou- 
ple of duets so that I can see what you 
can do." 



Puck: The New-Hat-Tree — .\nd you 
are a centenarian? By George! Aside 
from a few cracks in your face you 
hold your age mighty well. What's the 
secret? 

The Grandfather's Clock < serenely) — 
I keep regular hours and always find 
something for my hands to do! 



Puck: The Black Hole of Calcutta 
laughed gratifiedly. "Lucky for me." 
it chuckled, "that I got in among the 
classic horrors before the facilities for 
dressing in tlie upper berth of a .>-leep- 
ing car were i>erfected, otherwise I 
should be nowhere " 



Puck: Maud — Tom had me talk into a 
phonograph so he can hear my voice 
while I'm away. 

Clara — How lovely! And be can stop 
the machine! 



Zion's Advocate: Mr. Peck — I tell you 
I'm nobody's fool! 

Mrs. Peck— What's that? 

Mr. Peck — Except yours, 
only yours. 



my love-^ 



Philadelphia Ledger: "That stock you 
want to sell to me is worthless." 

"It's been worth a lot of money to 
me," replied the honest promoter. 



Chicago News: "You had your pie and 
coffee," said the lunch -wagon man; 
"anything else, sir?" 

"Y'es," murmured the drowsy custom- 
er, as the midnight bells chimed forth, 
"be a good fellow and drive me home." 

Pointed I'araitrapliB. 

Be good or some one will tell the 
truth on you. 

Many a bad husband at home is a 
"good fellow" down town. 

.\nd many a woman can't see a joke 
who is married to one. 

But the self-made man never neg- 
lects to worshin his creator. 

Occasionally a man gra.«ps an idea 
that is difficult to let go of. 

A man is seldom disappointed in love 
— until after he gets married. 

If you are perfectly miserable your 
enemies have no cause for complaint 



vou were half as 



think folks think 



im- 
you 



Don't you wh 
portant as you 
are "^ 

Y'ou can't convince the young man who 
is in love that the object of his affec- 
tions will ever grow to look like her 
mother 



A I'rayer for Ihe Idle. 

The September American Magazine 
opens with the following prayer by 
Vv'alter Kauschenbuscn: 

"O God, we remember with pain and 
pity the thousands of our brothers and 
si.'^ters who seek honest work and seek 
in vain. For though the unsatisfied 
wants of men are many, and though 
our land is wide and calls for labor, 
yet these thy sons and daughters have 
no place to l.ibor, and are turned away 
ii; humiliation and despair when they 
seek it. O righteous God, we acknowl- 
edge our common guilt for the di.«order 
of our industry, which thrusts even 
willing workers into the degradation 
ol idleness and want, and teaches some 
to love tiie sloth which once they 
feared and hated. 

"We remember also with sorrow and 
compassion the idle rich, who have 
\ Igor of body and mind and yet pro- 
duce no useful thing. Forgive them 
for loading the burden of their support 
on the bent shoulders of the working 
world. Forgive them for wasting in 
refined exces.s wliat would fee<i the pale 
children of the poor. Forgive tliem 
for setting their splendor before the 
thirstv lieart.-J of the young, luring 
them to theft or shame by the lust of 
eve and rtesh. Forgive them for taking 
pride in their selfish lives and despis- 
ing those bv whose toil they live. For- 
give them "for appeasing tiieir better 
self by pietended duties and injuri.jus 
cliaritio.'?. We beseech thee to aw^il^en 
them by the new voice of thy spirit 
that they may look ui» Into the stern 
eves of Christ and may bt smitten v/ilh 
the blessed pangs of repentance. Grant 
them strengtli of soul to rise up like 
men from their shame and give a just 
return of labor for all they receive 
and enjoy. 

"And to our whole nation do thou 
grant ■wisdom to create a world In 
which none sliall be forced to idle m 
want, and none shall be able to idle in 
luxury, but in which all shall know 
tlie health of wholesome work and tne 
sweetness of 'well-earned rest.' " 



AMUSEMENTS. 



Both Pheties 2416. 



-^ new f^ ■«"< rnenes x«ia. 

\ THEATER 

•eoond Ave. East and guperler Street 
ADVANCED VAUDEV.LLE 



Seatt on tale for 
•ne week aheaii 

Matinee 25c 

Except Sim4ays. 

Nifhte, I5e, 2S«. 
50e and 7S« 



SoliosI Boya and Girl*. 

Elita Pioctor Otit. 

Peter Donald and Meta 

Carson. 

The Temple Quartet. 

Marie Hart and Billy Hart. 

Arthur BoMen. 

Oe Lisle. 

The Kinodronit. 

The Concert Orchestra. 



MVTINKE SATl RDAY. 

Sam S. and 'i-ee Shubert Present the Stirring 
American Drama 



(4 



99 



THE CITY 

Matinee, ZSc to fl. XlKhta SRc to 91.30 



Next Sunday 
Comedy, "'The 
25c to $1.50. 

Sept. 20 to 
Fight Pietur**. 



and Monday Nights — ^the Farcical 
Blue Mouse." Seatt on Sale. 

24— The Orlfinal Jeflriet-Jehatan 



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Friday, 



LEADERS OF THE MEXICAN GOVERNMENT IN NATIONAL CELEBRATION 




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September 16, 1910. 



18 




WILSON IS 
NOMINATED 

Princeton President WUI Run 

lor Governor of New 

Jersey. 

Makes Speech on Issues at 
the Democratic Con- 
vention. 





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MANUEL GONZALES COSIO, 
Secretary of War and Marine. 

City of Mexico. Sept. 16. — Toilay Is 
the '>ne hundredth anniversary of the 
MeXivt'n republic anil tlie ceremonies 
ti.day were part of a month of cele- 
tration-s. The national independence 
dales from i^ept. 16, ISIO. when Father 
Hidolgo. priest of the '.ittle parish of 
I'olores. near Guanajuato, rang the 
bell of hla church suuinionlng the peo- 
ple to arms against their irovernment. 
This old bell Is preserveil like the In- 
dependence hell in Philadelphia and 
the i-eremonies of today were Inaus- 
urated with the rinsing of thl.s bell l«y 
President L>laz. The ceK-bratlon will 
extend to .<ept. 30. Each day there 
will be festivities of some sort, games, 
concerts, balls and parades and the 
dedir-atlon of public works. The 
I'nited States government has sent a 
Bpeclal delegation to represent it dur- 
ing the centennial, headed by Curtis 
Guild. Jr.. of Boston. 



DEFENDS NEW 
NATIONALISM 



RAMON CORRAL, PORFIRIO DIAZ 

Vice President and Secretary of the President of the Republic of Mexico. 

Interior. 



JOSEDVES LIMANTOUR, 
Secretary of Finance. 



Replyi 



Speech 



CoL Roosevelt Makes 
ring to Those As- 
saihng Him. 




Trenton, N. J., Sept. 16.— New Jer- 
sey's Democratic state convention yes- 
terday nominated Dr. Woodrow Wilson, 
president of Princeton university, for 
the office of governor of the state. 

Dr. "U'll.son's nomination was brought 
about largely through the Influence of 
Former United States Senator James 
Smitli. Jr., of Essex county, who Is 
undhsputed Democratic leader of the 
state and Robert Davis, leader of the 
Hudson Democracy, who for the first 
time In many vears acted In harmony 
with Senator Smith. Besides thi.s sup- 
port, Dr Wilson had with him a num- 
ber of Independent Democrats who be- 
lieved that because of his standing as 
an ef!ucator he would make an unusual- 
Iv strong candidate. Dr. Wilson was 
nominated on the first ballot. 

The platform adopted was in lino 
with the Democratic platform of three 



has been going on for seme time now 
in circles close to the president. 

It was not admitted at the executive 
offices that recent proj^resslve suc- 
cesses in states like I>wa, Kansas, 
California and Wisconsl i had influ- 
enced the pre.sident Neitlier was It ad- 
mitted that results in tlie;ie stales were 
at all displeasing to the president. 

Distinct objection is raised in Bev- 
erly these days to the term "insur- 
gent." On the other hand there is a 
disposition to point out many of Mr. 
Taft's utterances and aces of the past 
as evidence of a real progresslveness on 
his part. It 13 also pointed out that 
the president has had to work with the 
macliinery his party gav* him. 
Will Talk About It. 
It Is intimated that In the speech he 
is to deliver before the National 
League of Repuldlcan Clubs in New 
York on Oct. 1, the president may have 
something to say of his own progres- 
siv>iness. 

It is recalled in Beverl>' that prior to 
his inauguration President Taft had 
jnany earnest conferences with leaders 
of the i-arty looking to the overthrow 
of "Cannonism" in the house of repre- 
sentatives. It is delcarei that he was 
deterred from this course by persons 
high in the last administration on the 
ground that to press the; fight against 
Cannon at that time Ti'ould mean a 
split in the party and a loss of effec- 
tiveness in putting through and clinch- 
ing the Roosevelt policits. 

Meanwhile the Norton letter is to be 
allowod to sneak for Itself without 
further explanation. Mr. Taft's New 
York .■^peech may shed some light on the 
situation. 



Use IJZ-- 

Smaller Feef 



Sore Fe**, Tender Feet and SwoUen 

Foet Cared Eyery Time — TIZ 

MaJi^es Bore Feet Well Xo Matter 

Wbat Alls Them- 



BRITON BEATS 
GLENN CURTISS 




LEANDRO FERNANDEZ, 
Secretary of Communications and 
Works. 



O. MOLINA. 
Secretary of Encouragement. 



JUSTO SIERRA, 
Secretary of Public Instruction 
Fine Arts. 



and 



ment on my speech on new national- 
ism," he said. "-\11 that new national- 
ism means is the application of certain 
old time moralities to the changed 
conditions of the day. 

'I wish to see greater governmental 
efficiency because we have to deal with 
greater business efficiency. Simple laws 
are all that are necessary In a small 

no big busi- 
ness and each man works for himself. 

.L , ,1 When you get masses of wealth gath- 

Jsm. he declared that he was merely j ered together and great corporations 
urging the application of old morall- ' developing, conditions then become so 
ties to modern conditions. At the same flanged that there must be an increase 
^, . ,. , ,^, ...... ..^ I in government activity to control the 

time he replied with spirit to those v/ealth for business efficiency. 



Oyster Bay, N. Y.. Sept. 16. — Theo- 
dore Roosevelt says he Is not talking 
revolutliin in declaring his new politi- 
cal creed. Neither Is he making an ap- 
peal to mob rule. In a staunch defense j community where there is 
of his doctrine of the "new national- 



who have been opposing him. and hotly 
denounced newspapers which he said 
attacked honest public men. 

Col. Roosevelt's address was deliv- 
ered at the Suffolk county fair at 
Riverhead. L. I., yesterday afternoon. 
He rode about 120 miles In an automo- 
bile to and from Riverliead and spoke 
to a i^reat crowd on the fair grounds. 
The colonel's exposition of "new na- 
tionalism" came a4 the close of a 
speech in which he also denounced dis- 
honest corporations, dishonest men of 
wealth, and political bos.ses. He made 
no reference to the New York state 
political .situation. 

Deflneti XeTf XetionaliMm. 
I have noticed a good deal of com- 



I would not do any wrong to these 
great corporations but I don't Intend 
to rely only on the big corporations" 
good nature to see that the corpor- 
ations do not do harm against us. I 
want to see such control of the wealth 
now gathered for business uses, as to 
favor the honest man who uses the 
wealth genuinely for the service of tho 
public and to make the dishonest man 
feel that he has to do what is right; 
and If he doesn't feel it, we shall see 
to it that he does. 

No Revolution on Mob Rule. 

"That Is my creed. That is all there 
is In it. There is no revolution in It. 
There Is no appeal to mob rule. On 
the other hand. I recognize mob vio- 
lence as an enemy of the public as 
much as lawless wealth. I am against 
the poor man who is guilty of the 
crime of lawless violence, and, when 



It Is In ray power, I shall try to pun- 
ish him for his misdeeds, just as 
whenever I have the power. I will 
join with those that see to it that the 
corrupt man of wealth is good — not 
because he likes It. but because he 
has to be." 

Col. Roosevelt spoke with even more 
than customary earnestness. His 
words were received with cheers. 

"I have spoken to you as farmers, 
my neighbors here." he said, after he 
had appealed to them to develop the 
usefulness of the individual to the 
highest degree. 

"1 want to speak to you as citizens 
interested in the great iiroblems which 
concern all of us. I think every citi- 
zen of a free democracy ought to dis- 
trust above all others the public man 
whosre deeds do not square with his 
words. 

Different Kinds of L4e«. 
"That has two sides. It has to do 
with the politician who makes prom- 
ises that he does not keep, and it has 
to do with newspapers whlcli say w^hat 
they know Is not true. Mark Twain 
said that there are 8Ga different kinds 
of lies but the only one which was 
authoritatively forbidden was that of 
bearing false witness against your 
neighbor. There are one or two 
metropolitan dallies which would do 
well to print that at the head «f their 
columns and then try to live up to it. 
I withhold their names, but the omis- 
sion i." easily supplied. 

"There are two prime difficulties in 




getting good government. One arises 
from the dishonest politicians. I think 
thfc corrupt politician no worse an 
enemv of the people than the man 
who lies about the honest public serv- 
ant. The damage he does is to the 
public in so confusing the public by at- 
tacking the nnen who are honest that 
the public ceases to be able to recog- 
nize and to war against men who are 
dishonest. Such a man is of the great- 
est advantage to the thief. 

Polltidana and Paperw. 

The corrupt politician is no worse 
than that corrupt politician's main- 
stay, the newspaper which says which 
is not true about men in public life. 
Honestv. truth. courage — you need 
them fUst as much In public as in 
private. 

"I have no hostility to corporations 
as such. I recognize the corporation 
as a necessary method of dealing with 
modern business conditions. The cor- 
poration has its rights and is entitled 
to full protection In the exercise of 
those rights. But the corporation la 
not entitled to vote, or to the owner- 
ship of any public man." 

In concluding his speech, the colonel 
urged greater respect for manual labor. 
As for rich malefactors, he believed 
that the railroad man who gets rich 
by gambling in the securities of the 
road he operates in trust for his stock- 
holders, should be punished, and that 
if it is Impossible to punish him under 
present laws, the laws should be 
changed. 



WOODROW WILSON. 



Monoplanist Wins Aerial Race 

at the Atlantic 

Meet. 

Boston, Sept. 16. — Driving his mono- 
plane at approximately a mile a min- 
ute Claude Grahame-V'hite, the Eng- 
lish aviator, defeated Glenn H. Curtiss, 
the American flier and world's spee<l 
champion of the air, in a special 
match speed test at the Harvard avia- 
tion field at Atlantic yesterday by 16 4-5 
.seconds in a five and a quarter mile 
race. White thereby won the $3,000 
Harvard cup and made a new speed 
mark for (he field by poing the course 
in 5:47 4-5. White also added to his 
winnings the John Hays Hammond 
cup, the second prize for a special 
bomb-throwing contest. Ralph John- 
stone, the Wright aviator, took the 
first prize, the city of Boston cup. 

It was the conclud ng day of the 
Harvard aviation meat and it was 
marred by the first noteworthy acci- 
dent. A. V. Roe, an English flier, 
wrecked his machine and was pain- 
fully, but not seriously, Injured. 

From an elevation of 1,800 feet 
neither Johnstone nor White could hit 
200 square feet of canvas on the 
ground, each throwing six eggs, but 
.Johnstone's shots w?re better and 
earned him. the Boston cup. 

All the Nobby Styles 

In blues, grays and lir owns are now on 
display at the Three Winners, for only 

$10. $15 and $20. 



Every one who is troubled with sore, 
sweaty, or tender feet — swollen feet— i 
■mclly feet, corns, callouses or buniona 
can quickly make their feet well now. 
Here Is Instant relief and a lasting, 
permanent remedy — It's called TiZ. 
TIZ makes sore feet well auJ swollen 
feet are quickly reduced to their nat- 
ural size. 'fnousand." of ladles have 
been able to wear shoes a full b1s# 
smaller with perfect comfort. 

It's the only foot remedy ever mad* 
which acts on the principal of draw- 
ing out all the poisonous exudations 
which cause sore feet Powders and 
other remedies merely clog up the 
pores. TIZ cleanses them out and 
Keeps them clean. It w^orks right off. 
Tou will feel better the very ffrst 
time it's used. Use it a week and 
you can forget you ever had sore 
feet. There is nothing on earth that 
can compare with it. TIZ is for sala 
tX all druggists 25 cents per box oP 
direct if you wish from Walter Luther 
Dodge & Co., Chicago. 111. 



AIR TOURS XEXT. 

Glidden Offers Trophy for Aviators 
to Compete for. 

Borton. .-Sent. 16. — Aeroolane to.irs to 
be conducted on similar plans to thoso 
governing automobile tours are em- 
braced in a proposition announced by 
Charles J. Glidden. originator of the 
Glidden tours for automobiles. Mr. 
Glidden has offered a valuable trophy 
to tho National Council of Affiliated 
Aero clubs, to be competed for an- 
nually, under such rules as the coun- 
cil may prescribe. It Is planned that 
the Initial air tour shall "be started 
from the Harvard-Boston aviation 
field at Atlantic In 1911. 



WILLJ.A.>ISON <SJ MENDENHALL. 



Keep in step with the new fall 
Boston shoes — $3.50 



shoe styles, 
and $4.00. 



See our 



Store Open Saturday Night Till 10:30 




WILLIAMSON (& MENDENHALL. 




YOUR FALL CLOTHES 

Are here ready for you to put on. You'll have to 
look a long time before you'll find another display 
of men's and young men's smart clothes that in either 
variety, correctness or quality is even worthy to be 
compared with The Big Duluth's showing of high 
k class wearables. 

Sec Duluth^s Finest Display of 

Fall Suits, Cravenettes and Overcoats 

$10, $IZ5a $15, $18, $20, $22.50, 

$25 to $40 

Come Saturday to see these, no trouble, but a pleasure to show you the handsomest collection 
of fall clothes in town. 




:S 



years at ^ except that It was more 
specific in advocacy of reform meas- 
ures, including the conferring of rate 
making power upon the present pub- 
lic utilities commission. 

\eu.>pted the Xomluatlon. 
Dr. Wilson after his nomination 
came before the convention, accepted 
the nomination and made an address. 
After discussing the platform, Dr. 
Wilson said: _ , ^ 

■There are three great questions be- 
foie the people — reorganization ana 
economy in administration, equaliza- 
tion of taxation and the control of cor- 
porations. Other Important questions 
aro the proper liability of employers, 
tho question of corrupt practices m 
elections and the question of conserva- 

"6ur system of government should 
not be necessarily complicated and 
elaborate and there should not bo 
to(» many separate commissions ana 
boards." .^ „^., „ 

Referring to taxation. Dr. Wilson 

■'Our system of taxation is HI di- 
gested, piecemeal and haphazard This 
sv3tem, should not be changed too 
radicallv. but the whole system shou.a 
be carefully reconsidered and amende*., 
in such a manner as to fit economic 
conditions." 

State Coutrol of Corporatloiw 

Discussing the question of corpora- 
tions, llie speaker said: 

"The power to regulate taxation of 
corporations and fix rates should be 
vested in a public utility commission. 
Tiie regulation of corporations is mucfi 
more the duty of the state than of the 
Foderal government." 

In concluding his speech Dr. Wilson 

"The playing of politics Is to 
be deprecated. Measures having for 
their object the betterment of our 
condition should be conceived in the 
largest spirit and urged by leaders 
who are statesmen and not dema- 
gogues.'' 

^ ACTOR TALKS TO * 

^ HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS. * 

^ Xorman Hackett, leading mnn * 
Mlh with "The City" which Im playing »e 
^ at the Ly<^um, watd yesterUaj lu * 

* a talk before the high tjchool * 

* children that Bostou pewi'Je upeak Q 
^ the bent KugllMh uited In America. Q 

He Maid that Anierlcaus ax a ^ 

e mutilate the mother tongue. ^ 

wuggested that n dramatic ^ 

cluh he organized lu the school. ^ 

■if. He told of other McbooU where * 

5 vlubH of this kind are very sue- ¥fr 

* ce»»ful. * 

WONDER WHAT 
LETTER MEANS 



SHO'C RE^P AIRING 

. _^-l V 

NEALrl^Y, THE SHOi: SVRGEON 

19 FIRST AVENUE WEST 

cHeimbach patent). No 



Home of the Twi i Detachable Rubber Heel 
nails; no nail ho'es; great cushion effect. 



THE STOTT BRIQUET 



i^'Nothinff left but th^ ash 



:^. tt'%J--..iJ';^.«« 



^ rul 
ff He 



THE ''STOTT 
BRIQUET* 

is a solid chunk of 

pure anthracite 

screenings securely 

welded together 

by a newly 

discovered process 






THE ''STOTT 
BRIQUET* 

is about tu^ inches 
square- -it is the 
easiest fuel to 
handle, the best 
in heat giving 
results 






Our Fall Furnishings 



Never 




The New Silver Collar.i — Bi- 
plane and Monoplane adver- 
tlseil in this week'.s Post are 
on sale at 15e— 2 for 385c. 



patterns and colors been so 
pretty as this fall. 

FALL SHIRTS, 
^1.00 to ^2.50. 

FALL UNDERWEAR, 
50< to ^8.00. 

FALL NECKWEAR, 
50^ to ^1.50. 

FALL GLOVES, 
$1.00 to^2.50. 



Fall Hats 

Men come here for ab- 
solute newness, perfect 
fit of head and features 
and better hat values, and 
get them. 

Stetson's, $3.50 to $5. 

Guyer's, $3.50 and $4. 

MaUory, $3 and 3.50. 

Gordon, $3. 

Fall Caps, 50^ to $2.00 



Mothers of Boys 

Will find The Big Duluth Boys' Section 
ready to out the little men in the nob- 
biest fall clothes shown in Duluth. 

Boys' Fan Suits 

$2.45 to $15 

Boys' Fall Overcoats 

$2.45 to $16.50 

Winter underwear, nobby caps, sturdy 
shoes, warm stockings, coat sweaters 
and everything a boy will want you'll 
find here in endless variety. 




Beverly Political Gossips Spec- 
ulate Over Norton's 
Screed. 

Beverly, Mass., Sept. 16. — Beverly is 
not a little puzzled as to the exact 
meaning of the letter in which Secre- 
tary Norton, reflecting: the views of 
Mr. Taft, announced that the policy of 
withholding patronage from progres- 
sive senators and representatives had 
been abandoned and that it was the 
l)urpose of the administration to' treat 
all Republicans alike. 

No Interpretation of the document 
:ould be obtained from official sources. 
It was admitted that a variety of In- 
:erpretatlons might be placed upon it 
from the view point of different polit- 
ical observers, but It was Insisted that 
Che letter was simply a formal an- 
nouncement of a policy that soon would 
have been discovered In various ap- 
pointments of postmasters, etc., that 
are about to be made In some of the 
progressive states. 

Taft a "ProKrewslve." 
The suggestion that the letter seamed 
to Indicate a turn toward the "progres- 
sives en the part of President Taft, was 
met bv a statement that Mr. Taft al- 
ways 'has been a "progressive" him- 
self and that his record for progressive 
legislation during the first year in of- 
fice has never been equalled by any 
other Republican administration. 

There is also a disposition In Beverly 
to regard the letter as a further step 
In the process of readjustment which 



aved 

In Your Coal BUI 

n You Use 

Stott Briquets 

THE IDEAL ECONOMY FUEL 



Used in open grates, in furnaces, surface burning 
stoves, kitchen ranges, laundry stoves and hot water 
heaters, they ESTABLISH A NEW STANDARD OF 
FUEL VALUE. 

Ask your fuel dealer about Stott Briquets-'»if he 
does not handle them, write us and we will direct 
you to a dealer who can supply you, 

J?e Sure to get Directions for burning 
from the Stott Booklet— at your dealer's 

Stott Briquet Co 

Superior, Wisconsin 






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THE DULUTH HERALD. 



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PARIS FLOOD 

FUND STOLEN? 



Few Sufferers Have Seen 

Any of the Relief 

Money. 

Paris. Sept. 16.— Kosiilents of Paris 
Buturbs who suffered loss from the 
floods ot the Seine and the Marne las: 
winter have a genuine grievance. 
Thoiiph many thousands of dollars In- 
tended to relieve the misery of the 
s ; fieri- rs and assist ihein in the work 
of rehabilitation pouring into Paris, a 
very sniall proportion, it appears, ever 
found Its way to persons in real need. 

To this day the work of dlstribu- 
tl«'n has never been Feriously under- 
talon. When the relief money first 
appeared sufferers were promised that 
loans would be granted them. Months 
have passed and these havo not been 
arranged. Property owners who suf- 
fered losses were assurrod. too, that a 
I>u!-tii>!i ( r their taxes wiv I'.d be ro- 



September 16, 1910. 



i 



mltted but the amounts have proved 
absolutely out of proportion to tho 
necessity of the case In many In- 
stances. 

Kesidents of Afini^res, a suburb jn 
which the suffering caused by the 
floods was very great, recently held a 
mass meeting aijd protested against 
toe action of the government. They 
planned to march into Paris and hold 
a monster demonstration In the streets 
of the city, but ]Lou[b Lepjne. the pre- 
f^f** ef pCliCe, heard of tiio 'plan and 
prevented its consummation. 

At the time of the floods some 6t 
the corservative business men of 
Paris questioned the i^isdom of ac- 
cepting outside aid. But when the 
Seine and the Marne overflowed not 
only did other departments of France 
send money intended for the relief of 
the stricken district, but nearly every 
other civilized nation sent large sums 
to France. 

The I'nitod States contributed more 
ge/ierouslj' than any other country. 
Certain nev.'spapers had grossly exag- 
gerated conditions here and the gen- 
eral opinion of the disaster, aa enter- 
tained In America, was out of all 
proportions to the facts In the case. 

So the money rolled In and the gov- 
ernment accepted It without betraying 
the slightest misgiving or qualm of 
conscience. Hut the men for whorn 
it was intended say now that they 
have never seen It. An official In- 
vestigation to determine what became 
of the funds Is likely to bo ordered 
t-ocn. 



ASKIN ca. MARINE COMPANY 



4; loo 

A WEEK 

BUYS ANY STYLE 



■51 



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tJlThis is the first Autumn Announcement and it 
means that this Store is in thorough readiness to 
fit you out with Clothing, Hats and Shoes strictly 
up-to-the-minute in every little detail of fashion. 

In Both the Men*s and Women* s Departments 
there is everything for FALL WEAR, and 
the Assortments are at their Best Right Now 

Complete Outfits at all prices from $12 
to $20. Terms to suit Your Convenience 



is:;?ife--->' 



20 Third Ave. W 

Store Open Saturday Evening Until 10 o'Clock. 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Jr LINES 

Convenient Evening Train 

To Ne^v York 



Leave Chicago today after office hours — 5.30 p.m. 
—and dine tomorrow evening on BroadwaV- Travel on 

"The Pennsylvania Limited" 

Yor.r New York trip a,mid the luxurious comforts of a metro- 
politan club is made truly enjoyable aboard this train. An hour 
or two tonight among the books in library-smoking car after 
dinner — then retire. 

Tomorrow the trip is varied by mountain scenery. You ar- 
rive New York 5.30 p. m. Compartment -observation car, 
library-smoking car, parlor car, sleeping cars, and dining 
car service. 

Other New York trains leave Chicago daily 8.15 a. m., 
10 05 a. m., 10.30 a. m., "The PennsylvanJa Special' '(18-hour 
train) 2.45 p. m., 3.15 p. m., 9.45 p. m. and 11.45 p. m. 



Pennsylvania Station 
in New York City 

WiH be Opened Next 
Monti) (October, 1910) 

Occupies two entire blocks 
and fronts on Eiffhth and 
Seventh Avenues, &lso on 
Thirty-first and Thirty-third 
Streets. Main entrance la 
only one blocit from Broad- 
way aud Mew York's busiest 
spot. /291) 




W.E. BLACHLEY 

Traveling Passenger Agent 

219 McDerraot Avenue 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

will furnish complete and 
reliable travel information. 
Sleeping car berths reserved 
in advance, and valuable as- 
sistance given travelers free 
of ciiarjro. 



OPENING OF 
NEW OTAY 

Diverts Half of Long Island 

Traffic From the Ferry 

Boats. 



Two Hundred Trains Sent in 

and Out of New 

Terminal. 



New York, Sept. 16. — The great local 
event last week was the opening to 
business of the Pennsylvania railway 
terminal and the operation of the tubes 
connecting Manhattan with Long 
Island. 

Ninety-seyen outbound trains and 
ninety inbound were sent under the 
poijulous island and the Kast river and 
It is stated that during the first forty- 
eight hours of operation more than 35,- 
000 passengers were carried by these 
.'^ubway trains through the newly 
opened tunnels. 

The travel on the ferries on the East 
river was cut fully 50 per cent and the 
cross-town.s lints of street cars con- 
necting with the ferries gave plain evi- 
dence of the diverting of the travel 
from them to the new subway. 

The space allotted for the passengers 
In the new terminal depot was but a 
fraction of the final allotment when 
the building is fully finished, and it 
was not sufficient for the comfort of 
the thousands who came in on the new 
lines of travel. 

The Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and Ninth 
avenue railways were all benefited 
through the concentration of passenger 
traffic so close to their lines, and the 
same avenues, as well as Broadway and 
i itth avenue, were crowded far more 
than usual in the evening hours when 
the Long Island people came in bv the 
thousands to the theaters of Manhattan. 
ShupkeeperM Feeling Illue. 

It is said the merchants and shop- 
keepers of Long Island are very blue 
over the loss of trade which they feel 
will be the result of the opening of 
these time-.savlng lines of travel. 

They are of the opinion that the 
great department stores of Manhattan 
will receive the largest share of the 
patronage that the local merchants of 
Long Island now have, and the writer 
witnessed along the main roads of Long 
Island, even as far out as fifty miles 
from the East river, the delivery wag- 
ons of these enterprising department 
stores taking the merchandise pur- 
chased on Manhattan to the very doors 
of the residences of the Long Island 
purchasers. 

This was before the onening of the 
tubes and with the greater ease in 
transportation now and the greater 
rapidity in customers reaching those 
stores, and the delivery of their pur- 
chases, there is no doubt the locil 
Long Island merchants are right as to 
the increased sales of the department 
stores in Manhattan. 

The solace of the Long Island shop- 
keepers will come with the increased 
number of residents, as Long Island 
for fully twenty miles from the East 
river Is bound to be built up as a city, 
and to have the population that will 
maintain the local stores. 

Stct?k InveMtnients Suffer. 

In the face of material conditions of 
the very best character, there seems 
to be no desire for stock investments 
from the investors who use the ex- 
changes to deal through. 

A very good crop of cotton Is as- 
sured now, and it is known it will 
bring far more than an average price. 

Corn and oats are said to be record 
crops this year, while wheat is very 
little short of the last year's produc- 
tion. 

The grass and hay crops are very 
good Indeed, and the rains of the past 
three weeks, covering a very wide 
area, will aid In prolonging the pas- 
tures through the autumn months. 

Yet, witii all these exceedingly fav- ' 
orable factors for the railroads of the 
country, with this accumulation of 
crop tonnage that places the fall and 
winter business of the transportation 
companies at maximum figures, there 
exlst.s a dullness that comes from the 
sentiment of those who, like the late 
Jay Gould, make stocks. 

Take up the ralUvay reports of tho 
business during the months of July, 
.Vugust, and thus far in September, 
and the receipts of money and the 
number of cars moved, the tonnage 
carried, are aliove even the banner 
year of 1907 in the aggregate of each 
of these measures of railway business. 
BiiKinetiH Livens I'p. 

It is undeniably true that some 
branches of business are l>eing cur- 
■«ailed from the maximum of produc- 
tion, but the other classes of trade 
more than make up by increased ac- 
trivitles and larger outputs. 

Business may be "spotty," but the 
volume In values as well as in ton- 
nage of the aggregate of our inland 
transportation commerce is away be- 
yond all prior years. 

The country is doing more actual 
trading, true commercial business, 
then ever before in its liistory, how- 
ever, dull the stock exchanges are and 
however deep the sentimental depres- 
sion of those who are studying ft- 



^^nces through ancient political spec- 

These men are behind the times when 
they seek to Judge the present situa- 
tion by past con(ytions, or when they 
hope to have past conditions restored. 

The country is stronger, sounder, 
more powerful than when Garrett, Com 
modore Vanderbilt, Stanford, Hunting- 
ton, Jay Gould. Thomas A. Scott and 
their cotemporari«6 made such great 
financial successes. These men have 
fa^seH Q.y/^y and bo have their busl- 
iiess methods. 

Dolns More for Stockholders. 

The men of today at the head of the 
great transportation systems are earn- 
ing far more -<or nheir investors, the 
stockholders; -thejr; are doing far bet- 
ter for the bendluilders of their roads 
than any of the galaxy of great and 
famous operators ' named above ever 
did or ever could do. 

McCrea of the Pennsylvania, has 
placed the great system he controls 
at the highest point of organization, 
operation and aggregate of earnings 
it has ever attained. 

James J. Hill, witli all his fault-find- 
ing of the conditions of late years, is 
building his system more solidly than 
he ever dreamed of ten years ago. 

So with railway after railway that 
could be mentioned, and with manager 
after manager that could be named, 
growl and complaint and condemna- 
tion have become chronic, but the com- 
panies grow stronger financially with 
each year, their business assumes 
greater proportions with each season, 
they give the public better service 
and fairer rates and their stockholders 
are being better treated and better 
paid than they were ten years ago, 
twenty years ago, or thirty years ago. 

Xeed Be No C<icifllct. 
and There should be no conflict, no se- 
rious differences between the people 
and the public service corporations. 

Their co-operation can proceed safe- 
ly and peacefully ur'on lines fair, just 
and equitable to both parties and to 
all concerned, including the railway of- 
ficials. 

There is no reason for any man to 
think the American people wish to be 
to the public service corpora- 



unjust 
tions. 

No such 
any other 



sentiment exists here, nor In 
part of the Republic. 

It often happened that public service 
companies were forced to protect their 
Investors' interests by methods and 
through men they hated and despised. 

It is equally true that the public in 
terests were often .sacrificed 
porate interests should be 
thereby. 

In the future both 
be largely eliminated 
dealing on both sides 
rule. 

It is reported from abroad that for- 
eign investors are ready to enter once 
more the market for our stocks and 
bonds, having greater confidence than 
ever in the certainty of reasonable re- 
turns on the money they invest. 



that cor- 
advanced 



these evils will 
and fair, square 
will be made the 



The l.nmt of a Fiend 

Would have been about as welcome to 
A. Cooper of Oswego, N. Y , as a mer- 
ciless lung-racking cough that defied 
all remedies for years. "It was most 
troublesome at night," he writes, 
"nothing helped me till I used Dr. 
King's Discovery which cured me com- 
pletely. I never cough at night now." 
Millions know Ms matchless merit for 
stubborn colds, obstinate coughs, sore 
lungs, la grippe, astlima, liemorrhage, 
croup, whooping cough, or hay fever. 
It relieves quickly and never falls to 
sati.sfy. A trial convinces. 50c, ?1.00. 
guaranteed by all druggists. 

SOLVES THEFTS 
ON INDIAN ROAD 



Do You V/ant . 
Beautiful Hair? 

HERE IS YOUR CHANCE. 



FREE SAMPLES TO ALL 

T.very woman can now have lone, beautiful 
hair at small cost for ■Woodburj''s Hair nnd 
Scalp Treatment has at last been prepared for 
home use. This famous combination treat- 
ment cures dry or ffrea.-iy dandruff, relieves 
Itchme sc.^Ip and promote.<; a healthv abund- 
ant growth of hair. It revives dying hair, re- 
stores life and glo.s.s to dry, faded Imir and 
preserves its natural color. 




Let your dreams come true. 

Woodbury'* Hair Tonic makes the Hair 
Grew Wavy (und BeautifuL 

■Woodbury's Combination Treatment cost.«! no 
more thiin a bottle of common, ordinary hair 
tonic yet V/oodbury's is backed up by almost 
half a century of experience. 
Some people still think a visit to the Institute 
is necessary. DON'T M.A.KE THIS MIS- 
TAKE. "Woodbury's Hair and Scalp Prepar- 
ations are now sold by all druggists. 
Send a two cent stamp to The Woodbury Co., 
47 West 34th Street, New Yoi k City for .';.".m- 
ple, booklet and specialist's advice all FKEI;. 

Lyceum Pharmacy and Lenox Drug Store, Oil 

tributors (or Dulutb. 



Official Attracted By Man's 
Unusual Actions Appre- 
hends Perpetrator. 

Calcutta, Sept. 16. — Another train 
outrage Is reported on the East Indian 
railway. The victims were an elderly 
Bengali lady and her three children, 
and the accused is believed to be a 
clerk in the employ of the railway. The 
lady entered an afternoon train at Ja- 
maipore, and occupied a female com- 
partment in the intermediate class wltli 
the three children, while her eldest son 
was in another compartment. Wiien 
the train was about to start another 
passenger entered the female compart- 
ment. The new arrival had a veil cov- 
ering tlie lace, and the Bengali lady 
did not suspect her fellow-passenger to 
be a man. When the train arri\ ed at 
Taljharl station, between Bhagalpore 
and Sahebgunge, about 10 p. m., the 
children hud lailen asleep, and their 
motiier also prepared to rest. 

Between Jaljharl and Tinpahar the 
only occupant of the compartment 
awake was the veiled passenger, irfud- 
denly the Bengali lady was aroused, as 
her fellow-passeuger — a man in dis- 
guise-^-attempied to gag her in order to 
remove her ornaments. A scuffle fol- 
lowed, in which the ruffian overpow- 
ered his victim and gagged her, but the 
cliildren evidently clung to their moth- 
er and made the work of the thief dif- 
ficult. He is reported to have deliber- 
ately thrown the children one after the 
otlier out of the window of tlie running 
train. He then indicted a severe wound 
on the lady's throat with a large clasp 
knife, rendering her unconscleius. 
Tuuk V\ omau'M UruamentM. 

By the time the train entered Tin- 
paliar station the jobber had stripped 
her of lier ornaments, and before the 
train had come to a standstill he got 
down on the offside, and was making 
off with his b6oty, when the district 
traffic superintendent of the East In- 
dian railway, who was traveling in the 
ne.Kt compartment, noticed him. 

The railway officer was traveling 
with the express object of finding some 
clew to the mysterious thefts which 
liave taken place on running trains in 
the Sahebgunge district in the course 
of the past month, it struck him as 
suspicious that a man should have been 
iravelijig in the compartment reserved 
for females, and he challenged the rob- 
ber wbo had discarded the veil for or- 
dinarv male attire. The man at once 
took "to his heels. An alarm was in- 
stantlv raised, and two railway porters 
were sent in pursuit of the runaway. 

The superintendent looked into the 
female compartment, and on discover- 
ing the state of affairs he joined in the 
chase. After running a mile, the rob- 
ber suddenly turned on his pursuers, 
and as one of the porters was close to 
him he drew his knite and stabbed 
him The others, however, came up, 
and the man was overpowered and 
taken to Tinpahar. There the oldest 
boy of the Bengali lady Informed the 
superintendent that the children were 
missing. The engine of the train was 
Immediately detached and run up the 
line in search of the children. One had 
sustained severe injuries by the fall, 
but the other two appeared to have 
escaped with only a shaking. 

It is believed the capture of this man 
will throw considerable light on the re- 
cent thefts in running trains in the 
Sahebgunge district. Only a few days 
before at Sabour, an up-country wom- 
an was forced by a robber to make 
over all her jewelry to him, and no 
clew was found to the thief. In a sec- 
ond case the wife of a Bengali physi- 
cian was the v ictim. 

FIFTEEN-POUND GIRL 

BORN IN PENNSYLVANIA. 



Franklin. Pa., Sept. 16. — A girl weigh- 
ing fifteen pounds and fourteen ounces 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. 
McGinty. The weight was made on ac- 
curate scales by Dr. H. P. Hammond of 
Franklin, who says he believes this a 
record, for girls. The medical records 
tell of a few boys weighing 16 pounds, 
but no girls weighing within three or 
four pounds of that figure. 

This Is the'tentn child in the Mc- 
Ginty family, the others being boys. 
The father is a laborer. 

Suits Worth $22.50 Only $15 

At the Three Winners Clothing com- 
pany, 115 East Superior street. 



^cces sore t6 Bradbur y Music Co.) 

6 East Superior St. 




: 



PIANOS, 

PHONOGRAPHS, 

RECORDS, 
SHEET MUSIC. 
Band Instruments. 

M-usical Merchandise 
of Every Description. 



PoDular M 




-r 



'Lucy Anna Lou," "Planning," "Rosa Rigoletta.'* 

Sung this week at new Orpheum Theater. Gus Edwards' "School Boys and Girls." These 
.songs demonstrated daily at our store. 



^"m 



20c 



"Goddess of Liberty" and all 
'^i Comic Opera Songs 



20c 




PALATIAL BOATS 
FOR ARISTOCRATS 



Planned to Appeal Only to 

Those With Money to 

Burn. 

London, Sept. 16. — It would seem 
Am.erican millionaires are becoming 
extraordinarily reserved and exclusive 
and they are beginning to kick 
against traveling on the ordinary 
boats that voyage between America 
and Europe. 

"We have a variety of objections to 
this mode of traveling, " said Harrv 
Payne Whitney, who with a big party 
of friends arrived in England the 
other day from New York. "The first 
is that even when you engage pri- 
vate suites at the cost of $750 apiece, 
as I did for myself and my guests, the 
accommodation is not all that it might 
be and one has not the sense of pri- 
vacy cne desires." 

Many of the distinguished Ameri- 
cans Avho cross the Atlantic of late 
do so incognito so strongly do they 
resent the espionage which their pres- 
ence causes among the passengers. 

The upshot is that a number of mil- 
ionalres which includes the Pierpont 
Morgaas, the Vanderbilts, the Ogden 
Mills, etc., are putting their heads to- 
gether with the Idea of building a few 
palatial floating mansions for their 
own e:{clusive use in which sumptuous 
suites of rooms decorated in the most 
approved manner will be at their dis- 
posal. The wealthy American now 
crosses so often to and from New- 
York that there is an idea that a 
fitly equipped service of this kind in 
which the prices would be four or 
five times more than the usual fees, 
would pay handsomely. Some of the 
rich Americans like to cross with their 
retinuo of servants and even now in 
numerous instances take their own 
chef who does all his master and mis- 
tress's Cficking on board. The Rocke- 
feller family always have their own 
chef on board and a special kitchen is 
rigged up for his use and that of his 
staff. When the Goulds crossed for 



The Best Dumplings 

gggYou Ever Ate 

perfectly raised, light and delicious if you will use 

Pumford 

■^^L THE NVHOLESOME 

BAKING POWDER 

For producing food of most delicious flavor and perfect 
lightness and wholesomeness, there is no baking powder 
in the world to equal Rumford — it 

Makes Digestible Food — 



I- 



Tlie Best of tlie Hlgta-grade Baking Powders— No Alum 



the wedding of Viscountess Maidstone 
they, too, had a special chef, though I 
believe he was engaged for them by 
the steamship company and only for 
the voyage. 

The fact is America's snart ret see:n 
to try to outdo each other in the lu.x- 
uriousness with which they travel. 
One great lady who comes of a very 
nouveau riche crowd frjm Chicago — 
the spiteful people say her relations 
are still pork butchers — when cross- 
ing some time ago insisted that she 
must be allowed to use ler own table 
and bed linen which needless to say 
had a coronet emblazoned on it ami 
also her own cut glass and silver. It 
was one of her own country women 
who remarked that it sej-ved her right 
when a waiter with whom she con- 
stantly grumbled one ev.-ning as if by 
accident let the best par: of the beau- 
tiful glass and Queen Arne silver top- 
ple from a tray into ti e ocean. He 
assured the irate lady and the cap- 



tain who was In a white heat of rag» 
that he couldn't help It. But the pas- 
sengers liad their own idea about th» 
whole thing and laughed a great deal 
In their sleeves for the lady's airs ha4 
put up all their backs. 

■ . 

A I)KLICATK JOB. 

From System: Hens are now lay- 
ing eggs by sche<}ule. A scientific far- 
mer who raises potiltry for bird fanciers 
and sells specially bred eggs for spec- 
ially made prices has worked out a 
•scheme for keeping a record of the 
ancestry of each egg that is laid. 

The various breeds of chickens are 
segregated in their respective runways, 
and each nest in each runwav is duly 
numbered. To the leg of each hen is 
attached a numbered metal ring. A 
boy watches the hens as they enter the 
nest to lay their dally eggs, and on a 
time recorder stamps the hour the egg 
is laid, the number of the nest and the 
number of the hen. 



II 



J^\ 



RICEeHUIGHlNjS 

"EWORLD SHOEMAKERS , 
IfORTHEWHOLE FAMltY (( 

" 14- ZO HIGH St BOSTON. MASS. \* 



iUCATO^ 



■*H 



The well-sKod 

youi\ger 
G er\er€ilioiv 



m 



w 



IM 



I tie?' 



Bt& 



y.s 



PAT 



OFF' 



CE 



Vi<^z^ 



'jjw 



SSrioUBRAN^ 



Happy Hans says, "I like EDUCATOR SHOES because 
they give my toes plenty of room. I can play all day with- 
out being tired. My feet do not hurt me because the toes 
are spread out as they are when I go barefooted in the 
summer. I have noticed that boys who wear pointed shoes 
grow tired and stop to rest long before I do. My parents 
say that I am a better natured boy since they bought 
EDUCATOR SHOES for me." 

The makers, Rice CS, Hutchins, 
offering a free scholarship of $150 
one child in each state. The con 
ditions are so simple that it will 
pay you to ask your dealer for 
further particulars. 

This is EDUCATOR WEEK, the best 

time to buy EDUCA- 
TOR SHOES for the 
opening of school. 

^/S|^|5^ st^l^ Each dealer has a fresh 

stock at this time. 

Look for our sole brand 
as shown above. 



riftui 






fo 



[Qi 



Solid Line Educator Shape > 

^ room for five toes. § 
^J Dotted Line usual shape $> 
roamfsf (vr^ three tees. || 



/^y^^tS^^^JMl^ 




i«H 






T 



\f^ 



k 



*^55 



i 



1 



M> ■ O »■ 



If- 




U. I'l »i ^»' 



be: 

li 



fKaMBMa^aMI 




" ■"«< 9 



4- 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 16, 1910. 



IS 




AGAIN 



CURED IN THREE DAYS 



A WONDERFUL MEDICAL 
DISGDVERY 



An Internal Treatment That 

Cures the Drink Habit in 

Three Days Without 

Hypodermic Injections. 



MUST SERVE 
SIXYEARS 

Bertol B. Brosvik Pleads 

Guilty to Forgery and 

Larceny. 

Misappropriated Public Funds 

While Clerk of Town 

of Buyck. 



~-r-^ 



Alcoholism is not a disease, but a 
poisoning of the blood from alcohol. 
This is why the NEAL TREATMEXT 
neutralizes and eliminates the poison 
from the system in three days, and 
effects a perfect cure in every case. 
It has cured thousands of men in 
every conceivable condition in the 
past ten years, at the institute or at 
home. 

All mail sent in plain envelopes, 
sealed. Everything strictly confiden- 
tial. Call, write today, or telephone 
Broad 37, or People's 4177. The Xeal 
Institute, Superior. Wis., corner West 
Seventh and Belknap. Take "East 
End" car to door. Bank references 
as to the company's responsibility 
cheerfully furnished. 



Bertol B. Brosvik, clerk of the town 
of Buyck, who some time ago pleaded 
not guilty to the charge of grand lar- 
ceny preferred against him by the 
September grand Jury, changed liis 
p'ead to guilty and was sentenced by 
Judge William A. Cant of the district 
court at noon today to six years at 
hard labor at the state prison at .Still- 
water. , ,, . 

There were In all five indictments 
against Brosvik. He pleaded guilty 
to the grand larceny charge and al.so 
to a charge of forgery in the second 
degree The other three indictments 
which were for forgery, were waived 
on the motion of Assistant County At- 
tornev Warren E. Greene. 

On 'the grand larcen\- charge he was 
sentenced for fovir year.s and on the 
forgery charge the sentence was two 
vears On the first mentioned charge 




pleaded guilty without 'putting the 
coimty to tlie expense of a trial was 
another aid to a sh6rtened sentence. 

I. Grettum, Brosvik's attorney told 
the life's history of the prisoner and 
asked that the sentence be made as 
light as possible. The court in pro- 
nouncing sentence said that men who 
handlf'd public money must be taught 
that it is not their own. As is the 
case with a great many, Brosvik said 
that he fully intended to repay the 
money. He said that he had taken it 
only for the time being. He held a 
claim on which he hoped to discover 
iron. 



CITY BRIEFS 



he obtained J2.000 from the First Na 
tional bank of Duluth. and on the sec- 
ond charge he obtained %12-S from the 
Miner's National bank of Eveleth. 

Brosvik was clerk of the town of 
Buyck. He found It easy to forge the 
names of those who had to do with 
the affairs of the town and the 
amount.s ranged from $40 to $2,000. He 
passed the checks mostly in saloons in 
Duluth and Superior. 

The sentence imposed upon him by 
the court is considered lenient. Bros- 
vik had a good name up until the time 
he got into the present trouble and 
his many friends asked that the court 
make the sentence as light as pos- 
sible. The fact that he at once 




y 



CLOAK AND SUIT HOUSE 

WEST SUPERIOR STREET^^ji 




AT AT- 
TRACTIVE 
PR!C£S! 



An inspection of the New Suits for Fall and Winter shows the vogue that 
rough-surfaced fabrics are having, although the dressy broadcloth always retains 
its popularity. We call your attention to our distinctive models priced at 



Duluth-Made BookH. 

Thwing-Stewart Co.. Phone 114. 

Flue DuebeMN Apples. 

Three fine specimens ot the "Duch- 
ess" apple in the window of Huot's 
store, the fir-si fruit of a 3-year-old 
tree in the yard of W. C. McCarter, 
principal of the Duluth business uni- 
versity, 1424 London road, are excel- 
lent examples of bearing qualities of 
that variety ot tree in this climate. Mr. 
McCarter is a strong advocate of the 
•Duchess" apple tree, in fact he has 
fifty trees on his farm at Arnold that 
are two years old and in splendid con- 
dition. Next spring he will increase 
this number to 100 or more. The 3- 
year-old tree from which the three 
apples were picked was well filled 
with blossoms this year. Mr. McCarter 
picked off all but a few, which were 
left to mature. The apples are a nice 
size and color and are firm. 
.» > » 
C'ltiseu'M tlub to Meet. 
The Citizens' i'olitical club, an or- 
ganization of colored voters, will hold 
a meeting at Kalamazoo hail tomorrow 
nig^ht. • J. Louis Ervin, an attorney, 
is president of the organization. 

- - • -V 

luMurauee ABe«t Arre«ted. 
Homer D. Hewitt, an in.surance agent, 
was arraigned in police court yester- 
day afternoon on the charge of having 
S8 of the company's money in his pos- 
session, which he refused to turn in. 
He entered a plea of not guilty and 
will be tried Sept. 26. 

Teanmler 1m Fined. 

John Dawson, a teamster, admitted 
in police court this morning that he 
failed to properly hitch his horse when 
he left it standing on the street, and 
paid a fine of ?3. 

m » ' 

Bank CleariiifirN. 

Duluth bank clearings for the week 
ending Thursday, Sept. 16, were ?4,- 
2?6,682.54. 

« ■ » 

New DreusinukluB Parlon*. 
The Misses Julia Johnson and La 
Vallie are opening fashionable dres??- 
maklng parlors at il8 West vSuperior 
street, over W. & L. shoe store. 
■ ■ " 

DiNplay of Produce. 
Next Monday from 2 to S p. m., the 
Palvatlon Army will hold an exhibition 
of vegetables and fruit grown in Du- 
luth and vicinity, at their hall, 23 
Fifth avenue west. 

» » " 
Temple Service*. 
Regular services will be lield at 
Temple Emanuel this evening. Rabbi 
Lefkovits will preach at 8 o'clock on 
"Some Reasons Why People Should Go 
to Church." Sunday school will meet 
at 10:30 a. m. Monday. 



Sheriff Charles E. Johnson on three 
different warrants sworn out by his 
latiier-in-law, two charging him with 
assault and one with threatening a 
breach of the peace. It is claimed that 
the two have had previous trouble 
over the farm on which they live. He 
denied each of the allegations and will 
be tried Thursday morning. 

For Cuttlug Wires. 

Andrew Anderson was arrested this 
morning on a warrant sworn out by 
Attornev E. M Morgan charging him 
with injuring wires of the Duluth 
Telephone company. It is asserted 
that he cut some of them in order to 
move a house. He entered a plea 
of not guilty and will be tried Thurs- 
day afternoon. 

Falls Dead lu Saloon. 

Lsaac Kovlla, 40 years of age, dropped 
dead in a saloon at Floodwood yester- 
day, suiiposedly from heart disease su- 
perinduced by alcohol. The body was 
brought to Crawford's undertaking 
rooms, but the funeral arrangements 
liave not been made. 

« ■ ■- 
Petition In Bankaptcy. 
John Hoheisel, a bartender at Plerz, 
Morrison county, owes $430.19 on a 
thrashing machine. He filed a petition 
in voluntary bankruptcy in United 
States court today, having no other 
liabilities. His assets are valued at 
$150, all claimed exempt. 

Wan Thinly Clad. 

Maud Leonard was brought to the 
police .station clad in an attire which 
was so scant that she couldn't be 
brought into police court until an of- 



ficer had visited her room to bring her 
additional clothes. She \« as dressed 
in a nightgown, a long coat and one 
slipper She was arrested by Police- 
man Sunberg early this n^orning. to- 
gether with William McGra*-. She was 
charged with drunkenness ind he was 
booked on a statutory charge. Both 
entered pleas of guilty. H? was fined 
$20 and costs or thirty days and her 
case was continued for thirty days, to 
give her an opportunity to improve her 
conduct. 



golf tournament here. Fownes was 
up on Evans and Tuckerman was 
ujj on "U'ood. 



I 




Judge Alfred JaQues, Democratic 
candidate for congress, will make an 
address Tuesday at the Pine County 
fair, Pine City, leaving Duluth in the 
morning. 

P. R. Vail of Virginia, the brewer. Is 
in the city. 

Former Representative John Saari 
has returned from the range, where he 
has been for the last week. 

John W. Alton of Grand Rapids is 
in the city. 

Mrs. A. N. Ladin of CUsholm is a 
Duluth visitor. 



FOWNES AND WOOD 

ARE LEADING. 



Brooklln. Mass., Sept, 16.— .\t the end 
of the first round of 18 tiolffs, in the 



WAS HIDING 

UNDER HOUSE 

Mother of Deserted Virginia 

Ctuldren Brought to 

DulutL 

Mrs. Jack Louma was brought to Du- 
luth today from Virgina. Minn. She 
will be examined as to her sanity. She 
had been hiding under her house for 
several days. Her husband has disap- 
peared from Virginia and none of his 
fri.-nds know where he la. Two chil- 
dren of the Loumas were brought to 
Duluth ye-sterday and placed in the 
Children's home. They had been Ill- 
treated by their father, it Is said. The 
mother is believed to be mentally un- 
sound on account of hei troubles. 

The most meager, undersized adver- 
tisement you ever print will Impress 
some people, will remain in .«om© 
minds, as the measure of your store — 
as representing your store. 




$15, $2 




an 



d 




We guarantee our prices— quality considered— to be the lowest in Duluth 
on ladies' ready-to-wear apparel. 

BUY YOUR FURS HERE! 

• Maybe you have not thought of a set of Furs 
yet for winter, but soon they'll be needed. Our 
prices will interest you. 



WAIST SALE TOMORROW NIGHT! 

We will place on sale tomorrow night at 7. 2iX) 
beautiful White Waists that sell regtilarly for $3.a), 
$2.50 aivi $2}^^ at one price, $1.00. 



Case l« IJlMinlnHed. 

Morris Nelson, arrested yesterday on 
complaint of the FA-eleth authorities, 
who accused him of jumping a board 
bill and other sundry obligations, w^as 
reloasod for want of evidence. He 
claimed that he was on his way to 
Michigan to attend a law suit, and 
that he Intended to return. 
■ » ' 

Foiutd Sot Guilty. 

Mike Schultz was found not guilty 
of stealing $1 from John fPtBben after 
a trial In police court this morning. 
It was claimed that he took the money 
while they were drlnltlng in a Bowery 
saloon. 

Arrented at TfWwajr. 

Matt Soujunen was arrested at Mid- 
way yesterday afternoon by Deputy 



D. H., 9-16-l?10. 



#* ^ 







'^^ 



/ 



/ 



k^^ 



^w 



'/ 



MAYBE you don't know and maybe you do, but 
''Sampeck Clothes'* for boys are the best 
wearing and the best looking school clothes in the 
world. In every state in the Union and even in 
Europe parents, who realize that the clothes their 
boys wear must be absolutely good and perfect in 
stvle, purchase **Sampeck Clothes/* Their worth 
is"^attested by the fact that these clothes are pur- 
chased regularly season after season. 

Right now, when clothes are so necessary— vi'hen the boy is starting 
to school, why don't you have him fitted out with these very unusual 
garments? They are better than any you have seen, yet they cost no 
more than makes which aren't their equal in value. 



At 

Third Ave. W. 

Second Floor. 



Columbia 



At 

Third Ave. W. 

Second Floor. 



15c 



FOIl ^.lo 
SA.MTOL 
FOR 
THE TEETH. 



OM.V 10c FOR THE 1, \TKST MIU-MONTH LADIES' 
HO>Il- .fOl RN.4I-. 




40c 



FOR HIND'S 

HONEY 

.\l.MOND 

f REAM. 



117-110 WEST -SLI'ERIOR STREHOT, Dl LI TH, .MINN. 



See What $5 Will Buy Here Tomorrow 



$5 for Nobby $ 1 5 Coats for Fall 

Regular prices were $12.50 

and $15.00 for these three-quarter length 
models in gray or tan coverts — tomorrow 
to close out the line, take your choice at 
less than half — pay five dollars for the coat 
you want. S^zes for young women and 
their seniors. 




$5 for Women's $8.50 Skirts 

Right uow theiv's a great de 

mand for separate skirts for shirtwaist wear — 
ind we offer some smartly tailored models in 
black, navy and other wanted colors — cleverly 
gored and plaited — our regular $8.50 skirts — 
Bpecial tomorrow at $5.00. 



The Reed Tailored Waists are Finer Than Ever 

Impossible as it may seem, the Reed line for Fall >ncludes 

1 1 r „,.„ trreater oerfection tli.in tlie very superior styles so popular this 
sunin,";- her"e ^"nSwmo/els"' flannel shirts as' well as tailored waists of ln,e„, 
ckiro clothMd Madras-styles suitable for school wear and for street wear. 

$1.98 for $3.98 Waists 

$1 no This lot of waists is made up of prettily embroidered and lace trimmed 
J.90 models-most of them sell at $3.50 and $3.98-take your choice tomor- 
row to clean up the lot at $1.98. 

See the New Suits, the New Coats and the New Dresses 
We Opened Up This Morning I 

You'll appreciate the "uncommonness" of them all-tbey're the carefully chosen 
of the best the New York market affords. In this lot— 

The Dresses range $15.00 to $65.00. The Suits are $18.50 to 
$45.00. The Coats are not yet marked. 




The Wool Gowns WUl Be Prime Favorites This Fall ! 

And here are the proper materials for them They're ju^t heavy /^nough^^ 

r:'^ -'i^efarc™?'." er.?,rP^re^nc1rrr^.er'ifsar.^r.:rn?^r.aVr. "caX-eres. un«n.hea worsted, 
and sharkskin, are especially desirable for this purpose. 

values at 89e, $1.00, $1.25 and $1.50 a yard. 

Three Fine Attra<*lions in the Wash Goods Dep artment 

19c for 25c Shirting Madras ' 

These very desirable fabrics are 32 inches wide 

and are here in white grounds over printed with small blue and 
1 O black or red figures. They are fine for women's | Q 
■ WC -^ ' '" ""'^ ^r.iya' oViirts Take vour • ^V/ 



10c FOR 27-IX. 
LEKMA I I.AN- 
NKLKTTKS. 

They wear per- 
fectly and are 
Ideal for Fall and 
Winter wear. 



waists and for men's and boys; shirts, 
choice at 19c a yard. 



15o FOR 18o 

SKRPFATINE 

CRKPFS. 

There are no 
others as good — 
these are the 
"genuine." 



Fine Furs for the Particular ! 

Quality Right — Stvle Right — Price Right! 

You have learned to depend on the goods 



vou get at this store if you have traded here to any extent-and 
;ve are mighty careful to reject any furs of which we are not ab- 
jjolutely sure! 

We would_ratiier^nuss_^^alcjhan^^ 
^i^^hidTfails to ple ase the customer! You buy furs 
only at lon7~intervals— and we'd rather h ave your 
every -day trade than sell you fur s which^disappointj^ 

Good furs are a comfort and joy for years— and that is the sort 
of furs we sell-and prices are fair-in fact, less than equal qual- 
ity is usually priced ! 



See our offerings in- 
Black Lynx, 
Black Fox, 
Natural Fox, 
Pointed Fox, 
Blended Squirrel, 
Australian Oppossom, 
French Coney, 



Seal, 

Beaver, 

Caracul, 

Persian, 

Caracul, 

Martin, 



Eastern Mink, 
Russian Mink, 
Rivt:r Mink, 
Jap Mink, 
Broad Tail, 
Marmout, 
Racoon, 



•■■ai^a 





Wolf, 
Blended Hudson Bay Seal. 

Fur Coats— Luxurious, Yet Reasonable 

All lengths, from 30 to 52 inches long— our west window has shown 

many superb garments this week. ..... .-^ 

^ This Clever Little Hat Is One 
of Our Many Smart Models 

Fetching, isn't it? Will you try it on? Or would 
you prefer a Madame Sherry Hat, which we expect to 
picture in Sunday's paper? 

Many— very many clever styles are ready for early wear- 
it's time to change. Pleasant milliners will be charmed to 
wait on you ! -'• - •- - •" ' •' 

' An especially strong showing of Hats at ^6.00 to $12.00. 

Smart School Hats for the Girls 

We wish that vou could see some of our new Hats on your girL 
We know where you'd buy if you saw them. Clever httle stvles 98< 
to $5.00— with especitlly strong assortments at $!.»» to :^^.au. 







'•••^•.'i viJLtai 





10 



Friday, 



Births Exceed Deaths. 

Statistics compiled by I»eputy Morris 
J Segal of the health department ahow 
that there were 174 births, 91 males 
and S3 ftmales. In DulutJi last month, 
compared with 191 for July. Last 
mcntli ttio city haa 117 resident and 



23 non-resident deaths. 

The Seventh ward takes the prize 

for the largest number of births, re- 
porty forty. The Fifth ward is at 
the bottom with 13. The First ward 
had 14; the Second, 37; the Third, 18; 
the Fourth, 14; the Sixth, 15, and the 
Eighth, 23. 



-"i^M 




100 Suits 
came to us 
by express. 

We bought 

them at a 

bargain. 

They run 

in vakies to 

$40.00. 

On sale 

Saturday, as 

long as they 

last, for 

$12.50 



Our store will be the Suit Center Saturday 
^$12.50. 

You cannot afford to miss these values 
Saturday— $12.50. 




Buy a suit. Take it home. Keep it forty- 
eight hours. If not satisfied, com.e back; your 
money refunded as freely as taken. 



Your Credit Is Good 



West End Furniture Buying Means 
a Money-Saving Proposition. Our 
Lower Expenses Enables Us to Sell 
for Less. 

CREDIT 




.6 



^: --. 



f:^,^*^.!''^^^::?--^ ^i^ 



SNAPS IN 

Buffets! 

This is recognized as a gen- 
uine snap. Exactly like cut — ■ 
beautiful American .quartered 
oak — fine French plate mirror 
Usually sells for $20.00. Week's 
special 





Saturday Special! 



Tomorrow we will sell Wash Boilers 

No. 8 — fair weight of charcoal tin plate 

copper bottom. Worth about $1.50 or 
11.65. Saturday only 




ENGER& 
1828-1830-1832 W. 



LSON 

Superior St. 



City's Lowest Prices 



CELESTIALS 
DENY_GUILT 

Will Be Tried on Charge of 

Conducting a 

Lofiery. 

County Attorney's Office Filled 

With Paraphernalia Seized 

in Raid. 




J Oc Hair Nets 
for 5c 

1,200 cf these Nets on special 
sale tomorrow at ^/^ 

only OC 

Our regular 10c net. 



'WHERE VALUES REI8N tUPREME. 




1km 




00 



I 



21-23 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



2Sc and 30c RIBBONS FOR WAc 

This comprises a handsome as- 
sortment of plain and fancy rib- 
bons, in all colors, at the unusual 
price of, per 
yard 



1 7>/2C 



• t 



I-ee You, alias Charlie Harry Lee, 
Wong Sun, Siu Tuck Wo, alias Charlie 
Wong, and Hor P'ong Kong, pleaded 
not guilty to the charge of conducting 
a Chinese lottery before Judge Will- 
iam A Cant of the district court this 
morning. They were represented by i 
Attorney Alexander Marshall. Their 
trial will take place In district court i 
the latter part of next week. 

The Chinamen were arrested on Aug. ' 
13, at 18 West First street, where, 
the police claim, they had a full- 
fledged Chinese lottery In operation. 

The county attorney's office is filled 
with the paraphernalia seized at the 
time of the arrest. There are books 
filled with tiueer looking figures and 
printed i;i strangely colored ink. 
There are funny looking boards with 
slips of paper pasted upon them. 
There are tin dishes and china bowls. 
There are queer sticks and two mur- ! 
derous looking knives, such as the I 
old-time pirates are pictured as carry- 
ing. The knives are more than a 
foot long and their connection with 
the other gambling devices has not 
been explained. 

This morning Assistant County At- 
torney Greene tried to explain the way ' 
the device works. In the first place, I 
there are eighty numbers. They : 
don't look like numbers, but Mr. | 
Greene says they are. Those who 
play in the game are all given little 
slips with all the numbers on them. 
Each of them tries to guess the num- 
bers that will eventually be chosen. 
The numbers have to be shifted from 
a board and into a tin dish and then 
into four china bowls and wrapped up 
much like a magician makes the piece 
of paper disappear, before they are 
again pasted on the board. When 
they finally get back to the board 
there are but ten of them left. A 
Chin^flnan who is familiar with the 
game says that the numbers are 
guessed correctly only about once in 
a natural lifetime. 

After the one who is playing the 
game has made his choice of the ten 
numbers he thinks will win, he pays 
the "cashier" $1.00. If he guesses 
but four of the numbers correctly he 
gets nothing. If he guesses five, he 
gets his dollar back. If j?ix, he gi%ts 
$10; if seven, he gets $100; if eight, 
he gets $500; and if nine, he gets 
$1,000. Nine Is Just as g^.od as the 
entire ten seemingly, for he only gets 
$1,000 if he guesses them all. This 
very seldom happens, however. Need- 
less to say, the house generally wins. 

The police had their eye on the 
"joint" for some time. When they 
entered the place, the hundred or 
more Chinese, who were crowded Into 
the room, scattered like rats. The 
principals were nabbed, however, it is 
claimed. 



PART OF DISPLAY 
GOES TO HIBBING 



Timely Specials for Fall and Winter Needs 



NEW SILK DRESSES 

At Exceedingly Low Prices 

FOUR DIFFERENT STYLES, made up of pure Silk Taffeta, 
soft and lustrous, strictly new, of the very latest styles, in black 
and colors, at the wonderfully low ^ -W yg S^ /^ 

price of : ^ l^.yiiJ 

NEW ONE-PIECE DRESSES, made of all-wool Taffeta— a 
beautiful fabrice to wear, in the very latest styles, black and 
colors — a rare bargain — ^ "^ O ^/^ 

fl SPECIAL SALE OF CHILDREN'S AND GIRLS' 
COATS. DRESSES AND FURS 

SNAPPY NEW COATS, in chinchilla, cheviots, plush, cara- 
cul, bearcluth. broadcloth and novelty cloaking fabrics. 

PRETTY NEW DRESSES, in serge, Panama and fancy 
weaves ; also plaids and checks. 

FUR SETS of every kind for misses, at astonishingly low 
prices, at tomorrow's special sale, 

WAIST SPECIAL— New Tailored Waists, in linen and madras 
— some beautifully embroidered, others with tucks and pleats — 
the equal to any $2.50 waist — showing six styles ^ y ^ ^ 
from which to choose at \J_^ x • O O 



300 SAMPLE BLANKETS 

On Special Sale at Big Reductions 

Now is the time to supply your Blanket needs. We are 
showing an immense stock of these beautiful Sample Blankets in 
cotton and in fine all-wool, as high as $12.50. Every pair is per- 
fect and your savings will be from 33 1-3 to 50 per cent at the 
prices we offer them. 

Some will be slightly soiled, but the reductions in prices will 
more than offset this. 

$5.00 
$5.95 
$6.75 

$7.50 
$8.95 



Cotton Blanketji 



85c 
for. 

$1.25 11-4 Cotton 
Blankets for 



$2.00 12-4 Cotton 
Blankets for 



$2.50 12-4 Cotton 
Blankets for 

$5.00 Wool 
Blankets for, 



65c 

95c 

$1.35 

$1.75 

^'^. $3. 98 



$7.50 Fine All-Wool 
Blankets for 

$8.50 Wool 
Blankets at 

$9.00 Wool 
Blankets at 

$10.00 Wool 
Blankets at 

$12.50 Wool 
Blankets at 



$15.00 Wool Blankets at SIO.OO 

Take advantage of these special low prices and lay in your 
supply of blankets for the winter months now. 



49c 



Special Offerings Tomorrow 
in Dress Goods at $1 Yard 

54-INCH CHIFFON FINISH BROAD- 
CLOTH, all colors and black, 44-inch all- 
wool Peau de Sole, 52-inch all-wool Import- 
ed French Serge, 44-inch all-wool Diag- 
onals, 44-inch all-wool Taffeta — these goods 
are our regular $1.35 and $1.25 sellers — 
your choice for tomorrow — ^ ^ d\d\ 
per yard S^ -l • \J \J 

36-INCH WOOL SERGE— a complete line 
of colors in this cloth ; also black and white, 
regular value 69c — a leader for 
one day, per yard 

CHILDREN'S SCHOOL SUITING— 36- 

inches wide, a large assortment of checks, 
plaids and solid colors, at ^ ^r\ 

per yard 29c and ^i ^j C/ 

44-INCH ALL - WOOL IMPORTED 
FRENCH SERGE — they come in 20 new 
fall colorings; our regular 85c number — 
special for tomorrow — per ^7 SZ ^^ 

yard J OC 

Outing Flannel Remnants 

3,000 YARDS of fancy striped and checked 
Outing Flannel, also pink and light blue 
mill ends, from 1 to 10 yards, regular VI^-jC 
and 15c quality; tomorrow — -^ /T|y^ 

per yard • • • • • JL L/C 



Bargains in Fall and Winter Underwear 



Don't overlook these money-savers. Come early. 

48c 



UNDERWEAR FOR MEN. 

Men's good quality cotton fleeced 
shirts and drawers, at 

Men's 75c Lambsdown Shirts and Drawe's, 
heavy flat wool fleece; spe- ^Oy^ 

cial at O >^C 

Men's Mentor Union Suits — In fine wool, s Ik 
and wool and heavy lisle, 
at 



VaOff 



UNDERWEAR FOR WOMEN. 
Women's White and Ecru Cotton Ribbed 
Vests — High neck, long sleeves. ^ ^^^ 
Pants to match; special at ^OO 

Women's White Cotton Ribbed Union Suits 
— High neck, long sleeves; special ylGr^ 



at 



Women's Union Suits — 89c quality; 
heavy white cotton fleece, at 



75c 



Women's $1.00 Wool Vests, gray, ribbed, high neck — long sleeve— neatly finished ^IS^ 
neck — pants to match — special, each ^ OC 



UNDERWEAR FOR GIRLS. 

Girls' Velastic ribbed, fleeced Vests '^ ^/^ 
and Pants — sizes 16 to 34, at ^OC 

Girls' Union Suits — Velastic ribbed, drop scat, 
sizes 2 to 14 years — 75c quality — ^fl)/^ 
special at ^ ^y !• 

Infants' Vests, in wool mixed — high neck and 
low sleeves — all sizes — special -^ ^V* 



Boys' and Girls' Knit W'aists — Taped buttons; 
regular 15c quality — spe- ^ Ol/«%>^ 

cial at 1 ^y2C 

Boys' heavy fleeced Shirts and Drawers — Na- 
tural color — sizes 24 to 34 — spe- '^ ^/-» 
cial at JmlC}C 

Boys' Blouses in dark outing flanml and 
heavy blue wool flannelette — at -^ ^/^ 
59i*, 39f and ^OC 



Men's, Women's and Children's Sweaters 

MEN'S SWEATERS, heavy ribbed, closely knit, sweater coat style ^ ^ Cif^ 
■ — in gray, brown and navy, at %J^ J, • \^ v/ 

Come tomorrow and you will be convinced that our Sample Sale of Sweaters 
positivelv offer the very best values in the city. Your choice of hundreds of choice 
nobbv stvles at ONE-THIRD OFF regular prices. 




The car containing St. Louis cnunty'q 
exhlliit at the state fair was opened 



this afternoon and a part of the ex- 
hibit wlU be sent to Hibblng without 
delay for display at the St. Louis 
county fair for tlie t%vo remaining days 




of i;hat exposition. It was thought it 
would be impossible to send any of it 
to Hibbing, but a special effort was 
made and as a result tlie county fair 
will not miss it entirely. 

On behalf of the owners, A. \V. Taus- 
sig has offered the Commercial club 
the use of the windows in the unoc- 
cupied store In the St. Louis liotel 
building for displaying the exhibit. The 
suggestion that the entire exhibit be 
set up for the benefit of Duluthians 
was found to be Impracticable, as some 
of the products it contains must be 
devoted to exhibition purposes in the 
Northern Pacific car that is to tour 
the country and advertise lands tribu- 
tarj- to that road. 



HAS FIREBUG 
MOVED TO CITY ? 



maniac had transferred his attentions 
to the central part of the city. 




« Guilty of Larceny. 

Allen Shields, arrested for the theft 

of a lens from a Fourth etreet moving 
picture show, was found guilty in 
police court yesterday after a trial. He 
was fined $25 and costs or tj.irty days 
in the county jail. He didn't have the 
cash and was committed. 



Indications seem to show that an I 
attempt was made to fre tlie establish- 
ment of St. Germain Bros., on First 
avenue west between Pirst and Second 
streets, at an early hour this morninsc. 

Neighbors told Chi^J Randall of the 
fire department that :hey heard some I 
one prowling about the place a few | 
minutes before the fire broke out. but ; 
they were unable to give any descrip- I 
tlon of the man or m:>n. The damage , 
will amount to about !{200. The flames < 
had not gained much headway when 
the department reach'?d the scene, as ; 
the alarm had been urned in a few 
minutes after the fire was started. Of- 
ficials at the city hall were wondering 
this morning If the N'?w Duluth pyro- 



Special Tomorro^v 

Ladies' Hose 

pair ^^\^ 



The 2Sc Store, 

'n."? FIn.Hj ^ii|ieri>ir .Vireet. 



CHARLES W. LA DUE 

FOR REPUBLICAN NOMINATION FOR 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT, 
Comprising Carlton, Cass, Aitkin, Itasca and Koochiching Counties. 
. PRIMARY ELECTION, SEPTEMBER 20TH. 

If nominated and elected, I shall use my best efforts to fulfill 
the pledges contained in the Republican platform, adopted at the 
state convention in June last. To secure a just and fair reapportion- 
ment of the entire state ; for good roads, drianage ; more and better 
rural schools; better management and disposition of state lands; 
that state lands shall bear their just and fair burdens towards devel- 
oping "'orthern Minnesota, and for the conservation of our natural 
resources. 



THE TWIN PORTS CLOTHING CO., 



405-407 West Superior 
Street, Duluth, Minn. 





This IS a fancy season in men's and young men's at ire. Plenty 
of grays and browns, and in light browns too. It is the season when 
a ma should exercise the greatest latitude in the selection of his 
suit or overcoat, so long as he keeps within the limits o)' good judg- 
ment. 

Our many friends and patrons will be sure to find that every 
garment in our store has been carefully selected. 

AND OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT. 

THE TWIN PORTS CLOTHING CO., 

405-407 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. DULirXH. 



V 



THEY EARNESTLY 

BEQUEST A GALL 

FROM YOU 



We refer to our 
New Fall and Winter 
Shoes. A clean and 
well selected assort- 
ment awaits your wel- 
come — for 

Ladies, Gentlemen 
and Children. 

See the new high- 
cut and Jockey Boots 
for girls. 

WIELANO'S 

115 West Superior St. 



■^ 



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f 


4 




i 
J 


1 




J 




1 

■ 




I 



-^ 



l^wrn . I 



■ta 



I 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 16, 1910. 



4- 



' 



-H 







LATEST SPORT 



EVANS IS THE 
FAVORITE 




G N 




OF THE DAY 




Chicago Youth Picked to Win 

National Amateur Golf 

Title. 



header from Pittsburg. 11 to 3, aii.l 
lost Hie second, 6 to 1. In the early 
•^•rntesl Phillippe relieved Wliile in tlio 
fiflli inning with the bases full ami 
two out. The tir.st ball pitched by 
Phillippfe was hit for a home run by 
Murray. 

First game — R H E 

r-iusbur,^ ^ ^ 1 « p .^? ? ^-1 ? ^q i 

New York . . . .0 2 5 : 1 x— U 9 
Batteries— White. Phlllippe and Gib- 

uon: Crandall and Schlel and Myeis. 

Umpires — Johnstone and O Day. 

Second game — -o u i- 

Score- ^- "• '^• 

Plttsburs 3 00 002 00 1—6 6 1 

New Vo."k 00 00010—1 8 1 

Uatterics — Adams and Gibson; Mar- 

Quard. Hendricks and Myers. Umpires 

— Johnstone and O'Day. 



Evans Plays Fownes and 

Wood Meets Tuckerman 

in Semi-Finais. 




standing of the Clnbs. 



into the left field bleachers put the 
visitors one to tiie good in the tenth, 
but Hie new champions won in their 
lialf on a pass and hits by Cravath and 
Uo.ssman, willi Shannon's wild throw 
to tlie plate. Score; R. H. E. 

Minneapolis ..200001000 2 — 5 8 4 
Kansas City ..01000000 2 1 — 4 7 1 
Batteries — Altrock and Daw.son, 
Owens; Owen and Ritter. Umpires — 
Blerhalter and Cusack. 

INDIANS \MN FROM 

COLONELS IN TENTH. 

Indianapolis. Ind.. Sept. 16. — Indian- 
apolis defeated Louisville in a 10- 
Inning game yesterday. 2 to 1. The 
locals won the game on an error, an 
infield hit and Kroh's low throw on 
Wllliam.s' hit, which allowed George to 
score the winning run. Score; U. H. E. 

Louisville 010000 00 0—1 10 7 

Indianapolis ..0100000001—2 9 1 

Batteries — Kroh and Allen; George 
and Howloy. Umpires — Hayes and 
Weddigge. 



QUARRELS AND QUERIES 



Brookline. Mass., Sept. 16. — The semi- 
final stage in the amateur golf cham- 
'"■pkonship, reached today, found one 
Ka.stern wlelder of the midiron and 
the putter battling against three long 
drivers from tlie Middle West. The 
drawings brought W. C. Fownes of the 
Oakmont club of Pittsburg against 
the Western open champion. "Chick" 
Kvans. Jr.. of the Edgewater Golf club 
of Chicago in the upper half, while in 
the lower half Warren Wood of the 
Homewood club. Chicago, had as his 
opponent W. K. Tuckerman oC the 
.stockbrldge Golf club and also of 

^^ u'^'hai" a^l ways been an honor to reach 
the semi-finals In the national amateur, 
♦ jr even the losers are remembered b> 
tho fraternity, and the association 
awards them bronze medals. Ihe win- 
ners go on one day more tor the nnai 
In the championship tomorrow after- 
noon the loser in that receiving a 
gold' medal and having his name 
placed on the roll of honor on the 
championship cup. . . , 

The small army of enthusiastic toj- 
lowers today believed that Chkk 
Evans, despite his youth and onl> 
three years oi golf playing, was the 
coming title holder. , xr _-x 

The demoralization of Fred Herre- 
Bhoffs game after three days ot un- 
approlcliable golf, was the surprise of 
vesterday. Hundreds journeyed to the 
- Tuuntry club to see what every one 
e« >ected would be a battle o golfing 
Ihrs, Evans shone brightly through- 
out the day. but Herreshoff tailed 
after the first hole was played, and 
tafnever again a factor m the con- 
test, whlcli Kvans won 11 up. 10 to 

'''one of the remaining three matches. 
^ Ah&i between Fownes and W. H Wilder 
tf Vesper, ended on the fifteenth green, 
with the former 4 up and u to piaj. 
•\V>od was carried to the home green 
bv J G. Anderson of Woodland, win- 
ning 2 up. Tuckerman. after a see-saw 
match with H. Weber ot Inverness. 
wa.s forced to play the thirty-seventh 

^'^-nii'^VVood- Anderson contest carried 
a good gallery during the morning 
roifrui. Wood made a 7C in the m. ru- 
ing and was 83 In the afternoon while 
Anderson played the first round in S- 
and the second In i>5. 



Won, Lost. Pet. 

Philadelphia 92 40 .687 

New York 77 56 .a79 

Bo,ston 76 59 .5'1 

Fietrolt 77 58 .570 

Cleveland 60 74 .i-*^ 

Washington 59 76 .43r 

Chicago 53 80 .399 

St. Louis 41 94 -304 



Games Today. 

Washington at Clevela nd. 

NAPS WIN GAME 

\MTH FIVE NEW MEN. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 16.— With five 
recruits in the lineup, Cleveland de- 
feated Washington, 3 to 0. yesterday. 
Bianding. a University of Michigan 
pitcher, drafted from San Antonio, out- 
pitched Walter Johnson with men on 
bases. Each struck out eight men. 
After the first inning only one Cleve- 
land plaver reached first base. Biand- 
ing retired the side on strikes in the 
ninth. Score: R- H. E. 

Cleveland 3 x— 3 4 1 

Washington 0000000 00 — 6 2 

Batteries — Bianding and Land; John- 
son and Street. Umpires — Dliit-en and 
Perrine. 

ATHLETICS TAKE OPENER 

FROM THE TIGERS. 

Detroit. Mich.. Sept. 16. — Philadel- 
phia won the opening game of the 
series yesterday by bunching three 
singles, a double and a base on balls 
with O'Leary's two errors in the 
seventh inning. Score: R. H. h.. 

i'hiladelphia ...10010050 — 7 11 3 
Detroit 10000000—1 4 2 

Batteries — Plank and Living-^tone; 
Donovan and Stanage. Umpires — Evans 
and CoUiflower. 

HIGHLANDERS BUNCH 

HITS ON MITCHELL. 



2 
3 
G 
7 
6 
9 



7 
1 
2 
3 
3 
7 
6 
9 
5 




Standing of the Clnbs. 



Won. 

Chicago ^l 

• Pittsburg 4? 

*k.w Vork ll 

ptiltadelphla "i* 

Cincinnati °.' 

St Louis ^Y, 

Brooklyn ^; 

Boston '*^ 



Lost. 
40 
55 
55 
65 
6S 
75 
79 
88 



Pet. 
.685 
.580 
.577 
.511 
.490 
.4t.'9 
.397 
.338 



St. Louis. Mo., Sept. 16. — New York 
defeated St. Louis. 9 to 3. in the open- 
ing game of the series. New York 
bunched ten hits off Mltchel while 
Quinn held St. Louia to four hits. 
Score: R- H. E 

New York 3 10 3 2—910 1 

St. Louis 3 00 — 3 4 3 

Batteries — Qulnn and Sweeney; Mit- 
chell and Killifer, Umpire — O'Lough- 
lin. ^ 

WHITE SOX \MN FIRST 

GAME FROM BOSTON. 

Chicago, Sept. 16. — Mixing two 
singles and a double with two errors. 
Chicago yesterday overhauled Boston's 
one-run lead In the fourth inning and 
won the first game of the series. 4 to 
2. White for Chicago pitched brihiant 
ball despite erratic support. Score: 

R. H. E, 

Chicago 00031000 x— 4 5 3 

Boston 01000001 0—2 6 3 

Batteries — White and Sullivan; K. 
Collins and Klelnow. Umpires — Egan 
and Sheridan. 



(ianies Today. 



Pittsburg at New ^ork. 
Chicago at Philadelphia. 
Cincinnati at Brooklyn. 
St. Louis at Boston. 



PvEDS AIDED BY 

BIRKE'S WILDNESS. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



. Brooklyn. Sept. 16.— Burkes w Ud- 
ress aided Cinclnatti In scoring an 
easy vUtory over Brooklyn yesterday. 
Dalton turned his ankle In the open- 
ins inning and Coulson.^ formerly of 4 
Aitoona. replaced him. Score: B. H. E. ' 

Cincinnati 10 10 4 10—7 11 3 

-Brmjkl vn ... 2 0—2 5 3 
Batte'^-^esl-Suggs and McLean; Burke 
Dessau and Bergen. Umpires— Kle.n 
and Kane. 

SCHULTE'S HOME RUN 

WINS FOR THE CUBS. 

Philadelphia. Sept. 16.— Chicago won 
from Phllad.-lphla yesterday 7 to u. 
Slac who held the visitors to two hits 
and two runs, fell on .second base in 
the sixth inning and Injured his ankle 
Moore, who look his place was hit 
hard and was wild. Chicago won the 
gume In the eighth Inning on two bases 
on balls, a single by Hofman and a 
home run by Schulte. Score: R. H. E. 

Chicago 2 14 0—7 b 3 

Philadelphia ...001040000—510 2 

Batteries— Brown, Mclntyre and 

' Klir.g; Stack. Moore. Slaughter and 

aioran. Umpires — FUgler and Emslie. 

CARDINALS TAKE TWO 

GAMES FROM DOVES. 



Standing of tiic Clubs. 

Won. Dost. Pet. 

Minneapolis 101 55 .648 

Toledo 85 71 .545 

(Tolumbus 83 72 .536 

Kansas City 80 74 .620 

St. Paul 80 76 .513 

Milwaukee 71 84 .458 

Indianapolis 64 92 .410 

Louisville 57 97 .369 



Games Today. 



Boston. Ma.s.s.. Sept. 16.— St. Louis 
T^'on two games from Boston yesterdav 
the first. 7 to 5, and the second. 5 to 1. 

First game- ^ ^ ^ j 

St Louis 3 000003 1—7 9 1 

Bu-ton 01 1 3 0—5 12 2 

Batteries— Steele and Phelps; Mat- 
tf-rn. Parsons and Smith. Umpires— 
Brennan and Eason. 
^ .Second game—- p h E 

St LouH 000 000 50—5 8 1 

Boston .......ioOOO 1000—1 9 2 

Batteries— Harmon. Lush and Phelps; 
Frock. Ferguson and Graham. Umpires 
— Brennan and Eason. 

PIR.\TES AND GIANTS 

DIVIDE DOUBLE BILL. 

New York. Sept. 16.— The locals won 
the first game of estyerday's double- 



Kansas City at Minneapolis. 
Milwaukee at St, Paul. 
Toledo at Columbus. 
Louisville at Indianapolis. 

SAINTS BUNCH HITS 

AND WIN IN SEVENTH. 

St. Paul, Minn.. Sept. 16. — St, Paul 
scored five runs and drove Douglierty 
from the box in the seventh inning 
yesterday, winning the second game 
of the series from Milwaukee by a 
score of 6 to 4. Score: R. H. E. 

Milwaukee 10 110 10—4 9 1 

St Paul 000 100 50 X — 6 12 1 

Batteries — Dougherty, McGlynn and 
Marshall; Chech. Leroy, Reiger and 
Kelly and Spencer, Umpires — Fergu- 
son and Bush, 

TOLEDO WINS PITCHERS' 
BATTLE FROM COLUMBUS. 

Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 16. — Toledo re- 
tained second place by winning yes- 
terday in a pitching battle, 2 to 1. 
Both James and Liebhardt were wild, 
a hit batsman and a pass after two 
hits scoring the Columbus run. But- 
ler's walk in the fourth led up to To- 
ledo's first run. A hit by James and 
a fumble by Downs made the winning 
run. Score: R- H. E, 

Columbus 10000000 — 1 5 2 

Toledo 00010010 — 2 5 1 

Batteries — Liebhardt and Carisch; 
Jan.es and Abbott, Umpires — Chill 
and Owens. 

MILLERS WIN IN 

SEE-SAW BATTLE. 

Minneapolis, Minn,. Sept. 16, — Errors 
by Bues and O'Neill and Downie's sin- 
gle enabled Kansas City to tie the 
score In the ninth Inning of yester- 
day's game and Barbeau s home run 



FEATURE EVENT 
TO CARTER G. 

Winner ef $2,000 Purse at 

Milwaukee Takes Three 

of Four Heats. 

Milwaukee, Wis.. Sept. 16. — Yester- 
day's card of the Great Western circuit 
races at the state fair, was made up of 
five events, the feature, the 2:13 pace 
for a purse of $2,000 being won by 
Carter G., which passed the wire a 
winner In three out of four heats. 
Summary: 

Threc-ear-old trot, purse $500, best 
2 In 3; , , 

Jane Jones, b. f. (Chandler) 1 1 

Loopwood, b. s. (Hitchcock) 3 2 

Peter Clay, b. c. (Dean) 2 3 

Time, 2:14; 2:19=!4- , ^ 

2 13 pace, purse $2,000. best 3 In 5: 
Carter G., s. h., by W. L. Hill 

(Araphoe) 1 1 

Nathan B.. br. h. (Putnam). 8 8 
Walton Boy, br. h. (Dean* ..2 4 
Dean Oakley, s. g. (Deryder).4 

Ira Gay. b. g, ( Doyer) 

Tom Grundy, b. s. (Allen . , . 
Evan H.. br. s. (Halla) ,,,. 
Harry Weaver, b, h. (Kaine) 
Prince Albert, g, g. (Harris). 

Time, 2:06V4,; 2:07V4; 2:07^; 2:081/*. 
2:06 pace, purse $1,000, 3 in 6: 
Bland S.. b. h. (Barnes) ....... 1 11 

R F, D.. blk, h. ^Robinson). . .2 2 3 
Tony Swift, blk. h. (Dean) ■ ■ ■ ■* 3 2 

Adam G.. b. g (Deryder) 3 4 4 

Time, 2:0514; 2:05V4; 2:061/*. 
Three-year-old pace, purse $500, z 
In 3: . , , 

Countess Marie b. f. (Kaine l 1 

Lauretta Patch, b. f. (McCarr) ..2 2 
Tln.e, 2:141/*; 2:14y*. , ^ 

220 pace, purse $1,000 3 In 5: 
Denerve, b. g.. C L, Deryder, 

Pleasantown (Deryder) 1 

Morton G.. blk. h. (Dean) .....2 
Bessie Woodland, b. m. (Prlck- 

ett) ^ 

Sllverner. b. g. (Dovenberg) ..4 
Time, 2 :1 2U; 2:13'.4: 2:15, 

WILL CONSIDER 

CLUB POLICY 

Important Meeting ef Boat 

Club Officials at Spirit 

Lake Branch. 

At a meeting of the heads of the 
different departments of the Duluth 
Boat club, to be held at the Spirit 
Lake branch of the club this evening, 
the question of the policy of the dif- 
ferent departments of the club will 
come up for consideration. 

Representatives of the rowing club 
will make a strong plea for a profes- 
sional coach. It will be pointed otjt 
that unless a radical change Is made 
In the manner of conducting this de- 
partment of the club, there will be 
little use in even attempting to place 
a crew on he water next season. 

The oarsmen here have come to the 
absolute opinion that unless some de- 
cided upheavel is made in the method 
of coaching the crews, there will be 
little use In attempting to defeat the 
better coached crews of St, Paul and 
Winnipeg. The opinion, made known 
after the very poor showing at Ke- 
nora. will be told in plain words this 
even ing. 

The tennis players will ask for an 
appropriation It Is understood, to make 
some additions to their department. 
Another court may be asked for. 

Some discussion may be held of the 
suggestion to break away from the 
Inland Lakes Y'achting a.ssoclatlon. A 
suggestion has been made to hold a 
regatta with White Bear and Mlnne- 
tonka. 



Press dispatches say tiiat AaI W©!gast 
will have five more fights, H^ is groing 
to have four large ring contests — and 
then get married. 

• • ♦ .. - 

"Will you kindly tell," writes J. E. 
L.. "why there are 80 few good um- 

It is a very vast and Ingrowing dif- 
ference of opinion, dear J. E. L. Some 
of the fans in this league think Mr. 
Anderson just the best guesser that 
roves in the valley of tlie Mississippi. 
While on the other limb of judgment, 
some of the fans opined that little 
Augur was good. There are seldom two 
towns tnat like the same tempters of 
fate Tl.e best umpire, therefore. Is the 
one that the most people seem to be 
in accord with at the same time. 

On ladles' day the handsome umps 
would be very liable to get in right. If 
you don't go to the game at all. you 
are just as liable to pick the good 
umpire. » » ♦ 

The other day the Pirates played an 
exhibition game with some small town 
team On Hiis team was one of the 
phenom pitching demons. To jolly the 
crowd Hans Wagner struck out the 
first three times up. The iourtn time 
he came to the plate the young pitcher 
ventured the mark, careless and wholly 
unthinking, that he had the goat of 
the great chicken raiser. Wheerat the 
crowd also jeered with airy per^slflage. 
Mr W^agner copped the next ball on the 
nose and they have never found It. 
The youth has a sneaking suspicion 
that Wagner was deceiving him, I hate 

you Hans. 

' * ♦ • 

A communication without any at- 



tachment, with the exception of a 
stamp, reijuests the opinion as to the 
greatest i;wlrler In the world. It is 
generally conceded in both the Na- 
tional and American league circles, 
that Waller Johnson, pitcher on the 
Washington Americans, Is the greatest 
twirler in the dear land. Walter has 
been heaylng plum sorumptously the 
present seasoi., and with Mathewson 
and Brown going back, there is no 
one to dispute the greatness of the 
Idaho wonder, who Is. you must re- 
member, with a losing and somewhat 
listless team, 

« * * 

It has been asked if there Is any 
chance for Pittsburg to win the gon- 
falon. The Pirates can hljist the flag 
over Forbes' Field In the event that 
I they win the next twenty-six games, 
and the Cubs lose a few. You can see 
what a cnance they have. 
« * « 

Col. Roosevelt, when asked, the best 
way to win a baseball game, replied: 
"Hit the ball on the nose and hustle." 

Quite typical of T. R. 

• * * 

It has been asked why state prisons 
don't have baseball teams. Because, 
dear, prisoners are barred from play- 
ing. Original, thank you. 

* « • 

Here Is what the fans of dear Athens. 
Ohio, think of a young pitcher w-ho 
has received a call for a higher hurling 

hill job: , . , ^ ,,, 

"He Is the strong-winged bird with 
the full plumage and he only needs 
the ci-.arice to show that he is the 
cuckoo of tuneful vocalization." 

Afte;- luch a long lingo of laudation, 
Mr. Man should strike twelve. 



AS SEEN FROM 
! THE SIDE LINES 



(BY BRUCE.) 

"Say not so." quoth Mr. Corbett the 
other day to Mr. Robert Elgren, the 
sporting editor of the New Y3rk World. 
The firm if gentle request upon the 
part of Mr. Corbett, was that the scribe 
not hint further regarding any stuff 
that Corbett was mixed in. with regard 
to the JefCrles-Jolinsoa fight 

The "say not so" of Mr. C jrbett car- 
ries behind it more than the ordinary 
warning. Mr. Edgren is a \ery strong 
and husky young man. He was one 
of the best hammer throwers In the 
country, some few years f.go. Even 
today he can go out ani toss the 
leaden ball some few feet. 

One time Mr. Edgren became peeved 
at Mr. Corbett for some unladylike 
reason. In the midst of this peeve, he 
hinted that the solar pie. \ us punch 
that laid Corbett low at Carson City. 
Nev.. did not really carry all the high 
power that some people imag^lned 



Harvester, the air being warm and 
there being little wind. Geers nodded 
the word on the second attempt. The 
Harvester trotted a grand mile, never 
faltering nor making the semblance of 
a skip and finishing strong. 



COLORED VOTERS AnEHION ! 

There will be a meeting of the 
Citizens' Political club at Kalitjnazoo 
hall. 18 West Superior street, bept. 17. 
at 8 o'clock. 

All members and voters,, are re- 
quested to be present. 
J. LOUIS ERVIN, Pres., 

1006 Torrej^Bld^,^ JOHNSON. Sec. 



Shepperd again, aud the men \yill Prob- 
ably be brought together within the 
next two month.s, the winner to meet 
I'oung Miller for the world's welter- 
weigh title. 



THE HARVESTER 
BREAKS RECORD 



WILL DECIDE 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

Adams and Fitweils Meet 

Sunday for Amateur 

Baseball Title. 

The best amateur game of the pres- 
ent season, and one that Is arousing 
Interest in every part of the city, will 
be the game Sunday between the crack 
Adams team of this city and the strong 
Fitwell Clothing team. 

For the past six weeks Manager 
Geistman of the Adams Has been on 
the trial of the Fitweils. ^.JUaUenge 
after challenge lias been sent to t he 
Fitwell management, and at last tnc 
Fitweils have agreed to meet the cracjK 
association team. Every amateur team 
In the city will be interested in t.ie 
outcome of the game, for the winner 
will have undisputed claim to the city 
ohampionsiiip. ' ka^^c 

All the present season the Adams 
have played a strong and persistent 
game. Since the very first of the 
season the members ot the team have 
shown that they knew much more 
baseball than the average amateur 

The Fitweils have also shown somj 
very good batseball, one of the best 
games of the season being the contest 
here with Cloquet. 

Opinion as to the outcome of the 
championship game of Sunday is di- 
vided and for that reason the interest 
ill the game is so high. The Adams 
men are confident of winning, for 
Manager Geistman says he will have 
the strongest lineup of the season. The 
Fitwell manager says ,<-hat .*te team 
will be even stronger than the day it 
played Cloquet at Athletic park. 

The Adams Athletic association will 
be out In force and will back Its team 
to the end. Rooting clubs have been 
formed, and the colors of the club will 
be In evidence at the game. The tlt- 
v.-ells will not lack: for support, how- 
ever, as the team has many friends in 
tiie central part of the city. 

The game Sunday will be called at 
3 o'clock and It is expected that even 
a larger crowd than the one which 
witnessed the Fltwell-Cloquet game 
will be present. It Is very probable 
that the game of Sunday will be the 
last ot the present season, as the foot- 
ball games of the Adams Athletic >vS- 
soclation will begin a week from Sun- 

*The game will prove a fitting wlndup 
to tlie high-class amateur baseball 
that has been seen In Duluth the pres- 
ent summer— the fastest baseball that 
has ever been played by the amateurs 
of the Head of the Lakes. 

Talbot will probably hop the mound 
for the Fitweils. while Manager Geist- 
man will announce his lineup tomor- 
row. 



CHANCE WILL 

F AVOR BROWN 

Three Fingered Wonder Will 

Be Cubs' Mainstay in 

World's Series. 

Many Chicago fans are wondering 
whether Leonard Cole, the lanky young 
pitcher of the Cubs, will have the 
stamina to stand the test of hard work 
in the coming world's series To the 
man on the bleachers "King ^ Cole 
seems to be anything but a faint- 
hearted person. There are those who 
think Clole is too young and inex- 
perienced to stand the strain. 

It is contended that the thought of 
the importance of the contests and 
facing 4 team like the Athletics betore 
a crow! of probably more than 30,000 
persons would upset the young fllnger 
of the Cub staff. Such a thing is pos- 
sible vrith a pitcher of Coles expe- 
rience and one who has never coni- 
peted in a world's championship. But 
if his performance in league games 
Is any criterion, he should not have 
any trouble In doing as well as he has 
done before. , 

Cole was asked recently If he 
thought he would be able to pitch with 
the coolness that he had shown up to 
date. He replied: 

"1 do not see where there s any dif- 
ference m pitching In a world's series. 
Of course, the result Is-of more im- 
portance, but that should not make 
any difference with a pitcher. If 
Chance puts me In. as I hope he will, 
I win do just as I have done In the 
past. Perhaps I will be a little more 
cautious, as I have not seen any of the 
Athletic batters, and have not the least 
idea how they hit. But that should 
not mike any difference to a pitcher 
who his the 'stuff" and nerve." 

On t.ccount of his splendid work in 
the National league this seasori It is 
natural to expect that Cole will be a 
factor in the world's series, and he 
win. tut it is not likely that Chance 
will' rely too much on him. 

The mainstay will be either Brown 
or Reulbach. They havo had the ex- 
perience of playing In worlds series 
games and are noted for their cooltiess 
and n.Jrve when It comes to a crisis. 
Overall would be counted In on that, 
too but his arm is In such shape that 
It Is doubtful If he will get an oppor- 
tunity to work, unle.ss his whip shows 
a great change for the better before 
the series starts. Overall is a hard 
man to beat when he Is in top form 

Jack Pfelster will be In condition be- 
fore then and will be In fighting shape 
when called on for the series. Pfeister 
will b'! good for one game at least and 
po.sslbly more. Like Brown, Reulbach 
and Overall, he has had the experience 
of facing high-class opponents in a 
world's series, and has an unlimited 
amour.t of pluck. That is one feature 
Chance likes about a pitcher, and he 
never hesitates to praise his staff on 
account of that, 

PRESIDENT LYNCH 

ISSUES BULLETIN. 



and that at this time Corbett was In 
reality very ready to quit. 

Mr. Corbett came right back at the 
sporting editor. He Informed him that 
he was perfectly willing tt. show him 
that a blow In the tender solar plexus 
was all that It was advertised, and 
even more. 

They went to a gymnasium, and 
Edgren Is quite some boxer, and 
climbed into their demonstration cos- 
tumes. 

They hadn't gone very far in the lit- 
tle lesson of punching pain, when Mr, 
Corbett did smite with evil intent Mr. 
Edgren in the "tummy." It i^ said that 
Mr Edgren did jackknife t p In imme- 
diate fashion, it requiring several at- 
tendants and smelling sal-s to bring 
him arou.id to that state of jolly fe- 
llcltatton where he could recognize a 
long cool one served with Ice. 

Since that time, until very recently, 
Mr, Edgren has been very nice to Mr. 
Corbett Perhaps, though, he has be- 
come emboldened by the rather humble 
sliowing made by Mr. Jeffries, and has 
bonneted the Idea that James J, could 
not lick his shadow at tiie present 
time. 



I u. w .if ^- w \ic -.i^ g- u.- ,Jr ».i.- g.- ^ ^, ^- Vf A ^ 'm- w W "^ Ifc" -y-V. lit 
'^ % ^ ^ J^ ^ ^ ^ /fi ^ Jf^ 3f< JfiJftJfi tfL^Jt.Jf.^^Jjf^ iC n. ^ 

*• L..4JOII!: I NDEH HANOICVP 

^ IX B.Vl'l'INCi B.\T'ri,i:. 

* 

{ ^ The absence of left-handed blt- 

i %t terti from tUe Nap liueiip ban not 

I ^ added to tbe ehanoeH for Lujole 

j ^jt to cop the big auto. I.arry can 

ie murder HOiithpaw pitobiuK> but .^ 

jjt the .\apM ha»e had »o few oflViide 

^ battera thl« i»ea»on that other ^ 

^f luunagerst have not eared to rUk 

■k their MidewheelerM aKalnnt them. 

^ There Ik no tellliiK JuRt lion 

^ nuicli difference more left-hand ^ 

^ pltchluK >v<iuld have made In the ^ 

^ bljt fellow'M mark for the HeaMou, * 

^ but that race in liable to be !*o ^ 

* cloMC that even a point will de- ^ 
^ eide it. ¥ 
^ Manager!* don't ft«rure the Naps M^ 

* very Htrong;, but junt the name *^ 
4f they ne»er mtMM any chances to 
^ UMe their bent twIrlerM aKaioNt 
^ them. Kver> time Addle Jonn wan 
^ In the Kame, the Nai««t had t«> bat ^. 
^ a«.alaMt some pitcher ranked ^ 
^ amiiiig; the bent In the lenssue, and ^ 

ffy lounK never Ketn any ^er> * 
Noft propoHltion. Itunnell Kord, ^ 
who In S'oud enough to win a biK 
^ majority of bin ^nmen, ban 
ije worked bin nhare aKalnnt the 
3Jt .Napn. aud ever.v time they play 

Sthe Athleth-n, Connie Mack n«w 
lit to une Bender. Coombn and 
fMorRan an often an he could, 
.lohnnon. Mullln, \% iilettn, Uouo- 
van, WaUh and the other leaders 
Sha^e also done a lot of work . 
AKaluat the Cleveland club. # 




F you have never worn a Gordon Hat, get 
one Today. Never mind the why or 
wherefore now.— You'll know it after a 
month or so. 

Gordon Hats, $3.00 

The Cordon Deluxe, $4.00 



Milwaukee Horse, Driven By 
Ed Geers, Goes 
in 2:01 14. 

Syracuse. N. Y.. Sept. 16. — At the 
state fair track yesterday. The Har- 
vester, the great brown horse owned 
by August Uhlan of Milwaukee, pil- 
oted by Edward Geers, broke his own 
and the world's record for trotting 
stallions of 2:02 by stepping a mile, 
paced by a runner, in <J:01V4. ihe 
horse and driver were given a great 
demonstration by the throng which 
jammed the stands and overflowed 
against the track fences to the turns. 
The Chamber of Commerce stake of 
82 000 for 2:09 trotters, unfinished from 
Wednesday, developed a genuine sen- 
sation and gave Mr. Geers another 
honor. Three heats of this event had 
been raced at sundown Wednesday, 
Coprano, the Oak Heart daughter of 
Bellini, had taken the first two heats 
and was just brushed out by Oro 
Bellini in the third. At the resumption 
along came Geers' Demarest and took 
tliree heats and the race. He earned 
his victory too, for In each Instance 
the great Soprano carried him down 
the stretch to the wire at a heart- 
breaking clip. 

In the 2:04 trot after Bob Douglas 
had easily taken the first heat, when 
Sonoma Girl went to a bad break at 
the first turn and barely saved her dis- 
tance, Cox electrified the crowd by a 
magnificent drive In the second which 
almost landed the Girl a winner. 

There were ding dong finishes, too. 
In the 2:08 trot, captured by General 
H.. and in the 2:04 pace In which May 
Day beat out Earl. Jr., in great time. 

The course was In perfect order for 
the rocord-breaklug; Attempt of The 



GAMES IN UNION 

PRINTERS' LEAGUE. 

Washington. Sept. 1«.— In the annual 
tournament of the Union Printers Na- 
tional Baseball league yesteruay New 
York defeated Washington. 12 to «, 
and St, Louis defeated Indianapolis, 
19 to 6. Scores: _^^ ^' r7' <-' 

Washineton ...OOOOlOoO — 6 11 b 
5ew York . ! . . 2 4 2 4 0-12 16 4 

Batteries — Weaver and suess, 
O'Brien and Homan. R H E 

Of Louis 27210042 1 — 19 15 7 

Indianapolis !. .1 1 3 1- 6 10 10 
Batteries— Henley and W^alden; Perry 
and Linehan. 

Shepperd Alter Sailor. 

Dick Shepperd of Pipestone. Minn., 
the lad who made a host of friends 
In this city last winter by his great 
match with Sailor Jack, has written 
and asked for another match with 
Jack The Sailor stated last night 
that he was perfectly willing to meet 



New York, Sept. 16. — President 
Lynch of the National league yester- 
day announced the following contracts 
and r5leases: 

Contracts — „,,,,, ^„„^ 

With Philadelphia — William Carp, 
Byron A, Slaughter ^ .„ _ 

With Pittsburg— John F. Ferry. 

By Chicago to Louisville— P. Smith, 
Outflolder Keener. 

By Cincinnati to Jersey City— Alvln 

J. Dolan. .... , i ri 

By New York to Rochester — c 

^^By Philadelphia to Kewanee— Player 
Dllger, Player Daniels. 

By St. Louis to Chattanooga— Ru- 
dolph Hulswitt and Elmer H, Sacher, 

HANCOCK MADE MANAGER 

OF FOOTBALL TEAM. 



Football to the Fore. 

Just what the public is i;oing to de- 
cide about the new game of football 
that will be Introduced Into this coun- 
try this fall by some kind and cul- 
tured gentlemen of Bost in and the 
immediate environs. It Is >et too early 

to say, , , ,. _ 

In the aays past, before the Indians 
all disappeared from the plains, and 
Teddy Koosevelt, a strong; and sotne- 
what frank and open guy. was ruler, 
we had a game where n.en wrestled 
each other and bunted ln:o solid for- 
mations of bone and sinew. 

In that game the ball was blown up 
so that It could be conveniently tucked 
under the arm and carried up the field 
Occasiorally It was kicked. Some ot 
the more advanced of the players wore 
adhesive plaster on their hands, so that 
they would not be hurt If they hap- 
pened to accidentally strike one of the 
oppo.-3ing players on the head— Instead 
of on the nose. . , - 

In those days vast crowds assembled 
at the game, and yells and protracted 
screams rent the fall atmosphere. Col- 
' ors ran riot around the field, and al- 
togetiier In those young and crude 
days of our country a football game 
was a very exciting and grand occa- 
sion. J ^ .. 

Sometimes young men t sed to sit up 
un^ll the wee sni' hours of the morn- 
ing, talking about football — and high 

balls. 

But suddenly there caiie a change 
over the country. Mr. Roosevelt, who 
was a great prophet and yet had bun- 
dles of honor In his own country, as 
well as In Africa and s.»veral of the 
London streets, decided taat he would 
take a vacation from the job of ruling 
the ITnlted States and congress. He 
lad been upon the job for quite a 
while, and neded a rest and new Ideas 
before coming back. Yts; he la one 
of the kind tliat can — con. e back. 

Mr Taft, a gentleman from Ohio, 
succeeded Mr. Roosevelt, iroml-sing the 
patient peopul that he would carry out 
the same strenuous program. But Mr 
Taft was rather stout ani he found it 
rather difficult to maintain the pace of 
Mr Roo.sevelt, so he went back to golf 
and compromi.se. two games that even 
the fat can thrive on. At this time, 
when Mr. Taft decided hat ho could 
not keep the coy country keyed to the 
Roosevelllan strain, red blod paled and 
people said let us have reforms in the 
way of soft pedal hancllcaps on the 
strenuous games our yoi ng men Piay. 
And so the cultured gents, or rather 
gentlemen, met In Bostcn. where the 
rules of forensic debate have long been 
established, first by Samuel Adams and 
later by a man named Tew Lawson. 

These spectacled and pale brow 
students of the needs of tie times gath- 
ered In solemn conclave. For many con- : 
centrated days they labored diligent y 
to cut out the a-sperltles. If you will. 
When they had completed their arduous 
task they held their tired hands In sol- 
emn salutation to the peepul, crying: 

"We have made the game fit for 
feeble Fred and pale Paul; all any 
youth needs now, patient public, is a 
good mathematical mind and a pocket 
adding machine." 

Whereat the patient pjbllc applaud- 
ed, at least some of It, and the re- 
mainder went off to silent and secluded 
places and lit fires without the aid of 
matches. There was great excitement 
In the country. ^, 

Vnd so we are entering upon this new 
game, evolved or Invented, by this In- 
ternational peace confer€nce gathering. 
We are Just entering upon It. so It is 
too early to say what :he effect will 
be upon either the body politic or the 
body physical. ^ ,,.... *» .^ 

It is not considered polite to attend 
any of the new rules games after you 
have eaten onions. Neither must you 
yell above a cultured tone. Comport 
.self as If attending an Ibsen thnUer-- 
those dreadful dramas — and watch 
closely the mathematical formations 
and graceful gyrations of the perform- 

Later, perhaps, some riore clear Idea 
of the near game may be obtained. 



Barry Means Business. 

Jimmy Barry will post his forfeit 
today for a meeting with "Scraps' 
Costello. Barry has expressed his 
preference for one of the range clubs 
rather than the Head of the Lakes 
Social club, which has been staging 
all the fights that have been held 
here. 

In his reply to Barry, the manager 
of Costello asked that the figiit b« 
awarded to the club making the high- 
est bid. It Is expected that Costello s 
manager will be In the city within a 
few davs. when the articles of agree- 
ment will be signed by representatives 
of the two men. 

■• - 

Planning Football Team. 

A P Mi-Donald, a former newspaper 
man of this city. Is planning to or- 
ganize a strong seml-prolesslonal foot- 
ball team to represent i^uluth. Some 
of tlie best plavers of Duluth, Superior 
and the ranges, players who have 
played football In college, will be on 
tliG d© vcn. 

The Idea Is to get games ^\\U\ the 
strongest semi-professional teams In 
the Norhwest. It Is expected that one 
of the strong teams of Milwaukee will 
be brought to Duluth for a game some 
time this fall. 

MANY CITIES PLANNING 

TO COPY DULUTH LAW. 

Many cities throughout the country 
are sending to Duluth for copies of the 
wheelage tax ordinance. Inquiries com- 
ing to H. W. Cheadle. city clerk, from 
the Pacific coast as well as t.ie Gulf 
coast towns. The cities of the West 
and South are evidently following the 
example of Duluth and Chicago In put- 
ting a special tax on the vehicles which 
wear out the streets. The money se- 
cured in this manner Is to be used ex- 
clusively for the maintenance of the 
streets and avenues of tlie city. 



RHEUMATISM 

PDRIFTHC THE BLOOD 
THE ONLY PERMANEHT ODBE 

No case of Rheumatistn was ever 
cured except by a thorough purifica- 
tion of the blood ; just as long as the 
blood remains charged 'with ferment- 
ing uric acid poison, the painful dis- 
ease will continue. The pains and 
aches of Rheumatism are simply su- 
perficial effects of the impurities itt 
the circulation, and sometimes may 
be temporarily relieved by the appli- 
cation of plasters, liniments, hot 
cloths, etc. But the person who trifles 
with this dangerous disease by de- 
pending on local treatment alone, is 
certain to pay for the mistake with 
constant suffering later on. S. S. S. 
cures Rheumatism in the only way it 
is possible to cure the disease. It 
goes down into the blood, and re- 
moves the uric acid from the circula- 
tion, so that the nerves, bones, mus- 
cles and joints are lubricated and fed 

with nourish- 
i n g elements 
instead of being 
continually ir- 
ritated and in- 
flamed with the 
sharp, uratic 
i ni purity. 
When S. S. S. 
has cleansed 
and purified the 
blood, the pains and aches cease, all 
inflammation disappears, stiffened 
muscles are made pliaut, and every 
troublesome symptom of Rheumatism 
is permanently corrected. Book on 
Rheumatism and any medical advice 

free to all who write. 
TEE B'WIFI SPECIFIC CO.. Atlanta, 0*. 



SSS 




yOTEL 

STRICTLY FIRST CLASS 

New. modern and absolutely firs, 
proof. 

Rates, 11.00 and Up. 

Thres Cafes. 

Popular-Priced Lunch Dally. 

N ^ 



\t the yesterday afternoon's meet- 
ing of the board of athletic control of 
the Central high school, Raymond Han- 
cock was elected manager ot the foot- 
ball team. An assistant to the man- 
ager will be appointed later. The 
dutlej of the manager will include ar- 
ranging the high school schedule, 
which has not been completed as yet. 

Th.> board took up the matter of se- 
curing showers and lookers for the 
meml)er3 of the football team. An ef- 
fort will be made to secure quarters 
in the high school building. 

Thj first scrimmage of the season 
was held yesterday. 

YALE FOOTBALL MEN 

HAVE PRACTICE. 



Let Larry Win. 



Lakevllle, Conn.. Sept. 16.— The Yale 
football squad was given the first 
prac'lce of the season here yesterday. 
Thlr'y men were on the field with ten 
more expected to arrive later 

Only old style football was attempted 
yesttirday. 

While there will be but three of 
last year's eleven back this fall, the 
coaches will not feel the loss of ex- 
nerhmced plavers as would have been 
the case If it were not for the new 

rulen 

Ed' Coy. captain of last year s 
elevjn. has taken active charge of Ih© 
men as head coacli. 



Now that the race In the two leagues 
has been as good as set led. as well as 
the races In the Amerl.^an association 
and the Eastern league, where Roches- 
ter Is winning, the public Is bending 
the observing eye to wa.oh t-he up-s and 
downs of the fight for the automobile 
that goes chugging to tlie man making 
the highest batting average In the two 

^^ At ^tast^^accounts larrouping Larry 
Lajole was leading the race, with one- 
eyed Kid Cobb close up and Snodgrass 
and Speaker closing the gap to the 
garage. This is some rice, and one In 
which, the public Is taking a large and 
absorbing interest. 

Perhaps the great majority of the 
public would like to see Lajole win 
He has ever been a prime favorite with 
the baseball for severtil seasons, nay 
more, in fact; while Cobb is young ^et 
and. besides, is at times there with that 
promenade freshness. 

Larry will not lead the league many 
more years, and In th(. Wg red heart 
of the ba.seball public there Is the hope 
that the big Frenchman would take 
home the chug wagon to wife. Cobb 
owns one. anyway 

m ' 

Laudek' Gets Uetision. 

Winnipeg, Man.. Sept. 16.— Charlie 
Lucca of Chicago- and Billy Lauder, 
former lightwei.ght cltimpion of Can- 
ada, fought fifteen refunds here last 
alght, Lauder gettias tbe decesion. 



Ties, Pulpwood, Piling 

And Other Timber Products. 

MeLEOD-DAVIS TIMBER CO., 

515 I.yoeum Hiilldlng. 
Duluth, Mtun. 




THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPALDING 

Most delightful and luxurious restau- 
rant in Duluth. 



The royal LUNCH 

2i4 West Superior St. 

Our Speclaltle*! for Tomorrow'* 
(Saturday) dinner: 

RO.%ST PRIME RIB BEEF (au ju«). 
ROAST VEAL WITH DRESSINtt 
and Home-Made Pantrle* and Bread. 

THE ROYAL LUNCH 



i,f»-T»-JM \ I . - ^ O: 



h. >i 



4~ 




I -I 







■ 

> 

1 










1 


■ 











«^^^"H>«>^»eia 



I 



I pa 



18 



Friday, 



HER 



GALL STONES, APPEKDfCITIS, 
GOITER 

Carrel \Vlthoi:t 0|i«-rallon ^%■hon Moat 

IVople llflievc That Cutliiit; Is 

ISeoenMury. 

Demonstrated at St. Louis Hotel, 
Duluth, Minn., 

SATURD/IY^ SEPT. 17 

— ill — 




September 16, 1910. 




F THE NORTHWEST 




Kye l)iN«ra.'«rii, cataract, grraniilated 
litis. Weak ami watery eyes, inllamed 
eyes and the fittiiiK of frlasses, treated 
with thf niKst niodtrn lut-thods. 

C'MtNrrhnI UiNenReM, bronchial catarrh, 
catarrh vf tlie lungs, nas-al catarrh, 
forced breathing and obstructed 
breathing in tiie nostrils in most casts 
completely curiil. 

DtveiiNcn of tlie l.uiiKM, early con- 
eiiinp;ii.'n. jileurlsy. asthma, ishortneBs 
of the breath treated with the latest 
tubercular treatment. 

Liver, Stoinnoh unil Dovrel Troahlea. 
dyspepsia. sK-k headache, appendicitis, 
gall stones, constipation, diseases of 
the liver, and Indigestion, sour stom- 
ach, etc. 

Kldury and Bladder Trouble, dia- 
betes. Bright's disease, sti'ne in the 
kidneys, enlargement of the kidneys, 
pains in the back, stulTness of tlie 
I'ack, passing urine too often and burn- 
ing urine. 

XervouB niweasen, Xeuralsla, sciatica, 
nerv(.«us pn. st!atii>n, nerv(.>iis indlges- 
tU'n. paralvsis and brain diseases. 

Blood and Skin DiMeuMea, heart di- 
eeases. dropsy, swelling of the limbs, 
rBt>res. pain in the bones, rheumatism, 
enlarged veins eczema, itch, pimples 
and I'ad circulation. 

Uefomillea and Club Fee*, curvature 
of the spine, interrupted nutritiiti, 
slow growth in children and wasting 
diseases in adults. 

Cancer, Tumor, iioitvr, FlNtuIa, I'ileM, 
tubercular glands, rupture, varicose 
veins, enlarge*! glands, cold limbs and 
all external growths, treated iy hypo- 
dermic injection method without the 
knife and loss of blood. 

Dlaeaitea of Men, failing memory, 
lack of energy, forgetf ulness. falling 
of the liair sore throat, palsy, weak- 
ness In old and young. 

DlneaneN of \%'onien, headache, pains. 
In the I^ack. chn-nic diseases, deep- 
seated disease treated scientifically as 
adi'pted by America's most eminent 
specialists. Consultation. $1.00. 

DR. REA & CO.. 
S27 Century Bldg. Minneapolis, Minn. 




C-A-^ 



Diamonds 



are an investment at 

Bagky's 

Present prices ruling are 
'.vcrth every intending 
purchaser's attention. 

We are show'ng an ex- 
ceptionally fine value 
mounted in a T'ffany set- 
tmg for — 

$25.00 

Known Since 1885 as F. 
D. Day & Co. 

Jewelers and Silversmiths. 

315 W, Superior St. 





HEADQUARTERS FOR 

IRON FENDING! 




A very pretty design for 45 cents 
a foot. 

QUAYIE-LASSEN C9., 

W Second Aveuue \Ve»it. 



NOTICE ! 

H. S. WENGER, 

Iini)orter and Miwuifiu-turing 
Furrier, 

203 West Superior Street. 
In New Oak Hull Rulldinc;. 
WILL IJE OPEN EVERY EVEN- 
ING UNTIL 9 O'CLOCK. 

Order your new furs and have 
your repairing and remodeling 
done now at the 

QUALITY FUR HOUSE, 

Furnu-rly of the Duluth P^ur Co. 



r 



MA 

?Clli< 
lllui 
fur. 



Womaif 



The 



li Interested ar.d should know 

sbout the wonderful 

MARVEL >^hiriin9 Spray 

ncvv TiflcKl Sfricg*. Jnjfc- 

tion and auction, iJest— Saf. 

est— Most Convenient. 

IlClcsatci lait&nUjr. 

A(k jeiT dratfitt for It. 
If h-- r-Rimol suf.ply tli« 
MAKVKf... accept no 
cilKT. I'.it send BtRiiin for 
Illustrated l.ook-»»»lrd. It plTes 
full p*rtlcul.irs*nd 'lirectionii 11 
ValLiMbl*loU(1tes. M.%RVRI. ( O., 
K, -Jaa ST.. »UW \4tKH. 

rsr fi«te by Mu WIrtb, OrugBlit 



FORJIMBER 

Very Busy Day at the Land 

Otiice at Cass 

Lake. 



charged with rape, and he y!12 ?LT' 
rested at Tenstrike an5 liioiitrht lO Be- 
midjl last nigrht. He was Indicted by 
thy grand jury and will ]>robably be 
arraigned in court Saturday. 



SAFE A TOUGH ONE. 



Nearly 400,000,000 Feet 

Are Offered for 

Sale. 



Cass Lake, Minn.. Sept. 16. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Yesterday was a busy 
day at the loca.1 United States land 
office, when bids were opened for the 
sale of pine on the ceded Chippewa 
Jndian reservation, amounting in all to 
a little over 37tJ,000,000 feet, nearly 
ail of which was bid for. It took the 

force of the local land office, assisted 
by Frank 13. Walker of Wasliington, 
L». C. and S. J. Colter of Dulutii, nearly 
tiix hours to read the bid.s. All the bids 
were ininiediateiy torwaided tu Wash- 
ington, and the successful bidders will 
be iiutitied by wire ironi the office of 
the secretary of tlie Inieiior. Over 70,- 
00O,0t.'O leet of white pme and over 300,- 
000,000 feet of Norway were ofCereJ, 
and the J. Neils Luniuer company of 
Cass Lake succeeded In presenting the 
highest bid on about ttO.OOO.OOO feet, 
mostly within the Minnesota national 
forest adjacent to Cass Lake. This 
wi:l be good news to Cass Lake people, 
as It insures the running of the local 
mill lor a number of years to come, the 
goveinment estimate usually being less 
than the actual amount. The Thief 
Hiver Falls LuniLer company bid 
highest on about t»0,000,000 feet on the 
Winnibigo-shish reservation, usually 
known a.-^ Cut Foot Sioux. Shevlin- 
Matl:ifcu bid on 50,000,<'OO, while the 
Muliery-McDonald company of Duluth 
L:d on 6,000,000 on the !• ond du Lac 
leservation. 

Tlie highest bid put in was by the 
Ltech Lake Lumber company of 
Walker, which concern bid $14 per 
1.000 for white pine and ?12 for Nor- 
way, their bid being on 30,000,000 feet. 
E. A. Engltr of Baudette bid higliest 
on about 20,000,000 feet adjacent to 
Spooner and Baudette. on the lied Lake 
reservation. The Welsh Timber cont- 
pany of Bemidji was also a successful 
bidder. 

The Northland Pine company of Min- 
neapolis put in a blanket bid on every- 
thing to be sold in the national forest, 
averaging about $8.03 per 1,000, but 
was beaten out by other bidders. The 
Bemidji Lumber company pressed the 
J. Neils Lumber company closely on 
70,000,000 feet on the national forest. 
The bid of the local concern is better, 
however, by about 50 cents per 1,000. 

C. A. Barton of the Northland Pine 
company, whose blanket bid was un- 
siicctssful, was nevertheless close up 
to the highest, and will come very 
near securing everything on the na- 
tional forest, and doubtless the under- 
standing that he was to be a bidder 
resulted in much higher prices than 
weukl have been secured if he had not 
appeared among the bidders. 

Among the smaller bidders were: 
Th Burlington Lumber company; W. 
C. Gilbert, Grand Papids; S. D. .Seavey, 
Iicer Kiver; George T. Tallacksoni 
Grafton, N. D. : W. B. Flinders, Spoon- 
er, Minn.; Webster- Whipple company. 
M;nnei>.polis; John C. Dewitt, Chicago; 
I^. K. Hogan.son, Grafton, N. L>. ; Fred- 
erick M. Loveless, Mallard, Minn.; C. 
M. Joluison and Robert Jarvis of Cass 
Lake. 



Yeg/[;s Make Vain Attempts to Crack 
One in South Dakota Bank. 

Watertown, S. D., .Sept. 16. — (.Special 
to The Herald.) — P'our yeggmen at- 
tempted to blow open the safe of the 
Henry state bank early W^ednesday 
morning, but they had to give it up 
after five charges had been exploded. 
The night watcliman was hound and 
gagged and dragged to the town fire 
house, where lie was left while the 
four men dug into the bank vault witli 
tools stolen fron> the railway section 
house. When the quartet finally be- 
came convinced that the safe was all 
it claimed to be they stole a liorse and 
buggy and made their escape. Word 
was sent at once to the county sheriff 
at this city, but up till now no trace 
of them has h»en secured. 



GETS LIFE SENTENCE. 



Coyote Belly, Sioux Indian. Sent Up 
for Murder of Policeman. 

Deadwood, S. 1>., Sept. 16. — Coyote 
Belly, the Sioux Indian who pleaded 
guilty to murder In the second degree 
for killing Horn Cloud, an Indian po- 
liceman, last spring on the Rosebud 
reservation, was sentenced by .Judge 
Carland in the LTnited States circuit 
court here, to life imprisonment In the 
federal penitentiary at Leavenworth. 
His attorney made a strong pl«a for 
leniency, declaring that Coyote Belly 
was now nearly 60 years old and that 
he had rendered the government great 
assistance In the earlv days of settle- 
ment. The court held the murder to be 
cold-blooded. 



FULL OF BUCKSHOT. 



Man Training Dog in Woods Shot 
By a Careless Hunter. 

Marinette, Wis., Sept. 16. — (.Special 
to The Herald.) — Theodore Kngals of 
Cilvitz was seriously shot by a care- 
less hunter while teaching his dog to 

follow game In the woods near his 
home. He is at the Menominee River 
hospital with a dozen buckshot in his 
body. The one who shot the young 
man ran away without attempting to 
render him assistance. 



TO PLANT RICE TO 
FEED WILD DUCKS 

N. D. Game Commission Buys 
Quantity From Minne- 
sota Indians. 

Crookston, Minn., Sept. 16. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Yesterday Thomas 
Griffiths, a member of the North Da- 
kota slate game and fish cimmission, 
spent the day in Minnesota, in the 
vicinity of Bena, where he purchased 
300 pounds of wild rice seed from the 
Indians, and wliich the game and fish 
commission will plant in the lakes of 
North Dakota to afford protection and 
feed for tlie ducks and geese, specially 
the ducks. If the experiment proves 
successful,, the commission will make 
more extensive purchases next year 
and seed all the lakes, which are prop- 
erly located, in order to improve tlie 
Itunting and attract geese and ducks 
not only to breed, but In their flights 
south as cold weather approaches. 

The North Dakota commission has 
also decided to follow the Minnesota 
sport.smen In introducing the ring- 
ijecked pheasants, and Wednesday 
Griffiths purchased sixtv of them, bred 
at Grafton, N. D.. by Mr. Williams, a 
taxidermist, and they will be turned 
loose in tlie Turtle mountains, where 
It is believed the conditions are Ideal 
for their propagation. 

BELTRAMI GRAND 
JURY ENDS WORK 

Makes Usual Recommenda- 
tions and Returns a Few 
indictments. 

Bemidji, Minn., Sept. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The grand Jury ad- 
journed yesterday after having con- 
sidered many matters in such an ex- 
peditious manner as to win commenda- 
tion from Judge Stanton and those at- 
tending court generally. 

The jury In its final report, makes a 
recommendation that suitable quarters 
be provided in the county Jail for the 
retention of minor prisoners and Insane 
persons committed to the jail. The 
statutes provide that such suitable 
separate quarters shall be provided, 
and the Beltrami county jail has no 
separate quarters for this class of 
prisoners. « 

Frank Van Ta.osel, Indicted for as- 
sault; John Carlton, Indicted for rob- 
bery; John Davis, carnal knowledge 
of a female child under 14 years of 
age; Claude Carter, indicted for burg- 
lary; Andrew Rust, indicted for lar- 
ceny, and Ed Whaley, Indicted for 
grand larceny, were arraigned In court 
today. Van Tussel, Carlton, Davis and 
Carter plead not guilty; Rust was given 
until Saturday at 2 p. m. in which to 
plead and W'haley will plead Saturday 
also. 

A bench warrant was issued ror L. 
Lawrence Smith of Tenstrike, who Is j 



HUNTERS ARE FLNED. 

Five Men Plead Guilty to Dealing 
in Moose and Caribou Meat. 

Bemidji, Minn., Sept. 16. — One of the 
largest catches of big game violators 
In the history of the state game and 
fish commission was recorded here yes- 
terday when five men living at the 
northwest angle of the most northerly 
part of Beltrami county, on the north 
shore of the Lake of the Woods, plead- 
ed guilty to charges of dealing in 
moose and caribou meat and paid into 
the treasury of Beltrami county fines 
aggregating $429.80. 

Orrin Towner, for buying four quar- 
ters of moose meat, paid $209 and Mof- 
fit, for buying a quarter of moose meat, 
paid $55.20. F. Waldo sold a quarter 
of moope meat and was fined $55.20. 
Bert Cllson on the same charge paid 
the same fine. Orrin Dalley, who had 
a quarter of caribou meat in his pos- 
session, paid the same amount also. 

STOLE MANY STAMPS. 

Burglars Secure "Stickers" to the 
Value of $250 at Northfield, Wis. 

Black River Falls. Wis.. Sept. 16.— 

The postoffioe in the general store 

of H. A. M. Steen at Northfield. in this 

county, was burglarized Wednesday 

night and $250 worth of stamps taken. 
Nothing was disturbed in the store. 
It is .supposed the men who robbed the 
Sexton postofTice some time ago en- 
gineered the job !it Northfield. 

Pretiident of Kiiiuii, WIh., Collrffe. 

Ripon, Wis., Sept. IG. — Dr. Cliarles F. 
Kvans, professor of Hebrew literature 
at the University of Wisconsin, at a 
meeting of the trustees last night, was 
elected president of Rlpon college, of 
v.hlch he is a graduate. He holds de- 
grees from the University of Wisconsin 
and Princeton, and is noted as an edu- 
cator and clergyman. 

■ ■ 

Fbch Oil in Stove) Two Dead. 

Winnipeg, Sept. 16.— While llgliting 
a fire with coal oil, Andrew Albert, a 
Canadian Pacific railway agent at Ver- 
million Bay. and his son, Charles, were 
burned to death last night. 



Fairmont — Helen, the 4-year-old 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Suth- 
erland, was burned to death Wednes- 
day evening. Her clothing caught fire 
from a bonfire about which she was 
playing with a number of other chil- 
dren. Her clothing was burned from 
her body and she survived only a few 
hours. 

Kast Grand Forks — Thomas Vincent 
of East Grand Forks, employed as a 
brakeman by the Northern Pacific, suf- 
fered a painful accident at Crookston, 
his shoulder being dislocated. Mr. 
Vincent was assisting In the switching 
of some cars when he was caught 
between two cars and fell against a 
coupling. 

Crookston — Tuesday evening the 
team of M. Halvorson, a farmer re- 
siding near the city, took a notion to 
run away on Main street and caused 
considerable excitement for a time. 
The wagon struck the mall box In 
front of the Merchants National bank 
and knocked It down, but the run- 
aways were stopped before further 
damage was done. Mr. Halvorson will 
have to pay the damages done to the 
mall box, which he cheerfully agreed 
to do. 

Montgomery — The James Quirk mill 
of this city, which has been shut down 
for some time, has been taken by the 
Diamond Manufacturing company of 
Minneapolis, who expects to have it 
ready to run again in a week or 
two. 

Rochester — The marriage of H. Chase 
Ballon and Miss Luella Van Campen 
took place at the home of the bride's 
parents in this city Wednesday after- 
noon. Rev. Ora W. Taylor officiating. 
Mr. Ballou is general secretary of the 
Rochester Y. M. C. A., and before com- 
ing to this city vi'aa assistant secretary 
of the Duluth association. 

Montgon.ery — Troop B, Fourth cav- 
alry, stationed at Fort Snelling, Is 
making a practice marcli through the 
country and camped here Thursday. 
This Is the first time this place has 
ever been honored by the presence of 
so large a body of soldiers, and it Is 
a treat for our citizens. 

Fergus Falls — A large black bear 
appeared at the Curtis farm In the 
town of Inman. There were no weap- 
ons in the house, and the bear saun- 
tered about the dooryard, and made 
himself at home. The family locked 
the doors, and were held In a state 
of siege until a telephone message 
brought neighbors to the rescue. The 
bear escaped after two or three In- 
effective shots had been fired at him. 
Wild animals are more numerous this 
fall than they have been since pioneer 
days. 

Montgomery — The James Quirk mill 
cf this city, which has been shutdown 
for some time, have been taken bv the 
Diamond Milling company of Minne- 



'anolis. lyijo expect to have it ready to 
riin aifam in d" week or two. 

Winona— Axel AhdersOil, the young 
farmer residing about four miles from 
bt. Peter, who is charged with rob- 
bing William Campbell, Jr., of a gold 
watch valued at $25, on Aug. 26, in this 
city, has been held by Judge S. H. 
Somsen of tlie municipal court to the 
grand jury, whicli is to convene next 
Monday. 



I PENINSULA briefs] 

Hancock — While William Kerredge 
;.nd family were at the theater tliieves 
broke into the home and robbed it. 
Entrance was gaineu thiough one "'f 
the ground Hoor windows. The win- 
dow had been locked but with the aid 
of a glass cutter part of a pane was 
removed and the window raised. Every 
purse was rifled and the money taken, 
ab<.ut *25 or $30 in all. 

Bessemer — Hit by a chunk of ore. 
whicli dropped upon him, Joseph Au- 
guslinory, an Austrian, was instantly 
killed at the Ironton mine at Besse- 
mer. He had started work only that 
morning. 

Escanaba — Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Kirk- 
palrick and Mr. Patterson have left 
Escanaba in Mr. Kirkpalricks auto- 
mobile for a trip to Cleveland. Stops 
Will be made at frequent intervals and 
about eight days wnl be consumed in 
making the trip. The travelers are 
accompanied as far as Milwaukee by 
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Norton and Mr. 
and Mrs. C. W. Kates, these persons in 
Mr. Ntirtons car. Mr. and Mrs. Nor- 
ton will tour Wisconsin. 

Norway — Anton Anderson has pur- 
chased the lot between the Masonic 
building and Jacobsen's drug store at 
Norway, Dickinson county, and will 
erect a two-story brick building, 30 
by 60 feet in size, with concrete base- 
ment. The estimated cost is $6,000. 
Sam Anderson is engaged in erecting a 
business block on River avenue. Iron 
Mountain. The building Is 24 by 80 
feet in size, two stories in height, with 
a lull length basement. A substantial 
foundation which Former Judge Flana- 
gan is erecting on his property at the 
corner of Stephenson avenue and East 
A street Is indicative of an intention 
to erect a large business block at an 
early date. Tnis site is also in Iron 
Mountain. 

Menominee — The census giving Me- 
nominee county 25,648 people, whereas 
in 1900 the population was 29,046, has 
been explained that the apparent de- 
crease was because some years ago a 
large corner of the county was de- 
tached and given to Dickinson county." 
It develops that Dickinson county lias 
acquired no territory from Menominee 
since its organization, some seventeen 
years ago. Thus Menominee's explan- 
ation does not explain. It Is surmised 
that the waning of the lumber in- 
dustry has had a great deal to do 
with Menominee county's falling off in 
population. 

Bessemer — The proposition of grant- 
ing a street railway franchise to A. D. 
Johnston, F. A. Sullivan, A. E. Apple- 
yard and M. M. Reid, which was voted 
on at Bessemer, was carried by a vot»» 
of 379 for and 41 against. It is ex- 
pected that the promoters will start 
work on the line immediately and will 
have it completed early next summer. 

Bessemer— The corpse of a man was 
the grewsome find that was made a 
few hundred feet from the countv roaJ 
a mile south of Bessemer. From all 
appearances the man had hung him- 
self. The body was so badly decom- 
posed that the remains were bevond 
recognition. The man had a suit on 
purchased from Skud 
wood and there was 
pocket containing the 
Wiskovich. 

Escanaba — William Flynn, som?- 
v/nat known In Escanaba and other 
cities of the upper peninsula as a pro- 
fessional chimney sweep, was arrested 
in this city Monday night and is being 
held at the request of the authorities 
at the Canadian Soo. Flvnn tvrrived 
here Monday and his arrest followed 
the receipt by Chief of Police Iver.son 
of a long distance telephone message 
irom the Soo stating that Flynn was 
waiited there on a charge of highway 
robbery, that he was believed to be 
here and to ari'est him it he could be 
found. 

Marquette— The loss occasioned by 
the destruction of the Dulutli, South 
Shore & Atlantic car shops, at Mar- 
quette, is estimated at $40,000. 

Houghton — Houghton county has de- 
cided to build a new county jail at a 
cost of $40,000. 



THE BAYHA STORE FOR REAL VALUES 



Our Big Special 




This Massive Brass 
Bed Worth $55 f^""' 

Here's another money-saving opportunity that 
our profit-sharing plan offers you. Buy $100 
worth of goods, ca sh or credit, and we will sell 
you this genuine brass bed for $6.25. The bed 
we are showing is exactly like illustration, has 
2-inch continuous posts and heavy fillino- rods. 
Comes in satin or polished finish, and is one of 
the most popular styles of beds ever shown. 



Bros, of Iron- 

a book In the 

name of Matt 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 




Fargo, N. D. — A prominent farmer 
from the western part of North Da- 
kota was arrested by the police on a 
charge of drunkenness. When searched 
his pockets disclosed wealth to the 
amount of $79!s.60, principally in ne- 
gotiable paper. After he had sobered 
up he was allowed to go upon payment 
of the usual fine. While he did not 
relish arrest, he appreciated the act of 
the police In taking care of him and 
his money. 

New Leipsig. N. D. — The steel on the 
Northern Pacific had, at last report, 
reached a point about thirteen miles 
east of New Leipsig, and is coming 
right along. The big bridge, it was 
feared, might cause delay, but it is 
crossed, and there is now no par- 
ticular reason why the cars should 
not reach here next week. 

Aberdeen, S. D. — M. M. Guhin. the 
Republican nominee for county super- 
intendent, has been appointed super- 
Inlendet by the board of county com- 
missioners to fill the vacancy caused 
by the recent death of County Supt. Ole 
Jorgenson. 

Pierre, S. D. — Star Boy and his wife, 
Sioux Indians from the Rosebud reser- 
vation, were arrested on the charge of 
having purloined three pieces of silk 
from the store of C. E. Murray at Mid- 
land. Wlien arraigned before a justice 
they were fined an amount, which, 
with costs, reached $30. It developed 
she having watched her chance wiule 
she havnlg watched her chance while 
the attention of the clerks was drawn 
elsewhere and concealed the silk under 
her blanket. 

Medora, N. D. — While riding near 
Square Butte, Raymond, 16-year-old 
son of W. C. Collls, was seriously in- 
jured by the ground caving beneath 
his horse, throwing him into the liole. 
Raymond was after horses, and was 
riding rapidly to head them when the 
ground, about ten feet square, caved. 
He does not know how long he and 
the horse were there, but when he re- 
gained consciousness the horse was 
standing over him In the hole, and the 
boy was covered with blood from 
wounds on his face. 

Minot, N. D. — While assisting in 
pushing a turntable at the Great North- 
ern roundhouse Tony Papas, a Greek 
laborer, fell beneath the wheels. Pa- 
pas was on the wrong side of the ma- 
chine to push It around so was pulling 
and walking backward. He stumbled 
over a block which caused him ot fall 
and before the machine could be 
stopped the flesh from the ankle to 
the knee had been terribly lacerate. 

Devils Lake, N. D. — Last May J. H. 
Bredahl was arrested charged with at- 
tempting to rape a 5-year-old girl. He 
has remained In jail ever since. On 
Wednesday the charge against him 
was changed to assault, and he was 
sentenced to ten days In jail and fined 
$50 and $60 costs, in default of whicli 
he is to serve an additional thirty 
days. 

Mandan, N. D. — Mandan's building 
record for the past season, now prac- 
tically brought to a close, has attained 
a new mark, $250,000 having been ex- 
pended In Improvements. Even now 
new plans are under contemplation 
which will entail expenditures next year 
which will even exceed those of this 
year. 

Sioux Falls, S. D. — A peculiar and 
unusual ailjanent, known to laymen as 
leakage of the heart, caused the death 
of Martha Artcman, aged 6 years and 
11 month,"?, daughter of Mr. and Mrs^. 
Jacob Arteman, prominent residents of , 





large Size Roasters 

Worth 65c 

Special for 
Only 




We offer for Saturday's special selling, a good size, 
heavy sheet iron Covered Roaster, at a very low price. 
These roasters are so constructed that meats or fowl 
roasted in them have a better flavor than when roasted 
in the ordinary pan. 





Now is the time to fix up for the chilly nights. 5'omcthing here and there in bedding has to be re- 
placed, such as Blankets, Comforts, Pillows and Bedspreads, and to start you going, we offer FOUR 
BIG SPECIAL BARGAINS in Bedding. Note the values offered: 



BLANKETS — We offer an extra quality grey, 
Woolknap Blanket; full size and nicely finished; 
easily worth $2.50 each, extra special 



at. 



$1.39 



COMFORTS — You'll find an exceptional value in 
this Comfort we are offering. It is good size; filled 
with clean, soft cotton and covered in best grade 
silkoline. Quilted patterns; worth $2.50 
each, special at 



$t59 



PILLOWS — Large size bed Pillows, in heavy grade 
ticking and filled with superior grade feathers. A 
clean, sanitary pillow that is soft and full: worth 
$2.(K) per pair, special at, per 



pair. 



$1.25 



BEDSPREADS— Marsellies style, beautiful patterns 
— heavy fringe and cut corners. These spreads are 
exceptional values at the regular price tf «f T*! 
of $2.75, our special at ^l»i^ 



Univers 




toves and 



** 



„. » 





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itamam 






I 




An Exceptional Value in Steel 
Ranges. This $58.50 Range 
for Only 




This is the best value ever offered in a satisfactory Stee^ Range. We are offer- 
ing you a well-built range, with an 18x 16-inch oven, guaranteed in every way, 
at a price that is less than you can buy a range for cm which von takt vcur 
own chances as to the saisfaction it will give you. This (S* ^ 4 T fT 
range has a heavy firepot, with duplex grates for burning p >/ 7 / S 
wood or coal. Special at k^&i M. • m. •^ 

Easy terms of paj'ment. 




tmnm m^mmMViin 




Second Ays. % a&d Firsf SL 




1; 



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** 



Ccivour. The disease baffled the best 
experts in tlie Northwest and as far 
east as Illinois, who were unable to 
do anything for the little sufferer. 

Yankton, S. D. — Joseidi Branaugh, 39 
year« old, was accidentally shot and 
instantly killed here Tuesday by Jo- 
seph Barry, whose gun was discharged 
while the two were hunting ducks. 
Branaugh leaves a wife and four little 
children. 

Elk Point. S. D. — John Fross. aged 
84, was caught at the Milwaukee sta- 
tion at Vermilion Tuesday between 
a baggage truck and an Incoming pas- 
senger train and thrown under the 
wheels. His left leg wag severed be- 
tween the ankel and knee, and his skull 
fr.ictured. There Is little hope of his 
recovery. 

Aberdeen, S. D. — Arrangements have 
been completed for a "corn school" to 
be held fn Aberdeen Nov. 29 and 80 
and Dec. 1 and 2. Four Instructors 
from the South Dakota state college 
will be in attendance, and all phases 
of corn growing, testing of seed, se- 
lection of good ears and planting, etc., 
will be gone Into. 

Howard, S. D. — The county commis- 
sioners of Minor county are wrestling 
with a big drainage proposition. It is 
expected work will commence thl« fall. 
If the preliminary legal business is 
finished. Ajiplications have been made 



! for 



over three mi 



1 ditches. The project 
sive one, will be the 
ing a large area of f: 
has been under watt 
Sioux CMty. S. D.— 
homesteaders along l 
the soiinthwestern pa 
ty, have declared w 
horse thieves who 
come very bold. 



les of drainage 
. ■while an expen- 
nieans of reclaim- 
irmlng land which 
■r several years. 
The ranchers and 
he White river, in 
rt of Lyman coun- 
ar on a gang of 
•ecently have be- 



The Slim Woman is Winning 

The day of the slim woman's triumph 
has arrived. "The thinner one is the 
more stylish," say the dressmakers. 

This would have been sad news for 
the fat womon a year ago. She would 
have had to try dieting or exercise. 
Nc-wadays, however, the woman who is 
too fat for the style goes to a drug- 
glut and gets a case of Marmola Pre- 
scription Tablets, one of which she 
takes after each meal and at bedtime 
and so reduces her superfluous flesh 
quickly. 

These tablets, being made In accord- 
ance with the famous prescription, are 
perfectly harmles.s, and they are. also, 
the most economical j-reparation a 
person can buy. for they cost only 75 
cents a large case, one of which is fre- 
quently enough to start a person to 
loMing fat at a rate of 12 to 14 ounces 
a day. Pretty nearly every druggist 
keeps this tablet In stock, but should 
yours be sold out. you can easily obtain 
a case by sending to the makers, the 
Miirrnola Company, 491 Farmer Bldg., 
Detroit, Miclu 




Appleton — Twenty years a guard at 
a railroad crossing witlTout a single 
death occurring during that period. Is 
the record of -A. O. ]^all, who was re- 
cently placed on the Chicago & North- 
western pension list. In all that time 
there was only one accident on the 
crossing he flagged and that one would 
have been avoided had the person in- 
jured heeded the warning criea of the 
veteran flagman. 

Marinette — Harvey C. Anunson of 
Florence, Wis., lost liis life in a hunt- 
ing accident Wednesday. He was with 
Theodore Berklund near Fence Wis 
when one of the rien shot a. duclt 
from their boat. As the bird fell a 
dog jumped and upset the skiff Berk- 
lund reached the shore, but Anunson 
was drowned. The body was recov- 
ered. 

La Crosse — R. Wuest, a switchman 
on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, 
fell from the running board in front 
of a switch engine and was carried 
^00 feet, before he was finally tossed 
off the rails. Although only slightly 
hurt, liis escape is considered miracu- 
lous. His clothing caught on the run- 
ning board, thus preventing his body 
being carried under the wheels. 

La Crosse — After John Humphrey, 
member of the state board of arbitra- 
tion, had smoothed out the woodwork- 
ers' strike here and left for his home 
in Milwaukee, a committee, represent- 
ing the strikers. lecided that the 
terms were not satiiifactory and noti- 
fied employers that all settlement 
agreements were off. 

Eau Claire — Fiv<> horses, in ship- 
ment from Eau Claire to Minneapolis, 
were burned to death in a box car in 
Menomonle .Junction. The cause of 
the fire is not knovn. 

Beloit — Sixty people gathered in the 
home of Mr. and Mri5. S. L. Munger to 
attend a famiiy rei nion. The event 
was in honor of Jc hn Cormony, Sr.. 
84 years old. and his sister, Mrs. Har- 
riet Simmonda, 82 years old. Four gen- 



erations were represented in one 
branch of the family. 

Sheboygan — Controller John Kum- 
mer reports that the bonded indebted- 
ness of Sheboygan totals $592,000 

Madison — It is expected that tlie as- 
sessed valuation figures for Madison 
for 1910 will show an increase of near- 
ly 5900.000 over 1909. The total will 
be about $31,000,000. 

Fond du l^c — Final preparations 
for the grand encampment of Odd- 
fellows to be held in this city on Oct 
11 and 12 have been made. Three 
ledges will compete for prizes In the 
degree work on Oct. 10 

Monroe— A traction engine and tank 
wagon, owned by Henry Steininger 
^„^i'^\*?^?"f'' t bridge west of Juda 
and fell Into the water below where 
they still remain. Mr. Steininger and 
two employes narrowly escaped In- 

Janesville — The district convention 
of the Women's Relief corps will be 
in this city on Oct. 7. The corps in- 
cluded in the district, No. 5, are those 
of Janesvilie. Beloit. Clinton, Sharon, 
Montlcello, Brodhead, Monroe and 
Shullsburg. Mrs. Sophia Strathearn 
department president, will be Jii 
charge. 

Westby — After seventeen vears as 
postmaster here, E. C. Brattle" has re- 
signed because of poor health. 

Beloit — Ole lamn, an old resident of 
Rock county, while on his way home 
from the city to his farm Saturday 
night, fell from his wagon dead. Heart 
failure was the cause of death. 

Wilton — Waidemar Smith, an 11- 
year-old boy will be tried on a charge 
of .stealing ?35 from a butcher shop 

Wauzeka — At the election in the 
village of Bloomington. and towns of 
Bloomington, Patch Grove, Mount 
Hope and Little Grant ti-,e proposition 
to bond the municipalities to raise 
funds to build the Grant county rail- 
way carried by large majorities! 



wait^g*' 



>*■ 



% 



•^ 



PURE FOODS AND PURE MEDICINES 

mean better, healthier, happier peo- 
ple. It has been proved, however, 
that all medicines are not adulter- 
ated and worthless any more than are 
all lend products. 

The wheat has been sifted from 
the chaff, and such medicines as 
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com- 
pound, which is made from roots and 
herbs and complies with all conditions 
of the Pure Food and Drugs Law, will 
continue to hold its place as the stan- 
dard American remedy for female ilia. 






T 
i 



*•* 




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T 



EC 




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Friday, 



THE DVLUTU herald 



-t 



September 16, 1910. 






-•■ 



*iii- T i i 'y> ~»rnir 



19 



DIRECTORY OF 

AMUSEMENTS 




W HKKK TO GO TOXKillT. 

I.TrKl'M— "The City." 
OUrHKl'M — Advanced vaudeville. 

"THE Clffls 

A "THRILLER" 

Clyde Fitch's Last Play Stirs 

Audience at the 

Lyceum. 



CI.M)K FITt HISMS. 



■ 



^ "Who ^\anln Ut !»mell new J 
^ luonn hn> »>hfu >oii can mnell * 
* Kuxoliiit- iiIjujs I Jtili avfiiuer # 

■^ "Old mnf Im (tut o( tn-^liiou." ^ 

^ "The Htv tiirnn umhUlon to sel- Ifr 
^ flih urcetl." * 

.jf^ "IIiIh country la aot luu by * 
jfc >e\v ^ ork." * 

^ "WuttViin't you rather be IT In * 

the «-ouuiry than MT In New 

lork." 

" I'he Moiil of n itolKical party Id 

Ihi- iiufoniproniiHiUK hciueNty of 

II-. leader." 

••>lo»t Mien nre born Rood with i)^ 

Monie erot«kiMlu«-»M In tlieiu; I be- ^t 

lle»e I was* b»iru erooUetl with * 

fMOiie roimI In me." "J 

■^ -I nveepled lyluis for bu»lneMi« ^ 
■* dlploniuf} ; eheatInK for boslnenw * 
^ ei|»edlene>: theft for lejfitlniate ^ 

borrow InK-*' . fv 

••>\ hat th«- <Uy «lo»-<* i» t« ▼ 
rtriuK out ^•vhat'M f»lro»«»'j«« In "«• ^ 
If nt heart we are Kood, the Kood * 
■ift lu wi» will win; If bad, tio,l help jt 
* u»." * 









NAME THREE INSUR- 
GENTS IN ILLINOIS 

fCor.tinued from page 1.) 



he was opposed hy George P. Engle- 
hard and Frederick C. De Lang, insur- 
gent 

Speaker Jo.seph G. Cannon was re- 
nominated in the Eighteenth district 
by a majority close to 6,000. He was 
opposed by H^nry B. Downs, an insur- 
gent of his own city. . , ^ 

Lee 0'N?ll Browne, the minorily lead- 
er in the lower house of the Illinois 
legislaturj. who was recently acquitted 



FORECAST TILL 7 
SATIUDAY: 

For Duluth, Superior and 
vicinity. Including the Me- 
saba and Vermilion iron 
rangfi:; Showtr.-; tonight 
and Saturday. Not much 
change in temperature. 
Moderate southerly winds. 



PCPIANATORY NOTE*. 

Ob««rv»l'0(M t»ktn »t 9 «- m.. meniy.6.'th ioenJi»n Ume. Air preisure 
r*du<«.l to ^A level. , , . 

Uo.AKJ. or ccMinuou. Unet. |mm Ihroort poioti of eqttJ ur pfenure. 

IsoTMERJus, or d<i-.l«l Unti. piM ihrou«h point* of equ*l tempenlure, t^»y 
Will be .iiiwD only (or mto. fraenoc, 90", »nd 100* _ 

Symbols iodic*le •Uite of we»th*r Q <='"'; © p»nly cloudy, W 
cloudx, {g)ni.o; (t)MOw: ® report mminf. Arruwf «y wilb Uw wio4. F.rst 
figure. l*niper.ljre. Kcond, 2*-hour rmirvfall. if it equals .01 inch; thirj, w,nd 
vv^oclt) of 10 inil« per hour or more. 



2.0W, 



Calm 

Light 

Mixterate . 

KrisK 

Hi«n 

Gale 

HurrU^ane. 

H. 



SCALE. 

Miles par 
hour. 

, to 5 

5 to 15 

13 to 25 

2.5 to 3.5 

35 to 53 

50 to 85 

..C5 and abuT* 

W. RICHARDSON. 
Looa^ Forecaster. 




of a charge of bribery In connection 
with the election of United Slates Sen- 
ator William Lorimer, wa.s renominated 
for representative in La Salle jounty by 
a large majority. 

Out of thirty-two Democratic mem- 
bers In the last legislature %vho voted 
for William Lorimer for senator. 
twenty-two were renominated yester- 
day. 

The following is a list of Re- 
publican and Democratic nominees for 
congress: 
Dist. Republicans. Democrats. 

1 M B Madden Michael E. Maher 

2— *J R Mann J. C. Vaughan 

3 *\\\ W. Wilson.. .F. J. Crowley 

I 4_M. G. Walsh 'J. T. McDermott 

5 — L. H. Claussmann.*A. J. Sabath 

6 'W J. Moxley. . .Edmuni J. .^tack 

7 — F. Lundin Frand Buchanan 

8— D. D. Coffey 'T. Ga.lagher 

9_F H. Gansbergen .Lynden Evans 

10— *G E Foss R. J. I'^nnehgan 

11— Ira C. Copley Frank O. Hawley 

]•> ♦C E. Fuller.... No candidate 



Henry .S. Dixon 
.No candidate 
.A. E. Bergland 
.Claude V. Stone 
.Louis Fitzhenry 

W Cundliff 



13 — J. C. McKenzie 
14 — 'J. Mciv.nney. 

I 15 — 'G. W. Price. 

' 16— * J. V. Graff. . 
17 — 'J. A. Sterling 

18 — *J. G. Cannon - 

19— 'W. B. McKinley.T. C. Grady 

20 — J. H. Danskln 'H. T. P.alney 

•>1— H. C. Wilson 'J. M. Graham 

V2— «W. A. Rodnb'rg. -B. A. '.'ampbell 

23— L. H. Joy 'M. D. Foster 

■ 4 'P. T. Chapman.. H. R. i<owler 

25— *N. B. Thistlewd. -W. D. Lyerle 
♦Renominated. 



i 



HENRY S, BOUTELL. 
Represeatative From the Ninth Illin- 
ois District, Who Was Defeated for 
Renornination, 



AN UNUSUAL HOBBY. 

"In all my hunting aft.-r old gilt 
(articles I have never met any '>"« JY o^ 
was on the same quest/ says a wr ter 
in the Queen. "Not only tait but they 
are few- and far between who seem to 
know anything at all about it 

••\s a rule each pieie is ver> much 
discolored and in no way »"\>^'"S to 
those who are interested lii th'lf^^^r a 
cuiiar hobby: then again it is oftei a 
lottery buying anything when tht 

things are perfectly ,^'^al"-<i^ .^1 out a 
brown and sooty substance without a 
glimmer of gold sh )Wing. .j,^^^ ,- 

"If the price is low enough there Is 
uf.t much harm done: but It requires a 
very diplomatic person to negotiate a 
really successful purchase in these 
keen business times. All :he old giU 
articles are well coated with eighteen 



car&t gold, so that when once thor- 
oughly clean they do not tarnish for 
years. , , ... 

• The method in old days for gild- 
ing metal was to amalgamate pure 
gold with quicksilver by boiling the 
gold In six times its weight of quick- 
silver, then it was squeezed through 
chamois leather, when it became like 
stiff clay in substance, in which state 
It is the most convenient for being 
weighed into suitable portions for the 
number of articles to be glided. Be- 
fore thi.s substance will attach itself to 
metal objects a solution of mercury is 
absolutely necessary (called by oper- 
atives 'quick water'); to this amal- 
gamated surface mercury and gold 
amalgam closely adhere. _ 

•The articles are put into a aeep 
earthen pan (glazed), with a litt o 
quick water and amalgam; the whole 
is then well stirred with either a 
brush or a stick until each Piece is 
well coated with the '""* earn. Af er 
drying with warm sawdust the •ir^lp'®* 
are put Into a gilding cage w-hlch l3 
enc'osed In a red hot iron cylinder and 

"^^•?^^ tTi^'^^arUcTe^are to have a dull or 

cS' lon/e^a^id ^Jc^c^asf Jn^l^rtak^-n Tt 
?o^te shaken together, which causes 
the dull effect. This J'^aklng together 
oroces.s Is called heightening. fc-teel 
anil iron articles are gilt by being im- 
mersed in a mixture of nitromurlate of 
gold with sulphuric ether or alcohol, 
^y combining these liquids a solu- 
tion of gold Is formed from which the 
mental ^Is precipitated by Iron and 
steel." 




HE RODE HOMi:. 
Youth'. Companion: ^\1^en Bobby 
returned In a drenching rain from the 
children's party to which he had gone 
with reluctance he wa„s wet to the 
skin, but In high spirits. 

•Oh, Bobby." said his mother, "you U 
catch an awful cold. I'm afraid. I 
lieard vour father teli you to tele- 
phone for a cab If It ,'--^'"'^d hard-and 
you with your very ^^^t clothes on. 
Whv didn't you do as he told J oy 

"I did" said Bobby stoutly, and I 
sat on the box with the drWer saine 
as I've alwavs wanted to, and I had 
luch a good" time I'm almost glad I 
went to the party'." 



'Youre a 



liar!" 



■■»• 






i 



It isn't a pretty expression. At first 
tiiought It seems the height of tne 
dramatists audacity to put it into the 
mouth of a character on the stage. 
Some would never, in conscience or in 
reason, tlnd jusiincation for Its use. 
Y'et it seems the most natural expres- 
sion for George Frederick Hannock, 
dope-rteud, blackmailer, craven tool of 
his own passions, to hurl at George 
Rand. Jr., wlien Rand tells him that 
the girl whom he loves with all the 
love of wiiich his depraved soul Is 
capa-ble. the girl whom he has married 
a few hours before, is his own sister 
and that the marriage is no marriage. 
••The City." which was presented at 
the Lyceum last night, isn't a pretty 
ol^.v. It isn't a plav for the lover of 
Imiit amusement. It isn't a play for 
ti:e seeker after cmnedy. But Is a 
p. wertui play— a pUiy that cannot tail 
to thrill the most blase frequenter of 
the theater, a play that grips and holds 
ai:J tug.s at the heart strings. It is a 
■ accession of tense .-^iluaiions. a study 
* in character and human nature, a ser- 
ies of moral preachments. It places 
the city on one side and the country 
on the other and offers the problem of 
the effect of environment on character 
for the audience to solve after the final 
curtain falls. 

It is almi'St unpalatable In spots. 
The spectacle of tiie degenerate 
•wretch, Hannock, a writhing, grovel- 
ing cringing coward, on his knees on 
the floor threatening, appealing, ca- 
joling, begging in a desperate attempt 
to obtain possession of the gun with 
which he has killed ICamis sister, the 
ifirl whom he married only to iearn 
I that she is his own sister, to end his 
I onl> miserable life, is almost nauseat- 
ing, but It is powerful. Clyde Fitch 
didn't look to the aesthetic when he 
•wrote •The City." He had a lesson to 
teach and he teaches it with a series 
of thrills liiat are .^enditig theater- 
goers all over the country to the 
neitjhis of intense emotion and that 
-.""•ffecred the audience at the Lyceum 
" Uist !ilght as a Duluth audience has 
not bten affected in a long time. 
TbrilU la Plenty. 
••The City" is a study in hCKjiau na- 
ture and Clyde Fitch u.sed liis keen 
insight Into human nature, not only 
as ii affected the cliaraciers In hl5 
play, but as it touched the temuer of 
American audiences. They want thrills 
' anii pow»»r and intensity of emotions 
' ami In •fhe City" he gave them what 
they wanted in full measure and wiih- 
©u- frlll.s. The curtain was raised 
at least a dozen limes in response to 
th* applause of last night's audience 
at the end of the second act. , . , , 

The opening act of the play is laid in 
MiJdIeburg. N. Y., a small town where 
Geirge Rand, rir., is a personage of 
Bome note, the owner of two banks a 
-^ pillar of the church, satisfied with 
h'niself and his business methods and 
wlih the town in which he has reached 
the pinnacle of success. His three 
children, George, Teresa and Cicel>-. 
hav» tired of the little town and want 
to go to New York and they have 
"enlisted their mother In the effort to 
Induce their father to make the move. 
Tli-^ older man obstinately refuses and 
even refuses to allow his son to go to 
the city to satisfy the ambition that 
Is liarnessod In the small town. 

Rand has a skeleton in his closet In 
the shape of George Frederick Han- 
n>ik the crop of Hands wild oats. 
Hannock knows he has some liold on 
the banker, but is unaware of Us 
exact nature. At tlie time of the open- 
ing of the play. Itand has retermined 
to stop the blackmail, but Hannock 
ca'.ls at Rands home, threatens the 
banker with the publication of let- 
ters to his mother and the exptisure 
of some of Rami's ' snady business 
dea s and ubtains $2,000. George 
Rand. Jr., sees Hannock and the pas- 
sage of the money and alter tne 
young man's .leparture, he learns from 
. his father the true story. He proni- 
Ises never to disclose it, says he will 
••alwavs take care of Hannock and tne 
elder" Rand overcome by the opening 
of old wounds. Is stricken with apop- 
lexy and dies. , , .... 

While bemoaning his fathers deatn. 
the young man exults In the opportun- 
ity it glve.s him of going to the city. 
Life In the City. 
Thf second act is laid in the Rands 
home In tne citv several years later. 
George Rar.d iias been successful In 
business and is on the eve of being 
nominated for governor. Hannock has 
been Installed as his secretarv. When 
Bert Vorhees calls to offer Rand the 
nomination, he is met by Hannock. who 
wants to know wliat he "is going to 
Ket out of it." Vorhees demands Han- 
* nock's dhsmissal and Rand refuses. 
Later he agrees and in the meantime, 
plnd learns that his sister, Cicely has 
married Hannock that morning. 

Overcome bv the horror of It. he or- 
ders Hannock to leave. Tiie girl says 
she will go with hini. Rand sends her 
out of the room and tells Hannock the 

"^ Hannock refuses to believe tlie state- 
ment. He says It Is a plot Rand 
•■ threatens to tell his sister and when 
Bhe enters the room, he starts to d(i 
BO. Crazed with the knowledge ju.st 
Imparted to him, impotent to cope with 
the situation. Hannock shoots the 
girl Just as he Is about to fire a bul- 
let Into ills own head. Rand disarms 
him. He pleads, threatens, tells Rand 
to leave the gun on the table and walks 
out of the room. He tells Rand he will 
expose corrupt dealings in business and 
polltits, says that Rand will lose his 
nancee. appeals to Rand's ambition and 
to his every passion to gain his point 
and Rand alamc)st succumbs. He lays 
the gun on tiie table, Vjut when Han- 
rock leaps to gain possession of it. 
Band throws it out of the window and 
Hannock falls to the ttoor in writhing 
despair. 

In the third act. Rand finds himself. 
He resigns the nomination for gov- 
■*• ernor, determines to give back every 
cent, but says that iie will remain to 
light It out with the city and with 
himself and finds that he has not lost 
the love of Eleanor Vorhees. 

The work of Geoffrey C. Stein as 




J. Pluvius blus- 
tered around con- 
siderably last night 
and let a few drops 
of rain fall on the 
earth, but he didn't 
make good on his 
threats. Yesterday 
was balmj". enough 
to suit anybody. 
The lowest tem- 
perature last night 
wAs 54 deg. and the 
mercury moun ted 
yesterday. The sky is 
the weather man 



weather prevailed 
today. 

rose this morning at 5:47 
set at 6:19, giving twelve 



to 70 deg. 
clouded today and 
predicts sliowers. 

Beautiful autumn 
a year ago 

The sun 

and it will 

liours and thirty-two minutes of sun- 
light. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"Barometric depressions central over 
Western Mexico, Saskatchewan and the 
West Indies, respectively, caused rains 
over the Western plateau region, F.ast- 
ern South Dakota, Southern Minne- 
frota, Iowa, Southeastern Texas, Florida 
and Eastern North Carolina during the 
last twenty-four hours. A further 
rise in temperature also occurred over 
North Dakota. Western (Ontario, Mani- 
toba and Saskatchewan. Temperatures 



are moderate over the greater portion 
of the country. The barometer is high- 
est over the lake region and St. Law- 
rence valley. Unsettled weather with 
occasional showers may be expected at 
the Head of the Lakes during the en- 
suing thirty-six hours." 

. • 

General ForeeuNtM. 
Chicago, Sept. H). — Forecasts for 
twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 
Saturday: 

Tapper Michigan — Increasing cloudi- 
ness with showers tonight or Satur- 
day; warmer except in east portion to- 

VVisconsin — Partly cloudy with prob- 
ably showers in extreme northwestern 
portion tonight or Saturday. 

;\linnesota — Partly cloudy with 
probably showers tonight or Saturday. 

North Dakota — Partly cloudy tonight 
and Saturday; cooler tonight in north- 
west portion. 

Soutli Dakota — Partly cloud v tonight 
and Saturday, except probably show- 
ers in extreme east portion tonight. 

lovi-a — Unsettled with probably show- 
ers tonight or Saturday. 

Montana — Unsettled with probably 
showers tonight or Saturday. 

Upper lakes — Moderate southeast to 
south winds, increasing cloudiness with 
showers late tonight or Saturday on 
Micliigan and Superior. 



peratures for twe 
the minimum for 
a. m. today: 

Max. Mill. 

Abilene 'J' «* 

Alp^'iia 04 48 

Atlantic Oly «« 56 

UiiUleforU 84 48 

UlsiuarL'k "8 54 

Hoston tt* ^'^ 

Huffalo fiB 50 

Calgary 80 50 

(■Imrleslon "8 64 

Chliagd '58 60 

(•orims Chrlstl ..S4 'i 

Piiiver 84 bi 

])es Miilses «<> 54 

UrviU Lake "6 5; 

1 HjflgB 8S 

Pubuiiue rO 

DULUTH 70 

I>uraiij:ii "8 

Kiu-^lpiirt 66 

Kdm nli.'il 82 

Es<-anab:i 66 

Galveston 84 



nty-four hours and 
twelve, ending at 7 




llranil Haven 
i.reeii Bay .. 

Ifatl(ra.-i 

Helena 

Houghton 

Huron 

Jaolwonvllle . 
Kamli)oi>« .... 
Kaii:ias ("Ity 
KnoxvlUe . . . 
La rro!<.-je . . 
Louisville ... 

Mailison 

MaiTjuetle . . 
MeiUcliie Hat 
MempliU 



..66 
..74 

,..70 
...78 
...72 
...68 
. ..8« 
...78 
...74 
...78 
...72 
...74 
...70 
...78 
...80 
..78 



5;; 

54 

54 

50 

40 

52 

74 

48 

52 

68 

S6 

52 

56 

6ii 

41 

60 

56 

53 

52 

50 

54 

56 

60 



Max. 

.Milwaiikoe 72 

Mlvi»e»i<i*» ^6 

Mi^ileBa 76 

Mohtttoniory 88 

Mmitieal' 64 

MinrfUeafl 68 

.New J0Sean8 88 

New Si>* ,....72 

NQn,U Platte .. 90 

OMalioma 8) 

IpiKlsiiH* ; 100 

] PiMsWirB 68 

IPODt A.rtliiir 70 

jFottUwl. or. 76 

jPiJ)t<-e All-ert 82 

;uu .\i)vieUe 76 

iKa^JjJU , 68 

1UI)1,1 .Ciu 82 

Kils(;ljutil 78 

UoswcH 78 

St. I>oU*s 68 

St. Paul 68 

iSiflt take City..*. ..82 
....78 



'.SaH IHego ... 
I Saii knuii-lseo 



Marie. 



.64 
.74 

..84 
..86 
..80 
..82 



i.SauU S»e 

■ Sheri^lati 

Shro^epiiirt .. 

SiHiKane .... 
,S«ht Current 

Tampa 88 

'Toledo 74 

IWa'^hlngton 72 

WllUisttm 80 

! WiiuiiTnui'ca ......64 

Winnipeg 78 

TeUowstone 72 



Mln. 
.'>4 

r.o 

56 

t)6 

48 

56 

72 

56 

56 

68 

76 

50 

48 

52 

43 

54 

52 

53 

50 

58 

58 

r>6 

60 

66 

48 

43 

48 

61 



GRAND OPENING 




n. KNOX 




<^m* 



6 

54 

72 

54 

50 

60 

52 

66 

52 




George Frederick Hannock stands out. 
The demands on his ability are tre- 
mendous and he meets them. There Is 
nothing likeable ab>ul the character 
and Stein makes it suft'iciently despic- 
able Ho takes Hannock to the lowest 
depths of depravity. througn the 
tensest situation in the iilay and arises 
from it hitnseif in irlumpb. 

Norman Hackett. as George Rand, Jr., 
proves his ability. He makes the am- 
bitious voting ii>an sufficiently cock- 
sure, sulficientlv self centered, suf- 
ficiently selfish — trampling over the 
rights of others to satisfy his am- 
Ibltlons. finding justification for the 
means in the end, smoothing over his 
'departures from the path of righte- 
ousness hy the assurance that his aims 
are honorable. Mr. Hackett is liandi- 
capped by several long speeches, but 
he doe.3 not make them tediou?. 

The coniTJanv Is well balanced. M. ti. 
Harriman makes George Rand. Si-., a 
convincing example of a type. Mr.s. 
Rand, who furnishes what little com- 
edv th-re is in the play, is in capable 
ha"nds in those of Josephine y . &li(^P- 
pard. Susanna Willa as Cicely Rand 



and Ethel Martin a.s Teresa Rand meet 
the demand of the roles. Dora Booth . 
as Eleanor Vorhees, Arthur S. Hull as | 
Bert Vorhees and Mario Majaroni a.s : 
Gordon Van Vranken made the most of 
tl.eir small parts. 

"T'ae City," will be at the Lyceum to- 
night, tomorrow afternoon and tumor- 
row night. ^ 

ARE GRADUATES OF 

THE SAWDUST RING, 

Marie and Billy Hart, who are ap- 
pearing at the Orpheum this week in 
a novel sketcli known as "The Circus 
(Jirl " are at home In the act, for they 
are 'old- circus performers, and the pat- 
ter of the sawdust ring comes natur- 
ally to them. 

Miss Hart l3 one of the most versa- 
tile performers in vaudeville. She has 
a good voice, although it rather lacks 
training; is a slack wire artist ot the 
first rank can do a clever contortion 
turn- is an expert acrobatic dancer, 
nnd 'can plav the cornet and several 



5 and 1 Cent Store 



t »'>} 



-t 




other musical Instruments. She does 
all of them during tlie turn. Her slack 
wire work and the one contortion turn 
she does are especially good. 

Miss Hart was at one time with the 
Barnum & Bailey show, doing a slack 
wire act, and Billy Hart was one of the 
leading clowns with the same show. 
They decided to join forces and essay 
a vaudeville turn, which they did with 
decided success. , • « 

"The 'barker' monologue I give is 
one I learned from an old one- ring 
wagon show that used to visit otar 
town down in Ohio every year," said 
Mr Hart. "I used to carry Water for 
the elephant — they only had one — and 
fairlv lived around the circus tent 
when It was In town. 

"The 'barker' took quite a fancy to 
me and I learned his monologue be- 
fore he left, hoping to be a 'barker 
some day. When I decided to go into 
vaudeville, the old patter he had came 
back to me, and I used it in the act. 

Three more performance.s of the pres- 
ent week's bill will be given, torilght 
and tomorrow afternoon and night. 



Tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 1 7 



iki i 



iO L 



T-wo Floors. 



Double Space. 



n 





a^B9 




KNAPP-FELT HATS, 

$3, $4 and $G. 

E. & W. COLLARS, 

25 cents each. 



MANHATTAN SHIRTS, 

Best in the land. 

KNEIPP-LINEN MESH 
UNDERWEAR. 

"SOCIETY" CLOTHES 

For young men. 

MUSSER WOOL HOSE, 

None better, 

HANAN SHOES 

For men and women. 



ing May Make Sty! 
You May Wear 

The Stein-Bloch Smart Clothes in Fall and Winter ^f yl^^v ^^^^^^T; 
Thev brinff to vou m your own home town perfect parallels ot London s 
Jnd New York's best styles. Style originates in those two wodd cen- 
ters. It IS not created by a proclamation of the tailors A m. hon- 
aire clubman's whim may start a style wave rolling. 1 he death ot 
a King changed style over night. Style that does not trace back to 
London and New York is false style, 

Stein-Bloch Smart Clothes 

^'^' V;r;our Stei,,-B,och .ealer-Here in DiiUi.h ^^ THE COLUMBL. at T^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

these clothes before his mirror. Ihey fit be':'-, they are ai.oredD ^^j^^,, j,;^ j„ ,„,„d the 

5:rBl':>^h ,'atei:"'B^'no^cCheT?haT^"